Search Results (1 - 25 of 42 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Romero, Michael AnthonyThe Laying on of Hands and the Building Up of the Catholic Charismatic Movement
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2016, Theological Studies
The Catholic Charismatic Movement, inheriting the use of the laying on of hands from the Neo-Pentecostal movement, was able to grow and flourish because the laying on of hands was seen as a channel by which one could experience a spiritual renewal. The Catholic Charismatic Movement’s own rationale behind the use of the laying on of hands has fallen short in assessing its value during the early growth of the movement. The appraisal of the laying on of hands as a symbolic gesture or a sacramental is challenged in this study, and a new interpretation of the use of the laying on of hands is offered: the laying on of hands is a charism that built up the Catholic Charismatic Movement. The personal spiritual journeys of William Storey and Ralph Keifer are analyzed to understand what led them to their encounter with the Protestant Pentecostal prayer group, where the Catholics first received the baptism in the Spirit by the laying on of hands. The subsequent “Duquesne Weekend” retreat and the growth of the movement on the campus of Notre Dame are also studied in respect to the prevalent use of and the sought-after nature of the laying on of hands. My interpretation of the laying on of hands as a charism relies on the pneumatology of Heribert Muhlen. Muhlen’s description of the Church as the continuation of the anointing of Jesus with the Spirit, and his understanding of the Spirit as the divine self-giving supports the idea that in the laying on of hands the two parties are surrendering to the church and the Spirit. Ultimately, the laying on of hands in this context is a charism for the community where the public witness of the act edifies and strengthens.

Committee:

Sandra Yocum, Ph.D. (Advisor); Meghan Henning, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Dennis Doyle, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; History; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

laying on of hands; renewal; catholic charismatic movement; william storey; ralph keifer; pentecostalism; Heribert Muhlen; duquesne weekend; charism; sacramentals; jervell; acts 8; wolfgang vondey; baptism in the Spirit; pneumatology; trinity; Laurentin;

Price, Joe H.Chastised Rulers in the Ancient Near East
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
In the ancient world, kings were a common subject of literary activity, as they played significant social, economic, and religious roles in the ancient Near East. Unsurprisingly, the praiseworthy deeds of kings were often memorialized in ancient literature. However, in some texts kings were remembered for criminal acts that brought punishment from the god(s). From these documents, which date from the second to the first millennium BCE, we learn that royal acts of sacrilege were believed to have altered the fate of the offending king, his people, or his nation. These chastised rulers are the subject of this this dissertation. In the pages that follow, the violations committed by these rulers are collected, explained, and compared, as are the divine punishments that resulted from royal sacrilege. Though attestations are concentrated in the Hebrew Bible and Mesopotamian literature, the very fact that the chastised ruler type also surfaces in Ugaritic, Hittite, and Northwest Semitic texts suggests that the concept was an integral part of ancient near eastern kingship ideologies. Thus, this dissertation will also explain the relationship between kings and gods and the unifying aspect of kingship that gave rise to the chastised ruler concept across the ancient Near East.

Committee:

Samuel Meier (Advisor)

Subjects:

Ancient Civilizations; Biblical Studies

Keywords:

Hebrew Bible, Ancient Near East, Kingship

Rutherford, Miranda JuliaA Trickster in Disguise: Reading a New Type of Satan in 2 Corinthians
BA, Oberlin College, 2015, Religion
This paper examines three brief mentions of Satan in 2 Corinthians by comparing them with representations in two longer pseudepigraphal texts: the Testament of Job and the Greek Life of Adam and Eve. Although the Satan of 2 Corinthians is often read in tandem with other mentions of an apocalyptic evil figure, I argue that this Satan bears a greater resemblance to the Satan portrayed in the Testament and the Life. In these three texts, Satan's moral alignment is ambiguous: although he often acts for nefarious purposes, he does not oppose God on a cosmic scale as apocalyptic Satan figures do. Instead, this Satan tests and tricks humans, often using disguises. The trickster Satan is not the diametric opposite of the apocalyptic Satan; in fact, the two portrayals sometimes appear within the same text, indicating a gradual evolution of the figure of Satan during the early Christian period.

