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Minix, Matthew GlenMid-Twentieth Century Neo-Thomist Approaches to Modern Psychology
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2016, Theology
This dissertation considers a spectrum of five distinct approaches that mid-twentieth century neo-Thomist Catholic thinkers utilized when engaging with the tradition of modern scientific psychology: a critical approach, a reformulation approach, a synthetic approach, a particular [Jungian] approach, and a personalist approach. This work argues that mid-twentieth century neo-Thomists were essentially united in their concerns about the metaphysical principles of many modern psychologists as well as in their worries that these same modern psychologists had a tendency to overlook the transcendent dimension of human existence. This work shows that the first four neo-Thomist thinkers failed to bring the traditions of neo-Thomism and modern psychology together to the extent that they suggested purely theoretical ways of reconciling them. Finally, this work concludes that a personalist approach to modern psychology that locates the reconciliation of these two traditions within the practice of individual human beings rather than within a theoretical dialogue between the traditions themselves has the potential to succeed where theoretical neo-Thomist accounts of these traditions failed.

Committee:

Sandra Yocum, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); William Portier, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Anthony Smith, Ph.D. (Committee Member); John Inglis, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jack Bauer, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Neo-Thomist approaches to modern psychology; Neo-Thomist psychology in the 20th century; spectrum of Thomist psychology; American Thomist responses to psychology;

Romero, Michael AnthonyThe Laying on of Hands and the Building Up of the Catholic Charismatic Movement
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2016, Theological Studies
The Catholic Charismatic Movement, inheriting the use of the laying on of hands from the Neo-Pentecostal movement, was able to grow and flourish because the laying on of hands was seen as a channel by which one could experience a spiritual renewal. The Catholic Charismatic Movement’s own rationale behind the use of the laying on of hands has fallen short in assessing its value during the early growth of the movement. The appraisal of the laying on of hands as a symbolic gesture or a sacramental is challenged in this study, and a new interpretation of the use of the laying on of hands is offered: the laying on of hands is a charism that built up the Catholic Charismatic Movement. The personal spiritual journeys of William Storey and Ralph Keifer are analyzed to understand what led them to their encounter with the Protestant Pentecostal prayer group, where the Catholics first received the baptism in the Spirit by the laying on of hands. The subsequent “Duquesne Weekend” retreat and the growth of the movement on the campus of Notre Dame are also studied in respect to the prevalent use of and the sought-after nature of the laying on of hands. My interpretation of the laying on of hands as a charism relies on the pneumatology of Heribert Muhlen. Muhlen’s description of the Church as the continuation of the anointing of Jesus with the Spirit, and his understanding of the Spirit as the divine self-giving supports the idea that in the laying on of hands the two parties are surrendering to the church and the Spirit. Ultimately, the laying on of hands in this context is a charism for the community where the public witness of the act edifies and strengthens.

Committee:

Sandra Yocum, Ph.D. (Advisor); Meghan Henning, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Dennis Doyle, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; History; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

laying on of hands; renewal; catholic charismatic movement; william storey; ralph keifer; pentecostalism; Heribert Muhlen; duquesne weekend; charism; sacramentals; jervell; acts 8; wolfgang vondey; baptism in the Spirit; pneumatology; trinity; Laurentin;

Schmidt, Katherine G.Virtual Communion: Theology of the Internet and the Catholic Imagination
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2016, Theology
As virtual space, the internet can be understood theologically through the doctrinal loci of the incarnation and the church. These two doctrines pervade both scholarly and ecclesial discussions of technology and the internet to date, and remain the central doctrinal categories with which theologians should assess internet culture. In its broader sacramental imagination and its ecclesiology, the church relies on virtual space insofar as it relies on the productive tension between presence and absence. Furthermore, the social possibilities of the internet afford the church great opportunity for building a social context that allows the living out of Eucharistic logic learned in properly liturgical moments.

