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Pollock, Asher WPhase Shift
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Ohio University, 2017, Studio Art
Phase Shift is the thesis of Asher Pollock, submitted for graduation from the Honors Tutorial College of Ohio University. It contains writing and paintings that collectively question concepts, genres, and methods of story-telling known well to many audiences.

Committee:

Laura Larson (Committee Chair); Jennie Klein (Advisor)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Art Criticism; Art Education; Art History; Arts Management; Performing Arts; Personal Relationships; Personality; Personality Psychology; Philosophy; Religious History; Rhetoric; Social Research; Spirituality; World History

Keywords:

queer, poseidon, neptune, phase, shift, water, story, stories, painting, paintings, art, artist, man, they, them, gay, men, myth, mythology, mythic, myths, gods, god, family, love, loneliness, despair, ice, independence, conceptual, contemporary, modern

Morrow, Stephen MThe Art Education of Recklessness: Thinking Scholarship through the Essay
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Arts Administration, Education and Policy
This document has been (for me, writing) and is (for you, reading) a journey. It started with a passing remark in Gilles Deleuze’s 1981 book Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. That remark concerned the cliche. The psychic cliches within us all. The greatest accomplishment of the mind is thinking, which according to Deleuze means clawing through and beyond the cliche. But how? I found in my research that higher education art schools (like the higher education English departments in which I had for years taught) claim to teach thinking, sometimes written as “critical thinking,” in addition to all the necessary skills of artmaking. For this dissertation, I set off on a journey to understand what thinking is, finding that Deleuze’s study of the dogmatic image of thought and its challenger, the new image of thought—a study he calls noo-ology—to be quite useful in understanding the history of the cliche and originality, and for understanding a problematic within the part of art education that purports to use Deleuzian concepts toward original thinking/artmaking. This document is both about original contributions to any field and is my original contribution to the field. A critique and a proposal.

Committee:

JACK RICHARDSON (Advisor); JENNIFER RICHARDSON (Committee Member); SYDNEY WALKER (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Criticism; Art Education; Art History; Education; Education Philosophy; Film Studies; Fine Arts; Literature; Philosophy; Teaching

Keywords:

art education; art; cinema; poetry; philosophy; Gilles Deleuze; jan jagodzinski; the image of thought; Recklessness

Liu, JinyiZhang Yuan (1885-1919): Constructing a Public Garden in Cosmopolitan Shanghai
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2017, Art History (Fine Arts)
This thesis studies Zhang Yuan (Zhang Family Garden), a public garden in semi-colonial Shanghai founded by Wuxi merchant Zhang Shuhe (1850-1919). Opened in 1885 and closed in 1919, Zhang Yuan, along with other Chinese public gardens, was one the most popular venues for the public to experience the newly imported Western-style practices and ideas in urban Shanghai. However, scholarship on the urban history of Shanghai overlooks this critical field and focuses instead on Western-style schools, companies, and print industry. I propose that commercialized entertainment gardens, such as Zhang Yuan, better illustrate the negotiation between the established and the imported which marked the permeation of changes in late 19th and early 20th century Shanghai. In addition, this thesis approaches Zhang Yuan as a fluidly constructed social space to reveal the interconnections between changes in various integrated social areas. I frame the garden within the geopolitical transformation of semi-colonial Shanghai, map its architectural design in relationship to the developing built environment, and understand it through the ever-changing leisure pursuits. As a garden evolving with the urban culture of the city, Zhang Yuan illustrates the disappearing boundary between participating in the newly imported entertainments and advocating for sociopolitical reform. Such an interchangeability between popular culture and political discourse underlined the fluidity of changes in late Qing and early Republican Shanghai.

Committee:

Marion Lee (Advisor); Samuel Dodd (Committee Member); Joshua Hill (Committee Member); Brian Collins (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History; Asian Studies; History

Keywords:

Shanghai; Late Qing; Early Republican; Public Garden; Space; Urban Culture; Built Environment; Leisure; Reform

Quinlan, Joshua MortimerReduce, Reuse, Recycle – Research: Sustainable Scene Design for a Production of Henrik Ibsen’s An Enemy Of The People
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2016, Theatre

Theatre is a liminal environment between performers and a live audience, and between the past, present and future. Theatre practitioners often bring to life old scripts that have graced the stage many times while highlighting the relevance of key themes and motifs in relation to a modern audience. The work of playwright Henrik Ibsen is produced worldwide because of its modern subjects, despite having been written in the late nineteenth century.