Committee:

Cynthia Chapman (Advisor); Andrew Wilburn (Advisor); Corey Barnes (Committee Co-Chair); Margaret Kamitsuka (Committee Co-Chair)

Subjects:

Bible; Biblical Studies; Religion

Keywords:

Satan; 2 Corinthians; Greek Life of Adam and Eve; Testament of Job; New Testament, Bible; trickster;

Ewing, Lisa MDangerous Feminine Sexuality: Biblical Metaphors and Sexual Violence Against Women
Master of Humanities (MHum), Wright State University, 2013, Humanities
This analysis responds to an ongoing debate between feminist and traditional readings of sexually violent (SV) metaphors in the prophetic texts of Hosea, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, and the New Testament book of Revelation. Whereas feminist scholars have often argued that such metaphors are built upon the exploitation of women’s sexuality, traditionalist scholars have insisted that the metaphors are merely literary devices that should only be read within their historical and literary contexts. Taking a moderate position, this analysis uses the cognitive metaphor theory to explain that the SV metaphors depend on cognitive associations of dangerous feminine sexuality to relate to historically-specific concerns of the original authors and audiences. This analysis then examines said historically-specific concerns to reveal the literary function of the metaphors in their original contexts. Finally, this analysis closes by considering current sociopsychological concerns that cause contemporary society to continue relying on the same cognitive associations of dangerous feminine sexuality as seen the SV metaphors.

Committee:

David Barr, Ph.D (Committee Chair); Mark Verman, Ph.D (Committee Member); Andrea Harris, M.A. (Committee Member); Ava Chamberlain, Ph.D (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Religion; Womens Studies

Keywords:

BIBLICAL METAPHOR; BIBLE, FEMINIST CRITICISM; SEXUAL VIOLENCE; HOSEA, BOOK OF; JEREMIAH; BOOK OF; EZEKIEL, BOOK OF; REVELATION, BOOK OF; WHORE OF BABYLON; BIBLE, WOMEN IN; COGNITIVE METAPHOR THEORY

Kim, Kyoung-Hee MichaelaMary's mission at the foot of the cross of Jesus in John 19:25-28a; in light of Isaac's role in the narrative of Abraham in Genesis 22:1-19
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 2017, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

Isaac, Biblical patriarch, sacrifice ; Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint typology ; Bible Genesis 22, 1-19 criticism and interpretation ; Bible John 19, 25-28 criticism and interpretation

Post, Kaeleigh ANo Greater Love Than This: Violence, Nonviolence, and the Atonement
Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.), Trinity Lutheran Seminary, 2014, History-Theology-Society Division
"No Greater Love Than This: Violence, Nonviolence, and the Atonement" looks at the role of violence in the discussion of the atonement. This is accomplished by first examining a number of well-known atonement theories including Anselm's substitutionary theory, Abelard's moral exemplar, ransom theory, and Christus Victor for their connection to violence. Then, three less well-known theories such as Julian of Norwich's theory, Patrick Cheng's theosis theory, and womanist theories are looked at in light of their connection to violence. Finally, a proposed theory of atonement, which attempts to be as low-violence as possible, is presented. Throughout the thesis, the topics of what is violence and why a nonviolent atonement theory is needed are addressed.

Committee:

Joy Schroeder, PhD (Advisor); Cheryl Peterson, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Ancient History; Bible; Biblical Studies; Classical Studies; Divinity; Gender; History; Medieval History; Middle Ages; Religion; Religious History; Theology

Keywords:

Atonement; Abelard; Anselm; Womanist Theology; Sin; Queer Theology; Violence; Aulen; Christus Victor; Romans; Ransom Theory; Theosis

Christman, AmyConsumerism and Christianity: An Analysis and Response from a Christian Perspective
Undergraduate Honors Program, Malone University, 2015, Honors Thesis
This thesis is an analysis of the effects of consumerism on Christianity. In the United States of America, we consume in an attempt to fill our desires by making material items absolute goods. We look for fulfillment through the process of consuming because advertisers promise fulfillment and happiness, but those feelings never last. This thesis explores four aspects of consumerism and builds a definition of consumerism throughout these four chapters. Each chapter also includes a response as to how Christians can respond to consumerism and how they are called to living differently than consumerism calls us to live. As Christians, we must focus on our ultimate fulfillment coming from God who created us to be in relationship with him. The goal of this thesis was to explore how consumerism can be problematic for Christians but discover how Christians can honor God while still functioning as consumers in the United States.

