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Bonadio, Francis TonyWho benefits from usual care? Using latent profile analysis to identify differential treatment outcomes
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Psychology/Clinical
As more treatments are developed to address youth behavioral and emotional problems, an increasing number of studies seek to identify subgroups of youth for whom treatments are more effective. Previous research has shown differential treatment effects when grouping youth based on characteristics such as comorbidity, problem severity, gender, and age. However, the vast majority of this research has been conducted with evidence-based treatments (EBTs), and to date no research has directly examined differential treatment outcomes within usual care. Usual care receives minimal attention in research, and thus little is known about its effects. Additionally, the term usual care can include a variety of services including but not limited to standard outpatient, intensive outpatient, home-based services, and psychiatric services. Given the prevalence of usual care as a form of treatment, it is necessary to further explore its treatment effects. Further, the vast majority of studies exploring differential treatment outcomes use moderation as the primary method for subgroup analyses. However, moderation analyses have several limitations, and there has been a recent call for more person-centered approaches, such as latent profile analysis (LPA), as a more appropriate means of conducting subgroup analyses. The current study aims to advance the understanding of usual care by determining if some subgroups of youth, identified through LPA, are better served by specific types of usual care. The current study utilized 953 parent-reports and 553 youth-reports of youth emotional and behavioral symptoms across multiple time points, as well as archival records of usual care services received at a local community mental health center (CMH). Symptoms and demographic data collected at intake were used in a LPA to identify subgroups of youth arriving for treatment. Subgroup differences in treatment outcomes were then explored across the array of usual care services. Results indicated that usual care services were related to a significant reduction in symptom severity across time, and that there were differences in the relation between usual care services and outcomes across subgroups. These results suggest that different subgroups of youth respond differently to certain types of usual care services. Implications for future research and clinical applications are discussed.

Committee:

Carolyn Tompsett, Ph.D. (Advisor); Raymond Swisher, Ph.D. (Other); Eric Dubow, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Russell Matthews, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

treatment outcome; latent profile analysis; person-centered approach; usual care; comparative effectiveness

Razgoniaev, AntonDesign, synthesis, and characterization of photoresponsive materials using coordination bonds and other supramolecular interactions
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Photochemical Sciences
When designing light-responsive, healable materials and adhesives, these materials need to include controllable reversible, bonding interactions. Such dynamic interactions are difficult to control, however. In this work, we present how these interactions can be controlled by incorporating photoactive metal ions into supramolecular polymer network what allow the tuning of optical and mechanical properties of the polymers with light. Utilizing this approach, we created a series of supramolecular polymer melts and studied their mechanical and photo physical properties. We have shown that the photochemistry and photophysical properties of the metal center can be used to control the mechanical properties of the materials, and introduce new optical and mechanical properties not seen in the traditional covalent polymers. In particular, photo-induced metal-ligand bond labilization led to partial depolymerization of the supramolecular assembly, and softening of the materials. When the light stimulus was removed, the material recovered the initial stiffness back. We also investigated structure-property relationships in such systems where mechanical properties of the supramolecular polymers are controlled by coordination environment around metal cross-linking center. We also considered how polymer host matrix impacts on the photophysical and photochemical properties of chromophores that undergo molecular motion in the exited state. In particular, change in excited state dynamics of [Cu(dmp)2]+ can be used to sense viscosity of various polymers. A linear dependence of excited state lifetime and emission wavelength on viscosity was correlated with restricted photoinduced structural distortion of Cu(I) complex in more flow-resistance media.

Committee:

Alexis Ostrowski, Ph.D. (Advisor); Scott Rogers, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Alexander Tarnovsky, Ph.D. (Committee Member); R. Marshall Wilson, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Chemistry; Materials Science; Polymer Chemistry; Polymers

Keywords:

Photochemistry; Chemistry; Materials Science; Polymer Chemistry; Polymers

Walters, ElizabethThe Relationship Between Athletic Training Program Directors Self-Reported Leadership Style and Program Success
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
This dissertation explored the relationship between Athletic Training Program Directors’ (ATPDs) self-reported leadership style and Athletic Training Program (ATP) success. The metrics of determinants of ATP success were derived from data that the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) annual report seeks from all ATPs for continuing accreditation. Forty-six ATPDs from CAATE-accredited Athletic Training Programs (ATPs) completed the survey. Most ATPDs from this sample came from undergraduate ATPs, with a few responsible for graduate degree programs, and even fewer responsible for undergraduate and graduate programs. All ATPD participants completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ; Avolio & Bass, 2004), demographic information, educational history-related questions, years of experience as an ATPD, and other leadership roles/experience. This study established that ATPDs’ self-reported predominant leadership style is transformational in nature. This study demonstrated a statistically significant relationship when examining ATPDs’ self-reported leadership style and ATP success within one of the four ATP success metrics examined: Percent ATS post-graduation employment. This study was not able to demonstrate a statistically significant relationship between ATPDs’ self-reported leadership style and percent ATP retention, ATP percent first-time Board of Certification (BOC) pass rate, or percent ATP graduation rate. The lack of significance in three of the four variables likely is due to the small sample of participants. This study was underpowered. Furthermore, additional variables likely should be considered when determining the relationship between ATPD leadership style and ATP success.

