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Caruso, MyahThe Patient-Physician Relationship from the Perspective of Economically Disadvantaged Patients
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
This qualitative study utilized interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) to explore the patient-physician relational experience from the perspective of patients of lower socioeconomic status (SES). Research shows that physicians engage in collaborative care less frequently with patients of lower SES than with their more advantaged counterparts and that lower SES patients participate less during office visits. Information on the patient-physician relational mechanisms that inhibit collaborative care from the perspective of low SES patients is a key gap in this literature. Five adult patients from the lower socioeconomic strata, who were established patients of a primary care physician were recruited from a primary care practice in a rural area and interviewed. Data analysis identified six superordinate themes that best capture how patients experience the relational dynamics of the patient-physician relationship. The results show that physician-patient power asymmetry can be experienced by patients of lower SES as reminiscent of further examples of previous experiences of stigma and oppression. Future visits or aspects of a treatment plan may be avoided following an unpleasant medical encounter or a weakened patient-physician alliance. The emotional reactions of patients contribute to their loss of voice, and some disclosures are viewed as too risky to share with treating physicians. These interviews also showed that personable physicians increase patient comfort and physicians who proactively seek out and address patient dissatisfaction mend ruptures and strengthen the patient-physician relationship. The study describes the mechanisms by which patients of lower SES are susceptible to experiences of stigma and psychological oppression during medical encounters. It offers implications for practice and possible pathways for future research to minimize experiences that are barriers for patients and to maximize the great potential of the patient-physician relationship as a factor in improving the health of a very vulnerable population.

Committee:

F. Alexander Blount, EdD (Committee Chair); James Fauth, PhD (Committee Member); Cynthia Whitaker, PsyD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology

Keywords:

physician-patient communication; physician-patient relationship; socioeconomic status; rural primary care; power asymmetry in the physician-patient relationship; qualitative research

Daffon, Jennifer KThe Effects of Gender and Perception of Community Safety on Happiness
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
Income-based indicators of happiness have been shown to be limited in their ability to predict happiness. Alternative measures of happiness have been gaining prominence in happiness research, and two predictors of happiness were investigated in the current study. The extent to which happiness (measured by affect, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being) could be predicted by gender and perception of community safety was investigated with 19,644 participant responses to The Happiness Alliance Survey. Multiple linear regression models indicated that gender and community safety are significant predictors of affect, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being. The effect of the predictor variables was similar for all three of those happiness measures. B values indicated that both predictor variables had the greatest impact on psychological well-being and the least impact on life satisfaction. While all three models were statistically significant, they did not similarly predict the satisfaction with affect, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being scores. The results suggest that while gender and perceptions of community safety should be considered as part of the whole picture that supports a full life, there are likely other variables and life domains that have stronger influences on happiness.

Committee:

Suzanne Engelberg, PsyD (Committee Chair); Alejandra Suarez, PhD (Committee Member); Laura Musikanski, J.D, M.B.A (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Psychology; Public Policy; Social Psychology

Keywords:

happiness; positive psychology; community safety; gender; Sustainable Seattle; Happiness Alliance; multiple regression; quantitative; subjective well-being

Porter, John MartinNavigating Uncertainty in Automotive Technology Instruction: The Subjective Experiences of Automotive Instructors During Laboratory Activities
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
Educational researchers have conducted very few studies on the subjective experiences of both trained and self-taught auto mechanics (Barber, 2003, 2004; Nelsen, 1997, 2010). Further, no present studies explore the subjective experience of the automotive instructor as he or she experiences uncertainty in the automotive lab. This study addresses a gap in the current literature on career/technical instructor development. For this study, data were gathered by video recording automotive laboratory activities at three Midwestern automotive programs. Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR) interviews were conducted with automotive instructors as they observed themselves navigating the lab environment. Data from the IPR interviews were analyzed using emergent thematic analysis. The research revealed that most instructors in this study were aware, after reflection, of the reasoning behind many of the intuitive and improvisational behaviors, and had an awareness of the nuances of skill assessment the importance of modeling behavior. This study also identified transfer of artistry as a concept of advanced skill attainment in automotive subjects. Transfer of artistry is the result of an instructor’s ability to manage several paradigms of the laboratory experience at once, to create the appropriate conditions for a student to develop the cognitive, spatial, and tactile skills necessary for performing advanced automotive diagnostics and repair. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Member); Stephanie Davis, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Education; Vocational Education

Keywords:

Post Secondary; Career Technical; Automotive; Technology; Laboratory; Improvisation; Instructor; Mechanic; Technician; Reflection; Artistry; IPR; Interpersonal Process Recall; Thematic Analysis; Schon

Hague, Samantha MarieGraduate Students and Geropsychology: Growing Need and Lacking Interest
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
As the population of older adults continues to grow with time, the need for geropsychology clinicians also grows. Many barriers exist that contribute to why elderly individuals are not receiving adequate psychological treatment. This study explores why graduate psychology students are often disinterested in working with older adults and whether it is possible that student interest could increase with more geropsychology graduate coursework and practicum training opportunities. This study also explores the possible connection between quality of elderly relationships and interest in working with the elderly. The results of this study support that Clinical and Counseling Psychology graduate programs lack quality education for providing mental health services to the older adult population. This general lack of education includes the lacking availability of geropsychology courses, integration of the older adult population in academic courses, training in the assessment, diagnosis, and provision of psychotherapy for older adults, as well as building awareness of attitudes, responses, and biases toward this population. The results of this study also support that graduate programs lack the availability of practicum placements that allow students to work with the older adult population. Participants rated the age group of 65-years-old and beyond as least preferred and a majority felt “minimally competent” to provide psychological treatment to older adults, yet 31% of participants responded that they will likely work with older adults in the future. Correlational analyses showed that the likelihood of graduate students to work with older adults in the future increases as the quality of their clinical training for older adult service provision increases. Also, as the quality of education for older adult service provision increases, the quality of clinical training with older adults increases. No significant correlations were found between emotional closeness to an older adult and likelihood to work with older adults in the future, but many findings in this study support the idea that there exists some impact of experiences with older adults on interest and disinterest in clinical work with this population. Lastly, many reasons for interest and disinterest in working with the older adult population were found in this study.

