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Remark, Linda NPortraits of Developmental Reading Students: A Case Study Exploration
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
The purpose of this study was to explore developmental reading students’ abilities and attitudes in reading, as well as the role literacy played in their lives. As higher education is funded based on student performance, it is in all college stakeholders’ interest to help all students, including developmental learners, succeed. Learning from developmental reading students has been proven to be advantageous in understanding their experiences and assisting with their academic success. Using a descriptive multiple case-study design, data were collected from 16 developmental reading students through two questionnaires, two reading assessments, literacy tracking, and two semi-structured interviews. Five participants’ data were further explored through a case and cross-case analysis. The study found developmental reading students were open to improving their reading abilities and viewed the developmental course as a medium through which to do this. They also appreciated and valued reading, though not always in ways academia would require. Finally, developmental readers were not always able to accurately identify their reading needs and did not view literacy as a social or cultural experience. The results of this study have important curricular implications for developmental students, educators, and their institutions. Instructors should provide meaningful opportunities for reflection on reading abilities and attitudes. Additionally, institutions should incorporate placement measures which place and diagnose specific literacy needs. Finally, classroom experiences need to incorporate and expand on the different types of literacy students are using outside of the classroom as well as support literacy use with others.

Committee:

Denise N. Morgan, PHD (Committee Co-Chair); Kristine E. Pytash, PHD (Committee Co-Chair); Tracy Lara Hilton, PHD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Community College Education; Education

Keywords:

Developmental Reading;Developmental Students;Community College;Case Study

Muckridge, Nicole AAdult Learners' Knowledge of Fraction Addition and Subtraction
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
The purpose of this study was to examine adult developmental mathematics (ADM) students’ knowledge of fraction addition and subtraction as it relates to their demonstrated fraction schemes and ability to disembed in multiplicative contexts with whole numbers. The study was conducted using a mixed methods sequential explanatory design. In the first phase, 72 developmental mathematics students took a written assessment containing disembedding, fraction scheme, and fraction addition/subtraction items. Based upon the results of the assessment, three individuals from the first phase were selected to participate in one-on-one clinical interviews. These interviews were aimed at identifying and describing the cognitive processes underlying the participants’ performance on the written assessment items. Results from the quantitative phase indicated statistically significant moderate correlations between disembedding in multiplicative contexts, demonstrated fraction schemes, and fraction addition/subtraction. Moreover, regression analysis revealed that age, fraction schemes score, disembedding score, and number of repeated mathematics courses were all significant predictors of a participant’s fraction addition/subtraction score. Analysis of the clinical interviews revealed that norming and the equi-partitioning scheme play an important role in ADM learners’ conceptions of fractions. This study quantitatively measured the relationship between disembedding, fraction schemes, and fraction addition/subtraction, which has been hypothesized in prior qualitative research. The results also have important instructional implications. Instructors of ADM courses should use the results of this study as an indication of the importance of determining their students’ existing schemes and providing them with opportunities to engage in actions associated with higher-level schemes.

Committee:

Karl Kosko (Committee Co-Chair); Joanne Caniglia (Committee Co-Chair); Jay Jahangiri (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Higher Education; Mathematics; Mathematics Education

Keywords:

adult learners; fractions; developmental; fraction schemes; disembedding; mathematics

Klima, Kerry Lee BelvillHidden, Supported, and Stressful: A Phenomenological Study of Midlevel Student Affairs Professionals' Entry-Level Experiences with a Mental Health Condition
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2018, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the experiences of midlevel student affairs professionals who navigated a mental health condition as a new professional and remained in the field. New professionals’ attrition and retention concerns continue to warrant further exploration through research. Research is lacking on new professionals group was those with a mental health condition. Mental illness is prevalent in our society, and as evident in this study, professionals do negotiate their mental illness as professionals in the field. I interviewed nine midlevel student affairs professionals from across the United States. Each of the professionals worked at a variety of institutions and within many functional areas in student affairs during their first five years in the field. I lead eighteen interviews with nine participants. In addition to the interviews, all of the participants responded to one journal prompt. To mask the identities of my participants, the professionals selected pseudonyms and I used these names throughout my manuscript. The participants shared their experiences comprising five main themes: (1) coping with mental health conditions, (2) student affairs competence and mental health, (3) influential relationships, (4) disclosure, and (5) organizational influences. Three primary findings emerged following the analysis of the experiences and the review of the literature. Participants experienced fear of discrimination. They shared about negotiating the personal nature of the experiences and their own self-advocacy. Lastly, the professionals’ community was instrumental in connecting to their retention. With these themes and findings, I developed implications for practice and future research. Implications for practice include a proposed paradigm shift in our organizations; the important role of supervisors, administrators, and colleagues; the use of a universal design model; and the value of structures to support those with mental health conditions. Future research could explore the identities of people with a mental health condition, the various community structures, and the role of the influential relationships in coping with a mental health condition.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson (Advisor); Michael Coomes (Committee Member); Neal Jesse (Committee Member); Hyun Kyoung Ro (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Education; Educational Psychology; Health; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Mental Health; Occupational Health; Psychology

Keywords:

mental health; student affairs; student affairs professionals; mental health condition;