Committee:

Chris Willis, EdD (Advisor); Sara Worley, PhD (Other); Debra Ball, EdD (Committee Member); Paul Johnson, PhD (Committee Member); Kristina LaVenia, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Sports Medicine

Keywords:

Athletic Training Program Directors; Leadership; Program Success

Tuck, Paul TMorning Flight Behavior of Nocturnally Migrating Birds in Relation to a Geographic Obstacle
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Biological Sciences
Many bird species that normally migrate during the night have been observed engaging in migratory behaviors during the early morning, a behavior known as morning flight. There has been little formal investigation into the possible purpose this behavior could serve nocturnal migrants. However, the work that has been done seems to indicate that morning flight behavior is a way to compensate for wind drift that the birds have experienced during the night. The purpose of this study is to further explore this hypothesis in a unique geographic context; namely, in the presence of a geographic obstacle. In this study, the orientation of morning flight behavior was observed along the southern shore of Lake Erie. This orientation was then compared to the orientation of nocturnal migration from the previous night. The orientation of the birds engaged in morning flight following nights with drifting winds was then compared with those following non-drifting winds. The prevailing migratory direction was largely to the northwest, following the southern coast of Lake Erie, while the nocturnal migration was primarily north. The morning flight direction did not seem to be related to the direction of nocturnal migration. In addition, the morning flight orientation was not different whether the morning flight was following nights with drifting or non-drifting winds. These results seem to indicate that morning flight might serve additional purposes other than compensation for wind drift, particularly in the presence of geographic barriers.

Committee:

Verner Bingman, Dr. (Advisor); Karen Root, Dr. (Committee Member); Paul Moore, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biology

Keywords:

bird migration; morning flight; Lake Erie; geographic barrier; wind drift; nocturnal migrants

Kujjo, Keji CInvisible Scholars: Racialized Students from Immigrant Backgrounds in Honors Programs
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Cross-Cultural, International Education
ABSTRACT Dr. Christopher Frey, Advisor The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the diverse academic and social experiences of first-generation college students of color from immigrant backgrounds in honors programs. Data from for this research were collected from semi-structured, one-on-one interview sessions with interested students. The findings and implications can educate institutions and offer valuable feedback for recruitment and retention. The recommendations could also be used to increase educational support for minority students in honors programs. This study thesis sought to address the following research questions and sub-questions: 1) What are the academic and social experiences of first-generation, immigrant and/or refugee students of color in honors colleges? a) How do they describe their experiences? b) How and why do they join an honors program? c) What precollege experiences are most influential in their preparation for the honors college and persistence? d) What challenges do they face in honors? How do they cope with these challenges? 2) How do these students develop a sense of belonging in the Honors College? a) What makes them fit into the honors program? b) Why do they stay in the Honors College? c) What issues of belonging do they experience in the honors college? How do they respond to these issues? Keywords: immigrants, minority students, Honors College, honors program, first-generation

Committee:

Christopher Frey, PhD (Advisor); Sherri Horner, PhD (Committee Member); Mary Krueger, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

immigrants; minority students; Honors College; honors programs; first-generation

Gardiner, Christopher JamesQuasiconformal maps on a 2-step Carnot group
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Mathematics
In this paper, we find all the quasiconformal maps on a particular non-rigid 2-step Carnot group. In particular, all quasiconformal maps on this Carnot group preserve the vertical direction. Given that a Carnot group is a Lie algebra with a group structure, we employ concepts from linear algebra and abstract algebra to gain information about the group. Utilizing the theory of Pansu differentiability along with the biLipschitz nature of quasisymmetric maps, we use an analytical approach to help determine the form of any quasiconformal map on the Carnot group. The main result has consequences for the rigidity of quasiisometries of negatively curved solvable Lie groups.

Committee:

Xiangdong Xie (Advisor); Kit Chan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mathematics

Keywords:

Algebra; Linear algebra; Analysis; Calculus; Lie algebra; Carnot group; Quasiconformal; Quasisymmetric; biLipschitz; Pansu differentiability; graded isomorphism

Yadav, PoojaQuantitative Analysis of Microbial Species in a Metagenome Based on Their Signature Sequences
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Biological Sciences
ABSTRACT Xu, Zhaohui, Advisor McKay, Robert Roy, Sankardas Shotgun metagenomics has provided a relatively new and powerful approach to study the environmental samples to characterize the microbial communities in contrast to pure cultures by conventional techniques. To determine the microbial diversity and to understand the role of microbes in the ecosystem, quantitative studies are important whose values are comparable across different studies and samples. We have developed a statistical approach to microbial profiling which encompasses quantitative characterization and comparison of relative abundance of the microbes in a metagenome sample based on their signature sequences (unique k-mers). We demonstrated the utility of this approach by characterizing and quantifying the relative abundance of the microbes in 4 different simulated metagenome samples (Comp_25, Comp_50, Comp_75, and Comp_100). The suffix of simulated metagenome name represents the gene content percentage of reporter species in the simulated metagenomes. The analysis of simulated metagenomes for data volume 6e9 and 6e10 furnish the information about the abundance of species by identifying the unique k-mers (signature sequences) of the six reporter species B. licheniformis, L. brevis, L. fermentum, L. plantarum, P. ananatis, and P. vagans. Our developed approach has efficiently identified the abundance of 4 reporter species i.e. B. licheniformis, L. brevis, L. fermentum, P. ananatis whereas 2 species L. plantarum and P. vagans were overestimated in the simulated metagenomes. So, application of advanced statistics, refinement of the algorithm, and an increase in data volume would be our next steps to improve the accuracy of our approach to estimate the ratio of species of a metagenome.