Under the direction of Lesley Ferris, I designed the scenic environment for Rebecca Lenkiewicz’s version of Henrik Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People at The Ohio State University. I used a combination of sketches, digital modelling, and a physical white model to communicate my scenic design. By way of reducing, reusing, and recycling, I executed a sustainable scenic environment that complimented the themes of environmental awareness within the play without compromising the aesthetic of the design.

Committee:

Brad Steinmetz, M.F.A. (Advisor); Mary Tarantino, M.F.A (Committee Member); Lesley Ferris, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architectural; Architecture; Art History; Design; Environmental Education; Environmental Health; Environmental Management; Environmental Studies; Fine Arts; Gender; Gender Studies; Performing Arts; Scandinavian Studies; Theater; Theater History; Theater Studies; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Theatre; Design; Scene Design; Scene; Set Design; Set; Scenic Design; Scenic; Painting; Art; Scenic Art; Scene Painting; Scrim; Costume; Lighting; Sustainable; Green; Theater; Hammershoi; Henrik Ibsen; Enemy of The People; Production; Norway; Environment

Kim, MinaPan Tianshou (1897-1971): Rediscovering Traditional Chinese Painting in the Twentieth Century
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, History of Art
The goal of this dissertation is to enrich scholarly understanding of the transformation in practice and social role of traditional Chinese painting in the twentieth century by focusing on the work of Pan Tianshou (1897-1971). In part because the historical and art historical narratives of the three periods we examine have been so fiercely contested, much work still needs to be done in understanding the personal and environmental factors that made possible the great innovations of China’s major cultural figures. Pan lived during the period when China was most actively and creatively engaging with the forces of modernity. Although inclined by temperament to the classical arts of the past, he nonetheless met the circumstances of each era head-on, throwing himself into the task of redefining Chinese art for the modern age. This study investigates how Pan engaged with cross-cultural exchange, how he reevaluated traditional Chinese painting, and how he tried to update Chinese painting by achieving his unique artistic style. In particular, the Sino-Japanese relationship, which featured prominently in his education, helped Pan begin considering the importance of national identity. His definition of innovation was based in part upon a sense of national identity. At the same time, however, Pan Tianshou said that if tradition cannot pave the way for future artistic possibilities, then it is a dead tradition. To Pan, tradition was an inherited culmination of characteristics of masters from the past, but he argued that tradition and innovation are inseparable characteristics of art. His modern transformation of artistic consciousness and modern sense of identity enriched practices and definitions of traditional Chinese painting in the twentieth century. This dissertation primarily hopes to offer an alternative perspective on modernity in Pan Tianshou’s oeuvre as a case study of traditionalist efforts in modern Chinese art. Moreover, it tries to develop a new understanding of some of the results of the rich artistic and intellectual intersections among China, Japan, and the West in the early twentieth century. To be specific, Pan dealt with traditional subjects—bird-and-flower and landscapes—but his constructive composition, emphasis on flat painting surfaces, application of expressive ink tonality with his fingers and hands, and use of animal subjects as self-reflective images are imbued with a modern sensibility. These accomplishments were part of Pan’s larger mission of rediscovering traditional Chinese painting, establishing principles for Chinese painting that were suitable to contemporary art, and laying claim to modernity in the global world. This dissertation, by examining a little-studied aspect of Pan Tianshou’s rediscovery of traditional Chinese painting against the background of three distinct periods of modern history, contributes to research on the cultural complexities of twentieth-century China.

