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Young, William F1:1 Laptops in Education and Achievement Test Results in One Rural High School
Doctor of Education (Educational Leadership), Youngstown State University, 2017, Department of Educational Foundations, Research, Technology and Leadership
The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between a 1:1 laptop program and the achievement test results for the Ohio Graduation Tests (OGT). Two cohorts were examined (N=193): 1. Tenth graders who took the OGT subtests in Reading, Writing, Math, Science, and Social Studies in 2014 (n=109) and who had received traditional instruction and 2. Tenth graders who were given individual laptops and eTexts to use at school and at home, and who took the same OGT tests in 2015 (n=84). A Chi Square statistical assessment was conducted to compare student performance. No statistical difference was evident for overall passage rates when comparing the two cohorts. For the laptop cohort, there was no statistical difference in the expected counts for the subject areas of Writing, Science, and Social Studies. For Reading, laptop cohort scores reflect a trend, with scores moving upward into the Accelerated performance category. Math scores showed significantly more scores falling in the highest performance category of Advanced in comparison to what was expected. Similarly, when looking at the economically disadvantaged subgroup within the laptop cohort (n=29), a positive and significant difference from what was expected occurred within the Advanced category for Math, while a trend toward significance for improved performance occurred for Reading scores. The potential for significant gains in student achievement is evident. Additional longitudinal research is warranted to better understand the significance of impact as pedagogical practices develop following initial implementation and considering contextual factors.

Committee:

Jane Beese, Ed.D. (Committee Chair); Charles Vergon, J.D. (Committee Member); Karen Giorgetti, Ph.D. (Committee Member); I-Chun Tsai, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Educational Technology; Educational Tests and Measurements; Information Technology; Mathematics Education; School Administration; Technology

Keywords:

1 to 1 laptops; laptops in education; laptops and achievement tests; ubiquitous technologies; technology and education; laptops; achievement tests; rural schools; change in education; 1 to 1 technology, one to one; laptop programs; mathematics education

Malcalm, EbenezerGhana's Educational Policymakers and Their Impact on Information and Communication Technology Education: A Case Study of a Ghanaian Model Senior High School
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2012, Curriculum and Instruction Instructional Technology (Education)
The main goal of the research was to explore the lived experiences of Ghana's ICT in Education Policy makers and their impact on ICT education in Ghana. The research used Odorgonno Senior High School (OSHS) as a case study to ascertain how ICT is being implemented. The Assistant headmaster, teachers and students were interviewed to ascertain their ICT use in the school. The study used a phenomenological case study as a research design to explore the lived experiences of the respondents. In all, 30 respondents took part in the study. The findings of the study have shown that as much as Ghana's ICT Policy makers have immensely worked towards the development of the ICT policy document, the implementation of the policy was fraught with operational and leadership challenges. ICT in education implementation process at OSHS was bedeviled with problems such as inadequate ICT facilities, poor Internet connectivity and lack of capacity of teachers to integrate ICT in education. Students were not given enough time to practice their computer competency skills and the inability of the government and school's management to provide ICT facilities to the computer laboratories. Most of the computers were broken down and some were obsolete. It was evident from the findings that computers and the Internet are dominant ICT facilities used in the school. Other Internet facilities were not used. To address the challenges facing the implementation ofthe Policy, there is need to for a multifaceted approach. There is the need for the provision in ICT facilities to schools, the need for the ICT implementation plan at the national level and technology plans at the school level. Also, there is a need to review the ban on cell phone usage in the schools and professional development training for teachers and school administrators. The Ministry of Education and Ghana Education Service have to put in place persistence monitoring, supervision and evaluation mechanisms in the schools. To alleviate financial pressure on government to provide ICT infrastructural to the schools, there is a call for private-government partnership to provide teaching materials and ICT resources to the schools.

Committee:

David Moore, PhD (Advisor); Adah Ward-Randolph, PhD (Committee Member); Francis Godwyll, PhD (Committee Member); Albert Akyeampong, PhD (Committee Member); Phyllis Bernt, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education Philosophy; Education Policy; Educational Technology; Information Technology; Instructional Design; Public Policy; Social Research; Technology

Keywords:

Policymakers; ICT in Education; ICT use in high schools; Impact of ICT use in schools; ICT in education policy; Ghana's educational policymakers

Maynard, David CharlesPaying Attention to the Alien: Reevaluating Composition Studies' Construction of Human Agency in Light of Secret Government Surveillance
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Findlay, 2017, Rhetoric and Writing
Since the advent of digital composing methods, scholars of first-year writing have produced research exploring the implications of digital writing instruction for writing professionals and students. However, despite extensive consideration of how digital writing instruction may perpetuate societal inequalities, little scholarship has explored how the government’s digital surveillance of citizens may jeopardize writing studies’ understanding of human agency and its mission to preserve student agency even as students interact with increasingly complex, networked digital interfaces. In the following thesis, I address this gap by examining available information regarding the NSA’s surveillance of web users and the role web companies such as Microsoft play in such surveillance. Furthermore, I review composition studies scholarship that examines the implications of the digital interface for writing instruction, scholarship that has recently grown concerned with the potential for the government to exploit networked digital interfaces as a means of surveilling users. I suggest that Cynthia Selfe’s argument to writing professionals to pay attention to their technology use reinscribes a democratic humanist vision of agency. Furthermore, I suggest that the correlation of paying attention with increased agency limits scholars’ understanding of the insidious, secretive nature of government surveillance as an alien object that resists understanding. Ultimately, I present alien phenomenology as an alternative theoretical lens through which scholars may pay attention to government surveillance without assuming that doing so will increase the agency of writing professionals or students. Finally, I suggest that by paying attention to government surveillance through the lens of alien phenomenology, scholars may consider the possibility that agency is not a sustainable category as writing professionals and students engage with networked digital interfaces implicated in government surveillance.