Committee:

Zhaohui Xu (Advisor); Robert McKay (Committee Member); Sankardas Roy (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biology

Keywords:

Metagenomics; Genomic signature sequences; Quantitative analysis

Horton, MichaelHow Texas Discovered Columbus
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, History
This project examines the Columbus legacy in U.S. history textbooks used in Texas from 1919 to 2017. This study argues that the traditional and glorified interpretation of the life of Columbus dominated his coverage in U.S. history textbooks adopted for use in junior high and high school classes in Texas during the twentieth century. The wave of scholarly criticisms of Columbus at the end of the twentieth century had only sporadic effects on textbooks published at the turn of the century. Inconsistent representations of the new debate over Columbus’ legacy in these textbooks show at best a delayed response and at worst a reluctance to change the traditional story of Columbus as an American hero.

Committee:

Ruth Herndon (Advisor); Amilcar Challu (Committee Member); Kyle Ward (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education History; Education Policy; History; Teaching

Keywords:

Christopher Columbus; History Education; US History; Textbooks; Twentieth Century

Fang, QijuanAttachment, Bullying, and Romantic Relationships in College Students
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Psychology/Developmental
Some studies have examined the relationships between early attachment and bullying, bullying and romantic relationships, and attachment and romantic relationships. However, there is a dearth of empirical evidence regarding how later adverse experiences during adolescence, such as in-person bullying and cyberbullying, combines with early attachment to predict later romantic attachment and romantic relationships. In other words, my dissertation examines how early attachment style during childhood and online and offline bullying experience during adolescence may together affect someone’s later attachment styles and romantic relationships. There are some interesting findings. For instance, the more securely attached someone is to his or her mother in early childhood, and the less they were involved in bullying as an adolescent (regardless of online or offline), the more likely it is for them to be securely attached to their romantic partners later as a young adult. They also trust their romantic partners more and are more satisfied with their relationships. Childhood attachment and adolescent bullying involvement uniquely contributes to later romantic attachment as well as romantic relationship satisfaction. There are also some interaction effects on gender. Detailed differences between inperson bullying and cyberbullying as well as the interactions between predictors were examined.

Committee:

Marie Tisak (Committee Co-Chair); John Tisak (Committee Co-Chair); Carolyn Tompsett (Committee Member); Michael Buerger (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Developmental Psychology; Individual and Family Studies; Psychology

Keywords:

Attachment, traditional bullying, cyberbullying, romantic relationships, adolescent, college students

Wright, Matthew RCohabitation among Older Adults: Well-Being, Relationships with Adult Children, and Perceptions of Care Availability
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Sociology
Cohabitation has been increasing among older adults over the past decade. Despite the growth in cohabitation, research on this population remains limited. It is well established that the married enjoy better health than the unmarried, and while previous research has considered the psychological well-being of older cohabitors, it is less clear whether cohabitation provides physical health benefits. It is also unclear how cohabitors compare with the married and unpartnered on parent-child relationships. These omissions are notable because families play a key role in the lives of older adults. Using 2008 and 2010 Health and Retirement Study data, I assess psychological well-being and physical health differences between continuously married, remarried, cohabiting, divorced, widowed, and never married older adults. Second, I examine how cohabitors compare to the continuously married, remarried, divorced, and widowed on relationships with adult children. Finally, I explore marital status differences in parent’s beliefs that their children would help in the future with basic personal care. Throughout the project, gender differences are considered. I find that older cohabitors have poorer self-rated health than the continuously married and remarried, but the disadvantaged profile of cohabitors explains the differences. Cohabitors and unpartnereds have similar physical health. Cohabitors do not differ from the continuously married and remarried on psychological well-being, but enjoy better well-being than unpartnereds. There is little variation by gender. On parent-child relationships, cohabitors have less frequent contact and lower positive relationship quality than the continuously married and widowed, but are similar to the remarried and divorced. Mothers reported more frequent contact and higher positive and negative relationship quality with children than fathers. Moreover, positive quality differs by marital status for fathers but not mothers, whereas negative quality differs for mothers but not fathers. Finally, cohabitors are the least likely to list a child as someone they believe is willing to provide future help with basic personal care. Parent-child relationship characteristics explained the differences in care perceptions. Overall, my study extends prior research on the well-being of older cohabitors, and sheds new light on how cohabitation is linked to parent-child relationships and perceptions of future care receipt from adult children.

Committee:

Susan Brown, Ph.D (Advisor); I-Fen Lin, Ph.D (Committee Member); Karen Guzzo, Ph.D (Committee Member); Kei Nomaguchi, Ph.D (Committee Member); Susan Peet, Ph.D (Other)

Subjects:

Aging; Demography; Families and Family Life; Sociology

Keywords:

cohabitation; aging; marriage; older adults; health; parent-child relationships

Yang, LiuEffect of product review interactivity, social inequality, and culture on trust in online retailers: A comparison between China and the U.S.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Media and Communication
This study is the first study that compared the predicting strength of the effect of the micro factor (interactivity of product review use experiences) and macro factors (social inequality and culture) on consumers’ trust in online retailers. It examines the predictor of online trust by information asymmetry theory, reciprocity, in-group favoritism and out-group derogation, and social presence. Consumers of the two largest e-commerce sites in the United States and China, Amazon and Tmall, are compared. The results show the interactivity of product use experience is the strongest predictor of consumers’ trust in online retailers compared to social inequality and culture. The interactivity is positively related to consumers’ trust in famous brands, third-party retailers, and fulfilled third-party retailers of both Amazon and Tmall. In contrast, social inequality is negatively related to consumers’ trust in famous brands, third-party retailers, and fulfilled third-party retailers of both Amazon and Tmall. Individualism is positively related to trust in third-party retailers while collectivism is positively related to trust in third-party retailers fulfilled by Amazon or Tmall. Power distance exerts a positive impact on trust in famous brands only. Collectivism plays a more critical role in predicting trust in fulfilled online retailers in Chinese sample than in the U.S. sample. The relationship of trust in online retailers and consumers’ actual online purchases is different across countries. Trust in online retailers is an important direct predictor of online purchase diversity and indirect predictor of the amount of money spent online in both the U.S. and China. And it is a direct predictor of online purchase frequency in the U.S., but an indirect predictor of purchase frequency in China. Trust in online retailers is positively related to the amount of money spent on Amazon/Tmall indirectly by affecting shopping frequency on Amazon/Tmall.