Mitova, Mariana A.Relationship Between Investments in Self and Post-Graduation Career Satisfaction Among Apparel and Textiles Majors
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
Rachel Vannatta Reinhart, Advisor The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to explore the relationship between investments that students make in themselves while enrolled in a higher education program and their post-graduation career satisfaction, and (2) to gather information about the importance apparel and textile professionals place on selected competencies identified by the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA). Graduates (n=123) of an apparel and textiles (A&T) program at a four-year, public research institution were surveyed to examine which investments in self best predict post-graduation career satisfaction. The Survey of A&T Graduates’ Career Satisfaction consisted of 86 items measuring perceived importance and preparation of the ITAA meta-goals and competencies, career satisfaction, co-curricular activity involvement, on-the-job training, health and well-being, career competencies, and willingness to relocate. Multiple regression showed that Career Competencies and Health and Well-being best predicted participants’ post-graduation career satisfaction. Participants rated the Professional Development meta-goal; the Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal; and Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goal of highest importance. These same meta-goals received highest perceived preparation ratings. Lastly, ANOVA findings revealed that buyers, retail managers, marketing professionals and others indicated differences in perceptions of competencies and meta-goals. The buyers/merchandisers rated the Industry Processes and the Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goals of higher importance than retail managers. Retail managers perceived the Global Interdependence meta-goal as less important than marketing professionals did. The Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal was perceived more important by retail managers than “others” category did. Graduates’ career satisfaction differed mostly by Income levels. Those who reported earning lower salaries were overall less satisfied with their careers. Results suggest that current leaders of apparel and textile programs should enhance their curricula with pedagogy methods that facilitate learning of teamwork, leadership, clear communication, ethics, and social responsibilities. Internships and experiential learning are recommended to enhance the on-the-job training of students in A&T programs. In addition, all investments in self, with exception of Willingness to Relocate, are related to Career Satisfaction. Lastly, Post-graduation career satisfaction is best predicted by graduates’ Career Competencies and Health and Well-being.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta Reinhart (Advisor); Gregory Rich (Other); Barbara Frazier (Committee Member); Joyce Litten (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Economic Theory; Economics; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Health; Health Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Home Economics; Home Economics Education; Mental Health

Keywords:

Higher Education; College; Well-being; Health; Students; Career Satisfaction; Apparel; Textiles; Internships; ITAA; Graduates; Professionals; On-the-job Training; Internships; Curriculum; HCT; Human Capital Theory; economic theory; assessment

Kriner, Bridget AnnWriter Self-Efficacy and Student Self-Identity in Developmental Writing Classes: A Case Study
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2017, College of Education and Human Services
The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how instructional approaches to teaching developmental writing at a large urban community college foster the development of college students’ self-efficacy regarding academic writing and self-identity as college students. The case study examined the perspectives of four instructors and six students. The research considered: 1) how students experience the development of self-efficacy related to their academic writing; 2) how students experience their self-identity as college students; 3) how writing instructors foster students’ development of self-efficacy as writers; and 4) how writing instructors foster students’ self-identities as college students. The findings of this study provided a description of some of the specific ways students enrolled in developmental writing courses experienced the development of self-efficacy and self-identity. The study illuminated some of the practices that instructors use to facilitate both self-efficacy and self-identity in their approaches to teaching. With regard to students, what emerged in the analysis of this data was a sense that they felt both more empowered toward writing in an academic context and more self-identified as college students. The significance of the study demonstrated that fostering relationships among students and with the institution itself, along with scaffolding and contextualizing assignments, builds effective pathways to student success.

Committee:

Catherine Monaghan, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Catherine Hansman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Anne Galletta, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Wendy Green, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mary McDonald, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education

Wallace, Kyle SAn Exploratory Study of Learning Journeys for Makers in the Fields of Art, Craft and Design: An Investigation of the Blurred Boundaries between Art, Craft, and Design
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2016, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design
In this exploratory study, research was conducted on the learning journeys of makers in the fields of art, craft and design. The investigation was conducted to explore new ways of informing hands-on learning for makers, as well as parents and educators of makers. The primary research revealed insights about the makers' positions within the blurred boundaries of art, craft and design, how these makers approach creativity and how their learning activities fit within informal, non-formal and formal learning approaches. This study does not attempt to reinforce or redefine the boundaries between art, craft and design. Rather, this study suggests that practitioners and students want to explore the space between art, craft and design even though many academic institutions often attempt to reinforce boundaries between the three fields. The findings in this study were rich in details and these were used to create a framework for makers to begin or continue advancing their skills and knowledge in hands-on learning. The information provided could be used to bridge formal learning activities with informal and non-formal learning activities. Bridging these types of learning activities could better position future makers to become the producers of innovative ideas for our future economy. It is important to note that the investigator is also a maker. His background includes vocational education in cabinetmaking and millwork, and university education at a one-year exchange program in Germany and a BFA with a concentration in Industrial Design. His professional career includes fabrication and managerial experiences from a variety of production workshops at multiple locations across the United States and abroad, in countries such as England and Australia.