Committee:

Christine Denecker, PhD (Committee Chair); Ronald Tulley, PhD (Committee Member); Megan Adams, PhD (Committee Member); Christine Tulley, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Composition; Educational Technology; Higher Education; Information Technology; Legal Studies; Literacy; Mass Communications; Multimedia Communications; Pedagogy; Philosophy; Rhetoric; Teaching; Technology; Web Studies

Keywords:

government surveillance; corporate surveillance; FISA; Microsoft; NSA; first-year writing; composition; higher education; rhetoric; alien phenomenology; Bourdieu; habitus; object-oriented ontology; democracy; humanism; agency; digital; interface; network

House, Cody E.Integrating a Multi-Platform Web Application into the Supplemental Instruction Program
Master of Education (MEd), Ohio University, 2011, Computer Education and Technology (Education)
Nearly every college student now owns either a smartphone or a laptop, sometimes both. With so much technology now used across college campuses, it is time for university programs to embrace the technology and start addressing students' technological needs. The Supplemental Instruction (SI) program offers few online resources to students. To provide online resources, the SI web application was developed for students to access from their smartphone's and laptops. The web application provides study guides and worksheets to help students succeed in historically difficult university courses. Using three different surveys, Google Analytics, and data provided by the SI program, the impact of implementing a web application into the SI program was evaluated. The results show that students used SI more than in previous quarters, as well as achieved higher grades during the quarter in which the web application was implemented.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin, PhD (Advisor); George Johanson, PhD (Committee Member); Fei Gao, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Higher Education; Information Technology; Technology; Web Studies

Keywords:

eLearning; mLearning; web application; Supplemental Instruction; smartphone; mobile technology;

Incerti, FedericaAn Exploration of Emotional Intelligence and Technology Skills Among Students at a Midwestern University
Master of Education (MEd), Ohio University, 2013, Computer Education and Technology (Education)
The author of this study sought to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and technology proficiency among undergraduate pre-service teachers enrolled in a teacher preparation technology course. The study seeks to contribute to the understanding of the relationship between two important educational elements (emotional intelligence and technology skills) that need to be applied to a twenty-first century education. The study analyzed 113 surveys administered to undergraduate pre-service teachers enrolled in teacher preparation technology courses. The results of this study indicated that participants own a high level of emotional intelligence and very low technology skills. The results also indicate that there is no significant relationship between emotional intelligence and technology skills among undergraduate pre-service teachers in a College of Education teacher preparation technology course at a Midwestern University.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin, Dr. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Software; Educational Technology; Higher Education; Information Science; Information Technology; Multimedia Communications; Neurosciences; Psychology; Teacher Education; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

Emotional Intelligence; Technology Skills; learning; Education Technology; Higher-Education Technology; Teacher's Preparation; Neuroscience of Learning; Social-emotional Learning; Digital Natives; Web 2.0; Web Applications; 21st century skills; teachers

McGlothlin, Cheryle D.Evaluation of HQT Online Courses: Growth of Participants Technology, Pedagogy and Content Knowledge (TPACK)
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2014, Instructional Technology (Education)
This research project examined the pre and post survey scores of the seven constructs of TPACK to determine the impact of participation in an online course in regards to the constructs outlined with the TPACK instrument. Three online courses were used in the study with a total of 36 participants (math 6, science 17, and social studies 13). The intent of this concurrent mixed methods study was to determine whether online courses taken by teachers can help address the lack of technological integration in the classroom through a learn by doing model. The first phase, quantitative research addressed the relationship of the constructs of TPACK with teachers who participated in an online course not specifically aligned to the TPACK model by using t-test, ANOVA, and multiple regression analysis. In the second phase, the comment area of the pre and post survey and discussion forums within the online course were examined, to give voice to the participants. The responses within the comments sections of the pre and post survey and the discussion forums were analyzed inductively using thematic content analysis, a common approach of grounded theory (Burnard et al., 2008). And finally as part of the course requirement, participants created a lesson plan using a template. The Technology Integration Assessment Rubric (TIAR) was used to score the lesson plans. The four overarching themes used in the TIAR instrument are 1) ways in which technology was used with specific curriculum, 2) was the technology used by the teacher and/or by the student, 3) was technology used in a way that support the teaching strategies outline, 4) does the technology use alignment to curriculum goals and strategies, and content, pedagogy and technology fit. The t-test demonstrated statistical significance in each of the courses; however, the social studies course demonstrated the most consistent significance and greatest effect size across the constructs. The ANOVA analysis did not provide any clear patterns in terms of the demographic information. The multiple regressions provided some information in the relationship of the demographic information specifically gender and age. The data from the lesson plans supported this analysis. And finally, the discussion forums clearly demonstrated an increase in content, pedagogy and technology integration especially for the social studies course which warranted further analysis of the courses. This examination of the courses determined that the facilitator of the social studies course had a participation log approximately eight times greater that the math facilitator and three times greater than the science facilitator. This variation in facilitator presence may account for the variance between surveys. Further research needs to be conducted to include classroom observations and teacher perception analysis and a comparative analysis in order to determine the improved use of pedagogy and technology integration.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Design; Educational Evaluation; Educational Technology; Educational Theory; Information Technology; Secondary Education; Teacher Education; Technology