Committee:

Julia Andrews (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Twentieth Century Chinese Painting, Chinese Art, Pan Tianshou, Art History

Daly, Christopher R.Jacopo del Sellaio's Altarpieces for the Florentine Oltrarno
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2015, Art History (Fine Arts)
This thesis seeks to reconsider the life and work of the Florentine painter Jacopo del Sellaio (1441/2-93) through an examination of his altarpieces. Though he is best remembered today as a prolific painter of narrative panels for domestic interiors, I attribute Sellaio's success also to his altarpieces, of which comparatively few survive. This study will focus on what was arguably Sellaio's largest devotional work, an altarpiece for the Poponcino, a confraternity dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin and Saint Sebastian that met in the church of Santa Maria del Carmine in Florence. I propose a new reconstruction for this altarpiece (now dismembered and cut into at least three known fragments) and seek to place the work within the context of its lay patron and the interior of the Carmine church. In addition, Sellaio's other altarpieces painted for nearby churches will be considered in regard to the social fabric of the neighborhood surrounding the Carmine and the greater quarter of the Oltrarno. Sellaio and his family were lifelong residents of this area of Florence, and the various activities of the family in the neighborhood profoundly stimulated the careers of both Sellaio and his son, Arcangelo (1478-1531). Living in and working for the Oltrarno allowed Sellaio to create large confraternal altarpieces and secured the survival of his workshop well into the sixteenth century.

Committee:

Marilyn Bradshaw (Advisor); Jody Lamb (Committee Member); Barbara Bays (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Sellaio; Florence; painting

chi, coppinger tReciprocity Among All Things: A Personal Endeavor in the Environmental Crisis
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Ohio University, 2016, Studio Art
We live in a world where climate change and water shortage threaten life. This text explores what it is to be an individual living in such a world. All things living are inevitably linked and dependent through a constant trading of energy. Each must give and receive in order to create a system that can sustain life. This is explored through text, art events and daily life.

Committee:

Duane McDiarmid (Advisor)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Architecture; Art History; Design; Earth; Energy; Environmental Studies; Fine Arts; Performing Arts; Spirituality; Sustainability; Theoretical Physics

Keywords:

Life, Art, Climate Change, Water, Life Art, Tiny House, Performance Art

Dolan, Andrew P.A Case for Emile Bernard: A Reconsideration of the Artist's Reputation
MFA, Kent State University, 2015, College of the Arts / School of Art
By exploring his collaborations with the Paul Gauguin and Vincent van Gogh, comparing their paintings while working together, and re-examining Emile Bernard's work, this thesis will attempt to assert that : 1) Bernard's ideas and artwork foreshadowed important elements in the mature styles of both van Gogh and Gauguin, influencing each. 2) The symbolic importance of Bernard's paintings (Breton Women in a Meadow and The Buckwheat Harvest in particular) has been underestimated. And 3) Bernard's status amongst the pantheon of early modern painters should be reevaluated.

Committee:

Albert Reischuck, M.A. (Advisor); Carol Salus, P.h.D. (Committee Member); Gustave Medicus, P.h.D. (Committee Member); Scillia Diane, P.h.D. (Committee Member); Smith Fred, P.h.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Emile Bernard; Paul Gauguin; Vincent van Gogh; French Painting; Cloisonism; Synthetism; fin-de-siecle

Hearne, Auna RA Fortress Where Beauty is Cherished, Protected and Cultivated: The South Side Community Art Center, 1940-1991
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Art History
Since opening in 1940, the South Side Community Art Center (SSCAC) in Chicago, Illinois has continuously met the need for a creative space in the local African American visual arts community. I support this assertion by focusing on three aspects of the institution’s first fifty years: 1) the center as provider of education and access to the visual arts, 2) the center as an inclusive exhibition and market place, and 3) the center as a site for community building. The SSCAC has demonstrated a historical and contemporary commitment to enabling the production and appreciation of art through access and education, as evidenced by an extensive arts curriculum, its alumni and collection, and a strong exhibition history. I analyze how the SSCAC’s programs and exhibitions combatted discriminatory and oppressive practices of Chicago’s museums and academic institutions. Established by the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the center and its programs were components of the federal government’s strategy to restore the nation’s economy by employing artists and encouraging community participation in the development of culture. Chicago, especially its predominantly black south side, was a fitting location for an art center as it had been founded as a feasible cradle of creative expression long before the government considered the area. In the first chapter, I provide an abridged history of the forces present in Chicago before the SSCAC came to be a significant African American cultural presence. In chapters two through five, I provide an account of the SSCAC’s inception through its fiftieth anniversary. After the government withdrew fiduciary support in 1944, the Bronzeville community developed many solutions to keep the doors open. The community campaign included the inauguration of the wildly popular and lucrative Artists’ and Models’ Balls. Events like these enabled enable artistic production to continue and allowed patrons and residents to foster an appreciation for art. During the 1950s and early 1960s, Anti-Communist paranoia crippled operations and nearly led to the demise of the SSCAC while the Civil Rights and Black Power movements restored the center as a crucial site for cultural identity and sociopolitical organization and mobilization. In the late 1970s, the mass deindustrialization of Chicago led to a decline of the SSCAC’s host neighborhood and raised concerns about personal and institutional security. The election of Ronald Reagan in 1980 would create and amplify further problems for the SSCAC, as his administration’s policies reduced and cut funding to the arts. However, the community rallied to keep the center open for exhibitions and art classes. In this thesis, I substantiate the significance and vitality of this unique cultural institution with an appraisal of the SSCAC’s exhibition history and programs, as well as the impact of various efforts by the government, corporations, and individuals within the community. The SSCAC was instrumental in the creative development of not only internationally recognized artists such as Gordon Parks and Charles White, but for several generations of Chicago’s black artists, as well. The SSCAC provided an outlet for the creative expressions of a critically marginalized mass.