Committee:

Elizabeth B.-N. Sanders, Ph.D., (Advisor); Peter Chan, Ph.D., (Committee Member); David Staley, Ph.D., (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Art Education; Curricula; Design; Education; Epistemology; Fine Arts; Higher Education; Industrial Arts Education; Pedagogy; Teacher Education; Teaching; Vocational Education

Keywords:

Exploratory Study; User-Centered; Maker; Blurred Boundaries; Art; Craft; Design; Learning Journey

Alyoser, Abdulaziz ZSELF-REPORTED ATTITUDES AND PRACTICES OF MUSIC INSTRUCTORS IN KUWAIT REGARDING ADULT MUSIC LEARNERS
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, Music Education
The purpose of this qualitative descriptive research was to determine the self-reported attitudes and practices of music instructors in Kuwait regarding adult music learners. Of central importance to this investigation was how instructors approach adult music education in terms of preparation, goal-making, materials, and evaluation. Participants included 14 university faculty members from one music department in a high-population urban setting in the state of Kuwait. The research questions that guided the study included: (a) How do music instructors in Kuwait prepare for becoming teachers of adult music learners? (b) What are instructors’ goals in teaching adult music learners in Kuwait? (c) What are instructors’ chosen materials for adult music students in Kuwait? and (d) How do instructors in Kuwait approach evaluating their students as well as themselves? Data were gathered through a self-reported open-ended questionnaire that was developed by the researcher. Findings indicated that participants supported formal education opportunities for teachers, such as seminars and workshops. Teachers claimed that they wanted to see their students develop an appreciation for music, remain motivated, and become professional musicians. The participants used numerous resource materials for instruction, including materials designed specifically for adult music learners as well as teacher-modified materials. The educators also employed a variety of formal and informal evaluations such as tests and live feedback. Implications include implementing lifelong music making teaching practices in Kuwaiti music education, enhancing teaching practices and evaluation methods, improving the student-teacher relationship, and understanding adult music learners’ characteristics and their previous experience.

Committee:

Nathan Kruse, Dr (Committee Chair); Kathleen Horvath, Dr (Committee Member); Matthew Garrett , Dr (Committee Member); Denise Davis, Dr (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Music; Music Education

Keywords:

adult music learners, andragogy, lifelong music making, lifelong learning, Kuwait

Groman, Jennifer LynnFrom Calling to Crisis: The Growth Process of Teachers Through Crisis-Like Incidents
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2015, Elementary Education
The phenomena of crisis in the formation and development of teacher identity is not unknown in the field of educational research, yet the study of these phenomena tends to focus on preservice and novice teachers. The purpose of this research is to discover through veteran teacher narratives, descriptions of crisis-like incidents, as well as any growth and transformation they may have experienced in the context of the profession. By studying teacher stories I hope to contribute to the understanding of how teachers navigate their teaching lives and shifting identities, especially in the face of difficulty, and gain insight into the value of collectively sharing and talking about the stories together. This Organic and Narrative based inquiry engaged three veteran teachers in conversations about the difficulties and challenges (crisis-like situations) of their teaching lives. The stories of crisis-like incidents (Veteran Stories) varied greatly, but themes emerged, such as: passion for the profession; varying needs for reflection; conflict of personal beliefs and institutional beliefs; conflict of belonging and not belonging; harmed and healed relationships; and the presence of a strongly held core belief. The process of sharing crisis stories in a safe and caring environment was quite transformative for participants. Their reflections indicated increased understanding of self and others, desire to be of service, a sense of wellbeing and personal implications, as well. They concluded that teachers often cause crisis-like incidents for other teachers, and that reflecting on incidents, while emotionally difficult, proved valuable to them. The researcher gained increased awareness of the vulnerabilities and risk in teaching, and now views herself as moving into teacher Elderhood. Early readers responded to the stories of crisis with stories of their own, demonstrating the truly widespread nature of crisis-like incidents in the lives of public school teachers. Recommendations for the profession include increased time and space for teachers to talk to one another about their philosophical beliefs and values and the value of a healthy, trusting school culture. Further research is needed to unearth aspects of critical incidents among teachers with varying philosophical viewpoints, as well as the phenomena of teachers causing critical incidents to other teachers.

Committee:

Gary Holliday, Dr. (Advisor); Renee Mudrey-Camino, Dr. (Committee Member); Alfred Daviso, Dr. (Committee Member); Sandra Spickard-Prettyman, Dr. (Committee Member); Rebecca McElfresh, Dr. (Committee Member); Diane Montgomery, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Psychology; Elementary Education; Middle School Education; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Philosophy; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Spirituality; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Crisis, critical incidents, teaching, teacher training, organic inquiry, narrative inquiry, transpersonal psychology, stories, narratives, teacher stories, teacher identity, identity

Trehan, Dawn MarieThe Impact of Concept Mapping as a Learning Tool on Student Perceptions of and Experiences with Introductory Statistics
PHD, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
The ability to understand and utilize statistics concepts and techniques is paramount in today's data-rich society. However, research suggests widespread difficulties and misconceptions as well as prevalent affective challenges, such as anxiety and lack of confidence, in the learning of basic statistics concepts at all levels of education. The purpose of this study was to document the experience of incorporating concept mapping as a learning tool to augment the learning of students in an undergraduate introductory statistics course in an adult learning setting. The study explored students' experiences with concept mapping as a learning tool and examined the impact of this use of concept mapping on student perception by addressing the following questions: (a) How do students experience the learning of introductory statistical concepts through the use of concept mapping? (b) How do students in an introductory statistics course perceive the impact of their use of concept mapping on their ability to relate and apply important statistical concepts? Case study methodology was followed and data included observations, interviews, documents, questionnaires, and reflective journals. These data were analyzed in order to produce a detailed narrative describing the participants' experiences and perceptions regarding the impact of concept mapping on the learning of basic statistics concepts and to illuminate meaningful patterns from the participants' perspectives and experiences. Findings suggest students have mixed experiences with the use of concept mapping, and they felt their ability to integrate statistical concepts was enhanced through concept map use, but not their ability to apply concepts for problem-solving.

