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Martof, Ashley NicoleAnalysis of Business Models for the Use of Additive Manufacturing for Maintenance and Sustainment
Master of Science in Engineering, Youngstown State University, 2017, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Aircraft operators must maintain and sustain their aircraft through the platform’s life cycle. The Department of Defense (DoD) is no exception. Many DoD missions may require a time-sensitive production of spare parts. This lends itself to spare parts production by the Department of Defense itself and such an approach could be enabled by additive manufacturing. In order for the government to be able to produce spare parts in-house an entirely new business model between the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and the government has to be established. A physical spare part would not be the transacted item; instead the technical data package (TDP) would be exchanged. Industry needs to be incentivized to adopt a data focused business model. A key question is can industry achieve equivalent profit similarly to the traditional spare parts production? This research explores business models from the perspective of industry. A survey was provided to both government and industry to identify differences and similarities in assumptions and expectations. Four different business models were developed. The business models were applied to two different case studies to evaluate the pros and cons of the various models. This analysis provides industry and government a reference for discussions on approaches toward future maintenance and sustainment manufacturing operations.

Committee:

Brett Conner, PhD (Advisor); Darrell Wallace, PhD (Committee Member); Martin Cala, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Engineering; Industrial Engineering; Public Policy

Keywords:

Additive Manufacturing; Business Models; Aerospace and Defense; 3D Printing

Early, Jared WBusiness Opportunity Analysis of Wearable and Wireless Electromyography Sensors in Athletics
Master of Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, Physics
An athlete’s quality of training has impacts on their long-term performance. Suboptimal training then prevents and athlete from achieving their full potential. The scope of the work focuses on the feasibility of a technology based on a wearable and wireless electromyography sensor to detect the onset of muscle fatigue in elite athletes. The work analyzes the biophysics of electromyography, techniques to measure muscle fatigue, and the business opportunities available. The analysis found that successfully measuring fatigue using electromyography sensors provide a difficult challenge and building a business around the technology may cause poor returns on investment. The innovation is better served when championed by a company that has the resources to develop the technology, not a startup.

Committee:

Edward Caner (Advisor); Robert Brown (Committee Member); Michael Martens (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biophysics; Business Costs; Physics

Keywords:

Electromyography, physics, biophysics, wearables, IoT, wireless, sensors, business analysis, business opportunity, athlete, athletics

Lipkin, IlyaTesting Software Development Project Productivity Model
Doctor of Philosophy in Manufacturing and Technology Management, University of Toledo, 2011, Manufacturing and Technology Management

Software development is an increasingly influential factor in today’s business environment, and a major issue affecting software development is how an organization estimates projects. If the organization underestimates cost, schedule, and quality requirements, the end results will not meet customer needs. On the other hand, if the organization overestimates these criteria, resources that could have been used more profitably will be wasted.

There is no accurate model or measure available that can guide an organization in a quest for software development, with existing estimation models often underestimating software development efforts as much as 500 to 600 percent. To address this issue, existing models usually are calibrated using local data with a small sample size, with resulting estimates not offering improved cost analysis.

This study presents a conceptual model for accurately estimating software development, based on an extensive literature review and theoretical analysis based on Sociotechnical Systems (STS) theory. The conceptual model serves as a solution to bridge organizational and technological factors and is validated using an empirical dataset provided by the DoD.

Practical implications of this study allow for practitioners to concentrate on specific constructs of interest that provide the best value for the least amount of time. This study outlines key contributing constructs that are unique for Software Size E-SLOC, Man-hours Spent, and Quality of the Product, those constructs having the largest contribution to project productivity. This study discusses customer characteristics and provides a framework for a simplified project analysis for source selection evaluation and audit task reviews for the customers and suppliers.

Theoretical contributions of this study provide an initial theory-based hypothesized project productivity model that can be used as a generic overall model across several application domains such as IT, Command and Control, Simulation and etc¿¿¿ This research validates findings from previous work concerning software project productivity and leverages said results in this study. The hypothesized project productivity model provides statistical support and validation of expert opinions used by practitioners in the field of software project estimation.

Committee:

Jeen Su Lim (Committee Chair); James Pope (Committee Member); Michael Mallin (Committee Member); Michael Jakobson (Committee Member); Wilson Rosa (Advisor)

Subjects:

Aerospace Engineering; Armed Forces; Artificial Intelligence; Business Administration; Business Costs; Computer Engineering; Computer Science; Economic Theory; Economics; Electrical Engineering; Engineering; Industrial Engineering; Information Science; Information Systems; Information Technology; Management; Marketing; Mathematics

Keywords:

"Software Estimation"; "Software Cost Model"; "Department of Defense Data"; COCOMO; "Software Project Productivity Model"

Bharti, HarishchandraTo Validate the Model of “Semantic Breakdown of Functionality of a Matrix of RFID Technology to Support Application Development”
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2010, Industrial and Systems Engineering (Engineering and Technology)
The purpose of this thesis research is to expand the precinct of the research “Semantic Breakdown of Functionality of a Matrix of RFID Technology to Support Application Development,” by applying and analyzing its authenticity on various other functional areas across a spectrum of industries. This research will further categorize the fundamental functions which are broken down into three core areas of Identification, Location and State. The research will further instate if all examples fall in the incumbent domain, or if there is a case of expanding the fundamental functional areas to accommodate more examples to enhance the applicability of the model.