Committee:

Theresa Leininger-Miller, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Mikiko Hirayama, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Earl Wright, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

community art center;bronzeville;south side;WPA;FAP;Chicago

Paniagua, Amanda AnastasiaAn American Woman's Gaze: Mary Cassatt's Spanish Portraits
MA, Kent State University, 2016, College of the Arts / School of Art
This thesis examines portraits produced by Mary Cassatt during her visit to Spain in 1872-1873.

Committee:

John-Michael Warner, Ph.D. (Advisor); Nicole Rousseau, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Albert Reischuck (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Criticism; Art History

Cerdera, Pablo MiguelHealing and Belonging: Community Based Art and Community Formation in West Oakland
BA, Oberlin College, 2015, Comparative American Studies
Community Based Art is a model of art making which centers community and interpersonal interaction. Through an in depth case study of Brett Cook's West Oakland based project "Reflections of Healing" this thesis attempts to understand how community is both reflected and constructed in Community Based Art, as well as the political, social, and aesthetic consequences of this construction. Of particular interest are the relationships between art, community, race, class, gentrification, and self-determination. Ultimately, this thesis finds that through an ambivalent and sometimes messy process of collaboration, Reflections of Healing constructs a hopeful and positive image of community that prefigures a better world. This image does not come from nothing, but is built from a long history of organizing, activism, and community formation in Oakland, reflecting the importance of the creation of counter-hegemonic images of community, even while remaining open and inclusive for all. Although Cook intentional chooses not to face many social and political issues head on, the community constituted in the project carries with it the potential to make radical political change, and reflects the radical history of West Oakland, most significantly the history of the Black Panther Party (BPP). Cook's emphasis on healing reflects the deep traumas, both historical and contemporary, faced by many Oakland residents, particularly long term Black and Latinx residents, while remaining positive about the future. While it is not without room for critique in terms of the relationship to and definition of community, Reflections of Healing proves to be deeply meaningful for some of the participants and residents, and creates possibilities for community self-definition.

Committee:

Wendy Kozol, Professor (Advisor); Pablo Mitchel, Professor (Committee Member); Janet Fiskio, Professor (Committee Member); Shelley Lee, Professor (Other)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; American History; American Studies; Art Criticism; Art History; Black Studies

Keywords:

Art;Community;Community Based Art;Social Practice;Race;Class;Gentrification;California;Oakland;West Oakland;Black Panther Party;Aesthetics;Social Justice;Social Change; Community Formation;Politics of Aesthetics;Black Art;Latinx Studies

Kessler, Henry AThe Palazzo della Civilta Italiana: From Fascism to Fendi
Bachelor of Arts (BA), Ohio University, 2015, Art History
This thesis discusses the change in visual language and usage of the Fascist Palazzo della Civilta Italiana from its creation under Mussolini to its current state as the headquarters of the fashion house Fendi. Utilizing both political and semiotic theories to understand the meaning of the structure, this thesis assesses the ideological alteration of the building from glorifying imperialist Fascist Rome to showcasing the power of Italian design on the global market.