Committee:

William Kist, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Karl Kosko, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Evgenia Soprunova, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Mathematics Education; Statistics

Keywords:

concept mapping; statistics education; introductory statistics; adult learners; undergraduate statistics

Semer, ClaireExploring the Academic Success of Student Veterans in Higher Education
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2015, Judith Herb College of Education
Any veteran should be able to earn a degree without struggling financially, emotionally, or academically on or off campus. The purpose of this research study was to explore the college experience of student veterans and identify ways to help them succeed academically. More specifically, this study sought to identify factors that predict the academic success of veterans in their first year of college. The researcher examined veterans’ experiences in college, inside and outside the classroom, in order to identify which engagement activities, if any, influenced their first-term cumulative GPA. The researcher found the following seven variables to be statistically significant predictors of student veterans’ first-term GPA: (a) race, (b) the number of credit hours taken, (c) talking to faculty members about career aspirations, (d) receiving oral feedback from a faculty member about academic performance, (e) attending events on campus, (f) exercising or participating in physical activities, and (g) time spent commuting to class. Increased veteran enrollment has merited examination of the challenges student veterans have encountered at higher education institutions. This study adds to the limited body of knowledge on this topic and contributes to a future plan for the successful education of veterans who attend college.

Committee:

Ron Opp (Committee Chair); Dave Meabon (Committee Member); Debra Harmening (Committee Member); Thomas Barden (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Higher Education

Hayes, Susan M.A Mixed Methods Perspective: How Integral Leaders Can Contribute to the Growth of Emerging Leaders
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2015, Leadership and Change
Given that organizational complexity continues to increase, leaders are looking for credible information, and a process that helps them become a better leader. Emerging leaders are faced with trying to be the best leader they can be while leading teams of people who think and act differently from them. To assist emerging leaders with their leadership, this study explores the literature and looks to highly respected and admired leaders for how they became the leader they are today. The purpose of this study was fourfold: first, to identify and describe first and second tier integral theory leaders from a sample of leader respondents from a U.S. Midwestern city; second, to describe how first and second tier integral theory leaders define leadership; third, to determine what second tier integral leaders see as leading to their becoming the leader they are today; and fourth, to identify the integral leader’s perspectives and advice that can be shared with emerging leaders. This study focused on the convergent space of three theories. The first theory is the field of adult development theory with transformational leadership, the constructive-developmental theories, and meaning making; the second is the field of integral theory with Wilber’s all quadrants, all levels (AQAL) theory, and first and second tier consciousness; and the last is the hero’s journey as described by Joseph Campbell, and the quest for truth. The (AQAL) framework was used in a mixed methods perspective to explore how people assessed as integral leaders defined leadership, developed into integral leaders, and how they can contribute to the growth of emerging leaders. This study was dual-phased: Phase 1 was a quantitative and qualitative survey completed by 624 leaders, and Phase 2 was a telephone interview with eight integral leaders. From the thematic analysis of all the data, four themes emerged: looking inward, looking outward, being a good leader and paying it forward by mentoring others. Implications for emerging leaders, leadership and change, and future research are discussed. This ETD is available in open access in OhioLink ETD, http://ohiolink.edu/Center and AURA http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ron Cacioppe, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Rica Viljoen, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

mixed methods; integral theory; hero journey; spiral dynamics; tier one development; tier two development; leader; leadership; adult development; emerging leaders

Adkisson, Anthony CraigThe Unemployed Adult in the Liminal Space of a Job-Training Program: Transformations of Learner Identities
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2016, College of Education and Human Services
This research addresses the impact job-readiness programs have on the identity of unemployed adults. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the transformational learning that happened for a group of seven unemployed adults seeking employment. The research considered: 1) what meaning do unemployed adults make out of their experience going through job-training programs; 2) what are the liminal aspects of job-training programs; 3) how do aspects of the job-training programs influence the development of their identity; 4) what are the ways the programs shapes their views toward learning; and 5) in what ways was this experience transformative? Data were collected through interviews with participants and facilitators, and workshop observations. The findings of this study demonstrate how learners with barriers use learning environments as a space to further work on and develop their identities. The significance of this study demonstrates the need to consider program space and structure when working with unemployed adult learners with barriers to employment.

Committee:

Catherine Monaghan, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Catherine Hansman, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Brian Harper, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jonathan Messemer, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Helen Liggett, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education

Keywords:

Adult Learning, Workforce Development, Liminal Space, Transformational Learning

Carson, KristinaLa survie du breton en France par l'education, The Survival of Breton in France through Education
Bachelor of Arts (BA), Ohio University, 2015, French
Regional languages have existed in present-day France for millennia. However, there have been efforts throughout history to destroy them so that French could be the dominant language in the country. Breton is the regional language spoken in Brittany, and with Celtic roots, is unique from many of the other regional languages. Today, efforts to maintain and develop Breton are made mainly through education, both in the public and private sectors. Although Breton's situation in France has greatly improved in recent history, there are still many steps that need to be taken in order to secure the language's future.