Committee:

David A. Koonce, PhD (Advisor); Vic Matta, PhD (Committee Member); Kevin Berisso, PhD (Committee Member); Gary Weckman, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Area Planning and Development; Business Costs; Industrial Engineering

Keywords:

RFID; authentication; uniqueness; functional matrix and model of functionality

Ghalehkhondabi, ImanDeveloping Customer Order Penetration Point within Production Lines, Newsvendor Supply Chains, and Supply Chains with Demand Uncertainties in Two Consecutive Echelons
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Mechanial and Systems Engineering (Engineering and Technology)
Demand uncertainty has been an important obstacle in production systems and supply chains in recent decades. This uncertainty in demand has stimulated many researchers and practitioners to find new ways--such as combining Make to Stock (MTS) and Make to Order (MTO) manufacturing systems--to handle the uncertainty problem. In this research, applying the hybrid MTS/MTO system is developed in three different manufacturing frameworks. The first framework considers a production line, which produces semi-finished products based on a Make To Stock (MTS) strategy until a specific process is finished, and operates based on a Make To Order (MTO) strategy after this process. Two scenarios are studied in the first model: 1- In the first Scenario, the production line applies the MTO strategy after the OPP, which leads to an idleness cost when there is no order in the system. 2- In the second Scenario, the production line either applies the MTO strategy or the MTS strategy after the OPP, based on the presence of an order for semi-finished products in the line. This second scenario comprises the holding cost of completed products on MTS strategy, but does not have an idle cost. The second framework considers the demand uncertainties in two consecutive echelons of a supply chain--unlike most of the field research--which has only focused on the final customer’s demand uncertainty. In order to decrease the operating costs of a manufacturer, a model is proposed to use hybrid manufacturing in two different levels of a supply chain with two echelons of manufacturers. The output of the presented model is the quantity of semi-finished products ordered by the decoupling point upstream manufacturer. The third problem studies a multi-product, two-echelon supply chain within a newsvendor framework, in which semi-finished products are produced by a supplier and customized according to specific customer orders. The focus of this paper is to investigate a situation where the manufacturer wishes to determine the fraction of production performed by the supplier, its optimal semi-finished product order size, and the price for each product type. In order to make the problem more practical, capacity and budget constraints are considered.

Committee:

Gary Weckman (Advisor); William Young (Committee Member); Dale Masel (Committee Member); Benjamin Sperry (Committee Member); Yong Wang (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Industrial Engineering; Management; Marketing

Keywords:

Make to Stock; Make to Order; Hybrid Manufacturing; Queueing Theory; Inventory Management

Li, Tina LynnA New Product on the Chinese Market---Exploring how the Xiaomi smartphone became an “overnight sensation” in China
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2015, East Asian Languages and Literatures
Xiaomi, founded April 2010, within 4 years has already become the king of China’s smartphones and even ranks third in global smartphone sales. This current paper explores the reasons for Xiaomi’s explosion of popularity from six different angles: company development history, business operations strategy, competitive advantage, competitor analysis, potential obstacles to development and domestic market prospects. Through an in-depth analysis, this paper will explore the resistances faced by Xiaomi when entering foreign markets and how they were able to maintain foreign sales and health development. Finally, it will discuss some of the valuable lessons that Chinese enterprises expanding abroad and foreign enterprises entering China can learn from Xiaomi’s success.

Committee:

Xiaobin Jian (Advisor); Galal Walker (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Asian American Studies; Asian Studies; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Business Costs; Computer Science; Foreign Language; Information Science; Information Technology; Intellectual Property; International Relations

Keywords:

smartphone; cellphone; market; china; US; xiaomi; samsung; apple; HTC;

Ghadimi, HodjatollahEconomic development in economies with an exhaustible resource: a dynamic computable general equilibrium analysis for the case of Iran
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1993, City and Regional Planning

Oil exporting developing countries have the common problem of how best to transform their valuable but nonrenewable oil reserves into a permanent flow of income for achieving their long term development objectives. The most fundamental dynamic choices of these economies can be summarized in three basic questions: (i) how much to extract, (ii) how much to invest, and (iii) where to invest. In other words, a sustainable development path in the case of these economies involves the optimal depletion of their exhaustible resource, allocation of revenues generated by the resource, and the optimal composition of their investment funds. This study presents a dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model to explore issues related to economic development within a given window of time in these resource dependent economies by focusing on the case of Iran.

The proposed model consists of a price endogenous CGE model, simulating workings of a market economy, embedded in an optimal extraction model of an exhaustible resource. The model is benchmarked for the Iranian data and is used to examine the issues related to optimal extraction of an exhaustible resource, optimal savings in the economy, and the allocation of investment funds. Our interest is with general equilibrium effects of oil extraction and investment policies within a window of time during which the oil reserves abound and the oil sector plays a crucial role in the economy.