Committee:

Roger Peterson, PhD, ABPP (Committee Chair); Gina Pasquale, PsyD (Committee Member); Amanda Hitchings, PsyD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology

Keywords:

geropsychology; grandparent relationships; older adults; elderly

O'Leary, Kevin RService Members’ Perspectives on Treatment: Bridging the Military-Civilian Divide
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
The difficulties some service members have reintegrating into and reconnecting with civilian society are well established across the literature. Despite the veteran’s voices describing these struggles to connect with civilians and the current zeitgeist in psychotherapy on the therapeutic relationship and multicultural competence, little attention has been given to the implications of the civilian military divide in therapy. This study used a mixed method approach to conduct an exploratory study of 70 service members’ perceptions of working with a civilian and active duty or veteran therapist and what factors contribute to therapeutic alliance. Of interest are service members’ beliefs about what knowledge about the military is important for a therapist, what makes for a good first encounter, and what they look for to determine trust. Statistical analyses looked to explore the impact of combat, homecoming, and military experiences on Working Alliance Inventory scores for an imagined veteran and civilian therapist. Content analysis was used to analyze qualitative data to look for basic themes within service members’ responses. Results indicated no difference between a civilian and active duty/veteran therapist, a strong emphasis on being understood by their therapist, and that interpersonal negative homecoming experiences decrease therapeutic alliance. Based on these findings and the clinical literature, guidelines are proposed for effective ways to work with service members.

Committee:

Roger L. Peterson, Ph.D., ABPP (Committee Chair); Lorraine Mangione, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Elisabeth Parrott, Psy.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology

Keywords:

Veterans; Military; Therapeutic Alliance; Cultural Competency; Therapist Traits; Therapist Experiences; PTSD; Homecoming

Mark, Margaret WoodrowPracticing Sacred Encounters: A Narrative Analysis of Relational, Spiritual, and Nursing Leadership
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
This research examined one large health system that has, through a stated mission outcome that every encounter is a sacred encounter, sought to enhance relationships occurring within the health care environment. Seeking to understand the lived experience of sacred encounters through the lens of nurse leaders in one acute care hospital settings this study examined how nurse leaders experienced their leadership role in realizing sacred encounters. Participants were defined as nurse leaders from one hospital setting and included nurse managers, directors and one vice president. A narrative thematic analysis framed by situational analysis was the method of inquiry. Data was gathered through an intensive interview process eliciting an in-depth exploration of the experience of the participants, along with their personal interpretation of that experience. Two questions were asked to each participant, the first to gain an understanding about their personal experience with sacred encounters and the second to allow the nurse leader to reflect on his or her personal leadership behavior as it related to the realization of sacred encounters within their primary area(s) of responsibility. A review of research of current literature focused on relational leadership, spiritual leadership and nursing leadership theory. The major finding was that organizational culture can be defined from the top of the organization and, through well-defined and purposeful leadership behaviors, be realized at the point of bedside care. This study was limited to a one-faith-based hospital. Future research should focus on broadening the scope of inquiry about organizational culture and how espoused culture can be translated into action through purposeful leadership behaviors. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA, https://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Hollaway, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Peter Vaill, D.B.A. (Other)

Subjects:

Health Care Management; Nursing; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

nursing; nurse managers; leadership; nurses; relational leadership; spiritual leadership; spirituality; organizational culture; narrative inquiry; organizational psychology

Krapf, Carissa JeanThe Development of Intrinsic Motivation in Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has become a common diagnosis among children today. The numbers have grown exponentially in the last several decades and, despite extensive research and various treatment modalities, many children continue to struggle with its disruptive symptoms. Current research reports a poor prognosis for this population with difficulties continuing into adulthood. One of the difficulties noted is in their ability to develop intrinsic motivation when their behaviors have been managed by extrinsic rewards. Self Determination Theory (SDT) was used to conceptualize the difficulties around developing intrinsic motivation when an individual experiences symptoms of ADHD which impact several areas of functioning. SDT asserts that autonomy, competence, and relatedness are needed in order to develop intrinsic motivation. As such, it was hypothesized that ADHD symptoms and their treatment may be related to motivational difficulties in children with ADHD. The General Scale of the Children’s Academic Intrinsic Motivation Inventory was used to measure the intrinsic motivation of fourth and fifth graders, with and without ADHD, to explore possible differences in intrinsic motivation between groups. A total of 366 recruitment packets were sent home to families and resulted in 61 participants between the ages of 9-11. Test administration occurred within several elementary schools with the support of school principals and guidance counselors. The results of this research yielded only one statistically significant finding which illuminated a relationship of medium significance between age and intrinsic motivation. The lack of results in all other analyses indicate that there is no difference between the development of intrinsic motivation in children with ADHD when compared to their same-age peers. However, due to a small sample size, uneven diagnostic group distribution and the use of a subscale instead of a full measure, this study holds a low power of effect and the results should not be generalized to the population. In considering the numerous limitations of this study, the primary recommendations for future research are replication with a larger sample size and use of the entire CAIMI measure for a more comprehensive data set.