Committee:

Stephen Moroney, PhD (Advisor); T.C. Ham, PhD (Committee Member); Sue Wechter, PhD (Committee Member); Jay Case, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

consumerism; Christianity; absolute good; advertising; ultimate fulfillment; image of God; consumer culture; Ecclesiastes; American Dream

Nicole, ReamHabakkuk: Challenger and Champion of Yahweh
Bachelor of Arts, Wittenberg University, 2006, Religion
This thesis addresses the book of Habakkuk in the Hebrew Bible as a work of dissent literature. In literature of dissent, one is forced to put aside expected conventions, roll up one's sleeves, and bravely confront God. Habakkuk deals with the problem of pain that pervades human society. To bring such a complaint against God was one of the most daring actions that one could take. Habakkuk's lament serves as an ultimate attestation of faith in God. In his struggle to deal with pain that he believes to be unjust, Habakkuk steps up and cries out in complaint against God. When evil persists, he continues to insist in his belief that Yahweh is a just god, and he cries out once more, forcing Yahweh to listen and answer. Habakkuk's lament is an attempt to deal with pain and a challenge to the ancient views of the divine-human relationship.

Committee:

Barbara Kaiser (Advisor)

Subjects:

Religion, Biblical Studies

Keywords:

Book of Habakkuk; Hebrew Bible; Dissent Literature

Christman, Erica LynnAdolescent Females Areas of Concern and Correlation to Biblical Scriptures
Honors Theses, Ohio Dominican University, 2011, Honors Theses
This research paper summarizes the findings of a study where adolescent females were studied in correlation to issues in their lives and where Scripture addresses those issues.

Committee:

Leo Madden, PhD (Advisor); Marlissa Stauffer, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Bible; Biblical Studies; Communication; Gender; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

Adolescent Females; Bible; Scripture study; Modern issues in Scripture

Wood, Maureen M.A Dialogue on Feminist Biblical Hermeneutics: Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, Musa Dube, and John Paul II on Mark 5 and John 4
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2013, Theological Studies
The study of feminist biblical hermeneutics is very diverse; it can mean different things to different people. As a result, there is much disagreement concerning how to read Scriptures from a feminist perspective in the correct way. For a proper study of the Scriptures from a feminist point of view, one must converse with other forms of feminist hermeneutics. Therefore, using excerpts from Mark 5 and John 4, this thesis will create a dialogue between the theologians Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, Musa Dube, and John Paul II. In doing so, this thesis will attempt to show a more comprehensive feminist biblical hermeneutic using theological perspectives from Catholic Western feminism, Protestant Two-Thirds World feminism, and the Magisterium.

Committee:

Jana Bennett, Ph.D. (Advisor); Silviu Bunta, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Joseph Kozar, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Studies; Bible; Biblical Studies; Gender Studies; Religion; Theology; Womens Studies

Keywords:

feminist theology; Mark 5; John 4; Mulieris Dignitatem; postcolonialism; biblical hermeneutics; Catholic feminism; postcolonial feminist theology; feminist biblical hermeneutics

Haring, James WChaos, Kingship, Councils, and Couriers: A Reading of Habakkuk 2:1-4 in its Biblical and Near Eastern Context
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Habakkuk 2:4b is a prominent proof-text in several early Judaic writings. This thesis analyzes Hab 2:4 along with the preceding three verses and the rest of the book of Habakkuk. This analysis is conducted in light of the kingship and council of Yahweh, closely related institutions which frame the issues raised by the book of Habakkuk and lay the foundation for an analysis of 2:1-4. The kingship of Yahweh demonstrates the link between Yahweh's battle with the sea in Habakkuk 3 and the problem of injustice raised in in Habakkuk 1, while the council of Yahweh provides an important backdrop to Habakkuk's intercession in ch. 1 and to the messenger-witness of Hab 2:1-4. This thesis concludes that Hab 2:1-4 describes the speedy delivery of legally confirmed tablets by a messenger whose faithful testimony will result in the survival of the righteous.