Committee:

Lois Vines, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Bilingual Education; Education; Language; Linguistics; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern Language; Regional Studies; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

langues regionales; regional language; breton; France

Appleman, Michael JEmerging Adulthood: The Pursuit of Higher Education
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2015, Educational Foundations-Social/Philosophical Foundations of Education
The introduction of this thesis project will provide an overview of emerging adulthood and the context of higher education in contemporary society. In chapter two, a conceptualization of emerging adulthood will be provided. Given the social psychological nature of emerging adulthood, chapter two will explain the influence of identity development and social factors on emerging adults. In chapter three, self-authorship will be discussed as a theory for considering how emerging adults make meaning of their experiences, progress toward mature thinking, and assume responsible roles in adult life. Next, chapter four will provide an analysis of the relationship between emerging adults and higher education. An emphasis in chapter four will be the Learning Partnerships Model which articulates the potential for higher education to foster the development of self-authorship. This will provide one example of the way higher education cultivates individuals, and the implications for emerging adults. Lastly, a conclusion follows in chapter five to discuss the intersections between emerging adulthood, self-authorship, and higher education, with an emphasis on the social and cultural implications of emerging adulthood as a newly theorized phase in the human lifespan.

Committee:

Suzanne Mac Donald, Dr. (Advisor); Li Huey-Li, Dr. (Committee Member); Sandra Spickard-Prettyman, Dr. (Committee Member); Megan Moore-Gardner, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Aging; Cognitive Psychology; Curriculum Development; Education Philosophy; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Individual and Family Studies; Multicultural Education; Social Psychology; Social Structure; Sociology; Teaching

Keywords:

emerging adulthood; higher education; self-authorship; educational philosophy; social and cultural foundations; lifespan; student development; identity development; decision-making; possible selves; future-oriented thinking; student learning outcomes

Lewinski, Sandra L.Relative distance and the use of `this’ and `that’ and possible deictic response
Master of Arts, University of Toledo, 2014, College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences
Previous studies have been done on the use of `this’ and `that’ by native speakers (NSs) of English, non-native speakers (NNSs) of English or foreign language speakers (FLSs) by Kelly-Lopez (2005), Esseili (2006), Hickman (2005), and Imai (2003). Although the first three studies were very well thought out they were missing one point that Imai had. But as Esseili points out in her thesis, Imai’s research was flawed because he told his subjects what he was looking for. I want to re-do his test but remove the bias from the study to see if the presentation of objects would be more likely to elicit `this’ for near objects and `that’ for objects that are farther away from the subjects. In the current study four identical objects will be presented to subjects aligned at equal distances on a flat plane going away from the subjects on a mat, either on a table or on the floor. They may or may not be able to touch the items they are referring to. This will allow the researcher to see if the relative distance from the subject is important or not in the use of `this’ and `that’ and if Imai’s “contact/control” theory is valid (Imai, p. 135). Affective distance of all objects presented horizontally to the subjects has been proven to have the same effect on the choice of `this’ or `that’, whether closer or farther from the subject. Using NSs and NNSs of English, I plan on testing relative distance of the same types of objects, set up on a table or on the floor, so that one object is closest to the subject and the following items are spaced on the axis so that the final object presented is completely out of the subject’s physical reach. I feel that this presentation will elicit the desired response of `this’ and `that’ along with other possible deixis responses from the subjects. I would ask the subject in random order which item is first, second, third, and fouth. I also will use the survey provided by Christman for the assessment of handedness to check if handedness has a possible impact on the physical responses by the subjects. If the responses are as expected then it would show that relative distance does have an effect on the selection of `this’ and `that’ of the items presented in a straight line going away from the subjects by NSs and NNSs. The opposite could also happen where, same as affective distance, there is no difference between the use of `this’ and `that’ and if there is a difference between NSs and NNSs.

Committee:

Douglas Coleman, Ph. D. (Committee Chair); Stephen Christman, Ph. D. (Committee Co-Chair); Paul Fritz, Ph. D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Bilingual Education; English As A Second Language; Linguistics

Keywords:

Hard Science Linguistics; relative distance; absolute distance; English as a Second Language; Linguistics; contact-control; TESOL

Lenzo, Terri BrownOnline Professional Development in Preschool Settings: Music Education Training for Early Childhood Generalists
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College of the Arts / School of Music
TERRI BROWN LENZO, PH.D., DECEMBER, 2014 MUSIC ONLINE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN PRESCHOOL SETTINGS: MUSIC EDUCATION TRAINING FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD GENERALISTS Dissertation Adviser: Dr. Craig Resta Preschool generalists are often responsible for leading musical activities despite the fact that they may not have received training. The online format showed promise for ameliorating training barriers such as time commitment, cultural misconceptions regarding music education, and self-efficacy for leading musical activities. Therefore, the purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the effectiveness of an online training program for increasing preschool generalist self-efficacy for leading musical activities. This was research of the quasi-experimental genre in which a one-group pretest-posttest design was utilized. The researcher conducted four preschool music classes which were videotaped by an assistant. Selected recordings were combined with narrated PowerPoint presentations to create three separate video-training modules focused on teaching techniques for leading singing, instrumental, and movement activities. The modules were posted online and designed to allow unlimited asynchronous access for a two-week period. Using purposeful sampling methods, participants were recruited by contacting affiliates of the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Snowball sampling was also employed. The sample (n = 26) included classroom educators working in child care centers and independent settings from all six regions of the United States. Data were collected via Qualtrics online survey service and analyzed with IBM SPSS. At an alpha level of .05, overall teacher self-efficacy for leading musical activities increased significantly (p = .005). Self-efficacy for leading specific singing, instrumental, and movement activities increased in 21 of 22 categories, and 14 of those findings were statistically significant. The significant findings for teaching musical concepts and facilitating the development of creativity were particularly meaningful as previous researchers have found these activities lacking in preschool curricula. Significant results were also obtained for beliefs about inherited musical talent. Given an appropriate training design, study data support the use of an online delivery method for the music education professional development of in-service preschool generalists. Implications exist for the training of other generalist populations and music specialists. Considering the critical nature of early childhood musical development, additional training programs should be implemented with classroom teachers and music educators.