Committee:

Kathi Borden, PhD (Committee Chair); Daniel LaFleur, PhD (Committee Member); Barbara Belcher-Timme, PsyD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology

Keywords:

Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; ADHD; Self-Determination Theory; autonomy; competence; relatedness; children; intrinsic motivation; CAIMI

Marsh, Megan BrunmierIraqi Refugees and Cultural Humility: A Mental Health Professional Training Program
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
This paper describes the development of a thorough nine-hour professional training program targeting the cultural humility of mental health clinicians who are treating new Iraqi refugee communities. I used the 15-step evidence-based Comprehensive Program Development Model created by Calley (2009) for the design of the structure, curriculum, and materials for this proposed program (Calley, 2011). The training program is informed by conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and humility, ecological systems theory, and social justice with goals of (a) exploring clinicians’ cultural attitudes in order to improve self-awareness at multiple levels (e.g., physiological, psychological, interpersonal), (b) increasing clinicians’ knowledge about Iraqi refugee resettlement, and (c) developing clinicians’ intervention skills with this at-risk population. The impact of personal uncertainty on extremist attitudes and behaviors is described and connected to human physiological fear responses that arise in the context of intercultural encounters. An empirical needs assessment of an exemplary rural New England clinic complements the literature review; the program is designed to be responsive to the needs faced by clinics serving new Iraqi communities. Program structure includes rigorous evaluation and quality improvement mechanisms.

Committee:

Roger Peterson, PhD, ABPP (Committee Chair); Lorraine Mangione, PhD (Committee Member); Dean Hammer, PsyD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology

Keywords:

Iraqi refugees; posttraumatic stress; mental health; professional training

Moran, KelseyTrans Gender Identities and Language: Interviews with Recent College Graduates
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
There has been an increasingly pervasive need to gain a deeper and more individualized psychological understanding of how people experience their gender identities, as well as how they navigate the complicated and nuanced language of gender. Words carry meaning and it is vital to gain an insightful understanding of the impact of words, whether supportive or discriminatory, on trans people. The present qualitative study utilized phenomenological methods to hold interviews with three trans individuals, who had recently graduated from college, about their unique experiences with gender. Thematic analysis was used to examine common themes that arose throughout the interviews. Seven thematic clusters emerged: Positive Experiences, Language, Gender Development, Coming Out, Discrimination, Emotional Reactions, and Representation and Visibility. Twenty-one themes were organized under the seven clusters. Some of these themes include (a) fear (“that was a big step for me, and I was so scared”), (b) transphobia (“I’ve gotten `it’[pronoun] a few times”), (c) familiarity with language (“I appreciate it when people either are pretty up on [gendered language], or are really receptive to learning more about it”), and (d) necessity of support (“just knowing that there are other people like you [who are trans] out there is awesome and empowering”). Exploration of the emerging themes emphasized the individuality of trans individuals and their personal experiences with and opinions of gender. Suggestions for navigating the complicated language of gender, as identified by the participants, are provided in hopes of increasing awareness and safety for the trans community. Limitations of the study included the researcher’s identity and her related biases, the small sample size, and concerns regarding one’s personal safety that may have influenced people to participate or to not participate in the study. Directions for future research include gaining additional understanding of a wide breadth of trans individuals’ intersectional identities (sexuality, race, ethnicity, nationality, class, ability, religion/spirituality, etc.), the experiences of trans individuals, generational differences in gender identities, and positive experiences related to trans identities.

Committee:

Gargi Roysircar, Ed.D. (Committee Chair); Barbara Belcher-Timme, Psy.D. (Committee Member); Wendy Vincent, Psy.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology

Keywords:

trans; language; cisgender; gender identity; gender expression; biological sex; sexuality

Sidhu, GurjeetThe Application of Western Models of Psychotherapy by Indian Psychotherapists in India: A Grounded Theory
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
The following study explored the experience of Indian psychotherapists applying Western psychotherapy to Indians. Charmaz’ (2006) Grounded theory methodology was utilized. Seven Indian psychotherapists were interviewed. Interview data yielded the theory of Modification as Resistance. Modification as Resistance captured Indian psychotherapists’ attempts to modify Western psychotherapy to resist the erosion of local ways of healing due to the dominance of Western science. Results add to existing critiques of Western psychotherapy applied to Eastern populations. Recommendations based on results are offered to facilitate evidence-based practice (American Psychological Association [APA], 2006) with diverse populations. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohio Link ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.etd.

Committee:

Jude Bergkamp, Psy.D. (Committee Chair); Michael Sakuma, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Bettleyoun Barbara, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Asian Studies; Counseling Psychology; Psychology

Keywords:

Ground Theory; Qualitative; Individual Versus Collective Orientation; Internalized oppression; West is Best, South Again Psychotherapists Perspective; Cultural Appropriation

Harper, Erin KathleenA Review of Factors Contributing to the Shortage of Palliative Care Service for Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Patients
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
Adolescent and young adult oncology (patients aged 15–39 years old) is an emerging group of patients that are recognized to have distinctive qualities concerning their cancer treatment, including intensified psychosocial needs compared to their adult and child counterparts (Bleyer, 2012). The quality of life for adolescent and young adults during and after cancer treatment is disproportionally worse than what is reported by adults and children and the incidence of cancer in this population is steadily growing (Bleyer, 2011, 2012; Pritchard, Cuvelier, Harlos, & Barr, 2011; Rosenberg & Wolfe, 2013; Siegel, Naishadham, & Jemal, 2013; Wein, Pery, & Zer, 2011). Palliative medicine refers to an interventional service that specifically targets improving a patient’s quality of life throughout their care and has been specifically tailored in the oncology treatment guidelines and care principles for adults and children. The healthcare system, however, has been slow to notice how palliative medicine could positively contribute to adolescent and young adult oncology care. Consequently it has been under considered for this patient group. It has yet to be studied in depth as a viable and beneficial service to this cohort. Using a comprehensive literature review, this dissertation explores current shortages in palliative medicine among the adolescent and young adult oncology population. Employing multiple search modalities for key terms of the research topic resulted in 28,832 article returns. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and 36 articles were used in the literature review along with seven grey literature publications. Aspects of palliative care delivery and quality were investigated. Several themes emerged from the literature as well as specific clinical considerations for working with this patient group. Systemic barriers influencing the identified shortages were also examined. Recommendations for remediation are discussed where applicable, as well as the current state of addressing or not addressing each shortage. The role of psychologists in palliative medicine and care of adolescent and young adult oncology patients is also discussed. By illuminating the shortages in palliative care service to the adolescent and young adult oncology population, this dissertation can act as a stimulus to guide the creation of treatment guidelines or assist in future service and program development having proactively identified areas in need of attention. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohio Link ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/etd Keywords: adolescent and young adult, oncology, cancer, palliative care, palliative medicine, AYAO