The model will be used to explore how changes in the extraction costs, discount rate, and in the structure of the model might affect the depletion profile of the exhaustible resource. It will also examine the effects of adopting various government savings policies, changes in the level of responsiveness of the financial markets, and changes in the absorptive capacity of the economy on the optimal savings path. The model also explores the effects of quotas on oil exports and finds the compensating oil price increase. A simulation experiment with the model shows that the Iranian economy would have been better off if it had allocated sectoral investment following a simple rule of relative sector profitability rather than following the centrally planned strategies of industrialization prior to the Islamic revolution of 1979.

Committee:

Burkhard Von Rabenau (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Economic Theory; Economics

Miller, Adam J.Methodology for Cost Estimation of Systems at a Preliminary Stage of Design
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2012, Industrial and Systems Engineering (Engineering and Technology)

Reliable cost estimation of systems in the early design stages can be very beneficial. Some methods that do focus on system estimation are based on high level parametric models, which are not always detailed enough to provide a reliable or useful prediction model.

This thesis provides a repeatable method for creating Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) for the estimation of a system of parts using attributes available at a preliminary design stage. The methodology provides guidelines for collecting data, classifying data, and creating CERs. Also, Attribute Estimating Relationships (AERs) are discussed for estimating the CER inputs that may not be available in preliminary design with attributes that are available in preliminary design.

The methodology was tested on a system of parts from a jet engine and the resulting CERs were compared to other higher level models. The results indicated the proposed method was slightly less accurate than some alternative models. However, the proposed method provided a more detailed and logical CER than the alternate models.

Committee:

Dale Masel, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Aerospace Engineering; Business Costs; Design; Engineering; Industrial Engineering; Systems Design

Keywords:

Cost Estimation of Systems; Systems CERs; Cost Estimating Relationships; Cost Estimation; System Level Cost Estimation

Scriffignano, Anthony JamesStrategic Asymmetric Multicultural Alliances in Business
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2010, Leadership and Change
Global economics and other factors make it increasingly difficult for organizations to operate within the boundaries of one country in a rational way (e.g., leveraging best practices, profitable, achieving goals). In this study, I looked at strategic business alliances, transcending simple quid pro quo relationships to deliver ongoing partner value. I refined my study to multicultural relationships, having differing cultural identities (i.e., ideas, heritage, language, or demographics from differing geographies). Finally, I considered asymmetry (i.e., inequity in working relationship). Using a mixed-methodology design, I surveyed alliance participants and interviewed participants from selected alliances. A multi-case study addresses emergent themes of participants from these alliances, day-to-day experiences, and ways in which leaders intervened. Drawing from these experiences, observations are presented about the nature of these alliances and their increasing contemporary relevance. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, PhD (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Member); Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Member); James Krefft, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Business Community; Business Costs; Business Education; International Relations; Language; Management; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

alliance; multicultural; leadership; asymmetric; strategic; mixed methods; collaboration; multilingual; partnership; multi-case study; change leadership; multinational; coalition; cooperation; business; management; global; international; globalization

Sheikh, ShayaOptimization and Risk Scenario Analysis of Procurements and Planning of Energy Systems Using Z- utility Theory
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2013, EECS - System and Control Engineering
In this dissertation, we present an energy supply chain model called, energy planning problem, as a basic problem for analyzing distributed energy systems. We use multi-objective optimization and risk theory to optimize and analyze this problem under different circumstances. In the first chapter, we present energy planning problem with single or multiple decisions makers in energy system. These decision makers are able to buy or sell energy in the system according to their respective risk attitudes. We consider energy price of each generator as a decision problem under risk where each decision maker chooses its energy price as a function of its generated energy. Three different functions for risk attitude are considered for each decision maker; step function, piece-wise linear function, and polynomial function. A robust, simple, and verifiable approach for understanding and measuring risk of energy storages in distributed energy systems is introduced. We also show that the relationship between risk attitude and energy price simulates the behavior of real energy retailers or energy distribution companies. The resulting efficient optimization models provide the optimal risk strategy together with optimal amount of stored energy for each storage. In the second chapter, we use multi-objective optimization to formulate this problem using three criteria of cost, environmental impact and failure rate while satisfying operational and design constraints. We analyze the relationship between total cost, environmental impact, and failure rate using additive and goal seeking utility functions. We show that energy planning problem increases the flexibility of energy system in terms of changes in demand and energy price. Computational results and complexity analysis show that problems with extensive number of entities can be solved efficiently in reasonable time.