Committee:

Craig Resta, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Behavioral Sciences; Curricula; Early Childhood Education; Inservice Training; Instructional Design; Music; Music Education; Teacher Education; Technology

Keywords:

online training; self-efficacy; early childhood; musical development; music education; musical activities; child care centers; preschool students; classroom teachers

Passero, ThomasUsing popular culture to teach the community college business curriculum: A comparative study
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2011, Higher Education
This study addressed a need for comprehensive quantitative empirical studies to determine the effectiveness of using popular culture media as a teaching technique. A quasi-experimental design was implemented to examine whether a group of community college students taking a first-semester introduction to business course who were exposed to a teaching method incorporating popular culture media (Treatment Group) would have increased levels of knowledge and stronger preferences toward this method versus a group of students taking the same course who were not exposed to this teaching style (Control Group). Specifically, this study examined: (1) Do differences exist relative to student learning; (2) Do differences exist relative to perceived student comprehension; (3) Do differences exist relative to student semester retention; (4) Do differences exist relative to student semester attendance; (5) Do differences exist relative to student interest in the discipline of business; (6) Do differences exist relative to student’s interest in taking additional business courses; (7) Do differences exist relative to student satisfaction; (8) Do differences exist relative to student satisfaction between Millennial students and non-Millennial student. The 143 students taking part in the study comprised six intact groups, meaning they selected the days and times of the sections available that appealed to them (non-random samples). Without the students’ knowledge, the researcher/instructor arbitrarily selected three sections as the Treatment Groups and three as the Control Groups. Throughout the semester, general business concepts from the course textbook were taught to the Treatment Group using films, television shows, comic strips, and music. The Control Group were taught the same concepts but without the use of any popular culture media. Participants completed Pre-Delivery and Post-Delivery attitudinal questionnaires and took five multiple-choice exams during term. The fit of survey and exam data were tested using the Rasch model, with further hypotheses testing accomplished with Independent t’s, Chi-square cross-tabulations, and dependent paired samples. The analyses showed no significance between the groups receiving different teaching methods on knowledge, retention, or attendance. However, there were statistically significant differences on perceived knowledge, interest in the business major, interest in taking additional business courses, and course satisfaction for both the Treatment Group and Control Group favoring the popular culture-enhanced methodology. Regarding generational attitudes this alternative teaching method, both the Millennial and Non-millennial sub-groups strongly favored the popular culture techniques over the traditional ones. Implications for students and instructors are discussed, along with suggestions for future research.

Committee:

David Meabon, PhD (Committee Chair); Mary Ellen Edwards, PhD (Committee Member); Angela M. Nelson, PhD (Committee Member); Gregory E. Stone, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Business Education; Education; Educational Tests and Measurements; Experiments; Higher Education; Inservice Training; Instructional Design; Mass Media; Pedagogy; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

teaching techniques: instructional methodology; popular culture; quantitative study; quasi-experimental; Rasch; community college; millennial; survey; media; business education; empirical study

O'Brien, Katherine FSuccess of Developmental Readers: An Examination of Factors Affecting Attrition and Institutional Practices Which Support Retention
PHD, Kent State University, 2013, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
Students who enter higher education requiring reading remediation have poor institutional persistence. This study examined the course success and first-year institutional persistence of six women enrolled in a developmental reading course at a regional campus of a state university. Data sets were comprised of classroom observation, review of academic records, and interviews with students and their instructor. Three of the women were successful in the course while three were not. The cross-participant analysis revealed five factors associated with student success and institutional persistence. Successful students had more frequent attendance and were more engaged with their professors outside of class than unsuccessful students. Those who were recent high school graduates were less likely to succeed than students who had a gap between high school and college. While adult responsibilities such as raising children impacted students’ progress, these factors did not affect success in developmental reading. Most notably, students who were successful in the course and persisted through the first year had support systems both off-campus and on-campus including a college employee.

Committee:

Alexa Sandmann (Advisor); William Bintz (Committee Member); Tricia Niesz (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Literacy; Reading Instruction

Keywords:

persistence; attrition; student success; developmental education; remediation; developmental readers

Watts, Rebecca L.An Exploration of Community College Transfer Alumni Perceptions of their Undergraduate Experiences and Subsequent Alumni Affinity
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2013, Higher Education (Education)
The study explored transfer alumni perceptions of their community college and university experiences, their alumni affinity as measured by the frequency of alumni engagement with each institution, and what motivates that engagement. Study participants rated their university experiences more positively than those at their community college and reported engaging in more alumni activities with their university than their community college. Based on the findings, recommendations for practitioners include enhanced documentation and communication of the learning and development outcomes gained through the community college experience, increased university support services for transfer students, and increased community college outreach efforts with alumni.