Committee:

Vincent Miller, Ph.D. (Advisor); William Portier, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jana Bennett, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Angela Ann Zukowski, D. Min. (Committee Member); Sandra Yocum, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Multimedia Communications; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

theology; religious studies; media studies; internet; internet studies; sacrament; ecclesiology

Archer, Matthew D.Proclaiming Christ: Thomas Aquinas and Karl Barth on Handing on the Word of God in Human Words
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2016, Theology
This dissertation seeks to offer an account of the presence of the Word of God in human words, the presence of Jesus in the Church’s speech about him. This topic is explored by taking Thomas Aquinas and Karl Barth as interlocutors, framing an ecumenical and systematic approach to analyzing the mystery of the Church’s preaching and teaching through comparing and contrasting their works on the Word of God. Special focus is on the role of handing on the Word in three genres: biblical exegesis, sermons, and systematic presentations of Christian doctrine (summa and dogmatics). My aim is to offer a Catholic and ecumenical theology of the Word of God: my three-genre focus is essential to this task.

Committee:

Matthew Levering (Advisor); Vincent Miller (Committee Member); Jana Bennett (Committee Member); Brad Kallenberg (Committee Member); Reinhard Huetter (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Theology and Genre; Thomas Aquinas; Karl Barth; Word of God; Doctrine of the Word of God

Hentschel, Jason AshleyEvangelicals, Inerrancy, and the Quest for Certainty: Making Sense of Our Battles for the Bible
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2015, Theology
This dissertation seeks to understand and evaluate the hermeneutical logic and apologetic mentality behind American evangelicalism’s appeal to biblical inerrancy during its twentieth- and twenty-first-century battles for the Bible. In nuanced agreement with Christian Smith’s charge that evangelicalism’s pervasive interpretive pluralism renders appeals to biblical inerrancy meaningless, I argue that what drives the perpetuation of such appeals is a fundamental desire for epistemic certainty in the face of what is perceived to be a devastating subjectivism. This is a certainty said to be obtained and maintained by an oversimplified conception of sola scriptura and a biblical hermeneutic replete with modernistic assumptions about textual objectivity and the effects of history and tradition upon interpretation. After attending to the intersection of the hermeneutical theory of Hans-Georg Gadamer with those of high-profile evangelicals James Packer and Clark Pinnock, I propose the adoption of a more community-centered conception of biblical authority alongside a rehabilitation of faith as trust in God’s own faithfulness.

Committee:

William Trollinger, Jr. (Advisor); Brad Kallenberg (Committee Member); William Portier (Committee Member); Anthony Smith (Committee Member); Peter Thuesen (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Modern History; Religion; Religious History; Theology

Keywords:

Evangelicalism; inerrancy; certainty; sola scriptura; biblical hermeneutics

Larocca Grosso, Antonio de JesusLa maternidad espiritual de Maria: acontecimiento, permanencia y actualizacion de su presencia
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2007, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Johann Roten, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, Motherhood, Spiritual

Wiseman, Denis Vincent"Al nome di Gesu Cristo crocifisso e di Maria dolce": salvation and Mary in the life and writings of Catherine of Siena
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2001, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Johann Roten, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Catherine, of Siena, Saint, 1347-1380; Salvation, Christianity, History of Doctrines

Caro Osorio, Ernesto MariaLa virginidad de Maria: virginidad por el Reino: exploracion complexiva del ambiente socio-cultural-religioso de Jose y Maria previo a la Anunciacion y de su motivacion hacia un matrimonio celibatario
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2000, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, virginity, biblical teaching; Joseph, Saint; celibacy; marriage; Kingdom of God, biblical teaching

Sack, Susan K.Teilhard in America: The 1960s, the Counterculture, and Vatican II
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2014, Theology
Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, SJ, visionary priest, paleontologist, and writer, is an important landmark figure in twentieth-century French Catholicism. Especially from 1950 onward, Teilhard also significantly impacted the Catholicism of the United States. The period of 1959–1972 was the crucial age during which Teilhard’s writing and thought were first available in North America; over five hundred primary and secondary works concerning him were published in the US during these years. This period was also the decade of the counterculture, the Second Vatican Council, and the dissolution of the immigrant subculture of the church in the United States. A full-scale study of the U.S. reception of Teilhard de Chardin in this early period contributes not only to an awareness of the thought of this important figure and the impact of his work, but also further develops an understanding of U.S. Catholicism in its religious and cultural dimensions during these years, and provides clues as to how it has further unfolded over the past several decades. The manner in which this reception occurred, including the intensity of this phenomenon, happened as it did at this particular point in the history of both the United States and the Catholic Church because of the confluence of the then developing social milieu, the disintegration of the immigrant Catholic subculture, and the opening of the church to the world through Vatican II. Additionally, as these social and historical events unfolded within U.S. culture during these dozen years, the manner in which Teilhard was read, and the contributions which his thought provided changed. At various points his work became a carrier for an almost Americanist emphasis upon progress, energy and hope; at other times his teleological understanding of the value of suffering moved to center stage. Most importantly, Teilhard wrote concerning humanity’s desire for the divine, and strove to place that desire for unity within the context of both religion and science. In the end, it has been his attempts to leap the interstice between the secular and the sacred, particularly in terms of his Christology, that remain of value today, and which have had, and which continue to have impact upon U.S. Catholic theology.