Committee:

Mary Wieneke, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Cheryl Azlin, Psy.D. (Committee Member); Ross Hays, M.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Alternative Medicine; Clinical Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Health Care; Oncology

Keywords:

adolescent and young adult, AYA, oncology, cancer, AYAO, adolescent and young adult oncology, palliative care, palliative medicine, palliative services

Baker Christensen, Leslie MichelleArtistic Drawing as a Mnemonic Device
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
Despite art-based learning being widely used, existing data are primarily qualitative, and most research has not isolated particular variables such as memory for empirical study. The few experiments that have been conducted demonstrated that drawing improves free recall of unpaired words, and retention improves after lessons integrated with drawing, drama, and narrative exercises. To help fill the gap in the current literature, the present study compared the effectiveness of encoding and the rate of memory decay between a drawing mnemonic and note taking on a paired associates task. Using a within-subjects experimental design, participants were presented with word pairs and asked to complete either a drawing mnemonic (DM) or note taking (NT) to assist memorization. Participants were tested immediately after the word pair presentation and after a 20-minute delay. Results supported the hypothesis that the DM condition would produce superior encoding, as evidenced by greater retention on the immediate test. However, no memory decay was observed in the experiment, and therefore results on the delayed test were inconclusive. In fact, scores for the NT condition improved over time whereas the scores for the DM condition did not, which might imply that note taking results in a different consolidation process than drawing. Findings from this study suggested that arts integration can be an effective method to support memory for learned information. Future studies that examine the effect of rehearsal and the long-term effectiveness of a drawing mnemonic are warranted. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohio Link ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Suzanne Engelberg, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jude Bergkamp, Psy.D. (Committee Member); Luke Rinne, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Experimental Psychology; Experiments; Psychology; Teaching

Keywords:

art-based learning; arts-integration; drawing; experiment; learning; memory; mnemonics; paired associates; quantitative; within-subjects

Gonsalves, Crystal RThe Remembered Experience of Adoption: Factors Supporting Healthy Adjustment
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch Santa Barbara: Clinical Psychology
This qualitative research study is designed to explore ideas, customs, and practices related to adoption from the perspective of adult adoptees. While many studies seek to explain the negative impact of adoption, minimal literature exists with regard to a phenomenological exploration of adoption practices that successfully promote healthy adjustment and a sense of resilience and well-being in adopted children. Existing research on adoption has largely been conducted quantitatively, which can fail to capture the personal, lived experience of a positive adoption experience that leads to healthy adjustment. Specifically, little is known about which factors of the adoption experience adoptees perceive as contributing to healthy adjustment and a sense of well-being. The proposed study located themes and patterns that became apparent through narrative inquiry concerning factors in the adoption experience that contributed to adjustment. Narrative research honors the knowledge held in stories that are retrieved from memory (Fry, 2002). By interviewing adults who were adopted as children, it is hoped that their personal stories can augment clinical conceptualizations of adoption and shed light on positive meaning-making experiences in the context of adoption. These conceptualizations will be of use to persons and professionals who work closely with those involved in adoption, including mental health professionals and paraprofessionals working closely with adoptees and their families. This information is of value for those involved in family dependency treatment courts, child welfare services, and other agencies who wish to promote positive experiences for children and families who become involved in the adoption process. The electronic version of the dissertation is accessible at the Ohiolink ETD center http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Steve Kadin, PhD (Committee Chair); Bella DePaulo, PhD (Committee Member); Violet Oaklander, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Social Psychology

Keywords:

adoption; adopted; attachment; adjustment; resilience; phenomenological; qualitative; biological; adoptive parents; adoption registry; adoption stereotypes; adaptability; age of adoption; disclosure; racial identity; ethnic identity; closed; open adoption

Saiz, Carolina Del CarmenOpportunities for Conversion to More Sustainable Practices by Houses of Worship through Team Performance Enhancing Strategies that Include Leadership with Facilitative Skills
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies
This research focused on assessing the performance of teams of volunteers in Houses of Worship (HOWs) in the State of Massachusetts that are successfully planning, advancing and completing sustainable initiatives. The sustainable initiatives included solar photovoltaic (PV) installations, city public parks cleaning projects, efficient windows installations, efficient lighting fixtures installations, and building insulation improvements. The goal of this research was to assess the dynamics of a total of eight successful teams, including the relationships among team members and their leaders with facilitative skills that they perceived were instrumental to their effective and efficient performance. The role of team leadership was more relevant than anticipated, and it presented statistical interdependence with team interpersonal processes such as: collaboration, cooperation, cohesion, communication, coordination, trust, and especially conflict resolution. Based on this knowledge and qualitative data from interviews, a set of guidelines on “best practices” was produced, containing recommendations on how to build and manage HOW teams to conduct local sustainability projects. Key words: sustainability best practices, team, leader with facilitative skills, House of Worship (HOW), solar energy, energy efficiency.