Committee:

Kevin Haworth (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture; Art History; Political Science

Keywords:

Palazzo della Civilta Italiana; Fendi; Fascism; Italian Architecture; Fashion

Frederick, Amy ReedRembrandt's Etched Sketches and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, Art History
This dissertation examines nine etchings by seventeenth-century Dutch artist Rembrandt van Rijn that are characterized by their variety of finishes and disparate elements on the same plate, and, for some, the feature of rotation of the print required to view each element in its proper orientation. Despite the intensity of scholarly examination given to Rembrant’s prints historically, these etched sketches have been treated in a cursory manner with little or no connection to other works in Rembrandt’s oeuvre, and they have certainly never been studied extensively as a group. This dissertation asserts that the etched sketches, while seemingly on the margins of Rembrandt’s oeuvre, should be viewed as dynamic objects through which Rembrandt brought together many of his most recognizable artistic motifs and techniques in new and challenging ways, essentially creating ambiguous images that simultaneously demonstrate his skill and provide opportunities for deeper engagement from viewers. The etched sketches provide access—through varied finishes, disparate elements on the same sheet, and the element of rotation—to how Rembrandt himself thought through their formation. With consideration of the etched sketches, the conception of Rembrandt as a printmaker becomes not only more provocative, but also more playful.

Committee:

Catherine Scallen, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Rembrandt; printmaking; etchings

Maxwell, Andrea Michelle KiblerThe Message on the Walls: Discovering the Visual Sermon of the Brancacci Chapel
MA, Kent State University, 2015, College of the Arts / School of Art
For decades, scholars have studied the stylistic choices and possible interpretations of the Brancacci Chapel fresco cycle in Santa Maria del Carmine, Florence from the 1420s. While researchers disagree regarding the extent to which Felice Brancacci, the chapel owner, participated in the design process, little doubt remains that the resident Carmelites played an active role in the cycle planning. This research proposes an innovative approach to interpreting the fresco cycle dedicated to the life of Saint Peter. During the fourteenth century, the Carmelite brotherhood made the transition to becoming a preaching order, and as such, began developing sermons, many of which they based on those of the Franciscans. Subsequently, the Carmelite messages to the laity incorporated a fourfold method of interpreting scripture. This involved telling the literal and moral aspects of Bible verses and concluding with general themes related to allegorical and anagogic interpretations that affect one’s chance at attaining salvation. This new emphasis on preaching in the Carmelite brotherhood can be applied as a means of interpreting their art commissions from this same time frame, including that of the Brancacci Chapel. By examining the content and arrangement of the fresco cycle, I have found a literal and moral interpretation to the life of Saint Peter, as well as generalizations regarding achieving salvation through the church. Therefore, the Brancacci Chapel fresco cycle represents a visual sermon, or muta predicatio, by portraying the life of St. Peter, while simultaneously providing support for Florence, the papacy, the Carmelites, and a message for proper Christian living.

Committee:

Gustav Medicus (Advisor); Diane Scillia (Committee Member); Fred Smith (Committee Member); Carol Salus (Committee Member); Navjotika Kumar (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Brancacci Chapel; Florence; Renaissance; Carmelite; muta predicatio; visual sermon