Committee:

Henning John, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Young Robert, Ph.D. (Advisor); Horton David, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Brooks Gordon, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Descutner David, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Theory; Higher Education

Keywords:

transfer student; community college student; transfer alumni; alumni affinity; student satisfaction; student development; residential student; non-residential campus; at-risk college students; community college alumni outreach; university alumni outreach

Foor, Ryan M.Job Satisfaction of Agricultural Communication, Agricultural Leadership, Agricultural Teacher Education, and Extension Education Faculty
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2009, Agricultural and Extension Education

This study was conducted using survey research methods. The review of related literature revealed there was no recent measure of the level of overall job satisfaction among agricultural teacher educators in the United States using the Three Factor Job Satisfaction Scale. Additionally, there appeared to be no measure of the level of overall job satisfaction among faculty members specializing in agricultural communication, agricultural leadership, and extension education using the Three Factor Job Satisfaction Scale. The Three Factor Job Satisfaction Scale measured the level of satisfaction with the policy and administration, personal growth and satisfaction, and fiscal resources job factors in addition to the level of overall job satisfaction. Demographic characteristics of faculty members were also collected for the study. The level of overall job satisfaction was regressed on the policy and administration, personal growth and satisfaction, and fiscal resources job factors. Demographic characteristics were not included in the regression analysis.

Faculty members specializing in the areas of agricultural communication, agricultural leadership, agricultural teacher education, and extension education were moderately satisfied with their job. Faculty members were moderately satisfied with the personal growth and satisfaction aspects of their job, while only slightly satisfied with job factors pertaining to policy and administration and fiscal resources. The three job factors explained 67% of the variance in the level of overall job satisfaction of faculty members. The personal growth and satisfaction job factor facilitated a greater increase in the level of overall job satisfaction than the policy and administration and fiscal resources job factors. Therefore, it was concluded that faculty professional development activities should focus on aspects related to the personal growth and satisfaction job factor.

Committee:

Dr. Jamie Cano, PhD (Advisor); Dr. Robert J. Birkenholz, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Agricultural Education

Keywords:

job satisfaction; professional development

Paiz, Joshua MartinExamining L1 and L2 Use in Idea Generation for Japanese ESL Writers
Master of Arts, University of Toledo, 2011, English (Literature)

This thesis examines the effects of the language used in an idea generation task on the quantity and potential quality of ideas developed during a timed idea generation task; quality here being how developed the ideas are. This was done by having two Japanese ESL students, of differing proficiency levels, engage in three rounds of idea generation tasks using their native language (Japanese), their second language (English), or the language of their choice depending on the round. When the participants finished a round of idea generation, they then wrote a short essay, in English.

To code the data, the Japanese was glossed into English. Then all idea generation tasks (English, Japanese, Choice) were coded using a modified version of episodic units (see Brice, 2005). This thesis corroborates findings of Wang and Wen (2003); which seems to suggest that the language used in idea generation may correlate to a writer’s level of English proficiency. Also, it was discovered that the participants of this study appeared to develop their ideas more thoroughly in English, as opposed to Japanese. This may be because of differences in the languages “communication mode(s)”(Scarborough, 1998).

Committee:

Melinda Reichelt, PhD (Committee Chair); Anthony Edgington, PhD (Committee Member); Douglas Coleman, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Composition; Education; English As A Second Language; Language

Keywords:

Second Language Writing; L2 Writing; ESL Writing; Japanese ESL Writers; L1 and L2 use in writing

Edwards, Alexander KyeiProfessional Citizenship and Otherness Leadership Development: Examining the Relationships among Meaning, Moral Reasoning, and Diversity Competencies of Graduate Students
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Leadership Studies

This dissertation explored the relationships among three variables: meaning, moral reasoning, and diversity competencies. The relationships were examined to attempt explaining two central themes: professional citizenship and otherness leadership. A sampling of graduate students from business and education colleges at a Midwestern public institution was surveyed online with the Otherness Development Survey. The survey instrument had 104 items in four parts. Part one addressed meaning in life (as in spirituality) with ten items; part two had six managerial-based scenarios with several subsections to measure moral reasoning; and part three had 15 items measuring universal diversity competencies. The last part was a demographic survey.

The results from the survey showed a low response rate, which imposed some limitations on the subsequent data analyses. The study limitations, including instrumentation and administration, are worth noting. However, the descriptive statistics and a limited inferential statistics yielded interesting results. Overall, the relationships among the main variables showed no statistical significance. But there were interesting relationships among the various subsections that were discussed. Practical applications of the present study focused on the discussions on such concepts as spirituality, morality, and diversity in both business and education. Importantly, the interrelationships of meaning, moral reasoning, and diversity competencies were discussed for pedagogical development in higher education. The interplay of these concepts was recommended for the creation of purpose, moral responsibilities, and altruism and constructive appreciation of otherness in a cultural heterogeneity among college graduates.

Finally, further recommendations were discussed for adulthood literature, pedagogical studies, and scholarship on professionalism and otherness leadership. In particular, it is recommended that curricula in business and education should be holistic, facilitate the processes of civic consciousness, and promote inclusiveness. The present study has set the agenda for further explorations and discussions on the two themes of professional citizenship and otherness leadership.