Committee:

Behnam Malakooti (Committee Chair); Vira Chankong (Committee Member); Matthew Sobel (Committee Member); Mario Garcia Sanz (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Energy; Engineering; Systems Design

Elahi, BehinIntegrated Optimization Models and Strategies for Green Supply Chain Planning
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2016, Industrial Engineering
The main goal of this research is to present new efficient methods and optimization models to enhance the Green Supply Chain Planning (GSCP). As a first objective, we focus on developing a novel optimization planning model in a green supply chain network consisting of suppliers, assemblers, distribution centers, and retailers. This model is subjected to various constraints which are related to the inventory and forward logistics management. We applied the proposed model for a vacuum and floor machines manufacturer case study located in the Midwestern, U.S. The main objective functions include: minimizing the costs of assembling, transporting, holding inventory at assembling sites and distribution centers, and shortage at retailers under carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions constraints throughout the logistic network; maximizing service levels and determining the acceptable service levels to meet final customers’ demands. We applied three different solution methods including a gradient-based algorithm in MATLAB “Find Minimum of Constrained nonlinear multivariable function (FminCon)”, a novel metaheuristic algorithm “Grey Wolf”, and the “Branch and Bound (B&B)” algorithm in Lingo to find optimal solutions for the proposed optimization model, which has a specific complexity. We compared the achieved optimal solutions by these methods. The case study and expanded numerical example verify whenever the parameter of the minimum service level at retailers’ sites increases or decreases, the amount of produced CO2 emissions and the total costs of the supply chain will directly correlate. It also demonstrates the trade-offs among the total costs of the supply chain network, CO2 emissions, and service levels. The achieved results reflect the efficiency of the proposed model for GSCP. As a second objective, we concentrate on revealing more information about optimal points in which performance measures of various adaptive (X ) ¯quality control charts hold their optimal minimum values. In this way, better quality control systems can be applied to detect defective parts and errors sooner, reduce the wastes, and find the related causes for the various processes involved in supply chain networks/production systems in order to achieve more effective GSCP and improve the quality control. Previous researches applied a forward viewpoint and evaluated the performance of adaptive models only for a specific and limited set of design parameters. However, in this research, we use a reverse perspective and search all possible sets of design parameters in the response space to find optimal minimum values for three performance measures, including adjusted average time until signal, average number of observations to signal, and average number of samples to signal. For this purpose, similar to recent studies, the Markov-chain approach is applied to develop performance measures. Then, a coded algorithm is proposed that explores the entire response surface and evaluate the value of each performance measure to find the optimal points. As an output, this algorithm obtains sets of initial parameters resulting in optimal minimum values of performance measures for adaptive models with respect to broad ranges of shifts in mean. It also computes the values of other performance measures and their improvement percentages in comparison to a fixed parameters control chart at obtained optimal points. The presented new guideline provides decision makers and quality managers with more knowledge about optimal points to choose a proper adaptive model, select an appropriate performance measure, and set economical and viable values for design parameters for specific ranges of shifts in mean that are estimated to have a higher priority in their process control. Finally, the third objective of this research is to evaluate the waste streams and recycling opportunities for various echelons of a supply chain. A real case study categorized in health care systems is considered for this purpose.

Committee:

Matthew Franchetti, Dr. (Committee Chair); Efstratios Nikolaidis, Dr. (Committee Member); Kumar Ashok, Dr. (Committee Member); Zhang Yue, Dr. (Committee Member); Spivak Alex, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Applied Mathematics; Artificial Intelligence; Automotive Engineering; Business Costs; Computer Science; Engineering; Environmental Engineering; Environmental Management; Health Care; Health Care Management; Operations Research; Sustainability; Systems Design; Transportation Planning

Keywords:

Quality Control Charts, Supply Chain Management, Supply Chain Modeling, Mathematical Modeling, Fuzzy, VIKOR method, MCDM methods, Healthcare Supply Chain, Inventory Control, CO2 emissions, Grey Wolf Algorithm, Gradient-based algorithm

Burgos Suarez, Gabriel DarioThe Impact of Ownership Structure on the Financial Performance of Airlines in the International Context
Bachelor of Arts, Walsh University, 2014, Honors
The following paper focuses on the creation of a quantitative as well as a qualitative evaluation of the impact had on airline companies around the world based on the ownership structure (government or private owned) that each operates under. This is comprises an initial evaluation of similar studies previously carried out as well as a historical exploration of both privatization and nationalization and the background rationale of both which is corporate property rights. Further a financial ratio examination is carried out followed by a statistical analysis of selected financial indicators and ratios in order to test for significant differences among the international and global sample of airlines that was gathered. This examination is then presented both graphically as well as in text in order to illustrate both the differences in performance as well as the specific characteristics that are attributed to each form of ownership.

Committee:

Caroline Berry, Ph.D (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Business Costs; Finance; Statistics

Keywords:

airlines; business ownership; ownership structure; privatization; nationalization; corporate property rights

Moran, Terrence J.A Simulation and Evaluation Study of the Economic Production Quantity Lot Size and Kanban for a Single Line, Multi-Product Production System Under Various Setup Times
PHD, Kent State University, 2008, College of Business Administration / Department of Management and Information Systems

There are advantages to both Economic Production Quantity (EPQ) model and the Kanban model (Nicholas, 1998). The EPQ still has large lots, which generally lower costs associated with long setup times but due to larger inventories raise costs. Kanban systems on the other hand, manufacture only the necessary quantity of products, at the necessary time, and at the necessary place resulting in reduced work-in-process (WIP) inventory (Monden, 1993). Kanban systems tend to have lower inventory costs but higher setup costs since setups are more frequent. There is a lack of research evaluating EPQ and Kanban that isolates setup time. Clearly, Kanban is not the answer for all situations and neither is EPQ. When setup costs are high, the EPQ model may be more appropriate.