DeLouche, SeanFace Value: The Reproducible Portrait in France, 1830-1848
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, History of Art
This dissertation examines the understudied topic of portraiture during the July Monarchy (1830-48), the constitutional regime that has long been associated with both the social and political rise of the bourgeoisie as well as the development of an extensive commercial culture in France. The second quarter of the nineteenth century witnessed the proliferation of portraits executed in a variety of alternative media that allowed for their mechanical reproduction and subsequent distribution to a mass audience of cultural consumers. This phenomenon coincided with the development of a new kind of celebrity, one that was dependent upon a brand of notoriety generated by the rapidly expanding press as opposed to lineage or professional accomplishment, the sources of more traditional forms of personal fame. This dissertation examines these intertwined phenomena in detail and posits them as evidence of a fundamental reconceptualization of the notion of the self during the July Monarchy. Both media-driven celebrity and the reproduction and large-scale distribution of portrait imagery attest to the fact that the self was no longer a solidly fixed identity emanating from some internal “essence” of the individual, but rather the product of an increasingly complex network of perceptions and representations. This dissertation begins with an investigation of the theoretical literature on selfhood and how it pertains to the crisis of self in the post-revolutionary age. Concurrent with the explosion of portraits in printed media was an unprecedented rise in the production of traditional, one-of-a-kind painted portraits and their public display at the Salon. As representations of contemporaries, portraits served as discursive and participatory sites not simply for aesthetic debates about representation but, more largely, about questions of class, politics, and gender—debates that in turn contributed to the generation and constantly changing discourses of the self. The second half of the dissertation focuses on the examination of three sets of portraits in reproducible media. I examine the role of the reproducible portrait in the solidification and dismantling of the political identity of King Louis-Philippe. The so-called “citizen-king” sought to market himself to the constantly shifting “middle” through a variety of often contradictory guises, which resulted in an incredibly unstable and uncontrollable image. In 1831, the journal L’Artiste began publishing a suite of portraits of the cultural icons of the day. Through their casual style and representational format, the portraits seek to create intimate, approachable images that immerse the famous sitters not in the world of their celebrity, but in that of the viewer. The lithographs recall the tradition of portrait drawing, thereby translating the vicarious one-on-one private experience of the unique portrait drawings to the mass-marketed celebrity culture. The dissertation concludes with an examination of the most famous portraits-in-multiple to be produced during the July Monarchy: the 500 portrait medallions by the republican sculptor David d’Angers. This chapter explores the tension between the sculptor’s rather grandiose conception of these portraits as perpetuating a long and distinguished tradition of artistic commemorations of grands hommes in France, on the one hand, and their status as small-scale commodities circulating on the open market, on the other.

Committee:

Andrew Shelton (Advisor); Lisa Florman (Committee Member); Christian Kleinbub (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

19th-century French art; July Monarchy; 1830-1848; Louis-Philippe; identity; selfhood; portraiture; reproducible portraits; visual culture; celebrity; celebrity culture; Salon; art journals; Pierre-Jean David dAngers; medallions; Romanticism; lithography

Herzog, Charlotte KopacClaude Michel Clodion: The Influence of Antique, Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo Art on Him and How It Reveals Itself in His Works
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1968, History of Art

Committee:

Franklin M. Ludden (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Buchanan, Susan L.A Study of Pala Patronage
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1975, History of Art

Committee:

Susan L. Huntington (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Schwartz, Erin M.Spheres of Ambivalence: The Art of Berni Searle and the Body Politics of South African Coloured Identity
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2014, Interdisciplinary Arts (Fine Arts)
Berni Searle is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa who uses her body in performance and photographic works. In this dissertation, articulations of identity within the context of Searle's work are examined in their social-historical relationships. Searle, in her art, both uses her body to illustrate constructions of identity and reclaims her body (and by extension, other similar bodies). These performances of articulated identity considered through the rubric of reprendre will elucidate the construction of Coloured identity in the South African body politic. These performances will also allow a consideration of counter-spaces for discussing political agency. Since the collapse of apartheid in South Africa in 1994 the citizens of the new, non-racial state have had to contend with lasting effects of the violence and racism that founded much of South African history. Coloured identity emerged as a distinct one early in the development of South African nationhood. Problematically, Colouredness has been associated with absence and socio-political marginalization that tended to undermine this community's agency during the apartheid era and after. The trend can lead to contesting racial tropes of national belonging that only serves to increase disenfranchisement in a new democracy. Berni Searle, as a Coloured woman, engages such histories in insightful ways by embodying the shifting paradigms of Coloured identity. In so doing, Searle also participates in important discourses in the African contemporary art community. Using Searle's work as a lens through which to examine issues of identity, body and enfranchisement, this dissertation demonstrates how her works open up spaces to discuss political agency and racial identity in the post-apartheid era. Such considerations carry important theoretical weight for discourses in South Africa regarding the importance of racial identity in the new nation. In addition to Coloured identity, Searle's works also engages with issues of immigration in a transnational context, which give her work significance beyond the specificity of South Africa. The dissertation contributes much needed detailed analysis of Searle's work, contemporary South African art, and discourses on Coloured identity during South African history.