Committee:

Samuel Meier, Dr. (Advisor); Daniel Frank, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Ancient Languages; Bible; Biblical Studies; Judaic Studies; Near Eastern Studies; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

Habakkuk; Hab 2-4b; Hab 2-1-4

Downey, H.R.Removing Homosexuality from Sodom: Contextualizing Genesis 19 with Other Biblical Rape Narratives
Master of Humanities (MHum), Wright State University, 2017, Humanities
This analysis disputes common interpretations that the Sodom narrative (Genesis 19) is an anti-homosexual story by presenting it as part of a four-story arc about rape in the Bible. The three other stories discussed in addition to Sodom are as follows: the gang rape of the Levite’s concubine (Judges 19), the rape of Dinah (Genesis 34), and the rape of Tamar (2 Samuel 13). Each of the four stories discussed in this analysis contain various types of sexual violence, such as male-to-male rape or attempted rape, female-to-male rape, and male-to-female rape; in each case, the rapes or attempted rapes lead to disastrous social consequences, which this analysis concludes is the overarching message to each of the four narratives. In addition, this analysis will consider how the Sodom narrative became incorrectly associated with homosexuality and the negative impact that this misinterpretation in American jurisprudence and the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community.

Committee:

Mark Verman, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Patricia Schmil, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Sarah McGinley (Committee Member); Ava Chamberlain, Ph.D. (Other); Valerie Stoker, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Bible; Biblical Studies; Gender Studies; Glbt Studies; Political Science; Religion; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Bible; homosexuality; Sodom; sodomy laws; rape; American politics

Tibbetts, James J.The historical development of biblical Mariology pre- and post-Vatican II (1943-1986 American Mariology)
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 1995, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, Biblical teaching; Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, History of Doctrines, 20th century; Vatican Council 2nd 1962-1965; Vatican II

Hopkins, Stephen Chase EvansSolving the Old English Exodus: An Active Problem Solving Approach to the Poem
Bachelor of Arts, Miami University, 2011, College of Arts and Sciences - Linguistics
This project is an attempt to grapple with one of the most perplexing of Old English heroic poems, known today simply as Exodus. This 590 line work is an adaptation of the Biblical account of the Israelite escape from captivity in Egypt and their subsequent flight through the wilderness, climaxing with that most iconic of Old Testament images, the parting of the Red Sea. My reading differs from conventional scholarly attempts at interpreting the work not in the details, but on a more fundamental level. There is little doubt among scholars today that the poem’s perplexing and riddlesome passages are typological allusions, but there has been little attempt to unify all of these poetic nuances into a coherent narrative. My approach aims to unify all of the riddlesome aspects of the work by reading the poem as a riddle itself. This riddle exists as a vehicle to challenge readers in their thinking, their knowledge of theology, and how they will respond to such knowledge in their own personal behavior.

Committee:

Patrick Murphy, PhD (Advisor); Vincent Palozzi, PhD (Committee Member); Valerie Wilhite, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Ancient Languages; Biblical Studies; British and Irish Literature; European Studies; Germanic Literature; Medieval Literature; Middle Ages; Religious History; Theology; World History

Keywords:

Old English; Anglo-Saxon; Exodus; Theology; Christianity; Literature; Poetry; Riddle

Sears, Joshua M.“His Hand Is Stretched Out—Who Will Turn it Back?”: Intercession within the Twelve Prophets
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

This paper explores the phenomenon of prophetic intercession as it appears within the Twelve Prophets of the Hebrew Bible, Hosea through Malachi. I begin by defining the term intercession as I will use it in this paper, essentially a prayer someone offers on behalf of another in an attempt to have God act positively toward the latter. I include in my discussion intercessory prayers offered by both prophetic and non-prophetic figures, but my discussion will concentrate on the prophets simply because they as a group intercede most frequently. Within each book of the Twelve I determine 1) if intercession occurs in some form, and 2) if intercession occurs, what are the forms, functions, and results of the intercession as portrayed in that book, and how do these relate to examples elsewhere in the Bible. I have limited my study to the Twelve because, with the exception of Amos, intercessory activity within the Twelve is often glossed over or ignored in studies on intercession; most of the attention goes to more famous examples such as Moses, Samuel, and Jeremiah. My hope is to fill this void by shining the spotlight directly on these smaller texts.

Over the course of this study we find that Amos contains the clearest examples of intercessory prayer; Habakkuk contains some petitions that, while vague, demonstrate an intercessory character; Joel contains examples of intercession by both prophet and priests; Zechariah contains an unusual intercessory plea by an angel; Hosea and Micah contain passages that are not clearly intercession although some have called them such; and the remaining books contain no discernible examples of intercession. In these latter cases I discuss why the absence is either expected or surprising.