Committee:

William Portier, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Dennis Doyle, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Kathleen Duffy, PhD (Committee Member); Anthony Smith, PhD (Committee Member); Cecilia Moore, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Religious History; Spirituality; Theology

Keywords:

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin; United States 1960s; Vatican II; American Counterculture; Teilhard historiography; American Teilhard Association, Catholic spirituality; Christology

DeLong, Tyler BenjaminEucharistic Unity, Fragmented Body: Christian Social Practice and the Market Economy
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2015, Theology
The following is an interpretive synopsis of Henri de Lubac and Karl Polanyi's particular thought about how human sociality is organized around the formal influence of theological and economic structures, giving shape to the practice of everyday life. For De Lubac, social fragmentation and unity are central theological categories for understanding both the first instance of sin and the unfolding of salvation in history. God is at work in the world as an active agent in the reparation of discordant humanity, restoring humankind to its original state as one collective body in the Church. Karl Polanyi's analysis of the rise of market economics gives us a historical instance of social and ecological fracture, providing the possibility of relating de Lubac's theological argument in a particular historical context. Two competing logics of social formation emerge: 1.) the Eucharist implicates human sociality toward deep forms of community in the Church; and 2.) the mechanism of the self-regulating market actively dissolves these thick forms of community, organizing sociality around capital markets and production. Placing de Lubac and Polanyi in conversation provides a way of thinking theologically about the history of unity and break in an increasingly dispersed social era.

Committee:

Vincent J. Miller, Ph.D. (Advisor); Kelly Johnson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Portier, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agriculture; Economic History; Economic Theory; Economics; Environmental Economics; Environmental Justice; Ethics; Home Economics; Labor Economics; Religion; Religious History; Social Structure; Sociology; Theology

Keywords:

Eucharist; Henri de Lubac; Karl Polanyi; Catholic Church; Ecclesiology; Capitalism; Free Market; Economics; Thomas Aquinas; Agrarianism; Ecology; Creation; Sociality; Christian Social Practice; Community; Distributism; Unity

Chua, CeliaMary, Chinese ancestor veneration, and the communion of saints
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2006, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Johann Roten, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Asian Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; ancestor worship; communion of saints; Taiwan; China

Adingra, EugeneLa pertinence de Ia foi de Marie dans les textes de l'Eglise les plus anciens (Ecritures) et les plus recents (Lumen Gentium et le Magistere depuis le Concile Vatican II).
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 2009, International Marian Research Institute
No abstract.

Committee:

Francois Rossier, S.M. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Vatican Council II; Lumen Gentium; Immaculate Heart of Mary

Grubbs, Jeffrey BryanTeacher Belief Research in Art Education: Analyzing a Church of Christ Christian College Art Educator Beliefs and their Influence on Teaching
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2010, Art Education
People are behaviorally and psychologically complex to a point that we cannot separate ourselves from our values, beliefs, and assumptions. In education, beliefs influence what, why, and how something is taught. This qualitative case study analyzed one art education professor who teaches at a Protestant Christian Church of Christ affiliated university. Analyzed was the art educator’s belief system in connection with pedagogical practices of art teaching in the areas of art history, art criticism, and art making. This research utilized literatures from art education, teacher belief research, and Christian theology, analyzing the interconnectedness of personal and professional belief systems in shaping and influencing pedagogical practice in art education.