Committee:

Louisa Ha, Professor (Advisor); Gi Woong Yun, Associate Professor (Committee Member); Lisa Hanasono, Associate Professor (Committee Member); Philip Titus, Associate Professor (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative; Information Technology; Marketing; Mass Communications; Mass Media; Social Research

Keywords:

interactivity; online trust; product reviews;e-commerce;social inequality;culture;comparative study;China;US

Grant, Scott SA Multiple Case Study Analysis of Ohio Interscholastic Extracurricular Pay to Participate Policies
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
Due to the increasingly widespread utilization of interscholastic athletic pay to participate policies within the state of Ohio, this study focused on analyzing specific pay to participate policies within Ohio High School Athletic Association (OHSAA) member school districts through a qualitative, multiple case study methodology. This study aimed to contribute to the overall gap in research regarding pay to participate policies from a policy analysis perspective. Utilizing the policy process model outlined by Kraft and Furlong (2015) as a framework, policy document and interview data analysis assisted in the development of key elements such as contributing factors and goals of the specific policies, implementation methods and procedures unique and different among districts, as well as evaluation processes and criterion utilized to define success. This study did not intend to generalize pay to participate policies that implement the most evident fee typology within the state of Ohio, but rather provide depth within the stories of specific districts, intending to add value to district discussions surrounding pay to participate policy utilization. The study results described key policy elements from district contextual perspectives regarding their development, implementation, and evaluation methods. These key components provided unique perspectives based upon perceptions of athletic administrators, and actions of the policies themselves, as well as resulted in the development of a pay to participate discussion guide (Appendix C) that can be utilized by districts during policy discussions.

Committee:

Paul Willis, Ed.D. (Advisor); Christopher Kluse, PhD (Other); Tracey Huziak-Clark, PhD (Committee Member); Paul Johnson, PhD (Committee Member); John Marschhausen, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Sports Management

Keywords:

pay to participate; interscholastic athletics; pay to play; high school sports; athletics; interscholastic extracurriculars

Santangelo, Constance Ruth MichaelaSensory discrimination and refuge recognition in amblypygids
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Biological Sciences
Displacement experiments with amblypygids, nocturnal arachnids that inhabit the tropics and subtropics, revealed that they are rather extraordinary navigators and that their abilities are severely impeded when access to olfactory information is experimentally abolished. These results and the fact that amblypygids possess exceptionally large mushroom bodies, brain regions that process olfactory and, perhaps, spatial information led to the hypothesis that olfaction facilitates their navigation behavior. The amblypygid Phrynus marginemaculatus wanders nightly and shows strong shelter fidelity in a laboratory arena. Here, individual subjects were trained over a 26-night session in a square arena that contained two shelters to determine the extent to which shelter recognition is dictated by odor. The target shelter was positioned at a specific location in the arena near an acrylic well that contained 15 µl of geraniol. The other shelter was likewise positioned at a particular location in the arena, but near an acrylic well that contained 15 µl of water. The session consisted of nights on which the entrance to the target shelter was open and the entrance to the other shelter was closed, referred to as forced choice trials, and nights on which a subject had access to both shelters, referred to as probe trials. Probe trials involved manipulations of the locations of the shelters and their associated acrylic wells after a subject emerged from the target shelter. The probes consisted of three types of manipulations: control manipulations in which the shelters and associated acrylic wells were removed and replaced with identical shelters and dishes in their original locations; manipulations in which the positions of the two acrylic wells were swapped; and manipulations in which both shelters and their respective acrylic wells were moved from their original, trained locations. The odor-cued shelter was chosen in more than 90 percent of the control probes, but in the other two probe conditions shelters appear to have been chosen randomly. Thus, shelter choice was not dictated by odor. In addition, subjects did not rely primarily on path integration, a commonly applied navigation strategy in arthropods, as they did not chose the shelter in the original location of the odor-cued shelter in probes where only the positions of the acrylic wells were swapped. Instead, the results suggest that amblypygids, like ants, may use a configuration of cues to relocate and identify a shelter.

Committee:

Daniel Wiegmann (Advisor); Verner Bingman (Committee Member); Paul Moore (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biology

Keywords:

amblypygid; amblypygids; sensory; cues; cue; olfaction; navigation; homing; scent; antenniform leg; antenniform legs; whip spiders; whipspiders; whip spider; whipspider; mushroom body; mushroom bodies; sensory integration; refuge recognition