Committee:

Patrick Pauken (Advisor); Steve Cady (Committee Member); Roger Colcord (Committee Member); Mary Ellen Edwards (Committee Member); Judith Zimmerman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Higher Education; Management; Multicultural Education; School Administration; Teacher Education

Keywords:

professional citizenship; otherness leadership; spirituality; meaning; moral reasoning; morality; diversity competencies; business; education; graduate students; adulthood

Heiss, Brandon M.The Effectiveness of Implementing Classroom Response Systems in the Corporate Environment
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Career and Technology Education/Technology
Throughout education and training, instructors strive to create innovating as well as effective tools to assist their teaching skills. For this study, the researcher sought to determine whether the implementation of Classroom Response Systems (CRS) in a corporate environment would be an effective teaching method. Participants in this study were composed of employees at a Columbus, Ohio reprographics company. The employees were divided into either a control group, which received strictly lecture-based learning, or a treatment group, which used CRS technology integrated within a lecture. Using a pre-test post-test design method, the researcher wanted to determine if there was a difference in the amount of knowledge gained between the two groups. Along with observing a knowledge transfer between the groups, the researcher also wanted to determine whether the CRS technology was easy to use. Finally, the researcher tied in age demographics to determine if Digital Natives were more comfortable with using technology within this study than Digital Immigrants, or vice-versa. Analyses of the data indicated that there was a difference in scores between the participants using CRS technology integrated within their training lecture, and those students whose training was strictly lecture-based. The treatment group scores averaged 11% higher on their post-tests when compared to the control group scores. The researcher also observed participants disclosed in post-test results that CRS technology was easy to use, innovative, and kept their attention throughout the entire training session. The results of this study indicated that trainers, much like educators in higher education, must teach with engaging technologies as opposed to lecture-based pedagogies only.

Committee:

Terry Herman, PhD (Committee Chair); Paul Cesarini (Committee Member); Carrie Rathsack (Committee Member); Laney Fugett (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Software; Teaching

Keywords:

Classroom Response Systems; Clickers; Corporate Training; Training Effectiveness; Classroom Technology

Richardson, Anne E.Explainers' development of science-learner identities through participation in a community of practice
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies
The urgent environmental issues of today require science-literate adults to engage in business and political decisions to create solutions. Despite the need, few adults have the knowledge and skills of science literacy. This doctoral dissertation is an analytical case study examining the science-learner identity development of Exploratorium Field Trip Explainers. Located in San Francisco, CA, the Exploratorium is a museum of science, art, and human perception dedicated to nurturing curiosity and exploration. Data collected included semi-structured interviews with sixteen former Field Trip Explainers, participant observation of the current Field Trip Explainer Program, and review of relevant documentation. Data analysis employed constant comparative analysis, guided by the communities of practice theoretical framework (Wenger, 1998) and the National Research Council's (2009) Six Strands of Science Learning. Findings of this research indicate that Exploratorium Field Trip Explainers participate in a community of practice made up of a diverse group of people that values curiosity and openness to multiple ways of learning. Many participants entered the Field Trip Explainer Program with an understanding of science learning as a rigid process reserved for a select group of people; through participation in the Field Trip Explainer community of practice, participants developed an understanding of science learning as accessible and a part of everyday life. The findings of this case study have implications for research, theory, and practice in informal adult science learning, access of non-dominant groups to science learning, and adult workplace learning in communities of practice.

Committee:

Elizabeth McCann, PhD (Committee Chair); Tania Schusler, PhD (Committee Member); Joe Heimlich, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Educational Theory; Environmental Education; Environmental Studies; Museum Studies; Museums; Science Education

Keywords:

Explainers; Science Museum Educators; Communities of Practice; Informal Learning; Science Literacy; Science Learning; Museums; Exploratorium; Adult Learning; Workplace Learning

Jacoby, Jill BethArt, Water, and Circles: In What Ways Do Study Circles Empower Artists to Become Community Leaders around Water Issues
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2009, Leadership and Change
This research explored the use of study circles as a means of engaging artists in dialogue with their peers about water related concerns. The question driving this research was, “In what ways do study circles empower artists to become community leaders around water issues?” Secondary questions focused on emerging environmental, water, and social justice themes as well as examples of increased water awareness and behavior change occurring as a result of individual participation in the study circles. Artists have a unique way of commanding attention and communicating about environmental concerns while functioning as catalysts for activism on a variety of social topics. Barndt (2004, 2006,2008) has written extensively about the nexus between community-based art, activism and action research, as well as identifying the important differences in participation and intent behind community-based art versus art as commodity. This research incorporated the use of study circles (also known as dialogue groups, dialogue circles, or talking circles) with artists to learn how study circles empower artists to become community leaders. Literature focusing on civic engagement and the arts has looked at the process of utilizing the arts to engage the public in dialogue about a social concern. This research differs in that it focused on how a dialogue process impacts artists. Seventeen artists participated in four study circle sessions that encouraged in-depth dialogue on water quality concerns. Lohan’s (2008) Water Consciousness: How we all Have to Change to Protect our Most Critical Resources was used as a study guide and to focus the dialogue sessions. The artists participated in one-on-one semi-structured interviews to help clarify the relationship between the study circles and their own water awareness as well as community building, collaboration, and/or leadership among the artists. A focus group was used to obtain feedback on the value of study circles for social change. Key findings from this research conclude that the study circles brought about new methods for problem identification and solving, individual behavior changes, a deeper understanding for others, and the dialogue provided a powerful catalyst for collaboration, leadership and relationship building. The electronic version of this dissertation is available in the open access OhioLink ETD Center, http://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Steve Chase, PhD (Committee Member); David Attyah, MFA (Other)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Ecology; Environmental Science; Fine Arts; Freshwater Ecology; Personal Relationships; Science Education; Social Research

Keywords:

action research; study circles; dialogue circles; popular education; water resources; activist art; social change; public art; environmental art; community-based art; collaborative leadership; environmental leadership; civic engagement

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