Committee:

Sydney Walker, PhD (Advisor); Arthur Efland, PhD (Committee Member); Patricia Stuhr, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Bible; Education; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

art education; teacher belief research; qualitiaitve research; protestant Christian; Church of Christ; case study; belief; pedagogy; art criticism; art history; art making

Rocha, Biff"De Concilio's Catechism," Catechists, and the History of the Baltimore Catechism
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2013, IMRI Theology
The history of the Baltimore Catechism has been written largely by its critics. This work will provide a review of how catechisms developed over time, and the position of the leaders of the catechetical renewal. These new catechists characterize the creation of the Baltimore Catechism as hurried and lacking effort. A brief introduction into the life of the compiler, Fr. Januarius De Concilio, is followed by a closer examination of the text seeking to highlight some elements of originality within the work.

Committee:

William Portier, Ph.D (Advisor); Sandra Yocum, Ph.D (Committee Member); William Trollinger, Ph.D (Committee Member); Michael Barnes, Ph.D (Committee Member); Patrick Carey, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Education; History; Theology

Keywords:

Januarius De Concilio, catechesis, Third Plenary Council of Baltimore, Baltimore Catechism, Americanism, New Jersey

MacRobbie, Danielle ElizabethAn Investigation of Technological Impressions in Steve Reich and Beryl Korot's Three Tales
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2013, Music History
The impact of technology upon the twentieth century and the influence it continues to exert upon the present human community is self-evident. The allure and power of technology are broadcast via the grandest media and performance entertainment, while on the opposite spectrum, technology is being continually refined to render its electro-mechanical or bio-technical feats for humans. It is this theme of the increasing growth and import of technology upon every facet of human life that serves as the subject of Three Tales, a twenty-first century documentary digital video opera by composer Steve Reich and video artist Beryl Korot. In this work, Reich and Korot confront society's negligence of particular directions that technological development and application have undergone in the past century, and advise against taking the same paths in the coming era. Even as modern technology is critiqued in Three Tales, the work itself bends to accept the reality of technology's significance upon modern thought and life. In keeping with Reich and Korot's categorization of the work as a "documentary digital video opera," Three Tales is a performance work heavily dependent upon technology for its generation, presentation, and discussion of the interchange between technology and humankind. This thesis will investigate how technology has shaped the course of an artwork whose purpose is to expose and debate the handling of technology in current society. Technology in Three Tales is examined from various perspectives. Chapter one presents the foundational role of technology as "tool," "subject," and "theme." Chapter two considers how visual and audio technologies are used in Three Tales to suggest the effects technology may have upon perceptions of human connectedness and isolation. Chapter three investigates the inherent paradox in Three Tales that occurs from using technological devices for the work's production while its theme critiques modern, technological advances. The chapter also considers the influence technology has upon the formation of Three Tales's generic identification.

Committee:

Eftychia Papanikolaou (Advisor); Alexa Woloshyn (Committee Member); Mary Natvig (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biology; Ethics; History; Information Technology; Medical Ethics; Military History; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Music; Nanotechnology; Robotics; Robots; Spirituality; Technology; Theology

Keywords:

Steve Reich; Beryl Korot; Three Tales; Technology; Hindenburg zeppelin; Bikini Atoll; Cloning; electronic music; IRCAM; freeze frame sound; new music theater; Kismet; human connectedness; human isolation; technology and art; art and politics; paradox

Martin, Joseph LeeA Phenomenological Study of United Methodist and Conservative Jewish Clergy Viewpoints Concerning Their Eventual Deaths
PHD, Kent State University, 2008, College of Education, Health, and Human Services / Department of Adult, Counseling, Health and Vocational Education

The purpose of this study was to learn how 12 United Methodist and 12 Conservative Jewish clergy describe and understand their eventual deaths. Each religious group consisted of 6 male and 6 female clergy. Purposive sampling was used to acquire the 24 participants.

A transcendental phenomenological approach adapted from procedures described in Moustakas (1994) was used to explicate the data. Participants composed responses to the Clergy Death Anticipation Protocol (CDAP) developed for the study and derived from an extensive review of the death literature. The format consisted of five statements to solicit viewpoints related to eventual death. Areas of inquiry included (a) preferred death, (b) non-preferred death, (c) death scene, (d) emotions experienced, and (e) meaning ascribed to one’s eventual death.