Staszel, John PaulBeyond The Thong: Contexts, Representations, and the Performances of Erotic Masculinities in Male Strip Show(s)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Theatre and Film
Male stripping has been a cultural performance of growing interest for scholars and the wider US population for decades. In the1980s the male stripping industry developed as numerous clubs, groups, and agencies materialized, offering various erotic masculine strip performances. As the industry emerged, a pathway was created for the narrative of the male stripper to become a common constituent of today's popular storylines as seen in numerous types of media and entertainment. Over the past few decades, the investigation of sex work has also been a growing area of focus in academic research, particularly the body of scholarship associated with exotic dance. However, academic research on erotic dance is almost exclusively focused on the women who sell it and the men who buy it, thereby focusing mainly on the female segment of the industry and the issues female performers confront regarding the industry in general. Very little has been written about the male stripping industry in relationship to the performance of masculinity, and how the performance of masculinity is constituted beyond a heteronormative and white context. Male strip shows are cultural performances that vary in purpose and meaning, and are best understood as a cultural display that presents the body as a socially interactive text, where performer and spectator have (or develop) an understanding of the interactions and expectations of the show. The erotic theatre of male stripping is highly stylized based on the continuous negotiation of the performers identity as he dances the line located on the continuum between work and play. The work/play engagement of the male stripper takes place in a kind of erotic type of playground, where rules and behaviors are sometimes predetermined and other times fluid and impromptu. In either case, the realities and social contexts of venues produce their own outcomes, behaviors and performative approaches based on a gendered expectation. As such, male strippers create performances that accord expectations of the context of the performance venue. As contextual playgrounds shift, the performer must be informed and prepared to meet varying expectations. The expectations, based on the norms and values of a particular context, ultimately influence how masculinity is constructed and performed. I quickly learned this for myself, and how different contexts of the business require alternative approaches to the performance, and necessitate impromptu adjustments to an erotically constructed identity. When I entered the industry, and began performing as a male stripper I never anticipated I would eventually shift my focus from the money and sex the industry offered to self-analyzing in an attempt to make sense of who I was, what I did, and how the act of erotic male stripping functioned in society. Bodies carry value differently in various spaces, and as the context of a venue shifts, the gender, race and sexuality affect the behaviors and expectations of a male erotic performance. In this study, I offer insight into the construction and performance of masculinity in the male strip show by examining variations of masculinity and the ways masculinity is constituted and performed based on context and variables in various settings. Building on the current scholarly discourse about male stripping and gender performance, juxtaposed with close readings of popular erotic performances on film and television, plus thick descriptions from interviews and personal experience, I explore various sides of the construction of erotic masculine identity. I move toward a critical understanding about the industry as a whole by focusing specifically on how erotic masculinity is constituted within a variety of on contexts. I do so by focusing on three emergent themes and how they vary across the two segments of the industry that are divided by presumptive heterosexual and queer sexualities. I first examine how masculinity is performed in the initiation and continuation period when entering the business and how practices of community, mentorship and grooming have an impact upon the entry experience. I then focus on how performances are constructed and ordered based on the context of the performance venue and the expectations of the audience. Finally, I evaluate how power is established and negotiated in different performance contexts and how practices of erotic masculinity are written and re-written to meet the wants and desires of various audiences situated within specific contexts. Throughout the study, I experiment with the writing process and alternative forms of qualitative writing as a way to explore the interpretive understanding of socially performative acts and actions. I view lived experience as interpretive rather than a causal story and attempt to unravel the complex way emotion, cognition, and the lived body intertwine to arrive at an understanding of lived experience that is both rigorous and imaginative based on systematic observation and expressive insight. I write to develop a relationship with readers through the appropriation of traditionally regarded nonacademic literary devices including knowledge drawn from popular culture, direct address, poetic device and word play to initiate the production of a different, more somatic kind of knowledge. I offer evocative storytelling combined with ethnographic insights, as well as poetic framing devises to engage the reader, with which to investigate the power of reflexive passages as ancillary to critical analysis. I implement these approaches to bring the reader into the process of constructing and performing an erotic masculine identity in an industry that has numerous stages in various contexts.

Committee:

Lesa Lockford (Advisor); Jonathan Chambers (Committee Member); Montana Miller (Other); Ron Shields (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Gender Studies; Performing Arts; Theater Studies

Keywords:

Gender; Performance; Sexuality; Context; Race; Striping; Masculinity; Dancer; Sex; Ethnography; Power; Media; Space

Nardandrea, Coral HHer Name is Albatross
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Creative Writing/Poetry
Larissa Szporluk Celli, Advisor, For this thesis, I did not want to restrict it with any one theme; however, it can be assumed that the title is a nod to “The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. In the original poem, Coleridge faces a devastating haunting after killing an albatross at sea. In my work, the albatross continues that metaphor—ghosts of identity, family, pain, place, and queerness all haunt this speaker, and she experiences those emotional hauntings through her very physical body. Each of the three sections nods to a different point in the speakers life, how she is navigating these hauntings. In the first section, the speaker gets herself into poor situations, flounders through her identity, trying to find something to grab onto. In the second, she is more clear on her identity through past and place, but has trouble admitting to the changes she must face. The last section, hopefully, is one of resolution, if reserved. While the speaker does not have her identity pinned down or completely resolved, she is more focused on meeting it head-on. In short, this work is meant to be a window to the intersectional, and how our self-image is skewed by those we are close to and those we are not.