Keywords:

TPACK; Online Learning; HQT; In-Service Teachers; Growth; Evaluation; Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge; Framework

Alsufi, Duaa AEvolution of Classroom Technology, The New Way of Teaching, Using iPads in Schools
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Curriculum and Teaching
The aim of this thesis is to evaluate the present use of iPads in schools, particularly K-12 schools, as well as to consider how they might be used more effectively in the future. In order to carry out this aim, the researcher used the quantitative research method and developed a 32- question survey for a potential 250 participants. Responses to all 32 questions were gathered from those who responded, 65 participants. Of those who responded, 77% were female and 23% were male. Approximately 45% were between the ages of 22-25, 38% were above the age of 25, and 17% were between the ages of 18-21. A majority, 62%, had obtained a Bachelor’s degree as their highest form of education. The participants were from two schools, one in Bowling Green and the other in Toledo. Out of the 32 questions that they responded to, 18 were multiple-choice questions, and 14 involved free responses. The free responses allowed for a wide range of opinions, and for descriptive statistics to be gathered. Importantly, this study revealed that most teachers, whether or not they already use iPads as a tool for instruction, would use them as such if they were available and if their access was cost-effective. It also revealed that most teachers who are currently using iPads for the purpose of classroom instruction are able to recognize and articulate various ways that they are useful and beneficial tools for this purpose. This study recommended that parents, teachers, school administrators, and government officials communicate with one another and work together to ensure that technology is used efficiently.

Committee:

Tracy Huziak-Clark, PhD (Advisor); Jodi Haney, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Technology; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

iPad; Technology in Education; Classroom Technology; Using iPads In Schools;

Powless, Seth J.College Student Satisfaction: The Impact of Facebook and Other Factors
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2011, Higher Education

This study examined the impact of undergraduate college student Facebook usage on college student satisfaction. Participants in the study completed an electronic survey to determine academic Facebook usage tendencies, non-academic Facebook usage tendencies, levels of involvement with in-person college-related activities, and feelings of being connected to the college or university environment. Both academic and non-academic Facebook usages, and level of satisfaction with the college experience were also topics of focus. Participants were undergraduate college students who were enrolled in Ohio colleges and universities during the spring of 2010. This study found that undergraduate college student Facebook usage impacts college student satisfaction, mediated by student‟s feelings of being connected to his or her college or university.

Data from this survey (Appendix B) are discussed in conjunction with an extensive study on student involvement, social media websites, and student satisfaction.

Participants reported using Facebook both for academic and non-academic purposes. Participants also reported using Facebook regularly, often multiple times a day for various activities. Data analysis conducted within this study suggest that participants who used Facebook regularly are more satisfied with various facets of their college experience, including academic and social experiences. This increase in level of satisfaction among participants appears to be mediated by feelings of being connected to the college or university environment. Results from the study have implications for both academic and student affairs professionals, concerning policy decisions on how college or university stakeholders utilize social media for academic purposes including pedagogy, recruiting, student learning, and student outreach.

Committee:

Lisa Kovach, Dr. (Committee Chair); Snejana Slantcheva-Durst, Dr. (Committee Member); Bin Ning, Dr. (Committee Member); Dale Dwyer, Dr. (Committee Member); Thomas Sharkey, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Information Technology; Technology

Keywords:

Facebook; Student Satisfaction; Student Involvement; Connectedness

Drake, Jeffrey P.Civil Talks: Analysis of online discussions in social studies classrooms
PHD, Kent State University, 2012, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
The Internet has revolutionized the way we live, the way we learn, and the way we discern public issues. Put simply, a new public square has developed online. Social studies teachers, as social educators, should be well suited to fuse technology and classroom discussions about civic issues. Many argue the social studies classroom remains the most appropriate place to teach citizenship via discussion and deliberative practices. Teaching discussion skills is foundational to an issues-centered curriculum and advocated by social studies educators because an effective democracy depends on the practice of publicly deliberating issues that are important to society. Yet, facilitating classroom discussion of controversial issues has never been easy, and moving these discussions to online spaces presents a new set of challenges altogether. The purpose of this research study was to understand, explain, and forge new theoretical concepts for online deliberative practices. Data from 4 issues-centered blogs used in the high school social studies classroom were gathered and analyzed. Three findings emerged revealing these new deliberative spaces (a) leaned toward conversation, (b) attempted to balance authentic engagement with needed procedures, and (c) tended to shortcut reason. The findings were interrelated and provided grounding for a Model of Online Deliberation, a conceptualization of such hybrid deliberative activities.

Committee:

Alicia Crowe, R. (Committee Chair); William Kist (Committee Member); Susan Iverson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Technology; Instructional Design; Social Studies Education; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

deliberation; social studies; digital citizenship; education; high school; online

Darney, Kelly S.Vocational Nursing Programs in Appalachia: The Effects of Technology Efficacy Across Traditional and Non-traditional Post-secondary Students
Doctor of Education (Educational Leadership), Youngstown State University, 2017, Department of Educational Foundations, Research, Technology and Leadership
This study examines the effects of technology on the success of traditional and non-traditional, post-secondary students in nursing programs in an Appalachian vocational setting. A survey was developed for use in Columbiana County, Ohio, a designated Appalachian area at a county vocational school with several programs in the nursing field. The survey was used to measure technology self-efficacy, perceptions about the impact of technology on the educational experience, and preparation for future employment. The survey was completed by 205 participants, both traditional and non-traditional in age for comparison. Findings from this study indicate that non-traditional students face more barriers to learning with the use of technology than the traditional set of students. With an ever-changing economy and job market, non-traditional students will continue to be a group that faces different barriers and challenges than others in different age brackets.

