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Browning, AmandaThe Impact of Culture on Accounting Students' Ethical Reasoning
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA), Ohio University, Business Administration
The current study aims to add to the body of research related to ethical reasoning and ethical decision making in accounting students, focusing on the impact of culture on both topics. This study examines the impact of culture on accounting students’ ethical decision making, by comparing the responses of accounting students from the United States with the responses of accounting students from China. Ge and Thomas (2008) conclude that the Chinese culture’s high power distance, low individualism (high collectivism), and long-term orientation make Chinese students more likely to make unethical decisions. This study also examines the connection between Hofstede’s (1984) cultural dimensions and Kohlberg’s (1975) moral development theory. Specifically, it aims to identify any correlation between certain cultural dimensions and the various stages and levels of the moral development theory by comparing the responses of accounting students from the United States with the responses of accounting students from China pursuing an accounting education in the United States. Correlations between high power distance and heteronomous masculinity (Stage 1 of the moral development theory), collectivism and conventional reasoning (Level 2 of the moral development theory), and individualism and post-conventional reasoning (Level 3 of the moral development theory) are expected.

Committee:

Raymond Frost (Advisor); Christine Yost (Advisor)

Subjects:

Accounting; Business Education; Ethics

Heusi, O JA comparison of job surveys of 125 offices in 1939 and 43 offices in 1946 in Defiance, Ohio
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1946, EDU Policy and Leadership
N/A

Committee:

William Stone (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Education; Education

Keywords:

Education; business

Passero, ThomasUsing popular culture to teach the community college business curriculum: A comparative study
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2011, Higher Education
This study addressed a need for comprehensive quantitative empirical studies to determine the effectiveness of using popular culture media as a teaching technique. A quasi-experimental design was implemented to examine whether a group of community college students taking a first-semester introduction to business course who were exposed to a teaching method incorporating popular culture media (Treatment Group) would have increased levels of knowledge and stronger preferences toward this method versus a group of students taking the same course who were not exposed to this teaching style (Control Group). Specifically, this study examined: (1) Do differences exist relative to student learning; (2) Do differences exist relative to perceived student comprehension; (3) Do differences exist relative to student semester retention; (4) Do differences exist relative to student semester attendance; (5) Do differences exist relative to student interest in the discipline of business; (6) Do differences exist relative to student’s interest in taking additional business courses; (7) Do differences exist relative to student satisfaction; (8) Do differences exist relative to student satisfaction between Millennial students and non-Millennial student. The 143 students taking part in the study comprised six intact groups, meaning they selected the days and times of the sections available that appealed to them (non-random samples). Without the students’ knowledge, the researcher/instructor arbitrarily selected three sections as the Treatment Groups and three as the Control Groups. Throughout the semester, general business concepts from the course textbook were taught to the Treatment Group using films, television shows, comic strips, and music. The Control Group were taught the same concepts but without the use of any popular culture media. Participants completed Pre-Delivery and Post-Delivery attitudinal questionnaires and took five multiple-choice exams during term. The fit of survey and exam data were tested using the Rasch model, with further hypotheses testing accomplished with Independent t’s, Chi-square cross-tabulations, and dependent paired samples. The analyses showed no significance between the groups receiving different teaching methods on knowledge, retention, or attendance. However, there were statistically significant differences on perceived knowledge, interest in the business major, interest in taking additional business courses, and course satisfaction for both the Treatment Group and Control Group favoring the popular culture-enhanced methodology. Regarding generational attitudes this alternative teaching method, both the Millennial and Non-millennial sub-groups strongly favored the popular culture techniques over the traditional ones. Implications for students and instructors are discussed, along with suggestions for future research.

Committee:

David Meabon, PhD (Committee Chair); Mary Ellen Edwards, PhD (Committee Member); Angela M. Nelson, PhD (Committee Member); Gregory E. Stone, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Business Education; Education; Educational Tests and Measurements; Experiments; Higher Education; Inservice Training; Instructional Design; Mass Media; Pedagogy; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

teaching techniques: instructional methodology; popular culture; quantitative study; quasi-experimental; Rasch; community college; millennial; survey; media; business education; empirical study

Fonseca Leao, Iara M.Brand Brasil: A Comparative Analysis of the Brazil Country Image in the United States and Brazil
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2012, Latin American Studies (International Studies)
In the past decades, countries have been adopting the trend of creating their own Nation Brand and to manage them as commercial brands, establishing their brand identities and brand strategies, resulting in their brand image. The focus of this thesis was to analyze how Brand Brazil is perceived in the United States and Brazil, by business people. Brazil developed, officially, its Brand Brazil in early 2000’s, and by 2003 there was already an Agency, called APEX-Brasil, designated to manage and promote the image of Brazil abroad. APEX-Brasil, currently, supports 81 sectors of Brazil’s economy, supports over 10,000 Brazilian companies and has promoted Brand Brazil in over 3,000 presentations worldwide for audiences of entrepreneurs, investors and trend-setters. For this thesis, an extended focus group study, with instrument containing qualitative and quantitative written questions in English and Portuguese was conducted. With the results was possible to set patterns and make comparisons between the perception from North- Americans and Brazilians. This thesis also presents recommendations to expand the promotion of Brazil for the United States market.

Committee:

Yong Wang, PhD (Committee Chair); Catherine Axinn, PhD (Committee Member); Patrick Barr-Melej, PhD (Committee Member); Jose Delgado, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Business Education; Latin American Studies; Marketing

Keywords:

Brazil; Brasil; Brand Brazil; Nation Brand; Country of Origin; APEX

Schubert, FranziskaExploring and Predicting Consumers’ Attitudes and Behaviors towards Green Restaurants
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2008, Hospitality Management

With the increasing awareness of global climate change and natural disasters, environmental protection is an issue of high topicality and relevance. Companies across all sectors try to develop products and practices with minimized environmental effect as part of socially responsible practices, but also in order to establish themselves in a new niche for consumers with environmental concerns. This is also true for the hospitality and tourism industry where businesses often rely on the integrity of the environment. However, while a number of studies exist for the lodging sector, there has been done almost no research on green practices in the food service industry. Given the large number of restaurants in the U.S. and the consumer’s common habit of frequently eating out, there is a high need for restaurants to engage in green practices. In fact, restaurants who exhibit strong interest in environmental issues and actively participate in eco-friendly practices could distinct themselves from other businesses, hence creating a significant competitive advantage.