The Setup time variable was evaluated for the two systems (Kanban and EPQ) against the five performance measures of total annual cost, total completion time, average WIP inventory, average WIP cost, and annual setup cost. EPQ outperforms Kanban on three (total cost, total time, setup cost) of the five measures used for setup time. On the measure of WIP inventory # units, EPQ is superior when setup time is less than 5 minutes. On the measure of WIP inventory cost, Kanban 5 is superior.

The research helped clarify for practitioners whether EPQ might be more suitable than Kanban for their given situations. It gives practitioners a potential solution for evaluating the choice between Kanban and EPQ. By evaluating the Kanban and EPQ in a single study, this dissertation offers managers a better understanding of choosing the correct production system for their multi-product production line. This contribution is significant because it evaluates the different systems and provides insights on selecting the correct system for a multi-product item.

Committee:

Felix Offodile (Committee Co-Chair); Marvin Troutt (Committee Co-Chair); Michael Hu (Committee Member); Murali Shanker (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Industrial Engineering; Management; Mechanical Engineering; Operations Research

Keywords:

Economic Production Quantity; Kanban; Production Systems; Lot Size; Manufacturing Systems

Scaglioni, Maria MarthaThe Development of Brazilian Railroads: How the Brazilian Economy can Benefit from More Efficient Railroad Utilization
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2009, Latin American Studies (International Studies)
This research analyses the railroad infrastructure initially, with a broader look at the general railroad characteristics and moving to the specific railroad history and aspects of railroads in Brazil. While several countries with comparable economies have a strong rail infrastructure to transport their production, Brazil does not. This paper explores the goods that have the potential to be transported by rail, but for some reasons, are not. A deeper study of the railroads’ geographical distribution in Brazil and of the exact localization of the production of the selected products points to an answer to the research question of how the Brazilian economy can benefit from a more efficient railroad utilization. Furthermore, it proposes the use of the existing railroad infrastructure to the transportation of four types of grains (corn, rice, beans, and wheat) and coffee. The content presented in this thesis contributes to the understanding of the problems in the Brazilian transportation infrastructure. The usage of the existing railroads to transport grains and coffee is an idea that has the potential to work in the short-term and without the need for excessive initial investments.

Committee:

Catherine N. Axinn, PhD (Committee Chair); Ariaster Chimeli, PhD (Committee Member); Brad Jokisch, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Economics; Geography; Latin American History; Transportation

Keywords:

Brazilian Railroads; Rail Transportation; Rail Freight in Brazil; Grain Transportation; Coffee Transportation; Better Railroad Utilization; Brazilian Rail Logistics

Fila, Marcus J.Stressful Work and Turnover: The Mediating Role of Psychological Strain
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2013, Industrial/Organizational Psychology (Arts and Sciences)
The subject of employee turnover continues to attract global research attention (Hom, Mitchell, Lee, & Griffeth, 2012). The job demands-control-support model (JDC(S); Karasek & Theorell, 1990) is a conceptual model that can be used to examine the stress-strain-turnover process. To date, however, only one study has examined this process (De Croon, Blonk, Broersen, & Frings-Dresen, 2004). Because there are several theoretical and methodological issues apparent with this study, the present study represents a revised and extended version of De Croon et al. (2004). A sample of 443 employees of a large national insurance company answered a survey at two six-month time periods, measuring actual voluntary turnover six months later. Although the correlation matrix supported the hypothesized bivariate relationships, a structural equation model showed poor fit to the data, and the reversal of two relationships in the model. Believing this was due to multicollinearity, I examined a revised model which better fit the data, and supported all nine hypotheses. Furthermore, psychological strain in the form of job dissatisfaction and emotional exhaustion fully mediated the relationship between stress (demands, control, and support), and voluntary turnover. Research and managerial implications are discussed.

Committee:

Rodger Griffeth (Committee Chair); Peggy Zaccola (Committee Member); Paula Popovich (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Business Costs; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Psychology

Keywords:

work stress; psychological strain; turnover; demands; control; support; job satisfaction; emotional exhaustion

Clemons, Rebecca EEXAMINING THE IMPACT OF DISRUPTION, SUPPLIER QUALITY AND KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER: RECOMMENDED STRATEGIES FOR MEETING DEMAND AND SUPPLIER DEVELOPMENT
Doctor of Business Administration, Cleveland State University, 2014, Monte Ahuja College of Business
I investigate the effect of supply-chain disruption on a firm’s decisions on investment in quality, and on ordering decisions, when there is a choice between suppliers, and a variable rate of knowledge transfer. I find that supply-chain disruption has a negative effect on profit, which can be mitigated by appropriate policies for order allocation and supplier development. When the probability of disruption is high, the firm should seek alternative sources of supply (even if they have lower levels of quality). Under certain conditions, the firm can improve its profit by investing in quality improvement efforts at the alternative supplier. I consider three different policies for supply-chain management and quality investment, and find that investment in supplier development is warranted when the initial quality level of the new supplier is relatively low; when the expected rate of improvement from such investment is relatively high; when the effectiveness of inspection is relatively low; and when the cost of inspection is relatively high.