Committee:

James Gruber, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); James Jordan, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Robert Pojasek, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Energy; Environmental Studies; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Sustainability

Keywords:

sustainability; team; leadership; facilitative skills; House of Worship; solar energy; energy efficiency; environment; climate change

Johnson, LuanneThe Behavioral Ecology and Population Characteristics of Striped Skunks Inhabiting Piper Plover Nesting Beaches on the Island of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies
We studied coastal striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, USA to gather information on the population characteristics of this mesopredator on Atlantic coast beaches with nesting piping plovers (Charadrius melodus). From 2004 – 2008, we captured and marked 138 skunks and fitted 51 adults with VHF radio-collars. Capture rates ranged from 1 – 7 individuals/100 trap nights (TN) in the spring and 4 – 21 individuals/100 TN in the fall. Spring capture rates were highest at Dogfish Bar (DB), a beach with abundant wrack in the intertidal zone in close proximity to low-density housing, where we estimated a spring density of 8-10 skunks/km2. All adult skunks were residents at this site, and most were initially captured in April/May (100% of males and 67% of females). Spring capture rates were too low for a density estimate at Norton Point/Wasque (NPW), a beach with sparse wrack and farther from development. We initially captured 80% of adult males in April/May but only 1 adult female. Most adult females (88%) were captured in June/July, which coincided with the arrival of anthropogenic food on the beach. While all adult females captured at NPW were residents, 50% of males were non-residents. Half (50%) of all radio-collared skunks died from human-related causes while disease killed another 29%. Female site fidelity was high at both sites, with 40% recurring in subsequent years. While male recurrence at DB was high at 36%, no males recurred at NPW. Similarly, no juveniles recurred in subsequent years at the NPW, but 26% of juveniles recurred at DB. The Martha’s Vineyard skunk population does not exhibit any distinguishing characteristics from mainland striped skunk populations at this time. Skunks captured exhibited all stripe patterns known for the species, but narrow (45%) and short-striped (37%) patterns were most abundant. Adult skunks weighed a mean of 1.47 ± 0.05 kg between April and July and 2.08 ± 0.09 kg between August and November. At beaches where exclusion fencing is not an option for protecting eggs of rare and threatened birds, spring trapping could be effective in reducing skunk densities for most of the nesting season because our data indicates that female territories would remain vacant until late summer. Future research tracking the temporal and spatial variation in wrack line fauna availability on beaches with sparse vs. dense wrack lines will increase our understanding of the factors influencing interactions between piping plovers and predators that share foraging habitat with them, such as skunks and crows. On beaches that are seasonally urban habitats (SUH), research using experimental designs to investigate the influence of predictable anthropogenic food subsidies (PAFS) on the activity and density of generalist predator species during the summer could provide valuable data for management efforts and public outreach aimed at reducing predation on rare and threatened beach species.

Committee:

Jonathan Atwood, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Stephen DeStefano, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Rachel Thiet, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Wildlife Conservation; Wildlife Management; Zoology

Keywords:

striped skunk; Mephitis mephitis; maritime mammals; mesopredators; skunk resource use; skunk habitat selection; beach-nesting bird predators; predictable anthropogenic food subsidies; piping plover; egg predators; skunk densities;seasonally urban habitat

Scroggins, Marissa JoySurvey of Compassion Fatigue Education in APA-Accredited Clinical and Counseling Psychology Programs
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2015, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
The purpose of this study was to examine the present state of compassion fatigue (CF) education in APA-accredited clinical and counseling doctoral level training programs. It also sought to identify the number of training programs that require CF training or offer it as optional, attempted to discern the type of setting in which it is taught (class, supervision, etc.), as well as identified some of the reasons why it may not have been included (cost, time, interest, etc.) in programs without CF training. A researcher-developed survey was designed and consisted of a mixture of yes/no and multiple choice questions. Program chairs in 287 programs served as representatives of their programs and were invited to participate in this study. Participants included 69 program chairs from APA-accredited clinical and counseling programs that met study criteria. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. In response to the first question of “Does your program offer any form of compassion fatigue prevention training,” the majority of participants (75.4%) indicated that they did not have any formal CF prevention training though several indicated that CF training likely occurs in spontaneous class and supervision discussions. In response to the question “if no CF training exists, why not,” the majority of participants sited “other” (58.5%) or “lack of time” (34%). The results and interpretations are explained; contributions to the current literature, implications, and limitations are discussed; and recommendations for future research are provided. The electronic version of this dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu.

Committee:

Suzanne Engelberg, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Colin Ward, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kelly Brown, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Continuing Education; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Ethics; Psychology

Keywords:

quantitative; descriptive; exploratory; APA-Accredited; clinical psychology; counseling psychology; doctorate programs; program chairs; compassion fatigue; vicarious trauma; secondary trauma; preventative training