Therefore, the purpose of this study is twofold: to explore consumer attitudes towards various areas of green practices in restaurants and consumers’ willingness to pay for green restaurants, and to predict attitudes, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control leading to the likelihood of consumers to actively seek and visit green restaurants.

Ajzen’s (1985) Theory of Planned Behavior was used as a theoretical foundation to examine the influence of consumers’ demographic characteristics on attitudes, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control toward green practices in restaurants as well as the influence of those three constructs on consumers’ intention to dine in such restaurants. Data was collected with the help of a structured survey questionnaire that consumers of casual dining restaurants were asked to fill out while waiting for their food. The study sample was 455. Descriptive statistics were obtained in order to answer the exploratory questions and the hypotheses were tested using multiple linear regressions.

The analyses revealed that a majority of consumers perceived the area of “green action” as very important, and many consumers were willing to pay up to ten percent more for green restaurants. Furthermore, several demographic characteristics were related with the constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior, and attitudes and subjective norm were good predictors of intention to dine at a green restaurant. A collection of qualitative data gave further inside into consumers’ thoughts and values.

Committee:

Jay Kandampully, PhD (Committee Chair); Jae Eun Chung, PhD (Committee Member); Caezilia Loibl, PhD (Committee Member); Wayne Johnson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Education

Keywords:

Green practices; restaurants; consumer behavior; Theory of Planned Behavior

Niederpruem, Michael G.The Potency of Informal Learning in Paid and Non-Paid Work: A Mixed Method Study
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2017, Management
Why do individuals perform knowledge work on behalf of organizations in both non-paid (i.e., volunteer) and paid work contexts? And, what spurs an individual’s organizational engagement and commitment during this lived experience of performing knowledge work on an organizations’ behalf? In this mixed methods study, we sought to explore the potency of learning—specifically, informal learning—on satisfaction, work engagement, employability, and organizational commitment in both paid and non-paid (i.e., volunteer) work environments. Informal learning is rapidly emerging as the preferred learning mode in the workplace, especially in learning-oriented organizations and knowledge-based firms as a potent countermeasure to the ever-shortening shelf life of workers’ employability both within and outside the firm. Yet, institutional ambivalence towards the recognition of informal learning and the implementation of systems and structures to facilitate its use are pervasive. This ambivalence is due to the current inability to measure, quantify, or otherwise account for informal learning to meet employer needs, as well as the current inability to assess the efficacy of informal learning, as well as translating informal learning experiences into perceptions of realized value both within and outside the firm. In our first qualitative study (phase #1), we used grounded theory to explicate context-specific, situational factors which contribute to volunteer commitment. In our second quantitative study (phase #2), we used existing survey data from the American Society for Association Executives (ASAE) and structural equation modeling (SEM) to further quantify how and/or to what extent two of these factors, learning and career orientation, contributed (or failed to contribute) to volunteer commitment. We found that an individual’s learning orientation is positively related to volunteering satisfaction and future volunteering intent, whereas an individual’s career orientation is negatively related to volunteering satisfaction and future volunteering intent. Our third study (phase #3) demonstrates, through the use of structural equation modeling and the consideration of three discrete samples, that the perceived importance of informal learning has a significant and positive effect on employability, organizational commitment, and work-related curiosity, while controlling for age, gender, and level of education. These findings demonstrate the potency and efficacy of informal learning as a viable workplace activity which fosters work engagement, employability, and organizational commitment, and likely in turn, firm performance.

Committee:

Paul Salipante, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); David Aron, M.D. (Committee Member); Denise Douglas, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kalle Lyytinen, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ellen Van Oosten, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Business Administration; Business Education; Education; Management; Statistics

Keywords:

Informal learning; workplace learning; work engagement; organizational commitment; work-related curiosity

O'Neal, April MThe Effects of Calling and Vocational Presence and Search on Psychological Well-Being
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
This study was a quantitative exploration of 13 calling and vocational constructs related to calling presence, search and actualization to determine which best predicted psychological well-being. For this study, calling was defined using the definition established by Dik and Duffy (2009) and its three component parts: (1) an external summons, (2) viewing one’s work as a source of purpose or meaning, and (3) having a prosocial orientation or using one’s work to help others. Forward multiple regression analyses revealed that Search for Calling and Presence of Prosocial Orientation were the best predictors of well-being. Further, group differences were explored using the calling categories: calling diffusion, calling foreclosure, calling moratorium, and calling achievement (see Table 1). Results revealed that individuals who were high in searching for a calling had significantly lower levels of psychological well-being if they also had low levels of calling presence (Calling Moratorium Category). The hope of the researcher is that these as well as previous research findings lead to the future study of additional aspects of calling and psychological well-being.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta Reinhart, PhD (Advisor); Margaret Brooks, PhD (Other); Dale Dwyer, PhD (Committee Member); Judith Jackson May, PhD (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Business Education; Education; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Psychology

Keywords:

Calling; Calling Presence; Calling Search; Vocation; Well-Being

Anderson, Jillian Rene“Yes, and…!” Assessing the Impact of Theatre-Based Improvisational Training and a Simulation on Work Group Behavior
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2008, Speech Communication
Theatre-based improvisational training for executives is becoming a trend with improv-based theatres such as Chicago's Second City catering their skills to the corporate world. Unfortunately, effectiveness of such training has relied primarily on assumptions and anecdotal testimony, with little supporting empirical data. This study seeks to take the first step toward quantifiably assessing the effectiveness of workplace improvisational training and the use of a supplementary simulation activity. Malcolm Knowles' assumptions of adult learning guide the research. The Group Behavioral Inventory (GBI), used for assessing impact of organizational interventions, allows for the testing of changes in dimensions of group behavior across time. Results indicate no significant increases in dimensions of group behavior following training and a simulation; however, analysis of trends points to the potential for improv-training to temporarily encourage positive group bonds and reinforce existing group goals. Trends also reveal the value of simulation activities for creating increased self-awareness.