Findings revealed that a general structure emerged from the viewpoints of the participants as a whole consisting of four overarching themes: (a) timing and manner of death, (b) relationship and closure, (c) variant emotions, and (d) eschatological/temporal frames of death. Results indicated that Timing and Manner of death linked to death occurring at an acceptable time and in a non-debilitating manner. Relationship and Closure linked to the value that significant others and religious rites play in life endings. Variant Emotions linked to participants’ distress their death would have on others. Participants expressed anxiety concerning the dying process and no anxiety for the afterlife. Eschatological/Temporal Frames of Death linked to the meaning participants ascribe to their eventual death. What lies beyond the present time is in the hands of a divine “Other.” The present time provides impetus to make contributions that go beyond self-serving ends.

The findings have implications for the counseling profession and clergy providing pastoral assistance to the dying and bereaved. Limitations to the research investigation were identified and suggestions for future research with clergy and counselors were provided.

Committee:

Martin Jencius, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Cynthia Osborn, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Joanne Caniglia, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clergy; Philosophy; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

phenomenology; clergy; death; United Methodist; Conservative Jewish; transcendental

O’Neil, Sean S.Thinking in the Spirit: The Emergence of Latin American Pentecostal Scholars and Their Theology of Social Concern
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2003, International Studies - Latin America

Latin American Pentecostalism is often characterized as being either socially and politically conservative or apolitical. Nevertheless, Latin American Pentecostal scholars have expressed progressive political and social concerns. In this thesis, I synthesize Latin American progressive Pentecostal theology and explore the prominence given to the Holy Spirit in such doctrine. I also examine the influences of liberation theology on the movement.

I argue that the emergence of progressive Latin American Pentecostal scholars has thus far been an ambiguous phenomenon. These scholars have played an important role in bringing Latin American Pentecostals into the ecumenical sphere. Also, their social doctrine seems to be both spurring and reinforcing social and political concern in some segments of grassroots Latin American Pentecostalism. On the other hand, progressive Pentecostalism has not resonated at the grassroots level to the degree that one might expect, given the marginalized social class base of Latin American Pentecostalism.

Committee:

Thomas Walker (Advisor)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Latin American Pentecostalism; Progressive Pentecostalism; Prophetic Pentecostals; Liberation Theology; Pentecostal Scholars; Social Doctrine

Peterson, Brian R. E.Ancient Voices: The Church Fathers in Ecumenical Conversations
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2012, Theology

A common feature of the Ecumenical Movement of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries is bi-lateral or multi-lateral dialogues. In these dialogues, two or more Christian churches arrange for meetings between representatives of each side in order to discuss how they can work toward the commonly accepted goal of “full visible unity” between the sides. This dissertation will examine the U.S. Lutheran-Catholic dialogue (hereafter, L/RC) which began in 1964 and is on-going. When churches hold these dialogues they use many sources in their conversations as they strive for ecumenical convergence, consensus, or agreement. One of the sources used in dialogues, and especially in the L/RC, that has not received any significant attention to date is the church fathers. This dissertation will examine how the L/RC used the fathers and in what capacity the fathers were an aid to the L/RC’s ecumenical work and in what capacity they were not.

As the goal of the Ecumenical Movement is the church’s “full and visible unity,” it should not be surprising that the vision of the church which has the most theological purchase at the moment is known by a cognate of unity, namely communion ecclesiology. In large part, communion ecclesiology has been based on the church fathers, and this has been the case in many different Christian traditions, including Eastern Orthodoxy and Protestant churches represented in the World Council of Churches, as well as Lutheranism and Catholicism, all of which are examined as part of this dissertation. This relationship between communion ecclesiology and the fathers is critical for my present work because it is here that the exploration of the church fathers’ place in ecumenical conversations becomes a viable and needed subject of research. Indeed, my main contention is that communion ecclesiology is both based in large part on the fathers and provides a framework for ecumenical conversation in which the fathers can be used to help forge ecumenical rapprochement.

In the case of this dissertation, the relationship between communion ecclesiology and the fathers illumines how the L/RC used the fathers. It is the combination of the manner in which the fathers are used along with what the fathers actually said that is a real hope for the ecumenical movement. The L/RC used the fathers in two general ways: as sources for constructing historical background to a dialogue topic and as sources directly in the constructive ecumenical argument of a dialogue round which provided convergence, consensus, or agreement. As the L/RC increased its focus on communion ecclesiology as a vision of the church, the more explicit did it uses the fathers, and to greater effect. Most importantly, the fathers proved most helpful when the L/RC addressed issues of apostolicity, i.e., how the churches retain the mission and identity of the church from the time of the Apostles.