Committee:

Larissa Szporluk (Advisor); Rebecca Klaver (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Keywords:

queer, poetry, feminism, ghosts,

Vieira, MariaA Study of Compositional Elements in Ciclo Brasileiro by Heitor Villa-Lobos
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Music Performance/Instrumental Performance
Heitor Villa-Lobos, a well-known Brazilian composer, was born in the city of Rio de Janeiro, in 1887, the same place where he died, in 1959. He was influenced by many composers not only from Brazil, but also from around the world, such as Debussy, Igor Stravinsky and Darius Milhaud. Even though Villa-Lobos spent most of his life traveling to Europe and the United States, his works always had a Brazilian musical flavor. This thesis will focus on the Ciclo Brasileiro (Brazilian Cycle) written for piano in 1936. The premiere of this set was initially presented in 1938 as individual pieces including “Impressões Seresteiras” (The Impressions of a Serenade) and “Danca do Indio Branco” (Dance of the White Indian). The other pieces of the set, “Plantio do Caboclo” (The Peasant’s Sowing) and “Festa no Sertão” (The Fete in the Desert) were premiered in 1939. Both performances occurred in Rio de Janeiro. Also in 1936 he wrote two other pieces, “Bazzum”, for men’s voices and Modinhas e cancões (Folk Songs and Songs), album 1. My thesis will explore Heitor Villa-Lobos’ Ciclo Brasileiro and hopefully will find direct or indirect elements of the Brazilian culture. In chapter 1, I will present an introduction including Villa-Lobos’ background about his life and music, and how classical and folk influences affected his compositional process in the Ciclo Brasileiro. Chapter 2 will be an analysis on each piece within this set with a special emphasis on Brazilian characteristics. Hereby, the focus will be on rhythm and melody. This exploration should reveal a direct or indirect connection to Brazilian folklore. The goal of this thesis is to present Villa-Lobos’ pieces with the hope that they would become more known and performed outside of Brazil. Even though some English-speaking scholars have examined Heitor Villa-Lobos’ piano music, more studies are needed of these specific pieces to help us to understand Villa-lobos’ creative process and to bring attention to important Brazilian characteristics in these pieces.

Committee:

Gene Trantham, dr. (Advisor); Yu-Lien The, dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Villa-Lobos; piano music; Brazilian music; analysis

Peng, YishengAntecedents of older nurses' intentions to continue working in the same organization after retirement
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Psychology
This study contributes to the literature on bridge employment by examining the relationships between job-related psychosocial factors (i.e., generativity opportunities, workplace incivility, and relational job crafting) and intentions to continue working in the same organization after retirement, as well as the underlying mechanism through work meaningfulness. Furthermore, the moderating role of individuals’ communion striving motivation was tested. A sample of 384 nurses 50 years old or above was recruited to test the hypothesized moderated mediation model. Results indicated that all the three examined job-related psychosocial factors (except generativity opportunities) were significantly related to older nurses’ intentions to continue working in the same organization after retirement. Work meaningfulness partially mediated the relationships between workplace incivility, relational job crafting, and older nurses’ intentions to continue working in the same organization after retirement. Work meaningfulness also fully mediated the relationship between generativity opportunities and older nurses’ intentions to continue working in the same organization after retirement. Finally, communion striving motivation enhanced the positive relationship between generativity opportunities and work meaningfulness and exaggerated the indirect relationship between generativity opportunities and older nurses’ intentions to continue working after retirement via work meaningfulness. Overall, findings suggest that in order to retain older nurses, organizations should lower workplace incivility, provide generativity opportunities, encourage relational job crafting, and cultivate work meaningfulness. Implications of these findings, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.

Committee:

Steve Jex (Committee Co-Chair); Yiwei Chen (Committee Co-Chair); Russell Matthews (Committee Member); Alfred DeMaris (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

older workers; bridge employment; incivility; generativity opportunities; job crafting; work meaningfulness

Markham, ThomasA Tree Falls In A Forest
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Creative Writing/Fiction
A Tree Falls In A Forest is a novel that wrestles with the many issues regarding how the past both colors and shapes the present. Specifically, the novel looks at tragedies and the way we as humans attempt to ground ourselves in the present by either ignoring a past tragedy or by letting the tragedy shape our present and future. In the narrator Joe Coleman, the reader finds a man whose life is caught in stasis; having suffered the tragedy of his wife's passing, he tries to ignore the grief and keep moving forward with his life but finds he can't. This problem becomes even more complicated when he must out of necessity rekindle his relationship with his estranged brother, the famous musician Anthony Coleman. A Tree Falls In A Forest uses Joe and Anthony's relationship as a crucible for exploring the ways that we as humans might suffer tragedy and honor the memory of tragic moments while still carrying out fulfilling lives.

Committee:

Lawrence Coates (Advisor); Wendell Mayo (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Mitova, Mariana A.Relationship Between Investments in Self and Post-Graduation Career Satisfaction Among Apparel and Textiles Majors
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
Rachel Vannatta Reinhart, Advisor The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to explore the relationship between investments that students make in themselves while enrolled in a higher education program and their post-graduation career satisfaction, and (2) to gather information about the importance apparel and textile professionals place on selected competencies identified by the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA). Graduates (n=123) of an apparel and textiles (A&T) program at a four-year, public research institution were surveyed to examine which investments in self best predict post-graduation career satisfaction. The Survey of A&T Graduates’ Career Satisfaction consisted of 86 items measuring perceived importance and preparation of the ITAA meta-goals and competencies, career satisfaction, co-curricular activity involvement, on-the-job training, health and well-being, career competencies, and willingness to relocate. Multiple regression showed that Career Competencies and Health and Well-being best predicted participants’ post-graduation career satisfaction. Participants rated the Professional Development meta-goal; the Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal; and Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goal of highest importance. These same meta-goals received highest perceived preparation ratings. Lastly, ANOVA findings revealed that buyers, retail managers, marketing professionals and others indicated differences in perceptions of competencies and meta-goals. The buyers/merchandisers rated the Industry Processes and the Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goals of higher importance than retail managers. Retail managers perceived the Global Interdependence meta-goal as less important than marketing professionals did. The Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal was perceived more important by retail managers than “others” category did. Graduates’ career satisfaction differed mostly by Income levels. Those who reported earning lower salaries were overall less satisfied with their careers. Results suggest that current leaders of apparel and textile programs should enhance their curricula with pedagogy methods that facilitate learning of teamwork, leadership, clear communication, ethics, and social responsibilities. Internships and experiential learning are recommended to enhance the on-the-job training of students in A&T programs. In addition, all investments in self, with exception of Willingness to Relocate, are related to Career Satisfaction. Lastly, Post-graduation career satisfaction is best predicted by graduates’ Career Competencies and Health and Well-being.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta Reinhart (Advisor); Gregory Rich (Other); Barbara Frazier (Committee Member); Joyce Litten (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Economic Theory; Economics; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Health; Health Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Home Economics; Home Economics Education; Mental Health