Committee:

James Patterson, PhD (Advisor); Gary Shulman, PhD (Committee Member); Judith Weiner, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Business Community; Business Education; Communication; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Psychology; Fine Arts; Higher Education; Teaching; Theater

Keywords:

Training and Development; Adult Education; Improvisation; Simulation; Theatre; Andragogy; Adult Learning Theory; Group Behavior Inventory

Louis, Valerie AnneDeveloping a Relationship with an Organization’s Energy: Four Experiences Exploring the Person-Organization Connection
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Education : Educational Studies
This research study explores the relationship between people and organizations. This phenomenological action research study is framed in the literature of organizational development and spirituality, quantum organizational theories, and chakra energy theories. Focusing on four individuals and the way they developed a relationship with each of their organization’s context and energy, this study led participants through a process of engaging their organization's energy system to help create change throughout their work roles.

Committee:

Mary Brydon-Miller, PhD (Committee Chair); Barry Morris, PhD (Committee Member); Margaret Kupferle, PhD, PE (Committee Member); Miriam Raider-Roth, EdD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Education

Keywords:

Organizations;Chakras;Quantum physics;Action research;Energy;Spirituality

DeGennaro, Alfred JosephApplication of Multiple Intelligence Theory to an e-Learning Technology Acceptance Model
Doctor of Business Administration, Cleveland State University, 2010, Nance College of Business Administration

With the speed of doing business on the rise, employees must learn to adapt to new technologies and improved performance expectations without losing productivity or time on task. Students looking to enter the workforce must understand that education does not end with graduation; rather the expectation is that everyone will be life long learners.

To meet the challenge, education providers are looking for alternative ways to bring education to the student and enhance the learning experience. With e-learning, students enjoy flexible scheduling, businesses can realize improvements in workforce skills while reducing education expenditures (i.e. improved Return On Investment, ROI) and education providers extend their campuses at minimal cost. E-learning is fast becoming a preferred method of delivering quality education any time, any where.

Educators, however, have mixed feelings on the subject. Many have embraced the new technology and report positive results. Others question the effectiveness of e-learning, pointing to the high dropout rate in e-learning courses and bias in the literature supporting e-learning. The cautious are concerned about rushing in on uncertain ground. They recall the advent of television and the unmet promises of that technology with respect to education.

The purpose of this study is to develop an e-learning adoption model that is firmly founded in education research (especially with respect to learning) coupled with what is understood about the diffusion and acceptance of (information) technology. The goal of developing such a model is to identify and pair crucial learning characteristics of students with the acceptance of the technology used to deliver educational content electronically so as to foster mastery learning. Students can use the results of this study to help decide whether or not to enroll in an e-learning course or what additional strategies they may need to employ so as to maximize the experience. Businesses may benefit from an understanding of how to match the needs of their employees with appropriate criteria for selecting the most effective e-learning delivery system. Schools and colleges can use such a model to help minimize the dropout rate from distance learning courses and to promote overall student success.

Committee:

Santosh Misra, DBA (Committee Chair); Victor Matos, PhD (Committee Member); Sridhar Madhavaram, PhD (Committee Member); Susan Rakow, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Education; Education; Educational Theory; Information Systems; Teaching

Keywords:

e-learning; elearning; multiple intelligences; technology acceptance model; TAM; MI; learning