Committee:

Susan Slotnick, PhD (Advisor); Raymond Henry, PhD (Committee Member); Birsen Karpak, PhD (Committee Member); Walter Rom, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Management; Operations Research

Keywords:

Supply Chain Management; supply chain disruption; quality; knowledge transfer; supplier development; swift knowledge transfer; quality improvement

Alkhasov, Solomon SCommercializing a Resin-Coated Proppant
Master of Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, Physics
HD Proppants, an early stage venture requesting strategic direction, has set out to commercialize a novel coating chemistry for resin-coated sand, a proppant that operators use to extract oil and natural gas from hydraulically-fractured shale. This study discusses technologies that have made shale fracturing economically feasible, introduces the proppant’s role in hydraulic fracturing, and presents fundamental physics equations that govern proppant performance. A financial framework and competitive landscape help describe the commercial viability, technical feasibility, and marketplace value of HD Proppants in comparison to competitors’ products and strategies. Absent major developments that change the context, this study finds that HD Proppants should abandon independent business development. Alternatively, HD Proppants should aggressively pursue a licensing arrangement to initiate joint venture product development with a competitive resin-coated sand company that would most value the incremental innovation possible from using HD Proppants’ novel coating chemistry.

Committee:

Edward Caner (Committee Chair); Bruce Terry (Committee Co-Chair); Rigoberto Advincula, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Geophysics; Management; Materials Science; Physics

Keywords:

Proppants; Hydraulic Fracturing; Market Analysis; Value Proposition; Strategy; Technology; Technical Feasibility; Strategic Analysis; Petrophysicists

Schabel, David LightonChinese-American Business Customs: a Comparison of Cultural Similarities and Differences
Bachelor of Science in Business, Miami University, 2008, School of Business Administration - Marketing

A study of the relationship between the Chinese and American culture and economy, and the subsequent similarities and differences as reflected by the Top 20 Companies in each country.

The history and legacy of State-Owned Enterprises, or SOEs, still greatly impacts China's Top 20 Companies in terms of their business purpose, employment structure, industry focus, company age and maturity, and revenue figures. American companies must be cognizant of the reasons behind over employment, which dilutes revenue per employee figures and makes Chinese layoffs nearly impossible. Additionally, Chinese companies will be more concerned about how contracts will enhance their social responsibility rather than how they will increase their revenue.

The Chinese are seeking to adopt best practices to better suit their way of business in order to bring economic power and respect within their borders. American businessmen must then focus on how they can improve their counterparts' efficiencies and brand equity.

Committee:

David Yen, Dr. (Advisor); Fu Liang, Ms. (Committee Member); Roger Jenkins, Dr. (Committee Member); Susan Humphrey, Mrs. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Community; Business Costs; Business Education; Economic Theory; International Relations; Labor Economics; Labor Relations; Management; Marketing

Keywords:

China; Chinese; America; American; United States; Top 20 Companies; Deng Xiaoping; State-Owned Enterprises; SOEs; World Trade Organization; WTO; 2008 Beijing Olympics; Olympics; Effective Business Practices; Mission Statement; Employee Analysis

Burton, Zachary TServants to the Lender: The History of Faith-Based Business in Four Case Studies
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, History
Tyson, Chick-fil-A, Walmart, and Hobby Lobby's presence within the faith-based business community is mostly thanks to corporate lineages that reached well into the previous century. Tyson was founded in 1935, Chick-fil-A in 1946, Walmart in 1962, and Hobby Lobby in 1972, each undergoing various business model and philosophical shifts along with their executives' changing understanding of Christian faith. This thesis analyzes these businesses through a series of case studies, highlighting various uniting themes in their corporate narratives, exploring the ways they interact with their customers and the cultures in which they flourish, while noting that there is a discernible, yet-unexplored gap between faith-based business and workplace spirituality. Ultimately, this thesis concludes that faith-based businesses choose to identify as such as an expression of belief in a Christian supernatural deity's influence in their careers rather than as a way of garnering specific markets or making a profit.