Borrup, TomCreativity in Urban Placemaking: Horizontal Networks and Social Equity in Three Cultural Districts
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2015, Leadership and Change
Many authors point to expanding disparities related to wealth and social benefits brought by globalization and the creative city movement while culture and creativity emerge as growing forces in urban placemaking and economic development. The phenomenon of cultural district formation in cities around the globe presents challenges and opportunities for leaders, planners, and managers. Emerging theory related to cultural districts suggests culture can serve to build horizontal relationships that bridge people and networks from different sectors and professions as well as across ethnicities, class, and interests. Research for this dissertation examined the formation of three urban cultural districts social and their respective organizational networks in different contexts. I employed a multiple case study approach to ask: How do horizontal networks form in the process of planning, organizing and/or ongoing management of cultural districts, and what kinds of benefits do those networks generate within their communities? Field research focused on districts in Los Angeles, Minneapolis, and Miami. This dissertation is positioned within ongoing discourse around the tension between form and function in the production of space (Lefebvre, 1974/1991) and within the dialectic of centralization and decentralization in urban planning and governance (Friedmann, 1971) characterized by the push for broad social equity and the pull of local control. Research found that strong horizontal networks characterized by dense and active grassroots leadership were present at the same time as relative community stability and higher levels of social and economic equity. Where horizontal networks were weak, social and economic tensions were higher. The research did not examine other potential factors and thus cannot ascertain whether strong networks resulted in greater stability and equity or whether stability and more equitable conditions brought on by other factors fostered the formation of stronger networks. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/etds/ and OhioLink ETD Center, http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mark J. Stern, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Emily Talen, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Area Planning and Development; Arts Management; Cultural Resources Management; Urban Planning

Keywords:

urban cultural districts; creative cities; economic development; multiple case study; placemaking; Los Angeles; Minneapolis; Miami; leadership; horizontal networks; arts districts; city planning; community revitalization; redevelopment; regeneration

Hayes, Susan M.A Mixed Methods Perspective: How Integral Leaders Can Contribute to the Growth of Emerging Leaders
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2015, Leadership and Change
Given that organizational complexity continues to increase, leaders are looking for credible information, and a process that helps them become a better leader. Emerging leaders are faced with trying to be the best leader they can be while leading teams of people who think and act differently from them. To assist emerging leaders with their leadership, this study explores the literature and looks to highly respected and admired leaders for how they became the leader they are today. The purpose of this study was fourfold: first, to identify and describe first and second tier integral theory leaders from a sample of leader respondents from a U.S. Midwestern city; second, to describe how first and second tier integral theory leaders define leadership; third, to determine what second tier integral leaders see as leading to their becoming the leader they are today; and fourth, to identify the integral leader’s perspectives and advice that can be shared with emerging leaders. This study focused on the convergent space of three theories. The first theory is the field of adult development theory with transformational leadership, the constructive-developmental theories, and meaning making; the second is the field of integral theory with Wilber’s all quadrants, all levels (AQAL) theory, and first and second tier consciousness; and the last is the hero’s journey as described by Joseph Campbell, and the quest for truth. The (AQAL) framework was used in a mixed methods perspective to explore how people assessed as integral leaders defined leadership, developed into integral leaders, and how they can contribute to the growth of emerging leaders. This study was dual-phased: Phase 1 was a quantitative and qualitative survey completed by 624 leaders, and Phase 2 was a telephone interview with eight integral leaders. From the thematic analysis of all the data, four themes emerged: looking inward, looking outward, being a good leader and paying it forward by mentoring others. Implications for emerging leaders, leadership and change, and future research are discussed. This ETD is available in open access in OhioLink ETD, http://ohiolink.edu/Center and AURA http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ron Cacioppe, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Rica Viljoen, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

mixed methods; integral theory; hero journey; spiral dynamics; tier one development; tier two development; leader; leadership; adult development; emerging leaders

Lavering, Dore IThe Relationships between Attachment Style and Boundary Thickness
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2014, Antioch Santa Barbara: Clinical Psychology
Despite the multitudes of research on attachment and many different aspects of relational structures, only one study to date has researched the relationship of adult attachment to boundary thickness. The possible benefits to understanding this relationship would provide therapists and clients a better conceptualization of individual's internal working model of attachment. This study investigated the relationship between the Hartmann Boundary Questionnaire (HBQ), a measure of boundary thickness, and an adult romantic attachment measure, the Experiences in Close Relationships Inventory-Revised (ECR-R) two dimensions of attachment. This study theorized that attachment anxiety would be related to thinner boundaries and conversely attachment avoidance would be related to thicker boundaries. Subjects were 89 mostly college educated adults with an average age of 42 who were recruited through Facebook and email. All of the participants completed a demographic questionnaire, the ECR-R, and the HBQ (self-report questionnaires) and given an option for debriefing via the website SurveyMonkey. My hypothesis was not supported having weak correlations between attachment anxiety to boundaries (r of .264) and attachment avoidance to boundaries (r of .077). However, upon analyzing the subscales of the HBQ with both attachment anxiety and avoidance a moderate correlation was found between attachment anxiety and unusual experiences on the HBQ(r or .4). This correlation may have greater implications for exploring self and identity within an attachment perspective and further our understanding of attachment. It would be useful to pursue this avenue of research in the future in better understand the reasons for this correlation.

Committee:

Juliet Rohde-Brown, PhD (Committee Chair); Salvador Trevino, PhD (Committee Member); Chelsea Gottfurcht, PsyD (Committee Member); Steven Krugman, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Psychological Tests; Psychology; Psychotherapy

Keywords:

Attachment; attachment style; boundaries

Morgenthal, Ashley HChild-Centered Play Therapy for Children with Autism: A Case Study
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2015, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
This dissertation evaluated archival data from the implementation of a child-centered approach to play therapy with a young girl diagnosed with autism. Goals of treatment included promoting spontaneous symbolic play and increasing verbal communication skills. Young children with autism who engage in early intervention often receive behavioral interventions, such as applied behavior analysis (ABA), on a regular basis. However, the use of child-centered play therapy as an intervention is not as common, as play is frequently viewed as being a deficiency for children with autism. In psychological theory, play is often regarded as a child’s work, and his or her primary mode of communication. Play, of any type, is vital for the healthy development of all children. Through a review of the literature, the importance of play interventions for children with autism is argued. Next, the use of child-centered play therapy with the goal of enhancing both spontaneous symbolic play and functional language for children with autism is examined. Methods for how the intervention was implemented and evaluated will be described. The results of the coded sessions are reviewed and explored. Results are then discussed through a traditional narrative case study method, highlighted by examples that occurred during therapy sessions. Information from an interview with the parents is narrated to illustrate their perspective on the implementation of the intervention, as well as their own experiences with the diagnosis. Limitations and challenges to the research are explored, followed by recommendations for future research. Finally, who should receive this type of intervention as well as when CCPT should be considered is discussed.