Slaton, LaVonneSTEM ENTREPRENEURS: EDUCATING SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS (STEM) UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITIES (URM) AND NON-MINORITIES FOR JOB SATISFACTION AND CAREER SUCCESS STEM Entrepreneurs Educating for Job Satisfaction and Career Success
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2018, Management
There is a dearth of literature on STEM-educated self-employed or entrepreneurs, so this dissertation is a contribution to education, and Entrepreneurship theory and practice. The dissertation includes four studies to identify common career blueprints that individuals pursued to gain career success and job satisfaction to flourish. This mixed-methods qualitative, quantitative and quantitative-qualitative research examines what experiences effectively prepare STEM-educated majority and underrepresented minority students (URM) for the workforce when 74% of STEM-educated individuals are not employed in STEM fields (U.S. Census Bureau, 2014). Half of all majority white STEM degree holders go into a STEM job, but the likelihood is lower than 30% among underrepresented minority (URM) workers (ESA, 2011). These statistics point to the importance of educating URM STEM students with skills beyond a STEM degree to achieve career success and job satisfaction. This is concerning when government funding is focused on increasing U.S. STEM-educated in STEM fields. Study 1 is a qualitative study consisting of interviews with 38 individuals including 22 underrepresented minorities (URM) and 8 counselors whose insights were used to explore their definition and experiences of career success, education, transition into the workforce, diversity, workforce experience, and what fostered or hindered their career success. The study examines how individual experiences influence career success. The research revealed five characteristics common to career success: intrinsic satisfaction, the illusion that individuals can achieve career success based on their education alone, vocational experience, supportive guidance, and the presence of a personal champion. The research also suggests a need to educate individuals about the reality of the challenges of achieving successful careers and improvement in the career counseling process. Quantitative Study 2 focuses on job satisfaction of URM with a Bachelor’s degree in STEM fields to determine if taking courses education, job-related training, research development and design work activity and self-employed entrepreneurship have a positive impact on job satisfaction. The data for this quantitative study is from the 2013 National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG) administrated by the National Science Foundation (NSF) using a random sample of 500 individuals in STEM fields. The key findings are that for STEM-educated individuals, taking college courses is negatively correlated with job satisfaction for both minorities and non-minorities, but self-employment and training improves this relationship. The relationship between work activity of research, development and design and work-related training have a positive impact on job satisfaction. These findings confirm that there is an illusion that STEM education will result in job satisfaction and success of URM which was found in the qualitative research. Studies 3A and 3B include a quantitative and qualitative mixed methods study which triangulates around the concepts of support, training, and entrepreneurship. The qualitative study 3B consists of interviews with 32 STEM-educated individuals which included 12 STEM educators, 19 underrepresented minorities (URM) and 18 STEM-educated self-employed. The results indicate that the main reasons individuals were dissatisfied with their education was that it did not prepare them for the opportunity of starting their own business and the reality of the real-world work environment was often missing from the education environment. This study explored what was essential to achieve well-being and found that Positive Emotions (P), Engagement (E), Positive Relationships (R), Meaning (M), and Achievement/Accomplishment (A) was what people wanted but the experience they had lacked these elements (Seligman, 2012). The quantitative study 3A used the same 2013 NSCG survey data from Study 2, but with two larger and separate samples of STEM-educated individuals which included 500 whites non-minority and 360 minority individuals in STEM fields who are self-employed and non-self-employed. The second quantitative study 3A confirmed the findings from Study 2 and further emphasized the importance of STEM self-employed individuals and entrepreneurs. At the institutional level, the findings indicate that educational institutions are not doing enough, and a significant issue is the lack of knowledge regarding the real-world work experience and occupations, which perpetuates the illusion that education leads to career success which affects STEM-educated and non-STEM-educated alike. However, educational institutions and employers can effectively respond with internship programs, on-the-job training and counseling. At the individual level, individuals can see their careers as a journey with issues and problems to be solved along the way, starting in school and continuing well into their careers. Educational institutions and individuals can take the initiative and find mentors and be open to conversations about the realities of the work environment. The over-arching finding that education institutions are not doing enough are unified under four key issues and the effective actions that educational institutions and individuals can take: (1) The knowledge of internships, work experience and the reality of work environment is needed; (2) Support from individuals and groups indicate that educators, employers, and individuals can institute finding mentors, creating networks and take advantage of counseling to increase success. STEM education and knowledge of STEM entrepreneurial occupations plus real-world work experience are also needed; (3) There is a synergy for career success between STEM personality characteristics and entrepreneurs. The combination of STEM plus entrepreneurship knowledge of STEM occupations and real-world work experience in education is potent for career success. There are some important overlaps between characteristics developed in STEM education and characteristics useful to entrepreneurial initiatives and success. This is a critical finding of this dissertation since there is a dearth of studies connecting the two areas; and (4) The main findings are about URMs and the challenges they face. STEM education is a path to higher earnings, but institutional discrimination, the need to prove oneself, the lack of conversation about the challenges faced, and inflexibility in STEM work environments impede success. The implications for URM individuals is based on interviews about overcoming challenges and their entrepreneurial pursuits. The findings in this dissertation suggest that the institutional actions would benefit URMs’ career success at least as much as non-minority members, if not more. The distinct differences between minorities and non-minorities are that URM and women interviewed express the craving and need for knowledge, support, and encouragement to be confident in a world where people of color and women are discriminated against, experience prejudice and inequality. They discussed the challenges of needing to work smarter, fastest and harder than everyone else, and still experience challenges which made entrepreneurship a vital avenue for success. Non-minorities were not concern about needing support, encouragement or confidence. Non-minorities greatest concerns were gaining knowledge to create opportunities and advancement. There was no discussion of challenges of discrimination or prejudice that prevented them from advancement, career success, and job satisfaction for non-minorities although they were asked the same question. The distinctions between minorities and non-minorities must be addressed to overcome inequalities, and this can start with having dialogs about the reality of the challenges and support needed by both to increase knowledge. Both groups yearn for knowledge which supports the research finding that the knowledge from training can increase job satisfaction for minorities and non-minorities. There are important intersections between characteristics developed in STEM education and entrepreneurial initiatives and success. This STEM knowledge base can create more opportunities and aid in achieving global goals to save and change lives. Study 3B develops a Blueprint for STEM Entrepreneurs by drawing together the findings of: Education, Knowledge, Personality Characteristics, Support, Opportunity, Challenges, Entrepreneurship and PERMA which is an acronym for the five essential elements of well-being: Positive Emotions (P), Engagement (E), Positive Relationships (R), Meaning (M), and Achievement/Accomplishment (A) (Seligman, 2012). Many have discovered a combination of skills of human capital that gives them a path to follow and a job or business to create. Overall, the four studies in this dissertation contribute to theory, practice and improving educational institutions, government STEM-funded programs, and businesses. This dissertation provides insights to assist with workforce management knowledge and skills to increase the number of diverse workers and identifying the positive and negative factors that impact job satisfaction for minorities and non-minorities. Considering the volatile political support of STEM programs and economic changes, the U.S. requires not just more STEM graduates, but also STEM URM graduates educated with skills and experiences to expand their employment opportunities to become entrepreneurs as well as employees to achieve job satisfaction and career success. To expand opportunities, this requires an improved educational institution that offers skills far beyond a narrow STEM education curriculum. STEM entrepreneurship is vital to our society and the U.S. economy, so it is imperative to identify what influences STEM-educated individuals to achieve success. This thesis is intended to enhance theory-building research designed to understand, predict, and facilitate the experience of individuals to achieve job satisfaction and career success of STEM-educated URM and non-minorities.