Committee:

Karen Larwin , PhD (Advisor); Salvatore Sanders, PhD (Committee Member); Patrick Spearman, PhD (Committee Member); Steven Toepfer, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Educational Technology; Nursing; Sociology; Technology; Vocational Education

Keywords:

Non-traditional students; Vocational nursing; LPN; Appalachia; Self-efficacy; Columbiana County

Sprague, AdamAnalyzing the Feedback Preferences and Learning Styles of Second-Language Students in ESOL Writing Courses at Bowling Green State University
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, English (Rhetoric and Writing) PhD
My dissertation study fills current gaps in scholarship by analyzing the feedback preferences of students enrolled in two sections of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 1010: Academic Composition II courses at Bowling Green State University during the Fall 2015 semester and whether or not those preferences match the students' individual learning styles as measured by a learning style inventory. Additionally, the study examines how providing feedback in different modalities (audio, video, and written) impacts student comfort levels and their perceptions of the writing classroom. Finally, the study examines the impact each feedback modality had on the students' academic performance as measured by the grades students received on essay assignments when utilizing the differing feedback modalities throughout the semester. The learning style inventory and initial feedback preference survey were provided during week 1 of the semester, and a follow-up feedback preferences survey was given during week 15. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze, code, and categorize the students' survey responses. Through classroom observation, student surveys, and grade analyses, it was clear that despite showing a preference for written feedback at the onset of the semester, the majority of students identified as visual learners, preferred video feedback, and performed better academically when they received video feedback.

Committee:

Lee Nickoson (Advisor); Neal Jesse (Other); Kristine Blair (Committee Member); Sheri Wells-Jensen (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Educational Technology; English As A Second Language; Foreign Language; Higher Education; Instructional Design; Language; Language Arts; Multilingual Education; Pedagogy; Rhetoric; Teacher Education; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

Composition; Educational Technology; English as a Second Language; ESL; ESOL; Higher Education; Instructional Design; Learning Styles; Pedagogy; Teacher Education; Teacher Feedback; Teacher Research

Murray, Alexander R.The New Normal: Lived Experiences of Teachers’ Educating Students in an Always-on and Connected Middle School Environment
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2016, Instructional Technology (Education)
Mobile technology has inundated modern society in the form of small always-on and connected devices that can be carried and accessed from nearly everywhere, enabling a wealth of continuous information. As society embraces this norm and technology-driven standards continue to emerge in education, preparing K-12 students for digital media use and information fluency is necessary. Also, finding ways to leverage always-on and connected devices that are already embedded in the lives of school-aged youth, advances opportunities for flexible classroom activities that are not only useful in presenting content, but learner engagement as well. Accordingly, this study explores the lived experiences of teachers’ educating students in a bring your own device (BYOD) middle school setting, by which students’ have access to and use always-on and connected personal technology in class. The inquiry took place at a suburban science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) middle school in Central Ohio. The participants included five teachers of students from grades 5-8 and two facility administrators from the school. Data was obtained through semi-structured interviews; classroom and lab observations; and a follow-up teacher interview survey. The findings revealed that teachers were open to using always-on and connected technology to support both personal and classroom activities. Teachers also embraced and leveraged Chromebooks and smartphones for content delivery, student engagement, and to access internet-based applications for learning. It was also found that the teachers attitudes toward educating students in the connected environment was primarily positive. However, they were more pessimistic about middle school students capabilities for self-guided learning by means of their always-on and connected technology.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Educational Technology; Middle School Education; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

Mobile; STEM; Connected; Middle School; Connected Technology; Always-on and Connected Students; One-to-one; BYOD; bring your own device

Chuang, Shengfa JFACILITATING RADICAL INNOVATION IN CONSUMER ELECTRONICS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRIES
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, Management
Radical innovation (RI) is widely recognized as a source of competitive advantage because it contributes to business sustainability and growth. This applies especially to firms operating in the hyper-competitive environment within consumer electronics (CE) and information technology (IT) industries. A recent Boston Consulting Group survey suggests that radical product innovation is one of three top strategic priorities for 71% of companies. Despite its importance, RI has been widely characterized as lacking order and an outcome of serendipity. Indeed, prior literature has largely ignored antecedents of RI or has studied them in isolation. This dissertation explores the interplay of RI antecedents in the context of CE/IT industries. I conducted an exploratory mixed-methods study on the nature and antecedents of RI in the CE/IT industries. The dissertation consists of three empirical studies. In the first study, I interview 38 product managers and engineers in the CE/IT industries to define the nature of RI and to identify challenges associated with RI. I found that RI emerges from identifying unarticulated market needs and matching them with new technological opportunities. In the second study, I conducted a survey among 408 innovation managers from CE/IT industries to identify antecedents of RI and how they interact with incremental innovation (II) and influence product performance. My findings reveal that identifying unarticulated market needs has a significant positive effect on RI and that strategic intent has a significant positive effect on product performance. I also examined which antecedents are most salient in influencing RI, II, and product performance. The third study focused on how firms can facilitate (strategically) the RI process. I suggest a new construct of future-oriented thinking—which identifies a pivotal cognitive future oriented element of RI—and use it as a mediator to explain the effects of strategic intent and technology sensing on RI. Findings show that future oriented thinking has a significant (mediating) effect on RI, while strategic intent has a positive effect on both sensing and future oriented thinking. These findings suggest that firms can strategically facilitate RI by creating a strong exploratory “flow” of activities expressed in path: Strategic Intent ¿ Technology Sensing ¿ Future Oriented Thinking ¿ RI. Overall, my study suggests that strategic intent helps address the complexity of RI. It also enriches our understanding of the cognitive processes associated with RI and the negative effects of current market focus on RI.