Committee:

Frohne Andrea, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

African History; African Studies; Art Criticism; Art History; Fine Arts; Gender Studies; History; South African Studies

Keywords:

South Africa; Contemporary Art; African Art; Berni Searle; Body Art; Performance Art; Racial Identity; Race Theory; Gender Studies; National Identity; Art Theory; Body Theory; Identity Theory; South African Coloured Identity; South African Art

Livingston, Amy MillerA study of the iconography, style, and origin of three Tibetan Thangka paintings
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2001, History of Art
This study examines the style and iconography of three brightly colored and carefully detailed paintings depicting three of the five Jina Buddhas, along with a host of other deities. As I will show, these paintings were originally produced as part of a set of five, although the whereabouts of the other two are not known. This partial set is one of the earliest known commissions to a Nepali artist from a Tibetan patron, and a wonderful document of the fine craftsmanship of the Nepali painter combined with the complex and symbolic iconography of Tibetan Tantric art. Although these three paintings have come to be publicly known only in the last forty years, they have since been published frequently in books on Tibetan or Nepali painting, especially museum collection or exhibition catalogues. However, much of the iconography has not been identified or discussed at any length. In particular, the small deities in the top and bottom horizontal registers of all three paintings have been illustrated exactly as described in the Buddhist texts, however their identities have, for the most part, gone undocumented. One task of this paper is to properly identify all of the deities in these three paintings, including the Jina Buddhas, the Eight Great Bodhisattvas, or A¿¿amahabodhisattvas, and many other popular Buddhist deities, and discuss their iconography in the Tibetan context. I will also discuss the translation of the Tibetan inscription on the reverse of two of these paintings and the consecration ritual. Following this is an analysis of the stylistic characteristics of these paintings, which have been variously dated to the eleventh, twelfth, and thirteenth centuries. By comparing them with the mural paintings at the Shalu Monastery, I suggest that they most probably date from the early to mid-fourteenth century.

Committee:

John C. Huntington (Advisor); Susan L. Huntington (Committee Member); Dina Bangdel (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History

Grigsby, J. EugeneA study of African Negro art and its influence on modern art
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1940, History of Art
none

Committee:

Frank J. Roos, Jr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

African Americans; Art History

Thompson, Jaime L.M.“A Wild Apparition Liberated From Constraint”: The Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven’s New York Dada Street Performances and Costumes of 1913-1923
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2006, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Art History
After eighty years of obscurity the German Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven (1874-1927) has reemerged as a valuable subject of study. The Baroness was an artist and a writer whose media included poetry, collage, sculpture, performance and costume art. In chapter one I firmly establish the Baroness’s position as a Dada artist through examining her shared connections with the emergence of European Dada. In final chapters I will examine the most under-examined aspect of the Baroness’s various mediums-her performance and costume art. In the second chapter I will explore the Baroness’s work utilizing performative and feminist theories in relation to Marcel Duchamp’s female alter ego Rrose Sélavy. Finally, I will discuss the theme of “The Other” as a social and cultural commentator within the Baroness’s performance art. A study of the Baroness’s Dada performance art during her ten years in America can broaden our understanding of New York Dada.

Committee:

Theresa Leininger-Miller (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History; History, Modern

Keywords:

Baroness; Elsa; Freytag-Loringhoven; gender; Dada; New York; German; Germany; Marcel Duchamp; performance; performance art; costume; costume art; theater; street performance

Silverman, Sarah KellyThe 1363 English Sumptuary Law: A comparison with Fabric Prices of the Late Fourteenth-Century
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2011, Human Ecology: Fashion and Retail Studies

The 1363 English Sumptuary law was put in place to control the consumption of fabrics and related goods based on social class. The social implications of such laws have been discussed previously as reviewed in the literature. But there is a need to better understand the context, purpose, and function of these laws through examination of the prices of fabrics compared with the limits on cloth expenditure set out by the sumptuary laws.

This thesis provides a comparison of the 1363 English sumptuary law, the most comprehensive of the fourteenth-century English sumptuary laws, with available fabric prices from the fourteenth century. The fabric prices come from transcriptions of fourteenth-century documents that record fabric purchases for making clothing. Through a comparison of these documents it is possible to gain some understanding of the fabrics available to people based on the restrictions in the 1363 sumptuary law.