Committee:

Dennis Doyle, PhD (Advisor); Maureen Tilley, PhD (Advisor); William Portier, PhD (Committee Member); Brad Kallenberg, PhD (Committee Chair); Michael Root, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

ecumenism; church fathers; communion ecclesiology; Lutheran-Catholic dilogue; apostolicity; ressourcement

Prus, Erin S.Divine presence, gender, and the Sufi spiritual path: An analysis of Rabi’ah the Mystic’s identity and poetry
Master of Arts (M.A.), Xavier University, 2009, English
In light of the theoretical debate surrounding Qur’anic exegesis and the question of gender egalitarianism, my contribution calls for the (re)interpretation of Rabi’ah the Mystic’s poetry in relation to Qur’anic exegesis on gender relations. I to bring to light the intertextuality of Rabi’ah’s spiritual poetry and its relationship to Qur’anic interpretation—as her language is infused (either consciously or unconsciously) with the Qur’an’s prescriptive and marginalizing teachings toward women of her time. By examining her language through a Bakhtinian lens, I investigate how Rabi’ah evokes the heteroglot voices of eighth to ninth-century Basra (or present-day Baghdad, Iraq). I explore three interrelated questions surrounding the construction of her identity: 1) the question of her language as “gendered” or feminine; 2) how scholars have related her identity based on her language and the knowledge of her life passed on through centuries; and 3) how readers may (re)interpret her identity based on the language of her poetry today. Through a textual analysis of the sacred language found within her four poems, I make the following arguments about the inherent multivocality of Rabi’ah’s language: first, Rabi’ah communicates a feminine perspective in much of her poetic language; second, Rabi’ah exhibits normative “masculine” behaviors as her language and lived experience, at times, take on a critical tone typically reserved for the men of her society; and third, Rabi’ah demonstrates an androgynous identity, at various times, through her critique of both the feminized and masculinized paths associated with the Muslim faith tradition and Sufism. Thus, Rabi’ah’s discourse and the construction of her identity through the centuries (as portrayed by scholars) produce various discursive effects—both linguistic and cultural. Rabi’ah’s language and experiences, in particular, reveal social mores in the context of eighth-century Muslim society, work to resurrect female voices (as her voice speaks to the female Muslim experience), and illustrate the subjugation of women.

Committee:

Carol Winkelmann, Ph.D. (Advisor); Graley Herren, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Middle Eastern Literature; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

R&257;bi&8216;ah al-&8216;Adaw&299;yah, d. 801?; Sufism; women saints in Islam

Ruhl, Deborah AEngaging the Heart: Orthodoxy and Experimentalism in William Gadsby’s A Selection of Hymns for Public Worship
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Music
William Gadsby (1773-1844) stands out as an exceptional figure in the history of nineteenth-century English Particular Baptist churches: he is at once a defender of high orthodoxy, a radical separatist (as perceived by his Baptist peers), a popular preacher in the areas surrounding Manchester, and a vanguard of high Calvinistic, experimental hymnody. He is also the compiler of one of the oldest English hymnbooks still in current use, A Selection of Hymns for Public Worship (1814), known informally as “Gadsby’s Hymns.” During his lifetime Gadsby was criticized both for his anachronistic high orthodoxy and for his experimentalist modernity. To the men who argued with Gadsby, the relationship between his traditional orthodoxy and his experimentalism must have seemed bewildering, but seen from a more distanced perspective, his theological stance may be understood as a synthesis of two cultural movements: the Enlightenment and romanticism. Gadsby’s high Calvinistic orthodoxy was influenced by the Enlightenment teachings of eighteenth-century Baptist theologians John Brine and John Gill, but as the eighteenth century came to a close the influence of high Calvinism began to decline. At the same time, Andrew Fuller’s moderate Calvinism, which encouraged free evangelism, was sweeping through the Calvinistic Baptist churches, reaching the laity through the “Bristol Collection” and John Rippon’s Selection of Hymns. Gadsby sought to revitalize high Calvinistic orthodoxy through experimentalism, which he gleaned from the Protestant Reformers, the English Puritans, and in particular, the nascent romanticism evident in the teachings of William Huntington. Because Gadsby believed singing to be the duty of all men, he turned to hymnody as a means through which to communicate what might be called a romantic high Calvinistic theology, which I shall term “romantic orthodoxy.” Gadsby’s romantic orthodoxy led him to develop a distinct method of evangelism through his hymnbook: by combining his duty to preach with mankind’s duty to sing, Gadsby discovered a method of evangelism that accommodated his high Calvinistic theology. In this way, Gadsby’s publication may be understood as both a response to and a participation in the Evangelical Revival. Through his hymnbook, William Gadsby succeeded in defining (and essentially transforming) high Calvinistic Baptist theology for the romantic generation of English Baptists.