Committee:

Paul F. Salipante, Jr., Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Philip A. Cola, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Richard J. Boland, Jr., Ph.D. (Committee Member); Chris Laszlo,, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Bo Carlsson, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Education; Education; Engineering; Entrepreneurship; Mathematics; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Science Education; Technology

Keywords:

education; educational institutions; educators; work activity; training; job satisfaction; career success; self-employed; entrepreneurs; flourishing; science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, STEM; underrepresented minorities, URM, STEM

Dubose, Lisa EExperiences in the Leadership Advancement of African American Women
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
The purpose of this dissertation was to examine the experiences in leadership advancement of African American women. Over 10 million African American women are in the civilian labor force (United States Department of Labor statistics, 2015). The population of African American women with degrees having significantly increased over thirty years, with 264% more Bachelor’s degrees and 353% more Master’s degrees being earned, however barriers to opportunities continue to exist (Nooks-Wallner, 2008). Although anti-discrimination laws have existed since 1964, covert discriminatory patterns continue and are often entrenched in workplace systems, which prevent advancement opportunities (Cook & Glass, 2013). Phenomenology was the qualitative research method utilized for this study. Phenomenology is a scholarly study method that provides meaning-making, to more effectively comprehend the perspective of an individual or group of individuals. Meaning is gained through attaining data about situations or events surrounding a specific phenomenon. The intention is to determine how and why it influences others as it goes beyond the surface to gain depth. This study gathered data through various methods, such as an advance questionnaire, semi-structured interview protocol, review of participant leadership samples, and resumes/curriculum vitaes. This study contributes to understanding the leadership advancement experiences from African American women who have ascended to director-level or higher positions, across various industries. The key themes in this study were strategic preparation, and self-determination and courage. The data collected illustrate these themes and ten associated sub-themes. The purpose is to gain understanding from the experiences that influenced the advancement of African American women within this study into leadership positions. Interviewing African American women who have ascended into leadership offered contextual insight into their lived experiences, obtaining what they perceive helped promote their advancement into leadership positions. The themes may serve as a model for other African American women seeking advancement into leadership positions.

Committee:

Patrick Pauken, PhD (Advisor); Paul Christian Willis, EdD (Committee Member); Paul Johnson, PhD (Committee Member); Dalton Jones, PhD (Other); Angela Logan, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; Black History; Business Administration; Business Education; Education; Educational Leadership; Gender

Keywords:

African American; leadership; leaders; career advancement; promotion; discrimination; barriers; concrete ceiling; glass ceiling; diversity; gender; race; Black; inequality; ethic of justice; ethic of care; women; black tax; phenomenology

Tribuzi, Scot BruceEfficacy of Concept Mapping Instructional Techniques to Teach Organizational Structures and Interactions
PHD, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences
Businesses are challenged by the accelerating global changes in infrastructures, competition, and consumer demand. However, there is a gap in American undergraduate business student preparation. Graduates are not ordinarily taught about the interactions between the hierarchical levels within an organization. These graduates learn on the job which inhibits their value creation. Concept mapping is an instructional technique that identifies the relationships between ideas. The most common organizational charts are fundamentally hierarchical concept maps. However, utilizing a concept map instructional approach to teach organizational structures and interactions has not been explored. Technological adaptations of a concept mapping instructional approach may provide further means to effectively teach business structures and interactions through active learning and feedback. This study utilized a between subjects design with business undergraduate students (N=91). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: a control group that read about the structures and interactions, and three concept mapping instructional groups that used passive learning, active learning with basic feedback, or active learning with elaborative feedback. Achievement was measured on a post instruction assessment. The results from the one way ANOVA of the subjects achievement scores indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between the treatment groups, F(3,91) = 3.517, p = .018. The post hoc analysis of the treatment groups indicated that both of the active learning groups performed significantly better than the control group, but not the passive learning group. These results show that concept mapping can be deployed successfully with undergraduate business students.

Committee:

Drew Tiene (Committee Chair); Christopher Was (Committee Member); Brian Castellani (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Education

Keywords:

concept mapping, active learning; feedback; organizational charts

McLean, David M.I.Understanding Relational Agility: Exploring Constructs of Relational Leadership Through Story
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
Organizational storytelling was used within Tri Fit, a Canadian health promotion and fitness company, to explore relational leadership practices. Through 27 confidential one-on-one interviews and an interview of the four-person leadership team, the research attempted to examine how relational agility, a new leadership construct, exists, how it is defined, and to describe its organizational impacts. Two hundred and forty unique stories were shared through this process, out of which nine storylines emerged. The distillation of these revealed three cultural themes: a culture of relational connection; a culture of nice and a culture that values positivity. Demonstrations of transformational leadership, authentic leadership, aesthetic leadership, emotional and social intelligence, servant leadership and stewardship were frequent amongst many of its members. Four leaders were described by their colleagues as being relationally agile, as demonstrated through the application of a unique collection of relational qualities. This research has also established evidence that relational agility can be learned, and when present, confers positive benefits to the organization including enhanced loyalty, commitment and productivity. Developing relationally agile leaders will therefore likely serve organizations as they navigate change. Furthermore, this may be the first empirical description of relational leadership as a triadic experience where the relationship is personified as a unique product of leader and follower co-development that ultimately serves the higher purposes of the organization. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd . This dissertation is accompanied by two mp4 video files

Committee:

Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Ardra Cole, EdD (Committee Member); Soosan Latham, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Business Education; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Psychology

Keywords:

relational practice; leadership; relational agility TM; return on positivity; ROP TM; positive psychology; culture of leadership; triadic expressions of leadership; organizational storytelling; relational leaderhip; organizational culture; change

Gokhale, Priyanka G.DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIALIZATION OF A FECAL DNA BASED MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC ASSAY FOR COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING
Master of Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, 2010, Biology
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among both men and women in United States. Screening helps to find CRC at very early stages, when treatment often leads to a cure. A company known as GLC Biotechnology Ltd. is developing a molecular diagnostic assay for screening of CRC. My thesis will discuss the developmental and commercialization process for this assay. At first, the science behind the development of this assay will be discussed. Thereafter, the overview of the CRC screening market and the competitive landscape will be presented followed by the description of the business venture. Lastly, most feasible options for the commercialization of the assay will be discussed and then based on over all analysis; final recommendations for the Company’s progress will be put forth. Recommendations will be based solely on my knowledge and personal viewpoints on this subject.