Keywords:

Higher Education; College; Well-being; Health; Students; Career Satisfaction; Apparel; Textiles; Internships; ITAA; Graduates; Professionals; On-the-job Training; Internships; Curriculum; HCT; Human Capital Theory; economic theory; assessment

Papathanasiou, DimitriosHypercyclic Algebras and Affine Dynamics
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Mathematics
An operator T on a Fréchet space X is said to be hypercyclic if it has a dense orbit. In that case, the set HC(T) of hypercyclic vectors for T is a dense Gδ subset of X. In most cases the set HC(T)∪{0} is not a vector space. However, Herrero and Bourdon showed that if T is hypercyclic then HC(T) contains a hypercyclic manifold, that is a dense linear subspace of X except for the origin. In a different direction, a great amount of research has been carried out in the search of hypercyclic subspaces, that is infinite dimensional closed subspaces contained (excluding the origin) in HC(T). It is not always the case that a hypercyclic operator has a hypercyclic subspace. For instance, Rolewicz's operator on ℓ2 does not have a hypercyclic subspace, but on the other hand all hypercyclic convolution operators on the space H(ℂ) of entire functions have hypercyclic subspaces. If the space X is a Fréchet algebra, continuing the search for structure in HC(T) one may ask whether HC(T)∪{0} contains an algebra. In that direction, Aron, Conejero, Peris and Seoane-Sepúlveda showed that the translation operators on H(ℂ) do not support a hypercyclic algebra. On the other hand, Shkarin and independently Bayart and Matheron showed that the complex differentiation operator D on H(ℂ) has a hypercyclic algebra. In the present dissertation we first continue the search for hypercyclic algebras in the setting of convolution operators on H(ℂ). Following Bayart and Matheron's techniques, we extend their above mentioned result with Shkarin, by establishing that P(D) supports a hypercyclic algebra whenever P is a non-constant polynomial vanishing at 0. With a different approach we provide a geometric condition on the set {z: |Φ(z)|≤1} which ensures the existence of hypercyclic algebras for Φ(D) with Φ ∈ H(ℂ) of exponential type. This new approach not only recovers the result of Shkarin-Bayart and Matheron but also gives hypercyclic algebras for convolution operators Φ(D) which do not satisfy the conditions Φ(0)=0 or that Φ be a polynomial, such as I+D, DeD, eD-1, or cos(D). Answering a question of Seoanne-Sepúlveda, we show that the operator D supports hypercyclic algebras that are not singly generated. We next consider hypercyclic algebras beyond the setting of convolution operators. For instance, we provide abstract criteria for the existence of hypercyclic algebras, which in a sense generalize familiar results from Linear Dynamics. We also show that every hypercyclic weighted backward shift operator on ℓ2 supports a hypercyclic algebra. Finally, on a completely different direction we study the dynamic behavior of affine maps, that is, maps of the form A=T+a where T is a linear map and a is a vector of the underlying space. We prove that in many cases the dynamic behavior of A is identical to that of its linear part T. We also show that if A is hypercyclic then T has to be hypercyclic as well. The converse is not true however by an example due to Shkarin, who provided a hypercyclic operator T on ℓ2 and a specific a ∈ ℓ2 such that A=T+a is not hypercyclic. Furthermore, we generalize several results from linear dynamics to the affine setting, as well as discuss some open questions and provide partial answers to those.

Committee:

Juan Bes (Advisor); Kit Chan (Committee Member); Alexander Izzo (Committee Member); Neocles Leontis (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mathematics

Keywords:

hypercyclic algebras; affine dynamics

O'Neill, Katherine AGhostlands
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Creative Writing/Fiction
Ghostlands is a collection of short stories that features vivid landscapes and an emphasis on place. Most stories take place in Pennsylvania, but the locations range from Scranton to Alaska to Ireland. Many of the central conflicts revolve around natural and manmade disasters and how the two often collide. For instance, the final story, “Vortex,” focuses on the Knox Mine Disaster where mine drilling too close to the Susquehanna River caused the river to collapse into the mines and ruin Anthracitic coal mining in northeastern Pennsylvania. These stories attempt to identify how people react to place and become part of the landscape. In the aftermath, these characters often struggle to move past their disasters and are unable to connect with the others. There are moments when the connectivity to the land saves these characters. In “Round-Leaved Sundews” a young woman uses the bog to establish an identity separate from her ex-husband.

Committee:

Wendell Mayo (Advisor); Lawrence Coates (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Language; Language Arts; Literature

Komosa, EricSERPENT SOMETHING
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Creative Writing/Poetry
ABSTRACT Committee: Sharona Muir, Advisor; Larissa Szporluk Serpent Something is a collection of poems that fuses experimental forms with traditional lyric in a hybrid attempt to problematize the uneasy relationship between ontology and language, representation, and photographic absence.