Committee:

Scott Martin, Ph.D. (Advisor); Amilcar Challú, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agriculture; American History; American Studies; Animals; Audiology; Bible; Biblical Studies; Business Administration; Business Community; Business Costs; Divinity; Economic History; Economic Theory; Economics; Entrepreneurship; Finance; Food Science; History; Labor Economics; Labor Relations; Management; Marketing; Modern History; Religion; Religious History

Keywords:

faith-based business; christianity; consumer capitalism; consumer culture; capitalism; history; religious history; workplace spirituality; Tyson Foods; Hobby Lobby; Wal-Mart; Chick-fil-A; meat industry; retail; fast food; crafts; evangelicalism

Scoville, James GSales and Investment: Behavior of Manufacturers 1949-1957
BA, Oberlin College, 1961, Economics
Since the appearance of Keynes' General Theory the major point of macro-economic emphasis has been upon the conditions and inducements necessary for capital investment. The general view on the dynamic processes of the economy has been largely altered in this past quarter century. No longer do we believe that what is saved automatically finds its way into investment, with total demand---and, hence, income---remaining constant. The Great Depression the development of fairly decent time series, and the often biting words of Keynes have given business cycle theory a new outlook and a new direction. I do not propose to discuss all these facts in this short paper the consideration of the classical views and the examination of the ideas of Keynes and his successors can well be left to the reader. Instead, our attention shall be focused on a very limited aspect of the problem or capital investment, namely, the plant and equipment expenditures of manufacturers during a short period of time. An attempt will be made to go beyond the simple statistical analysis to discover other factors operative in this period, and their possible effects upon our results.

Committee:

Kenneth D Roose (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Economics

Keywords:

sales; investment; manufacture; business;economics;

Gildenblatt, Robbie B.A Methodology Incorporating Manufacturing System Capacity in Manufacturing Cost Estimation
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2013, Industrial and Systems Engineering (Engineering and Technology)

Using Design for Manufacturability to integrate manufacturing and design has been shown over the years to reduce manufacturing costs and increasing overall revenues. Much research has been provided with a focus on integrating the design of a product and its respective manufacturing processes, but without the consideration of the existing facility capacity. By incorporating the existing capacity, manufacturing cost estimations can more accurately represent true factors such as overtime and material handling.

This thesis describes a methodology to incorporate system capacity in cost estimation. Ideal manufacturing costs, widely used as a standard for production cost estimation, incorporates only material and labor costs. Ideal cost is used as an input to the methodology proposed, and determines true manufacturing costs using the existing manufacturing system design.

The methodology compares multiple possible designs for a given part and estimates true cost of each design. Along with estimating true cost, the methodology considers three alternatives for implementing each design and the total costs of each: minimizing material handling costs by minimizing intracellular movement; minimizing overtime costs by utilizing all machine capacity, and minimizing total costs by purchasing additional machines to meet demand.

The methodology will provide an estimate of the true cost for each design being evaluated for each alternative presented. This will allow the user to not only get a more accurate representation of manufacturing costs, but also allow for cost analysis of multiple implementation alternatives for versatility. A mathematical model which maximizes facility profit by using the methodology proposed will be created and evaluated. The model will show how the methodology presented can be used in alternative scenarios in manufacturing settings.

Committee:

Dale Masel (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Costs; Engineering; Industrial Engineering

Keywords:

Manufacturing Cost Estimation; System Capacity; Ideal Cost; Feature Based Cost Estimator

Mithani, Murad A.The Development and Marketing of an Online Guided Study Program for the GRE Physics Exam Towards an Understanding of Future Instructional Methodologies
Master of Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, 2008, Physics
Online Distance Learning has made it possible to use a large set of training resources customized to the users and the environment. The study identifies an effective approach for the development and marketing of a GRE physics online guided study program based on the available literature and the experience and materials developed by Professor Robert Brown at Case Western Reserve University. The findings conclude that the approach is cost‐effective for the student, will serve approximately 30% of the 12,500 GRE physics candidates every year and will generate an annual income of $80,000 if continued as a university publishing project or more if transformed into an online training platform with multiple revenue streams. The program also serves as a proof of concept towards structuring future online instructional methodologies to position Case Western Reserve University and the Department of Physics at the forefront of learning technologies.

Committee:

Dr. Robert Brown (Advisor); Cyrus Taylor (Committee Member); Edward Caner (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Community; Business Costs; Education; Educational Software; Marketing; Mass Media; Physics; Science Education; Teaching

Keywords:

distance learning; online education; GRE physics; physics training; GRE marketing; future instructional methodologies; physics education; internet physics; physics marketing; ETS physics education; GRE multimedia mix

Soules, Travis PComparative analysis of the optimization, size, economic feasibility, and carbon emissions for fixed and single-axis tracking solar photovoltaic arrays that meet the total electric power needs of Miami University
Master of Environmental Science, Miami University, 2017, Environmental Sciences
The purpose of this research was to determine the best design for a solar array to be located at Miami University to produce all of the University’s electricity needs over any given year. Computer simulations were carried out using the NREL PVWATTS online calculator and the NREL System Advisor Model (SAM) which both use the NREL Typical Model Year (TMY) climate data sets. Two primary types of solar arrays were analyzed: fixed position (FP) and single-axis tracking (SAT). Simulations were repeated using varied solar panel tilt angles and array azimuth angles. Hourly expected electricity generation data from simulations was given a dollar value from the hourly rates charged to the University by Duke Energy. Simulations were then compared by hourly total electricity generation and total dollar value to determine the best configurations. Analysis showed that the best configuration for FP solar was a tilt of 31.5° away from horizontal, and an azimuth of 195°S, and a default tilt of 31° and azimuth of 185°S for SAT. The SAT array required 22.1% fewer panels, and 6 more acres. Either array would also save 1,641,813 metric tons of carbon emissions. Financial analysis found a PPA to be the most economically feasible option.