Committee:

Christopher Cullis (Committee Chair); Glen Gaughan (Advisor); Barbara Kuemerle (Committee Member); Robin Synder (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biology; Business Education; Molecular Biology

Keywords:

Colorectal Cancer; Screening test; Diagnostic assay

Yoon, Dong-YeolThe relationships among the extent of participant involvement in cross-cultural learning activities, individual differences of participants, and adaptation of expatriate managers to the host country in a Korean multinational corporation
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, EDU Physical Activity and Educational Services
The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among the extent of participant involvement in cross-cultural learning activities, individual differences of participants, and adaptation of expatriate managers to the host country in a Korean multinational corporation. Correlational research was used to investigate the relationships among the above variables. This study is ex post facto in nature. The treatment, cross-cultural learning activities, had already occurred, and expatriate managers self-reported their degrees of adaptation. The data for the quantitative research were collected from an online survey questionnaire. The potential respondents for this study were expatriate managers of a global manufacturing corporation. The total number of respondents was 136 (40.12%) out of 339 randomly selected employees who were working as expatriates in the overseas subsidiaries at the time of the survey. The survey data was analyzed with the PASW Statistic 18. Both descriptive and correlational statistics were used according to the nature of the research questions. This study provides implications for future research and practices in CCL and HRD.

Committee:

Ronald Jacobs (Advisor); Joshua Hawley (Committee Member); Shad Morris (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Business Administration; Business Education; Education

Keywords:

Cross-cultural learning (CCL); workplace learning; expatriate adaptation; human resource development (HRD); social networks; cross-cultural training (CCT)

Peng, ChengDo Social Networking Websites Play a Part in Generation Y’s Dining Information Search and Sharing? An Examination of Consumer Characteristics
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2011, Human Ecology: Hospitality Management
This study investigates three questions: (1) Generation Y’s dining decision-making styles, (2) Generation Y’s use of social networking websites (SNWs) for dining information search and sharing, and (3) the factors that influence Generation Y’s dining information search and sharing on SNWs. Specifically, three factors regarding consumer characteristics were examined: consumer decision-making styles (CDMS), consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence (CSII), and consumer opinion leadership (COL). Gender difference was also examined. A pilot study was conducted using 38 undergraduate students from the Consumer Sciences Department of a Midwestern University in the United States. A final survey was conducted using 162 undergraduate students from the same program. Exploratory factor analysis and reliability analysis were performed to validate all variables. Descriptive statistics were gathered to describe the subjects’ age, gender, and their use of social networking websites. A Consumer Style Inventory was produced to profile respondents regarding their decision-making styles. A series of Mann-Whitney U tests were performed, alternately using CDMS, CSII, COL, and gender as grouping variables. Results show that Generation Y uses a variety SNWs. There is a moderate usage of SNWs for the purpose of dining information search and sharing. Five decision-making styles of Generation Y diners were identified: hedonistic/ recreational style, habitual/brand-loyal style, price conscious style, confused by over-choice style, and brand conscious style. Results also indicated that CSII and COL influence Generation Y’s use of SNWs for dining information search and sharing. CDMS has a partial influence. In particular, confused by over-choice style has an influence on dining information search and price conscious style has an influence on dining information sharing. No gender difference was detected. Limitations of this study and future research directions are also discussed.

Committee:

Jay Kandampully, PhD (Advisor); Jae-Eun Chung, PhD (Committee Member); Thomas George, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Education

Keywords:

Social networking websites; Generation Y; consumer decision-making styles; consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence; consumer opinion leadership

Scriffignano, Anthony JamesStrategic Asymmetric Multicultural Alliances in Business
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2010, Leadership and Change
Global economics and other factors make it increasingly difficult for organizations to operate within the boundaries of one country in a rational way (e.g., leveraging best practices, profitable, achieving goals). In this study, I looked at strategic business alliances, transcending simple quid pro quo relationships to deliver ongoing partner value. I refined my study to multicultural relationships, having differing cultural identities (i.e., ideas, heritage, language, or demographics from differing geographies). Finally, I considered asymmetry (i.e., inequity in working relationship). Using a mixed-methodology design, I surveyed alliance participants and interviewed participants from selected alliances. A multi-case study addresses emergent themes of participants from these alliances, day-to-day experiences, and ways in which leaders intervened. Drawing from these experiences, observations are presented about the nature of these alliances and their increasing contemporary relevance. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, PhD (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Member); Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Member); James Krefft, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Business Community; Business Costs; Business Education; International Relations; Language; Management; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

alliance; multicultural; leadership; asymmetric; strategic; mixed methods; collaboration; multilingual; partnership; multi-case study; change leadership; multinational; coalition; cooperation; business; management; global; international; globalization

Vurdelja, IvaHow Leaders Think: Measuring Cognitive Complexity in Leading Organizational Change
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2011, Leadership and Change
The ability to lead complex organizational change is considered the most difficult leadership responsibility. Habitual linear thinking based on sequential procedural decision making is insufficient when responding to ambiguous and unpredictable challenges and interpreting systemic variables in the context of unforeseen problems, risks, and invisible interrelationships. The purpose of this exploratory multiple case study was to expand our understanding of the structure of the thinking employed by executive leaders as initiators and enablers of complex, large-scale organizational change. The researcher integrated knowledge of adult cognitive development and organizational leadership to examine the higher forms of reasoning abilities required for dealing with the complex and nonlinear nature of change. By using Laske‘s (2009) dialectical thought form (DTF) framework, the researcher explored the existence of dialectical thinking through structural analysis of interviews with 10 senior leaders who successfully transformed their respective organizations. Specifically, the study explored: (1) To what degree do the sponsors of organizational change engage in dialectical thinking in their work? (2) Is complexity of thinking related to complexity of sponsorship roles? (3) What phase of cognitive development must sponsors of transformational change attain to become effective change agents? (4) Does a higher level of dialectical thinking lead to more effective sponsorship of transformational, complex change? The results revealed that all 10 effective leaders were fully developed dialectical thinkers and that each one had a unique pattern of dialectical thinking. Data illustrated how metasystemic thinkers, despite their surface similarities, have deep epistemological differences that indicate profoundly different areas of strength and developmental needs. The potential application of the DTF framework as a developmental tool for expanding cognitive capabilities to deal with complex change is addressed and explored. The study opens an array of opportunities for another, richer way of looking at adult development. The electronic version of this dissertation is available in the open-access OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Daryl Conner, MA (Committee Member); Linda Hoopes, PhD (Committee Member); Sara Nora Ross, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Business Education; Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Epistemology; Management