Committee:

Kalle Lyytinen, PhD (Committee Chair); Richard Buchanan, PhD (Committee Member); Sayan Chatterjee, PhD (Committee Member); Toni Somers, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Information Technology; Technology

Keywords:

Radical product innovation; strategic intent; technology sensing; market sensing; future-oriented thinking; complexity; mixed-methods research

McCullough, Christina M.Building a Replicable Flood Forecast Mitigation Support System to Simplify Emergency Decision-Making
Master of Arts, University of Toledo, 2011, Geography

When faced with an incident, emergency or hazard event, Emergency Management Practitioners must work collaboratively to secure the safety and security of the citizens within their jurisdiction. Mitigation, response, and recovery efforts for emergency management decision makers are a complex and difficult challenge when a natural disaster, civilian unrest or man-made event occurs. Decision makers need a geographic vision during emergencies in order to understand situational awareness of the area of operations. These decision makers require geographic intelligence to support a common operating picture which delivers accurate real-time data and communication across agencies. No two emergency events are alike and each requires different problem solving techniques. Each supporting decision maker has specific responsibilities and requires a “Cliffs Notes” version of the available data. Data overload can easily overwhelm a decision maker.

During the summer of 2008, Central Indiana received up to 20 inches of precipitation on saturated soil in a short period of time. One of the responsibilities of the National Guard is to respond to these emergency events; it is considered Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA). In order to provide a proactive approach for the emergency at hand, a predictive analysis was needed to identify where and how much precipitation would accumulate for the area of interest. The scientific community provided a variety of precipitation data which supported this event; however, it could not be viewed seamlessly within the Indiana National Guard’s internal common operating picture (COP). Emergency Management Practitioners need to be equipped with accurate geographic data in order to orchestrate a mission’s success. When an emergency event is imminent, decision makers need immediate results to provide answers for the required tasks at hand. There is no time to plan for a scenario when the scenario is occurring.

Emergency managers are constantly relied upon to make decisions that will preserve and protect our communities during a flood event. This study will discuss how a geographic vision can reduce communication complications between scientists, geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysts and emergency management practitioners by delivering data in the form of a digital map. This project will provide an introduction into data and software solutions derived by NOAA scientists, a replicable modeling process for flood events, and simple-to-follow tutorials required to support emergency operations. And finally, this thesis shows the results of presenting these data for emergency management practitioners’ analysis in a viewer friendly geographic COP.

Committee:

David Nemeth, PhD (Committee Chair); Bhuiyan Alam, PhD (Committee Member); Kevin Czajkowski, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Technology; Geographic Information Science; Geography; Geotechnology; Hydrologic Sciences; Hydrology; Remote Sensing; Scientific Imaging; Technology; Water Resource Management

Keywords:

QPF; QAPF; WEATHER; FLOOD; FORECAST; EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PRACTIONERS; GIS; REMOTE SENSING

Meacher, Gary EarlNote-taking and Information Retention and Recall
MFA, Kent State University, 2012, College of Communication and Information / School of Visual Communication Design

Information retention is paramount to the education process. There is not a single act in academia that does not require extensive information recall. Beginning with the middle school grades, teachers increasingly rely on the lecture method of instruction. Incidentally, the middle grades are a critical period in the instruction of study skills as the students in that age range are developmentally ready to become strategic learners.

Notable is a versatile tool that functions in varied note-taking environments. Considerations for different learning styles and activities that aid in information retention and recall are uniquely utilized throughout the application. This thesis offers a framework for the development of Notable.

Ethnographic research was conducted on middle school students to gain insight on their learning environments, including the classroom, lecture styles, notetaking tools, organizational methods and social interactions among teachers and classmates.

Quantitative research was conducted in the form of a survey. Over 70 participants submitted answers to questions revolving around achievement levels, learning styles, tools, and study habits. Data synthesized from surveys informed the construction of user personas and usage scenarios to help focus an iterative design approach toward the development of a comprehensive note-taking application.

Committee:

Ken Visocky O'Grady (Advisor); Jerry Kalback (Committee Member); Karl Fast (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Education; Educational Software; Educational Technology; Middle School Education; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

graphic design; ipad; app; note-taking; information retention; information recall; memory; middle school students; child development; app; application; learning styles; design research; design process; touch interface; user testing; usability

Grace, Kristine ElizabethCOMPARING THE IPAD TO PAPER: INCREASING READING COMPREHENSION IN THE DIGITAL AGE
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Reading

The key to improving reading education is to continually assess the best methods and forms of reading. Paper based text has been the primary method of reading instruction for the last hundred years. Thus it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of electronic text in terms of reading comprehension. Given this issue, this study was developed to answer the following driving question: Does reading electronic text on an iPad impact third grade students’ silent reading comprehension? Data was collected and compared from two comprehension assessments given to students after they read from two chapters on the same paper-based text and the electronic text.