Committee:

Scott Johnston, RA (Advisor); Sarah Dumyahn, Dr. (Committee Member); Mark Scott, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Alternative Energy; Business Costs; Energy; Engineering; Environmental Economics; Environmental Engineering; Environmental Science; Environmental Studies; Higher Education Administration; Sustainability

Keywords:

Solar; optimization; economic feasibility; fixed position solar; solar array; single-axis tracking; solar carbon emissions; social cost of carbon; Miami University; solar photovoltaic array

Schrickel, James RobertLa Survie du petit cultivateur et l'agriculture traditionnelle en France: Le Conflit entre l'heritage et l'efficacite The Survial of the Small Farmer and Traditional Agriculture in France: The Conflict Between Heritage and Efficiency
Artium Baccalaureus (AB), Ohio University, 2014, French
Pendant que les communautes rurales se trouvent de plus en plus poussees vers l’urbanisation, les paysans francais s’accrochent a leurs proprietes et a leur heritage. L’agriculture mecanisee, alimentee par un haut taux d’investissement et des developpements technologiques, remplace le besoin du travail manuel a la campagne pendant que les methodes productivistes augment brusquement la reserve des produits agricoles aux niveaux excessifs, font baisser les prix, et saisissent la part de marche. Bien que les grandes corporations agroalimentaires en France soient mieux regulees que celles dans d’autres pays tels que les Etats-Unis, la legislation au niveau national et au niveau europeen favorisent les operations agricoles plus efficaces au depens des petites fermes traditionnelles. Cette these part en exploration des chances de reussite de redynamiser les communautes rurales durables en France, et les benefices atteignables si l’on soutient des methodes de culture traditionnelles et moins intensives. As rural communities find themselves continuously pushed towards urbanization, the French provincial-farmer class clings to its landholdings and its heritage. New investments in expensive farming equipment and techniques are replacing the need for manual labor in the countryside as productivist methods hike the supply of agricultural products to excessive levels, depress prices, and seize market share. While large food and agriculture corporations in France are more tightly regulated than they are in countries such as the United States, legislation at both the national and European levels have favored more efficient agricultural operations to the detriment of traditional small farms. This thesis explores the viability of reinvigorating sustainable rural communities in France and the benefits of supporting less-intensive, more traditional farming practices.

Committee:

Lois Vines, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Agricultural Economics; Agriculture; Business Costs; Conservation; Demographics; Economics; Environmental Economics; Environmental Health; Environmental Management; Environmental Studies; European Studies; Food Science; Modern History

Keywords:

french agriculture;Jose Bove;agriculture;Common Agricultural Policy;Agricultural economics;CAP;PAC;politique agricole commune;french farmers;agricultural surpluses;agrobusiness;capitalism;rural displacement;rural multifunctionality

Blanchard, Tina-LouiseA Systems Engineering Reference Model for Fuel Cell Power Systems Development
Master of Science in Industrial Engineering, Cleveland State University, 2011, Fenn College of Engineering

This research was done because today the Fuel Cell (FC) Industry is still in its infancy in spite over one-hundred years of development has transpired. Although hundreds of fuel cell developers, globally have been spawned, in the last ten to twenty years, only a very few are left struggling with their New Product Development (NPD). The entrepreneurs of this type of disruptive technology, as a whole, do not have a systems engineering ‘roadmap", or template, which could guide FC technology based power system development efforts to address a more environmentally friendly power generation. Hence their probability of achieving successful commercialization is generally, quite low.

Three major problems plague the fuel cell industry preventing successful commercialization today. Because of the immaturity of FC technology and, the shortage of workers intimately knowledgeable in FC technology, and the lack of FC systems engineering, process developmental knowledge, the necessity for a commercialization process model becomes evident.

This thesis presents a six-phase systems engineering developmental reference model for new product development of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Power System. For this work, a stationary SOFC Power System, the subject of this study, was defined and decomposed into a subsystems hierarchy using a Part Centric Top-Down, integrated approach to give those who are familiar with SOFC Technology a chance to learn systems engineering practices. In turn, the examination of the SOFC mock-up could gave those unfamiliar with SOFC Technology a chance to learn the basic, technical fundamentals of fuel cell development and operations. A detailed description of the first two early phases of the systems engineering approach to design and development provides the baseline system engineering process details to create a template reference model for the remaining four phases. The NPD reference template model's systems engineering process, philosophy and design tools are presented in great detail. Lastly, the thesis draws an overall picture of the major commercialization challenges and barriers (both technical and non-technical) that SOFC developers' encounter.

Committee:

L. Kenneth Keys, PhD (Committee Chair); Paul P. Lin, PhD (Committee Member); Walter Kocher, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Alternative Energy; Business Costs; Business Education; Engineering; Environmental Engineering

Keywords:

Systems Engineering; Systems Development; Reference Model, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells; Fuel Cells; Commercialization

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