Committee:

Patricia Anne Cunningham, PhD (Advisor); Sarah-Grace Heller, PhD (Committee Member); Gayle Strege (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History; Economic History; European History; History; Law; Medieval History; Middle Ages

Keywords:

fourteenth century; 14th century; clothing; sumptuary law; sumptuary laws; medieval clothing

Shabtay, Talia BessStill Wet: On Painting, Presence, Pleasure, and You
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, Art
I make paintings that appeal to the mind and stick to the eye. Thepaintings use text that has been borrowed from popular culture, advertising, and film as their subject. My most recent body of work functions as a footbridge between looking at and being seen, painting and life. The footbridge is not derived from any one set of architectural blueprints, but rather generates its form from within. At times the bridge is formless, an evaporating cloud, or bottomless black. The act of painting transforms the text; image and form merge into presence. The subject is no longer simply borrowed text, but somehow the viewers, the artist, the materials, are absorbed like oil into cloth and seduced into subjects. The junction where painting touches without moving its location in space is the junction that I find most remarkable; furthermore, it is the place in time from which my marks and remarks are generated.

Committee:

Pheoris West (Advisor); Alison Crocetta (Committee Member); Laura Lisbon (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Art History; Fine Arts

Keywords:

painting; presence; pleasure; vignette; visible; flicker; language; image

MCCLUGGAGE, MATTHEW S.THE STUDIO, CRADLE OF CREATIVITY
MS ARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2002, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning : Architecture
The term "studio" has a long and evolving history. It has meant many different things to many types of people. Today, the studio is seen as a place to learn, a place to work, a place to create, and a place to perform; it is even known as a domicile in which to live. As historic shifts occurred within the various fields and professions that the studio space served, the studio's uses became more specialized and its identity became more diversified. Starting with its beginnings as a non-defined location in which ancient "artifactual" art forms or architectural embellishments were created, the winding and splintering journey of its development touches several aspects of human life and help to define many concepts that we use in our lives today. This evolution contains a few main points where ideas and definitions change and new uses and identities of the studio occur, such as when the role of artist shifted from that of the craftsman, and when the craftsman's workshop became more specialized. Through all of these changes though, common characteristics seem to emerge and point to a universal form of studio-"ness". The common thread is that of being a physical space that fosters creativity and reflects the personalities of those who use the studio spaces. This comprehensive look at the studio's etymology and evolution should help us to understand its past evolution and our many contemporary uses of the term and all the subtle nuances that the word carries. These unseen implications could serve as possible starting points for answering other questions about the studio space and its place within our contemporary lives.

Committee:

Patrick Snadon (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture; Art History

Keywords:

studio; architecture; workshop; art; artist

Ricciardi, Ryan A.Where Did All the Women Go: The Archaeology of the Soldier Empresses
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Arts and Sciences : Classics

In the long history of the Roman Empire, there is no other period for which we know so many names but have so little evidence than the third century A.D. The leaders are collectively called the soldier emperors in reference to the majority’s origin in and promotion by the Roman army. Absent for this period are the colorful (and colored) historical views available for other periods. The emperors and their wives, however, lasted long enough to mint coins, make dedications, and have official portraits created. Even less well understood are the soldier empresses, the wives of the soldier emperors. While sculpture experts have evaluated surviving images for their intrinsic value, the social and political implications of such images have not been explored. In this project I reevaluate existing literary, historical and visual evidence to recover the identity of these women. In this liminal period, imperial women, often considered mere figureheads in a rapidly revolving power struggle, wielded considerable power and influence in the political realm.

Each type of evidence has its strength for revealing the role of the empresses; combined, the evidence speaks louder than the individual pieces. Epigraphic remains not only express official titulature, but they can be more confidently connected to a specific time and place than contemporary sculptural remains. Numismatic evidence combines image and title in an official medium. Official imperial portraiture consisted of both the image of the individual together with an inscription used both to identify the depicted person as well as to honor the dedicator. The combination of sculptural, epigraphic and numismatic evidence provides a more complete picture of the social implications of contemporary imagery.

I propose that the wives of the soldier emperors wielded more power than historians have traditionally suspected. The extant evidence reveals that the emperors continued to manipulate the public persona of their wives in order to create a semblance of harmony within the imperial union, to advertise the longevity of dynasty, and to foster connections with the Roman army. The group of imperial women who ruled Rome during the so-called third century crisis still strove to create the image of perfection in both the civic and military worlds.

Committee:

Dr. C. Brian Rose, PhD (Advisor); Dr. Barbara Burrell, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Kathleen Lynch, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Steven Ellis, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Archaeology; Art History; Classical Studies

Keywords:

Roman women; Imperial art; Roman Empire

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