Committee:

Charles M. Atkinson (Advisor); Danielle Fosler-Lussier (Committee Member); Udo Will (Committee Member); David Clampitt (Committee Member); Roger Crawfis (Other)

Subjects:

History; Music; Theology

Keywords:

music; hymnody; Baptist; Gadsby; Gospel Standard; hymn; experimentalism; orthodoxy; worship; theology; Gill, Fuller; Huntington; romanticism; Enlightenment; Calvinistic; nineteenth-century; English Particular Baptist; high Calvism; hymnbook

Gutowski, James ArthurPolitics and Parochial Schools in Archbishop John Purcell's Ohio
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2009, College of Education and Human Services
This study chronicles the contentious relationship between advocates of public schools and those promoting Catholic education in Ohio during the career of Archbishop John Purcell of Cincinnati. Using information culled from qualitative research into primary resources such as personal correspondence, published proceedings and newspaper articles of the time, this monograph reconstructs a history of philosophical and political conflict accompanying the parallel development of two burgeoning school systems. The years from 1833 to 1883 saw the development of an equilibrium between the two systems that helped to define Thomas Jefferson’s concept of the “wall of separation” between church and state. Public schools did not have to share tax-generated funding with parochial schools which, in turn, were irrefutably protected from taxation themselves. Furthermore, the history of competing school systems exhibits the paradox of religious liberty in America and uncovers an evolution in the nature of opposition to Catholicism in the United States.

Committee:

James Carl, PhD (Committee Chair); David Adams, PhD (Committee Member); Carl Rak, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Shelton, PhD (Committee Member); Mark Tebeau, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; American Studies; Education; Education History; History; Political Science; Religion; Religious Education; Religious History; School Administration; Teacher Education; Teaching; Theology

Keywords:

Catholic; Geghan; Cincinnati; Cleveland; Rutherford B. Hayes; school funding; church taxation; nativism; Gilmour

Ladd, Adam J.Bernini's Cornaro Chapel: Visualizing Mysticism in the Age of Reformation
MA, Kent State University, 2012, College of the Arts / School of Art
This thesis examines the interaction between the viewer, the depicted Cornaro men, and the scene of Teresa’s transverberation. The result is a fresh interpretation of Bernini’s Cornaro Chapel. Rarely has the theatricality of Bernini’s Cornaro Chapel gone unmentioned in literature. Scholarship thus far, however, has not gone beyond the formal, visual qualities of the chapel that suggest a theater space. I suggest that these qualities were more than just aesthetic choices—they were intended as an important aspect of the overall message being communicated to the viewer. The theme presented to the viewer of this chapel was one that carried with it a recent history of controversy and debate. The post-Tridentine Roman Church walked a fine line between acceptance and condemnation of mystical theology, as it had the potential to either confirm God’s divine interaction with the Roman Church, or to inspire protest and dissent against the rigid orthodoxy inherent in the Catholic faith. To guide the viewer toward an appropriate response to the subject matter, this thesis suggests that Bernini intentionally designed the chapel space as a play-within-a-play, a popular Baroque device that Bernini explored just years before the Cornaro commission in his play The Impresario. This creative device serves to focus the attention of the audience on the interaction that takes place between audience and performance, as the real audience sees a performed audience reacting to the play-within-a-play. In the Cornaro Chapel, the viewer witnesses a performance of Teresa’s mystical experiences to an audience of the Cornaro men, seven of whom were Cardinals of the Church. As such, we witness the creation of a canonized saint within the confines of the Church’s sanctioned system of doctrinal validation. We are reminded that such validation does not come from us, but from the upper echelons of Church hierarchy. Both the viewer’s experience and understanding of this miracle is controlled by Bernini’s structuring of the chapel space.