Intercession can be a complicated topic because it incorporates—and sometimes challenges our assumptions about—topics ranging from prayer to prophets, deity to human agency. This paper seeks to understand what the Twelve have to offer to this ancient and fascinating discussion.

Committee:

Samuel Meier, PhD (Advisor); Daniel Frank, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Ancient History; Bible; Biblical Studies; Religion; World History

Keywords:

intercession; prophets; prayer; Hebrew Bible; intercessor; intercessory; Minor Prophets; Twelve Prophets

Goings, Carolyn SmithRacial Integration in One Cumberland Presbyterian Congregation: Intentionality and Reflection in Small Group
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2016, Leadership and Change
Negative attitudes toward racial minorities and consequent maltreatment of non-Whites continue to be a crisis in America. The crisis of racism is still realized in phenomena such as residential segregation (Bonilla-Silva, 2014), health disparities (Chae, Nuru-Jeter, & Adler, 2012; Chae, Nuru-Jeter, Francis, & Lincoln, 2011), and in the not-so-uncommon unjust arrests and imprisonment of persons of color (Alexander, 2012). Improvement in race relations through the development of meaningful cross racial relationships in racially integrated settings is one avenue that may lead to reduction of racism (E. Anderson, 2010; Fischer, 2011; Massey & Denton, 1993). Christian congregations are common settings in America, and Christian teachings are primary sources of Western ethics and moral values. Historically, Christian practices have affected American attitudes such as with regard to elder care, have influenced legislation such as child labor laws, and have even swayed the contents of the United States constitution. Yet, racial segregation has been the norm in Christian congregations from the end of American slavery until today. Since there may be a relationship between the persistence of segregation in Christian congregations and the persistence of racism in America, racial integration in Christian congregations may impact racial attitudes and relationships. Using Participatory Action Research, this study explored ways to improve racial integration and race relations in Christian congregations. This study utilized volunteers in a 30-day exploration of racial integration in a congregation, a small church in one of the two Cumberland Presbyterian denominations. Data from observations, interviews, racially integrated events, reflection sessions, and participant journaling were collected and analyzed. Intentionality in racial integration in one congregation resulted in cumulative positive change, at times difficult and incremental. Findings revealed that adaptive, proactive leadership enabled cross racial dialogue leading to increases in transformative relations and learning. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/, and OhioLINK ETD Center, http://etd.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Laura Morgan Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Daniel J. Earheart-Brown, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Craig Keener, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; American History; American Studies; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Bible; Biblical Studies; Black History; Black Studies; Clergy; Divinity; Ethics; Ethnic Studies; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; Religious History; Social Research; Sociology; Spirituality; Theology

Keywords:

race relations; racial segregation; integration; churches; Christian congregations; participatory action research; Cumberland Presbyterian; leadership; Blacks; Whites; race in churches; segregated denominations; slavery and religion; race and religion;

Farley, Elizabeth MarieThe development of Marian doctrine as reflected in the commentaries on the wedding at Cana (John 2:1-5) by the Latin fathers and pastoral theologians of the Church from the fourth to the seventeenth century
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2013, International Marian Research Institute
This 335 page dissertation presents an original work organizing the Latin theologians' principal interpretations of the Blessed Virgin Mary's presence and actions at the wedding feast, which reveals their perception of the significance and enduring meaning of her role there and her relationship with her Divine Son and his Church. Chapter one outlines the purpose, scope, structure, and method, including the fundamentals of Patristic exegesis, the Latin translations of the Bible, and St. John's Gospel. Chapter two provides an overview of the early Latin Church, focusing on the Theological and Christological insights that became conciliar proclamations and the foundation for Marian Doctrines. Five chapters follow with the writings of twenty-eight theologians who wrote about the Blessed Virgin Mary in thirty-seven different homilies, commentaries, doctrinal treatises, exhortations or other works. They were the leaders of the Church: saints, fathers, doctors and pastoral theologians including a pope, bishops, abbots, teachers, monks, friars, and Jesuits. The chapters are arranged according to periods: Patristic (4th and 5th centuries), Early Middle Ages (6th to 11th centuries), Golden Age of Mary (12th century), Scholastic (13th century), and Late Middle Ages (14th to 17th centuries). Each chapter describes the context within which the theologians carried out their roles in promoting the faith by preaching, teaching, strengthening the Church, and combating heresies. Included is a section on the development of Marian Doctrine according to councils, papal documents, or the influence of religious orders and Scholasticism. The theologians are introduced by biographical sketches of their education, religious order, ecclesial position, and literary contribution to the Church. Their writings are quoted in Latin and English (including translations of Latin works never before found in English); biblical exegesis is analyzed, and commentaries are categorized into themes at the end of each chapter. The final section summarizes two predominate themes: the prerogatives of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and her person and action at the wedding feast and in the Church. Even though the primary focus was on the mother of Jesus in John 2:1-5, what was found were continuing and significant references to the prerogatives of the Virgin Mary that flow from the divine maternity woven into the work of each theologian. This was not a development of doctrine, but an affirmation that the Marian Doctrine found in Sacred Scripture and proclaimed by the councils was part of the writing during the entire period studied. The development of doctrine was found in the verse by verse analysis of the commentaries. The role of the Blessed Virgin was understood in relationship to Christology, Ecclesiology, and Soteriology throughout the period.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Turning Water into Wine at the Wedding of Cana, miracle; history of doctrines; patristic; medieval; John 2, criticism and interpretation