Keywords:

multiple case study; senior executives; complexity; CEOs; change leaders; adult cognitive development; change sponsorship; leading change; dialectical thinking; metasystemic thinking

Rechtman, Janet ElizabethOn Being a Nonprofit Executive Director
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2008, Leadership and Change
In describing the course of change in a dynamic field such as the nonprofit sector, neo-institutional theorists argue that isomorphic forces such as replication of best practices tend to increase the homogeneity of actors. This interplay of structure and agency creates what is known as the structuration of an institutional field. These theorists have little to say about the people who influence and are influenced by these dynamics. This study explores this personal experience at the micro level of the nonprofit field executive leadership. It focuses on their challenges related to the isomorphic pressures resulting from: (1) socio-economic roles, (2) being businesslike, (3) being altruistic, and (4) relating to the external environment. Interviews with executive directors of nonprofit organizations in the Atlanta area affirmed that nonprofit EDs use several strategies to hold together the tensions among these forces: (1) balancing intuition with data; (2) relying on the experience of others as a learning tool; (3) taking an improvisational approach to problem-solving; (4) being flexible and resourceful in managing subordinates; and (5) regarding fundraising as a necessary evil and a business means to an altruistic end. Their responses tended to be more self expressive than business-oriented, displaying an aversion to using purely business terms to discuss altruistic outcomes. In addition, the study engaged the executive directors in the construction of three theoretical perspectives on the practice of nonprofit leadership: (1) the essential themes that characterize the experience of being a nonprofit ED; (2) a micro-level framework for understanding the landscape where nonprofit EDs do their work; and (3) within this framework, the degree to which nonprofit EDs influence and are influenced by the structuration of the nonprofit field. By enhancing the understanding of leadership provided by EDs, the current study advances emerging theories of nonprofit enterprise and clarifies how nonprofit EDs lead in context. Further, the methodology used to derive these findings can be helpful in learning conversations within the sector and between nonprofit leaders and their counterparts in business, government, and foundations. The electronic version of this dissertation is accessible at the Ohiolink ETD Center at http//www.ohiolink.edu/etd/.

Committee:

Richard Couto, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Philomena Essed, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Alan Abramson, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Community; Business Education; Management; Organization Theory; Social Research

Keywords:

nonprofit; executive director; institutional theory; field theory; leadership; isomorphism

Price, J. MichelleAn Investigation into the Development of a Professional Online Identity through a Professional Development Course
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2013, Instructional Technology (Education)
The qualitative approach of grounded theory was used to better understand the perceptions of students concerning a professional online identity and the value of an eportfolio. Extensive research in the area of student created e-portfolios exists in the context of majors that have specific accreditation or licensure requirements. These majors, such as teachers, engineers, lawyers or those in the medical professions, have their own set of criteria that assist their students in forming a concept of what it means to be a professional in those given fields. The major of Retail Merchandising & Fashion Product Development at Ohio University does not have these types of guidelines or requirements and encompasses elements of both fashion and business. Because of these issues students find themselves in conflict with little guidance as they begin their transition from student to young professional. To further complicate today's creation of a professional identity is the fact that students already have an online identity that is available for employers to search as they transition to the work force. Because e-portfolios can be shared online they have the potential to help students create and manage their professional online identity as it develops. This study entailed analyses of students’ blogs completed as part of a professional development course, focus groups and individual interviews. The combination of students’ past experiences combined with the course content of the professional development class aids them as they explore what it means to be professional within their chosen industry and form their own professional identity. The eportfolio functioned as a means for students to actively engage in the process of what it means to be a professional in the fashion industry through the visual and content decisions they had to make. It also made them aware of possible consequences, both positive and negative, of sharing information online. E-portfolios can help faculty assist students in the transition from university to professional work. In addition, the creation of an e-portfolio provides the opportunity to create and manage a positive online identity as applicable to students in Retail Merchandising & Fashion Product Development. This knowledge can help to improve curriculum for students and act as a means of outreach to those in industry.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin (Advisor); David Moore (Committee Member); John Hitchcock (Committee Member); Phyllis Bernt (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Education; Higher Education

Keywords:

e-portfolio; professional identity; identity theory; qualitative; fashion merchandising; professional development

McCord, Kara EFactors Influencing Career Advancement Potential for Mothers in the Workplace
Master of Arts (M.A.), Xavier University, 2018, Psychology
This study sought to examine the career advancement potential of mothers in the workplace in relation to other variables, including family-oriented workplace practices, work-family stress, career advancement self-efficacy, family-supportive organizational perceptions, and family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Additionally, this study analyzed the relationship between career advancement self-efficacy and family-oriented practices; work-family stress and family-oriented workplace practices; and career advancement self-efficacy and career advancement potential. Data collected from 101 participants showed that family-oriented workplace practices significantly predicted a mother’s career advancement potential. Additionally, a significant correlation between career advancement self-efficacy and career advancement potential was found. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

Committee:

Morrie Mullins, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Dalia Diab, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Sjen Johnson, M.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Business Education; Families and Family Life; Individual and Family Studies; Occupational Psychology; Organizational Behavior; Psychology; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Working mothers; working women; career advancement potential; FSSB; family supportive supervisor behavior; FSOP; family supportive organizational perceptions; career advancement; work-life balance; work-family stress; family-oriented workplace practices