Committee:

Kathi Borden, PhD (Committee Chair); Gina Pasquale, PsyD (Committee Member); William Slammon, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology

Keywords:

child-centered play therapy; autism; case study; symbolic, play, communication, language

Manuelito, Brenda KCreating Space for an Indigenous Approach to Digital Storytelling: "Living Breath" of Survivance Within an Anishinaabe Community in Northern Michigan
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2015, Leadership and Change
As Indigenous peoples, we have a responsibility to our global community to share our collective truths and experiences, but we also deserve the respect to not be objectified, essentialized, and reified. Today, we are in a period of continual Native resurgence as many of us (re)member our prayers, songs, languages, histories, teachings, everyday stories and our deepest wisdom and understanding as Indigenous peoples--we are all “living breath” and we are “all related.” For eight years, Carmella Rodriguez and I have been nDigiStorytelling across the United States and have co-created over 1,200 digital stories with over 80 tribes for Native survivance, healing, hope, and liberation. By the making and sharing of nDigiStories, our training and consulting company called nDigiDreams is Healing Our Communities One Story at a Time.® This dissertation is a phenomenological study about nDigiStorytelling in an Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) community in Northern Michigan; it explores two four-day digital storytelling workshops during November 2013 and May 2014. Using an emergent research design called “Three Sisters,” I combine Indigenous methodologies, community-based participatory research, and portraiture to explore the “lived experiences” of our nDigiStorytellers who are thriving and flourishing in their families and communities and who are widely sharing their nDigiStories to help others. An Indigenous approach to digital storytelling is much needed and provides a new avenue for understanding how we can use nDigiStorytelling and our visceral bodies to release ourselves from traumatic experiences and how we can utilize technology and media-making for healing ourselves and others. The electronic version of this Dissertation is available in open access at AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/etds/ and OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd This dissertation is accompanied by a PDF that contains links to 24 media files on the nDigiStoryMaking YouTube Channel that are referenced in this document.

Committee:

Carolyn Kenny, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Holloway, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Luana Ross, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Daniel Hart, M.F.A. (Committee Member); Jo-Ann Archibald, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Cultural Anthropology; Multimedia Communications; Native American Studies; Native Americans; Native Studies; Public Health

Keywords:

Digital Storytelling; Native Americans; American Indians; Community-Based Participatory Research; Phenomenology; Portraiture; Indigenous Methodologies; Indigenous Resilience; Historical Trauma; Indigenous Film; Substance Abuse Recovery; Survivance

Natinsky, Ari SimonPsychotherapy and the Embodiment of the Neuronal Identity: A Hermeneutic Study of Louis Cozolino's (2010) The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Healing the Social Brain
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2014, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
In recent years, there have been several ways in which researchers have attempted to integrate psychotherapy and neuroscience research. Neuroscience has been proposed as a method of addressing lingering questions about how best to integrate psychotherapy theories and explain their efficacy. For example, some psychotherapy outcome studies have included neuroimaging of participants in order to propose neurobiological bases of effective psychological interventions (e.g., Paquette et al., 2003). Other theorists have used cognitive neuroscience research to suggest neurobiological correlates of various psychotherapy theories and concepts (e.g., Schore, 2012). These efforts seem to embody broader historical trends, including the hope that neuroscience can resolve philosophical questions about the relationship between mind and body, as well as the popular appeal of contemporary brain research. In this hermeneutic dissertation I examined a popular neuropsychotherapy text in order to explore the historical fit between neuroscience and psychotherapy. The study identifies the possible understandings of the self (i.e., what it means to be human) that could arise from Western therapy discourses that are based on neuroscientific interpretations of psychotherapy theories. The methodology of this dissertation consisted of a critical textual analysis of Louis Cozolino's (2010) The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Healing the Social Brain. The primary content, rhetorical strategies, and recurring themes in Cozolino's book were outlined and interpreted from a hermeneutic perspective. This included a historical critique of Cozolino's claims about the origins, purpose, and efficacy of psychotherapy, his assertions about the relationship between self and brain, and examples of his psychotherapy case vignettes. Rhetorical strategies in his writing included analogy, ambiguity, speculative language, and figures of speech such as metaphor and personification. A discussion of these findings addressed the implications of Cozolino's efforts with regards to patient care, psychotherapy theory integration, and the possible effects that these efforts may have on the profession of psychology. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd .

Committee:

Philip Cushman, PhD (Committee Chair); Alejandra Suarez , PhD (Committee Member); Gary Walls, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Mental Health; Modern History; Neurosciences; Philosophy; Philosophy of Science; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Science History; Therapy

Keywords:

hermeneutics; neuroscience; interpersonal neurobiology; neuropsychotherapy; brain-based psychotherapy; neuroimaging; biomedicine; self; selfhood; psychotherapy; clinical psychology; theoretical and philosophical psychology; textual analysis; rhetoric