Foster, Hiram S.Functions of Mentoring as Christian Discipleship
Bachelor of Science of Communication Studies (BSC), Ohio University, 2014, Communication Studies
Mentoring has always been defined as a relationship consisting of only two attributes: psychosocial support and instrumental support. This study attempted to develop and refine the old definition of mentoring by adding three more attributes: development, hierarchy, and mutuality. Three hypotheses stated that mentoring relationships will differ according to the presence or absence of each of the new attributes (hierarchy, development, and mutuality). One research question asked how each of the five attributes affected the mentee's valuation of the mentoring relationship. A second research question asked how mentees described their mentoring relationships with respect to each of the five attributes. The sample population were students involved with Cru, a Christian organization for college students. Mixed-methods research collected qualitative with semi-structured interviews and quantitative data with an online survey. The psychosocial and developmental attributes accounted for 55% of the variance in evaluations of mentoring relationships, demonstrating how a personal relationship with the mentee is fundamental for successful mentoring. In the interviews, mentees described all five attributes and their effect upon the relationship. The five attributes are interconnected and interdependent; each attribute affects other attributes and the entire relationship. Concluded that the old definition of mentoring is insufficient; more research should be conducted about the three new attributes for further evidence of their necessity.

Committee:

Anita James, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Behaviorial Sciences; Bible; Biblical Studies; Communication; Counseling Psychology; Education; Educational Psychology; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Occupational Psychology; Pastoral Counseling; Personal Relationships; Personality Psychology; Psychological Tests; Psychotherapy; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; School Counseling; Social Psychology; Social Research; Spirituality; Teaching

Keywords:

mentoring; Cru; Campus Crusade for Christ; Christianity; discipleship; psychosocial; instrumental; student mentoring; development; hierarchy; mutuality; multifactor leadership; questionnaire; friendship; mentee; mentor; interpersonal; leadership; protege

Wykes, James CulverThe Contextualized Noah: The Deluge Patriarch in Genesis, Jubilees, and Pseudo-Philo
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2012, Theological Studies
The figure of Noah--who appears in the biblical book of Genesis as well as this story's retelling in Jubilees and Pseudo-Philo--consists of a complex set of characteristics. A number of them are malleable, meaning that each work adapts Noah for their specific purpose: Genesis uses him as an axis of history; Jubilees, a priest; and Pseudo-Philo, a prophet. However, despite their diversity, several qualities remain constant in all three texts, regardless of their particularities. This thesis enumerates which qualities retain their stability and which ones change, as well as attempting to explain what about this character might have served the uses of this varied group of authors.