Another exploratory question examined was: Which features of the iPad did the students take advantage of? Data was collected through a short survey and observational field notes to answer this question. The study took place over the course of two days during an hour of in-class instructional time. On the first day, half of the class read from an iPad, and the other half read from the same paperback book. Then all students took a short six-question comprehension assessment. The next day students switched groups and the students reading the iPad read the book and vice versa. The same procedures as day one were implemented on day two of the study. However at the end of day two, once all students were finished, they answered a post suvey with four questions about their experiences with the iPad. Data were collected and compared.

After analyzing the data across both groups of students using the iPad and paper-based text, results showed that the difference in comprehension was not statistically significant. These findings should be taken into consideration when planning and implementing future research comparing the iPad and paper-based text. The exploratory observational field notes and survey data provided insightful information to take into account when considering future use of the iPad in the reading classroom.

Committee:

Timothy Murnen, PhD (Advisor); Cindy Hendricks, PhD (Committee Member); Mark Earley, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Early Childhood Education; Educational Technology; Reading Instruction; Teacher Education; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

iPad; technology; reading; comprehension; education

Toney, Jennifer L.Third Grade Students Literacy Practices As They Compose Multimodal Texts In A Digital Writing Workshop
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
The purposes of this qualitative study, viewed through the New Literacy Studies (NLS) theoretical lens, were to explore third grade students’ literacy practices as they composed multimodal informational texts in a digital writing workshop; and examine how these students composed multimodally in a digital format and what their perspectives were on digital, multimodal composition. An ethnographic case study methodology was applied to explore the participants’ experiences with digital, multimodal composition by addressing the following questions: (1) What are the literacy practices surrounding the writing by third grade students within a digital writing workshop? (1a) What are the students’ perspectives about working in the digital writing workshop? (1b) How does their writing change, both qualitatively and quantitatively? (2) How do students write multimodally when given the chance? (2a) What are their perspectives on that kind of writing? The findings revealed the participants’ writing appeared to be influenced by popular music and culture and the researcher’s instruction and their interactions with her—their classroom teacher. Additionally, the findings suggested participants found favor in digital composing and valued communicating multimodally. Third, there were quantitative differences—improvements in students’ alphabetic word-based writing—and qualitative differences—there seemed to be the establishment of a collaborative community throughout this project. Moreover, the participants utilized a variety of multimodal elements to craft unique compositions. Finally, when given the opportunity to compose multimodally, the participants took ownership of their work and demonstrated agency as they selected multimodal design elements, produced their digital compositions, and reflected on their choices.

Committee:

William Kist (Advisor); Timothy Rasinski (Committee Member); Gumiko Monobe (Committee Member); Niesz Tricia (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Early Childhood Education; Education; Educational Technology; Elementary Education; Teacher Education; Technology

Abo Alasrar, Heyam F.Digital Literacy to Bridge the Gender Digital Divide: A Phenomenographic Study of the Digital Diversity for Arab Graduate Women in the United States
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Instructional Technology (Education)
The digital divide exists worldwide. One of the forms of the digital divide is the gender digital divide: the unequal access of Internet use among men and women. Typically, women are perceived as less capable of gaining digital skills. Through a phenomenographic approach, the researcher conducted an empirical and interpretative inquiry to map the qualitatively different ways in which Arab women in the United States understand the use of technology in their lives, the skills needed for technology use, and how they define a digitally literate person. The study also explored their relation with technology and compared their experiences in using technology in the United States to their experience in their home country. The purpose of this study was to show the variation in women’s perception of technology and to understand how to design strategies that can bridge the gender digital gap in the Arab world. Twenty women from different colleges at a Midwestern university were interviewed. Semi-structured questions were used to help women reflect on their experiences with technology. The data analysis formed five qualitatively different categories that described the ways Arab graduate women experienced the use of technology. These five categories described digital literacy as: a basic need, a contextual need, a need to connect, a lifestyle, and as an awareness of 4 the Internet culture. The categories describe digital literacy as understood by those women and what skills, from their perspective, a digital person should possess.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Educational Technology; Information Technology; Instructional Design; Middle Eastern Studies; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Digital Literacy; Digital Divide; Phenomenography; Arab Women,

Al Zebidi, Ali A.Predictive Factors to Adopt Integrating Technology into the Teaching Process by Faculty at Al-Qunfudah University College
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2016, Instructional Technology (Education)
This study aimed to investigate predictive factors that influence faculty members at Al-Qunfudah University College to adopt integrating technology into the teaching process by applying the initial four UTAUT factors: performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence and facilitating conditions to predict the behavioral intention of the faculty to integrate technology in teaching. Barriers that faculty encounter and potential incentives that faculty would receive were highlighted since the college did not have a clear vision toward adopting technology tools yet. A hard-copy survey was distributed among all staff members. Only 142 surveys were collected out of the 185 representing the total size of the faculty. In addition to the survey, ten faculty members were interviewed by the researcher inside the college campus. Multiple regression was used to highlight the influence of these factors on the outcome variable. Pearson correlation coefficient was applied to detect whether or not the initial UTAUT variables are correlated with each other. An independent-samples t-test was used to compare the mean scores of faculty’s behavioral intentions regarding their gender. One-way ANOVA was directed to identify the differences among three divided groups of faculty’s ages on the behavioral intention. As well, it was employed to identify the differences among the three divided groups regarding years of teaching experience on their behavioral intention. The results of the regression analysis revealed that all independent variables predicted the behavioral intention to adopt technology for education; however, performance expectancy and social influence showed as insignificant predictors after controlling for other variables. Results of the interview supported the significant results of all four predictors which represented the triangulation of the study. Also, there were no differences among faculty’s behavioral intentions to adopt technology integration in the teaching process based on their gender, as revealed by the independent-samples t-test. One-way ANOVA showed no differences in the outcome based on faculty’s ages and years of teaching experience. Lack of technology infrastructure, lack of technological knowledge by faculty, the absence of training programs, and lack of leadership support were the common barriers. Providing ICT facilities and incentives for the faculty are recommended.