Committee:

Sharona Muir (Advisor); Larissa Szporluk (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

poetry; ontology; photography; absence; representation; language

Dillon, Jeanette MToward a Better Understanding of Social Enterprises: A Critical Ethnography of a TOMS Campus Club
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Media and Communication
This dissertation explores the lived experiences of Millennials organizing around a social enterprise. It details critical ethnographic methods that include 12 in-depth interviews, and participation and observation for nearly three years of a TOMS shoe company campus club in Northwest Ohio. Visual analysis, political economy, and audience engagement add to a cultural studies perspective that frames this study. Grounded theory principles inform analyses and reveal that the organizing efforts of these particular Millennials involve three processes: living precarity, living affect, and making a local place from a global space. The processes intersect continually yet are distinguishable by various themes that influence a Millennial organizing experience. Laboring as an entrepreneur, laboring in servant leadership, doing charity, and defining needy, work throughout and within club communication in ways that affect members’ meaning-making about the club and the TOMS corporation. This research helps define the Millennial experience with one social enterprise in an effort to better understand Millennials and social enterprises in general.

Committee:

Radhika Gajjala, PhD (Advisor); Barbara Bergstrom, PhD (Other); Alberto Gonzalez, PhD (Committee Member); Kate Magsamen-Conrad, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

Social Enterprise; TOMS; Millennials; Critical Ethnography; Critical; Cultural Studies; Precarity; Affect; Placemaking; Political Economy; Immaterial Labor

Wofford, Sarah JaneHow does alteration of chemical information affect assessment in male and female crayfish, Orconectes rusticus?
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Biological Sciences
This dissertation builds on our limited understanding of female agonsim through the lens of assessment and the information driving these behavioral strategies. While empirical studies have demonstrated differences in winning probabilities and contest duration for male and female intrasexual contests, we know very little about the rules dictating differences in behavioral strategies and information used in these contests (Rosvall, 2011). The work outlined in this dissertation fills these gaps in knowledge by examining (1) sex-based differences in behavioral response to a signal within agonistic contests, (2) the effect signal removal on assessment in intersexual contests, and (3) sex-based differences in population level assessment strategies under differing social and environmental contexts. I used crayfish as my model organism due to their well-studied aggressive behaviors and the propensity of both sexes to engage in inter- and intrasexual interactions. Because of their heavy reliance on chemical information across many aspects of their behavior, I first examined differences in male and female crayfish contest strategies in light of differential use of and response to chemical stimuli. Chemical information (i.e. urine) release and subsequent behavioral changes were quantified across male and female inter- and intrasexual contests, revealing that the behavioral response to this urine release differed based on opponent sex and relative size (Wofford et al., 2017). In line with previous studies, mixed sex contests seemingly followed a different set of rules and contest resolution than male or female same sex contests. The second aim of this dissertation further examined these differences by blocking chemosensory ability in mixed sex contests. Intersexual contest duration was significantly impacted by the sex of the lesioned opponent. Specifically, male lesioned contests were relatively unaffected by impaired chemosensation while female lesioned contests showed significant shifts in duration. Furthermore, the assessment strategy in place differed based on which sex had access to chemical information. In the final aim, I explored sex-based assessment differences due to alteration of social and environmental context. Artificial populations that varied in sex composition (male or female population), strength ratio (weak or strong skewed populations), and resource availability (i.e. resource value) demonstrated significant variation in assessment strategies in place. These findings confirm previous work that (1) suggests assessment fluidity across environmental and social contexts and (2) posits that the rules dictating male and female contest strategies significantly differ.

Committee:

Paul Moore (Advisor); Andrew Layden (Other); Ryan Earley (Committee Member); Shannon Pelini (Committee Member); Karen Root (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biology

Keywords:

contest behavior; assessment strategy; intersexual contests; crayfish

Sands, Zachary AdamFilm Comedy and the American Dream
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, American Culture Studies
This dissertation examines the generational renegotiation of the American Dream as represented in popular comedic films that center on issues of upward mobility throughout the post-WWII era. Through a combination of narrative and thematic analyses of select motion picture comedies, contextualized within a dynamic historical framework, I build on the assertion that these movies essentially serve as time capsules of dominant cultural anxieties, offering invaluable insights into the social fabric of American culture of the past seventy years. Ultimately, I argue that this proves to be a tattered patchwork tapestry at best comprising individuals who are bound only by a shared belief in the ideals of meritocracy, equal opportunity and progress, even despite consistent patterns of systemic exclusion. Fundamentally, this is the story of what made audiences laugh and why, and what this says about the changing shape of the American Dream since the end of the Second World War. It is history as witnessed through the lens of the humanities, told chronologically and from multiple points of view. Throughout this project, I describe how even something as steadfast and resilient as the American Dream has repeatedly had to adapt to changing social contexts and can mean very different things according to one’s race, socioeconomic class and gender, among other variables. Through a consideration of these underrepresented dimensions of the American experience and by covering a broad historical landscape in my research, I seek to supplement existing scholarship in film studies, American history and cultural studies by offering novel understandings of the interrelated dynamics of film comedy and public discourse.

Committee:

Timothy Messer-Kruse, PhD (Advisor); Lesa Lockford, PhD (Committee Member); Jeffrey Brown, PhD (Committee Member); Dena Eber, MFA (Other)

Subjects:

American History; American Studies; Film Studies; Mass Media

Keywords:

film studies; comedy; humor; american dream; american superpower; cold war; film comedy; upward mobility

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