Committee:

Silviu N. Bunta, PhD (Advisor); Pamela M. Thimmes, PhD (Committee Member); Fred W. Jenkins, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Bible; Biblical Studies; Comparative; Theology

Keywords:

Noah; Genesis 6-9; Jubilees; Pseudo-Philo

Dashottar, AmitabhPosterior Shoulder Tightness Measurements: Differentiating Capsule, Muscle and Bone
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2012, Allied Medical Professions

Shoulder injuries are associated with tightness of posterior shoulder tissues. Posterior shoulder tightness is currently evaluated by using two measures of shoulder joint range of motion, internal rotation with the shoulder abducted to 90°, or horizontal adduction with the shoulder flexed to 90°. The range of motion in these measurements is influenced by tightness in the posterior capsule and/or posterior muscles, and is also impacted by the magnitude of humeral torsion. The inability to identify the specific structure responsible for range of motion loss using these measurements affects the planning and outcome of conservative treatments aimed at regaining range of motion. The aim of this project was to evaluate current and potential measurements of posterior shoulder tightness so that separate measurements of glenohumeral joint posterior capsule and posterior muscles can be identified. Another aim was to evaluate the validity of palpation of bicipital tuberosities for measuring humeral torsion.

To evaluate the effects of glenohumeral joint (GHJ) posterior capsule contracture on range of motion, a cadaver study was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify a range of motion measurement sensitive to changes in the GHJ posterior capsule length. Repeated measures of shoulder ROM across four posterior shoulder tightness measurements were performed before and after experimental capsular contracture. Maximum reductions in the range of motion were observed in measurements that combined shoulder flexion and internal rotation.

To evaluate the effects of posterior muscle extensibility on the range of motion, an in-vivo study was conducted. Repeated measures of shoulder range of motion across four posterior shoulder tightness measurements were performed before, immediately after, at 24 hours, and at 48 hours after repeated eccentric exercises of Infraspinatus and Teres minor. To verify the effect of eccentric exercise, Infraspinatus and Teres minor hardness were also measured at the same time as the range of motion measurements. Maximum reduction in the range of motion was observed in a measurement that combined shoulder extension and internal rotation. Infraspinatus hardness was observed to increase immediately after repeated eccentric exercise.

To evaluate the validity of using palpation of bicipital tuberosities for measuring humeral torsion, an in-vivo study was conducted. The bicipital-forearm angle, an indirect measure of humeral torsion, was measured using palpation of bicipital tuberosities and real-time ultrasound imaging. Agreement among the two methods was excellent with the intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.92.

The findings of these studies taken together suggest using a progressive approach to test posterior shoulder tightness. The first step should be the comparison of humeral torsion between the dominant and non- dominant shoulders. If between shoulder range of motion differences are greater than between shoulder humeral torsion differences, posterior capsule and muscle should then be evaluated. The posterior capsule may be best evaluated in a position of shoulder joint flexion and internal rotation, while for evaluating posterior muscles a position of shoulder joint extension may be used.

Committee:

John Borstad (Advisor); Deborah Givens (Committee Member); Mark Merrick (Committee Member); Carolyn Sommerich (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Biomechanics; Health Sciences; Physical Therapy; Rehabilitation

Keywords:

Glenohumeral joint; Range of motion; Internal rotation; Clinical measurement;

Nguyen, Daniel Xuan-VuPauline Freedom: Idolatry and the Vietnamese Ancestor Cult
Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.), Trinity Lutheran Seminary, 2016, Bible Division
Ancestor worship has been a vexing issue for Christian missionaries since the 16th century in Vietnam due to Buddhist, Taoist, Confucian, and Communist influences. However, there are few studies from the Protestant perspective on the ancestor cult. This thesis hopes to contribute to the mission work by analyzing the ancestor cult in light of Paul’s First Corinthians 8––10, namely how Christian freedom informed participants regarding worshiping idols and consuming food sacrificed to idols. The analysis includes delineating the complexity of Vietnamese religious pluralism and tracing the similarities and differences between the Christian cult of the saints and the ancestor cult. This thesis challenges the traditional perspective that the ancestor cult in Vietnam is religious and superstitious; rather, the ancestor cult is cultural in every aspect. A successful inculturation of the Gospel must separate the ancestor cult from the religious components of Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and popular folk religion.