Committee:

Greg Kessler (Committee Chair); Gordon Brooks (Committee Member); Min Lun Wu (Committee Member); Danielle Dani (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

Factors to Integrate Technology; Technology Adoption; Faculty Use of Technology

Sims, Zack A.Deployment, Management, & Operations of Internet Routers for Space-Based Communication
Master of Information and Telecommunication Systems (MITS), Ohio University, 2015, Information and Telecommunication Systems (Communication)
This thesis addresses certain technical and financial challenges associated with the deployment and operation of relay spacecraft using the Internet Protocol as the primary routing protocol. Though IP in space has been a hot topic for nearly a decade, few studies address the capabilities of management protocols being used to operate a geostationary fleet. Likewise, few have addressed the real-world cost structure of replacing a traditional bent-pipe fleet with an IP-enabled fleet. Within our research, we investigate whether SNMP, TFTP, and SCP are capable of meeting the Tracking, Telemetry, and Command requirements set by a real-world geostationary relay service provider. We also investigate the driving forces of relay deployment and operational costs, identify Rough Order of Magnitude costs for a geostationary IP-enabled relay, and define a financial profile categorizing the costs of replacing a bent-pipe fleet with an IP-enabled fleet.

Committee:

Hans Kruse (Advisor); Shawn Ostermann (Committee Member); Philip Campbell (Committee Member); Wesley Eddy (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aerospace Engineering; Communication; Information Science; Information Systems; Information Technology; Technology

Keywords:

Space Internetworking; Delay Tolerant Networking; DTN; IP; Internet Protocol; Solar System; Telecommunications; Tracking Telemetry and Command; Network Management; Deployment Management and Operations; Financial Analysis; Technical analysis

Shackelford, Philip ClaytonOn the Wings of the Wind: The United States Air Force Security Service and Its Impact on Signals Intelligence in the Cold War
BA, Kent State University, 2014, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of History
The United States Air Force Security Service (USAFSS), created in 1948, was the first signals intelligence organization to be created post-World War II and played an integral role in Cold War intelligence gathering. Indeed, despite its relatively young age compared to its Army and Navy counterparts, the USAFSS soon became the premier agency for signals intelligence in the early Cold War and was responsible for hundreds of secret listening posts around the world. This thesis argues that the USAFSS was able to have such a large impact on the post-World War II intelligence community due to a high level of technological proficiency, dedication, and a close working relationship with the National Security Agency (NSA) after its establishment in 1952. Using oral history interviews and declassified government documents, this thesis explores how the USAFSS was established and how it grew to leave a lasting impact for both contemporary Cold War intelligence agencies and the modern incarnation of Air Force intelligence.

Committee:

Elizabeth Smith-Pryor, Ph.D (Advisor); Timothy Scarnecchia, Ph.D (Committee Member); Fred Endres, Ph.D (Committee Member); Leslie Heaphy, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Armed Forces; Computer Science; Engineering; European History; History; Information Science; Information Technology; International Relations; Mass Communications; Military History; Military Studies; Modern History; Political Science; Russian History; Science History; Technical Communication; Technology; World History

Keywords:

Air Force; United States Air Force; Security Service; National Security; Intelligence; Signals Intelligence; Cold War; Soviet Union; United States; Armed Forces; National Security Agency; NSA; USAFSS; Cold War History; History; United States Military;

OZER, IPEKFACEBOOK® ADDICTION, INTENSIVE SOCIAL NETWORKING SITE USE, MULTITASKING, AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS IN THE UNITED STATES, EUROPE, AND TURKEY: A MULTIGROUP STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELING APPROACH
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
Research has shown since 2008 that social networking site (SNS) use comprises the majority of time spent on the Internet. The age distribution and large amount of time spent on SNSs evoke a new research era: How students use SNSs and how the uses of SNSs impact their academic performance. The main objective of the pilot study was to investigate the relationship between time spent on SNSs, frequency of SNS use, multitasking with SNSs, time spent studying, and Grade Point Average (GPA). In the first part, the cross-cultural differences between the United States (US; n = 444) and European college students (n = 346) were examined using path models. After examining the path models, a new survey was administered with additional items (with existing reliability and validity evidence). The purpose of the main study was to define new constructs using observed variables. These constructs were Facebook® addiction, multitasking with SNSs while studying, using SNSs for school work, the amount of time spent on SNSs, college self-efficacy, and academic performance. A structural equation model (SEM) was developed using the above constructs. SEM has many advantages compared to path analysis, and it was used to compare two countries: the US (n = 226) and Turkey (TR; n = 200). This exploratory investigation focused on the following main goals: (a) testing if Facebook® addiction and intensive SNS use impact academic performance, (b) identifying the variables that directly or indirectly impact SNS use and academic performance, (c) understanding the impact of Facebook® addiction on general SNS use and academic performance, (d) indicating relationships between the variables, and (e) probing the differences between university students from different cultures (i.e., the US and TR).