Pape, Kathleen MMothering and the Functional Self: A Hermeneutic Exploration of Texts on Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2014, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
Mothering is a rich and complex experience involving challenging tasks, a developing relationship with one's child, and socially defined roles. How mothering is viewed varies depending on the cultural norms and historical era under consideration. This study is a textual interpretation of three books written about perinatal mental health, especially how those texts describe the challenges and struggles of birthing and mothering. I develop understandings about how clinicians respond to those issues and in the process understand themselves, their practices, and their sociocultural roles. I consider the shape of the current social terrain that brings to light the experiences of birthing women and the clinicians who treat them. Drawing on philosophical hermeneutics I interpret three books concerned with perinatal mental health (Stone & Menken, 2008; Bennett & Indman, 2010; Shields, 2005). Considering the themes that emerged, I describe how the beliefs of this era regarding birthing and mothering and corresponding therapeutic practices are reflected in these texts. Five main themes are identified. First, is that maternal suffering is overlooked and perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are undertreated. Second, suffering is reduced to a medicalized disorder located within the mother and her biochemistry. This created disorder in the mother and prevented her from enacting her role as mother and necessitated an individualist response. Third, the mother is viewed as an object whose wellbeing is important primarily because it serves others in her family. Fourth, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are seen as being universal. Finally, the clinician is viewed as a professional expert tasked with bringing order to the mother's biochemical disorder. I discuss how particular ways of being for clinicians and mothers are highlighted within these texts, and the implications of such for therapeutic practices. The beliefs expressed in these texts reflect and reinforce a predominant way of being in contemporary culture, which I describe as the functional self--a self that is valued for actively and efficiently performing social roles that reinforce current arrangements of gender and the political status quo. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Philip Cushman, PhD (Committee Chair); Melissa J. Kennedy, PhD (Committee Member); Leslie Butterfield, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Gynecology; Health Care; Medicine; Nursing; Obstetrics; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders; PMADs; hermeneutics; mothering; motherhood; Maternal Theory; functional self; postpartum depression; thematic interpretation; current social terrain; sociocultural roles; interpretive phenomenology

Korn, AnnTo Bend but Not Break: Adult Views on Resilience
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2014, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
A universal definition of resilience does not exist amongst researchers in the social sciences, making comparisons between studies nearly impossible. Added to this dilemma is that researchers hold divergent theories regarding the origin of resilience, whether it is a static trait across the span of a lifetime or more fluid phenomenon in response to life experience. Furthermore, the importance of resilience and the question of its commonality among individuals continue to be debated. A common thread, however, weaves through research: participants in the studies have not been asked for their views. A gap of understanding about the meaning and importance of resilience between the participant and the researcher may exist. In an attempt to understand the possibility of a gap in definition between participants and researchers, approximately 1,000 adult employees, from four different departments of a Northwest area hospital were sent an online, anonymous survey asking for personal views on resilience. The survey contained broad demographic questions. The survey had six additional questions; three were Likert-style and three were narrative in style. The responses were analyzed for the entire sample, by age, by gender and by two broad categories of ethnicity. A total of 348 survey responses were completed and analyzed. A wide range of ages were represented. Women far out-numbered male participants, though males did have representation. White participants out-numbered other ethnicities. Comparisons of views between genders and ethnicities were limited due to the disparity in group sizes. The most frequent definition of resilience was having the ability to bounce back from adverse events. As the majority of participants rated themselves with having high resilience, age did not directly relate to increased resilience in this study. In a more nuanced representation of age, the majority of participants reported that resilience had increased over time in response to adverse events. Death of a loved one was the most cited event that changed resilience for the participants. These views are fairly consistent with the developmental models of resilience. The electronic version of this dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Suzanne Engelberg, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Angie Hoffpauir, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Heather Hawk, DNP (Committee Member); Alejandra Suarez, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Psychology

Keywords:

Resilience; Developmental Theory; Trait Theory; History; Adult Views; Mixed Methods; Likert- Style questions; Text questions; Bounce Back; Recovery; Age and Experience

Wilbur, Cricket C.A History of Place: Using Phytolith Analysis to Discern Holocene Vegetation Change on Sanak Island, Western Gulf of Alaska
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2013, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies
This study investigated a terrestrial climate proxy, phytoliths, as a complimentary approach to documenting the dynamics of present and past vegetation on Sanak Island, the largest island in a small island group in the eastern Aleutian archipelago, and as a new basis by which to interpret Holocene environmental variability in Alaska. A phytolith reference collection was established from 59 selected plant species of maritime tundra belonging to 27 families. The grass species and a sedge species produced abundant phytolith forms whereas the majority of dicotyledons in this study were trace producers of phytoliths. A paleoenvironmental reconstruction from fossil phytoliths recovered from a continuous lake sediment core indicates that sedges and cool season grasses were present on this landscape throughout most of the Holocene suggesting the long-term dominance of maritime climate on island vegetation. Adaptation and resilience of the modern vegetation on Sanak Island to a warming climate is suggested by the densities of silicified stomata recovered from six species of grasses, one species of fern, and one species of horsetail when compared to the paleoenvironmental reconstruction. The changes in stomata frequency in the plants on Sanak Island today may have connections to future changes in regional and global climate through the water cycle. Our changing climate is forcing ecosystems to migrate, acclimate or go extinct demonstrating that new insights into ecosystem responses to present and past environmental variation, and forecasting future ecological change are especially relevant today for ecologic and economic sustainability. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at OhioLink EDT Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

James W. Jordan, PhD (Committee Chair); Charles G. Curtin, PhD (Committee Member); Deborah M. Pearsall, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Archaeology; Botany; Climate Change; Conservation; Earth; Ecology; Environmental Science; Freshwater Ecology; Geology; Limnology; Native Americans; Natural Resource Management; Paleobotany; Paleoclimate Science; Paleoecology; Plant Biology; Pollen

Keywords:

Paleolimnology; Phytoliths; Phytolith Analysis; Aleutian Islands; Sanak Island; Western Gulf of Alaska; Stomata; Maritime tundra; Grasses; Dicotyldons; Arctic ecosystems; Climate change; Paleoenvironmental reconstruction; Holocene; Lake sediment

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