Haile, YohannesSustainable Value And Eco-Communal Management: Systemic Measures For The Outcome Of Renewable Energy Businesses In Developing, Emerging, And Developed Economies
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, Management
The International Energy Agency (IEA) forecast of 2014 indicates a 37% energy demand increase in the next 25 years. To meet the forecasted energy demand increase and ameliorate ecological stress associated with meeting the demand, the increased deployment and effective operations of renewable energy projects and businesses are of paramount importance. This study sought to understand the factors impacting renewable energy businesses and identifies an integrative measure for the performance of these businesses in the context of developing, emerging, and developed economies. Our research data have revealed that the performance of renewable energy (RE) systems cannot be viewed or determined in isolation (contextual reduction) from the social system of the host community. Hence, the best way to understand its implications is using integrative approaches. Our research suggests well-developed and deployed eco-communal management practices, a type of innovative management, is the best way to create value proposition of RE businesses/projects into sustainable value. For developed economies the primary value path is from knowledge creation => eco-communal management => sustainable value, whereas, it is from connectedness => eco-communal management => sustainable value for emerging economies. In the context of emerging economies, the impact of knowledge creation on sustainable value is primarily indirect through hastening and affecting transformational changes, hence deploying effective transition engagements and instituting accurate methods to measure the efficacy of knowledge creation are imperative. In the context of developing economies knowledge creation and integrated vision frame the outcome of the RE business or project mediated by both eco-communal management and market creation. Our research further suggests the level of managerial authority bifurcates the translation of strategic objectives of businesses, and the relatedness of the key decision maker into sustainable value through its strategic management practices in emerging economies, while it does not have significance in developed economies. Our research makes theoretical, and practical contribution to the theory of innovation by discovering a novel type of management strategy, which is effective and instrumental in creating sustainable value from the initial conditions of integrated vision, knowledge creation, and connectedness.

Committee:

Roger Saillant, PhD (Committee Chair); Kathleen Buse, PhD (Committee Member); James Gaskin, PhD (Committee Member); Christopher Laszlo, PhD (Committee Member); Hokey Min, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Alternative Energy; Area Planning and Development; Asian Studies; Atmosphere; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Business Administration; Business Education; Climate Change; Cognitive Psychology; Communication; Comparative; Conservation; Demographics; Design; Ecology; Economic History; Economic Theory; Economics; Education; Electrical Engineering; Energy; Engineering; Entrepreneurship; Environmental Economics; Environmental Education; Environmental Engineering; Environmental Health; Environmental Justice; Environmental Management; Environmental Philosophy; Environmental Science; Environmental Studies; European Studies; Experiments; Finance; Geography; Health; Health Sciences; Higher Education; History; Hydrologic Sciences; Information Science; Information Systems; Information Technology; International Relations; Labor Economics; Labor Relations; Latin American Studies; Management; Marketing; Mass Communications; Mathematics; Mechanical Engineering; Meteorology; Natural Resource Management; Occupational Psychology; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Personality; Political Science; Public Policy; Regional Studies; Religion; Social Structure; Spirituality; Statistics; Sub Saharan Africa Studies; Sustainability; Systematic; Systems Design; Systems Science; Technology

Keywords:

Performance, nested complexity, connectedness, eco-communal management, transition engagement, technology and business model innovations, entrepreneurship, and sustainable value

Hayden, Carlos KA study of business education in the public city high schools of Ohio
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1946, EDU Policy and Leadership
N/A

Committee:

Ward Reeder (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Education; Education

Keywords:

Education; business education

Flood, Marguerite JoanMentoring and Self-Efficacy in Female Undergraduate Business Students
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, EDU Policy and Leadership

Women in the workforce struggle to reach the upper echelons of leadership positions throughout corporate America (Catalyst, 2011a). One potential reason for this lack of female leadership may be due to a lack of female models within the business environment which in turn may be negatively affecting women’s sense of business career self-efficacy. Self-efficacy is a person’s belief in their capabilities to take the necessary actions to produce a specific outcome (Bandura, 1997). Research has found that for women two sources of self-efficacy, vicarious experience and verbal persuasion, are crucial (Zeldin & Pajares, 2000). These two sources of self-efficacy are often provided in mentoring relationships which can also play a role in women’s career success (Gilbert, 1985; Lockwood, 2006). There is some research that has attempted to explore the relationship between the constructs of mentoring and self-efficacy and have found positive correlations between mentoring and self-efficacy (Hayes, 1998; Day & Allen, 2004).

The importance of mentoring and its effects on self-efficacy may have implications for female undergraduate students in business. Not being exposed to female mentors in college may affect the growth of self-efficacy as it relates to their business careers. To test this, a survey was done of undergraduate women in a business program at a large Midwestern university. The participants completed an online survey that collected basic demographic information and then, if the student had a mentor, the College Student Mentoring Scale, finishing with the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale. The outcomes of this study are similar to other literature that looks at the relationship between mentoring and self-efficacy. The study found that mentored students did report higher self-efficacy scores than those students without mentors. The study also explored the difference in self-efficacy scores depending on the gender of the mentor but no conclusive results were found. There is also slight evidence favoring a positive relationship between mentoring and students’ business career self-efficacy although no results were statistically significant.

The results of the study, although not highly conclusive, lend additional evidence that there is a positive relationship between the two constructs. These findings provide additional support for further research to evaluate how the measures are related as well as evidence that points to the importance of mentoring for women in business school. By building mentoring relationships when women are in college, women will have more opportunities to encounter successful women and receive verbal persuasion and vicarious experience that will in turn enhance their career self-efficacy.

Committee:

Tatiana Suspitsyna, PhD (Committee Chair); Terrell Strayhorn, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Education; Education; Gender; Higher Education

Keywords:

women; business school; mentoring; self-efficacy; careers

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