Committee:

Gustav Medicus, PhD (Advisor); Diane Scillia, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Fred Smith, PhD (Committee Member); Carol Salus, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Art Criticism; Art History; Fine Arts; Gender Studies; History; Performing Arts; Religious History; Theater History; Theology

Keywords:

Bernini; Counter-Reformation; Teresa of Avila; Teresa de Jesus; Baroque; Baroque sculpture; play-within-a-play; theatrum mundi; Federico Cornaro

Edmisten, Charles E"The Dent of Myne Honde": The Practice and Presentation of War in "King Horn"
BA, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English
The late 13th century Middle English romance, "King Horn" tells about a young English prince, Horn, who is ousted from his kingdom by Muslim pirates, called Saracens. The romance charts Horn's journey to reclaim the throne forcefully taken from him, a journey which involves bloody clashes with the Saracens. In the course of his battles Horn ruthlessly slaughters Saracens retreating from battle, and in the retaking of his kingdom, Suddene, Horn butchers Saracen soldiers and noncombatants indiscriminately. This raises the question, particularly for modern readers, as to whether Horn is acting as a proper Christian knight. Christian just war principles, first fully articulated by Augustine of Hippo, pled for restraint in warfare. The chivalric code of knights forbade them from harming women and children, and from cutting down retreating foes. Yet with the inception of the crusades in 1095, bloody warfare against Muslims became widely accepted. This thesis examines how the romance features a reconciliation between just war principles, chivalry, and the crusades into a unique synthesis that was widely accepted across medieval Western Europe at this time. This synthesis resolved the tensions between these three forms of warfare for most medieval Christians.

Committee:

Andrew Pfrenger, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

European History; Literature; Medieval History; Medieval Literature; Middle Ages; Religion; Theology

Stolz, Tinamarie SuzanneGendered Holiness: The Characteristics Female College Students Assign to Holy Men and Women
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2017, Theological Studies
After surveying 82 Catholic female college students from around the United States on their definition of holiness for men and women, it is clear they equate gender-normative characteristics with holiness. In other words, a woman must possess gender-normative feminine characteristics to be considered holy, and a man must possess gender-normative masculine characteristics to be considered holy. After analyzing the Catholic Church’s theology on the nature of women, it is apparent the Church strongly urges men and women to stay in their respective gender-normative roles, and develop a gendered set of characteristics. The Church names a specific and gendered set of characteristics for women; which can be seen in the androcentric interpretation of the Creation Story, and androcentric teachings such as complementarity theology and the feminine genius. The participant’s definitions of holiness, and the Church’s androcentric theologies strongly align. Meaning, the Church’s theologies on the nature of women are explicitly and implicitly teaching young women that gender-normative characteristics are the sole path to holiness. Emphasizing a narrow path to holiness is harmful to young Catholic women because it inhibits them from living out their fullest, most Christ-centered selves. Additionally, it leaves all women who do not fit the narrow list of gender-normative characteristics without a spiritual home. Instead, the Church needs to embrace women as individuals who possess various God-given characteristics, personalities, and abilities.

Committee:

Sandra Yocum, PhD (Advisor); Meghan Henning, PhD (Committee Chair); Vincent Miller, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Holy women, Holy men, Holiness, Gender, androcentric, feminine genius, Catholic, characteristics of holiness

Mullins, William E.The Higher Education Chaplain within a Post-Secular Context: A Case Study of Providing a Religious and Spiritual Reality on a 21st Century Campus
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Higher Education (Education)
The purpose of this study is to examine the lived experience of the higher education chaplain. The reason for this study is that many students attribute importance to religious and/or spiritual quests. The study is a qualitative reflexive case study of three institutions that employ higher education chaplains. The goal of the study is to better understand the role the chaplain plays in a student’s undergraduate experience. The lived experience of the chaplain is examined through a phenomenological lens of care within the current postsecular moment. The postsecular describes a renewed collaboration between the secular and spiritual worldviews within the larger culture and higher education.

Committee:

Peter Mather, PhD (Committee Chair); Laura Harrison, EdD (Committee Member); Lynn Harter, PhD (Committee Member); Rick Nutt, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Philosophy; Religion; Spirituality; Theology

Keywords:

Higher Education; Spirituality; Religion; Chaplaincy; Postsecular

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