Committee:

Tricia Niesz (Committee Co-Chair); Jian Li (Committee Co-Chair); Christopher A. Was (Committee Member); Aryn C. Karpinski (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Evaluation; Educational Technology; Technology

Keywords:

Facebook addiction; social networking sites; multitasking; academic performance

Jimenez, Eliseo DUsing Self-Directed Video Prompting for Skill Acquisition With Post-Secondary Students With Intellectual Developmental Disabilities
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, EDU Physical Activity and Educational Services
This dissertation contains three stand-alone papers on the topic of using video prompting and self-directed video prompting to teach individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The literature review examined the current body of literature to better understand if and how video prompting was being utilized with individuals with moderate to profound disabilities. Additionally, maintenance and generalization measures were examined to determine the extent to which each was being utilized and measured. Overall, there were positive results for the use of video prompting as a stand-alone procedure and as a packaged intervention. Additionally, there were positive results for the studies that included maintenance and/or generalization measures. Using the information from the literature review, the research paper presents a study that taught two individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities vocational and daily living skills using self-directed video prompting. Following task mastery, maintenance probes were conducted for 2 weeks starting 1-week post-mastery. Results showed that both students acquired novel skills across all three tiers, indicating that individuals can acquire novel tasks with minimal prompting with self-directed video prompting. The third paper is a practitioner paper that teachers and other practitioners can use to teach their students how to independently provide their own video prompts and how they can promote generalization after students have learned self-directed video prompting.

Committee:

Helen Malone (Advisor); Moira Konrad (Committee Member); Diane Sainato (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Software; Educational Technology; Special Education; Technology

Keywords:

Video Prompting; Self-Directed Video Prompting; Generalization; Maintenance; Developmental Disabilities; Intellectual Disabilities

Long, Leroy L.An Investigation into the Relationship between Technology and Academic Achievement among First-Year Engineering Students
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, EDU Teaching and Learning
In order to increase the number of American STEM degree recipients, it is important for academics to develop ways to improve students’ interest, retention, and success in fields like engineering. The purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between first-year engineering students’ (FYES) perceived (a) knowledge, (b) usefulness, as well as (c) frequency and nature of use of technology and their academic achievement (i.e., grades). This investigation focused on the specific types and uses of educational technology by FYES, while also analyzing differences by race/ethnicity and gender. Previously, scholars have employed a broad definition of technology to describe hardware such as cell phones and computers or software for word processing and web-based applications. Such definitions have been used to understand how collegians, instructors, and professionals interact with technology. In the present study, educational technology signified specific computer and information technology such as computer hardware (e.g., desktops, laptops), computer software (e.g., Microsoft Word/Excel, MATLAB, SolidWorks), electronic devices (e.g., cellphones, tablets, E-readers), and the Internet (e.g., websites, course management systems). Rogers’ (1995) technology adoption theory was chosen for the current study as it related well to the present research questions. A multi-step approach (i.e., descriptive statistics, independent samples t-tests, hierarchical linear regression) was used to analyze survey data from nearly 500 students. Results from the present study determined there were significant racial/ethnic differences in FYES’ perceived usefulness as well as frequency and nature of use of technology. There were also significant gender differences in FYES’ perceived knowledge and usefulness of technology. Furthermore, FYES’ background characteristics significantly predicted their final course grades in the second of two Fundamentals of Engineering courses. Findings have important implications for practice, research, and theory surrounding FYES and educational technology.

Committee:

Paul Post, PhD (Advisor); Terrell Strayhorn, PhD (Advisor); Lin Ding, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Gustafson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Engineering; Technology

Keywords:

Technology; Educational Technology; Technology Adoption; Academic Achievement; First-Year Students; First-Year Engineering Students; Underrepresented Students; Engineering Education;

Patton, Kelly ADigital vs. In-print Textbooks: Relationships and Trends for College Students
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Reading
A common idea among readers is that a specific type of text has an impact on the success of the reader. The problem is that readers do not fully understand the relationship between the specific type of text and the success of the reading that occurs. This lack of understanding causes readers to make uninformed decisions about which type of text to use to have the most success in achieving their reading purpose. This study identified the textbook preference (in-print or digital) of college students, while analyzing the success of the students in the class that corresponds with that text. There were three questions addressed in this study: What is the relationship between the type of text being utilized (in-print or digital) and the academic success of the reader? What are the students’ perceptions of success based on their text selection? How do students engage with the type of text they used? The data for this study were collected via a survey, and the results of this survey were analyzed to draw conclusions. The results obtained in this study led to several different conclusions. Although not all data were conclusive, it was clear in this study that most students used in-print versions of the textbook. Therefore, the perspective from those who were using digital textbooks was not as prominent in this study. The results do not show conclusive support of a relationship between a certain type of text and success in a course. Overall, this study provides insight into the debate of digital versus in-print texts and can be used to support further research into how different textbook formats can be used to positively or negatively impact student success in a college course, or learning at other levels.

Committee:

Cindy Hendricks, Dr. (Advisor); Mark Earley, Dr. (Committee Member); Cynthia Ross, Ms. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Technology; Higher Education; Reading Instruction; Teacher Education; Technology

Keywords:

Digital versus in-print textbooks; influence; college students; academic success; reading; e-books; digital; in-print; textbooks; trends; relationships

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