Committee:

Walter Taylor, Jr./Ph.D. (Advisor); Henry Langknecht, Th.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Asian Studies; Bible; Biblical Studies; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

Christian Freedom; Pauline Freedom; First Corinthians 8--10; 1 Corinthians 8,1--11,1; 1 Corinthians 10,14-22; Idolatry; Food Sacrificed to Idols; Idol Food; Ancestor Cult in Vietnam; Vietnamese Ancestral Worship; Ancestral Veneration; Inculturation

Leary, Judith A.Funding Faithful Felons: A Phenomenological Analysis of the Higher Education Transitions of Ex-Offender Scholarship Recipients
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of this study was to address gaps in post-secondary education research regarding ex-felons’ higher education experiences in order to help student affairs practitioners make campus environments and services more accessible to and welcoming for these populations. This study centers on the experiences ex-felons have had as they have transitioned into, through, and out of higher education. The Charles W. Colson Scholarship program, a need-based full-tuition and housing scholarship program at Wheaton College, provided the setting for this research. Six ex-felon men who earned bachelor’s degrees through the program participated in one face-to-face semi-structured individual interview of approximately three hours. The interviews elicited findings in five broad areas: (1) personal assets and liabilities, (2) coping strategies, (3) factors influencing disclosure of criminal pasts, (4) educational outcomes, and (5) supports and opportunities for greater support. Participants’ shared essential experience consisted of three distinct phases centering on their expectations. The Scholars interviewed entered Wheaton College with high expectations regarding their future college experiences. Moving through Wheaton, their expectations increased but shifted to post-graduate aspirations regarding future employment or ministry positions. As they moved out of their higher education experience, they found that their vaunted expectations had become unrealistic given their limitations and liabilities exacerbated by the real world conflicts they faced. As a result of these conflicts with their lofty aspirations, each participant began to question the pragmatism of his initial expectations, and to deconstruct them in order to reconstruct new expectations. However, this process caused recurring struggles within the participants as some battled with guilt for reconstructing their expectations while others struggled with patience regarding delays in their perceived timelines. No matter the struggles nor how often they recurred, each participant concluded that even if he had not accomplished all, or any, of the lofty goals to which he had once aspired, as long as he invested significantly in the life of one other person, he had accomplished something worthy of the investment that had been made in him.

Committee:

Ellen Broido, Ed.D. (Advisor); Michael Coomes, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Melissa Burek, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; Adult Education; Bible; Biblical Studies; Clerical Studies; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Criminology; Education; Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Ethics; Families and Family Life; Finance; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Individual and Family Studies; Law; Legal Studies; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Pastoral Counseling; Peace Studies; Personal Relationships; Philosophy; Political Science; Rehabilitation; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; School Finance; Social Research; Social Work; Spirituality; Teaching; Theology; Vocational Education

Keywords:

Reentry; Higher Education; Faith; Felons; Ex-offenders; Christian Liberal Arts; Schlossberg; Transition; Stigma; Labeling; Invisible Stripes; Phenomenology; Colson; Scholarship; Prison Ministry; Wheaton; Prisoner; Crime; Correctional Education; PSCE

Jones, LeoThe Role of a Pastor: As a Faithful and Authentic Servant of God
Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.), Trinity Lutheran Seminary, 2014, Ministry Division
"The Role of a Pastor: As an Authentic Faithful Servant of God" examines how pastors should conduct themselves in the performance of their duties to God and to God's people. A prerequisite for a pastor's service to God is love. Before an individual can render service to God's people he or she must first love God. Without this love it is impossible for an individual to offer faithful, authentic service to God's people. Moreover, it becomes impossible to humbly lead, nurture and care for God's people. The work of a pastor is noble and multi-faceted and often goes unrequited. Accordingly the author uses three metaphors to describe the office of pastor: Pastor as Shepherd, Pastor as Teacher, and Pastor as Servant.

Committee:

Brad Binau, PhD (Advisor); Mark Powell, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Bible; Biblical Studies; Clergy; Divinity; Ethics; Pastoral Counseling; Religious Congregations; Spirituality; Theology

Keywords:

Authentic; Blessing; Bond Servant; Care; Compassion; Disciples; Faith; Feed; Flock; Humility; Leader; Love; Metaphors; Pastor as Servant; Pastor as Shepherd; Pastor as Leader; Pride; Prosperity Gospel; Protection; Riches; Servant of God; Wealth

Presta, JamesCornelius a Lapide's biblical methodology used in Marian texts and its comparison with a contemporary approach
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2005, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, Biblical Teaching; Cornelius a Lapide; Bible, hermeneutics; Bible, criticism and interpretation

Garafalo, Robert C.History, theology, and symbol: the mother of Jesus in the Cana narrative (John 2:1-12), 1950-2005
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2009, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Turning Water into Wine at the Wedding of Cana, miracle; John 2, criticism and interpretation

Next Page