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Christopher, Yvonne M.Welfare Dependency and Work Ethic: A Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2017, Applied Behavioral Science: Criminal Justice and Social Problems
This study examined relationships between work ethic and welfare dependency. The 65-item Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile (MWEP) (Miller, Woehr, & Hudspeth, 2002) and the 28-item MWEP (Meriac, Woehr, Gorman, & Thomas, 2013) with attached socioeconomic surveys were administered to n=338 and n=247 adult subjects, respectively. A negative correlation between the two variables was anticipated, so that as levels of agreement with work ethic increase, reported use of welfare benefits decrease. After running correlation matrices to examine Pearson’s r, hierarchical regressions were conducted, culminating in a model which partially predicts the connection between the variables. Bivariate analyses for the 65-item MWEP data indicated that marital status, age, sex, centrality of work, waste time, delayed gratification, self-reliance, morality/ethics, hard work, and leisure were statistically significantly correlated. Bivariate analyses for the 28-item MWEP data indicated that centrality of work and hard work were statistically significantly correlated. These findings could be used in the design of a comprehensive assessment tool to be utilized at the point of entry into the welfare system.

Committee:

Gary Burns, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jacqueline Bergdahl, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Jonathan Varhola, M.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Demographics; Labor Economics; Public Policy; Social Research; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociology; Statistics; Welfare

Keywords:

Work ethic; welfare; dependency; labor force; unemployment; disability; SNAP; food stamps; TANF; temporary assistance for needy families; welfare reform

Bennett, Robert MichaelEnhancing Our Understanding of Human Poverty: An Examination of the Relationship Between Income Poverty and Material Hardship
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Social Work
The purpose of this study was to investigate the Official Poverty Measure’s (OPM) classifications and predictions of ten material hardships: unmet essential need, rent or mortgage nonpayment, eviction, skip or cut meal, a day without food, utility nonpayment or disconnection, phone disconnection, unmet medical need, and unmet dental need. The basis for the OPM was developed in 1965, and it has been used by the United States’ federal government to estimate the prevalence of poverty since 1969. Many criticized the OPM for its single price index, its definition of income and family, and its lack of geographic variation in prices. These limitations were expected to affect the OPM’s accuracy to identify and predict hardship. Respectively, classification and predictive probabilities are statistical metrics of a binary test’s efficacy to indicate the presence or absence of a condition (e.g., material hardship) and the trustability of that indication. The OPM’s correct positive classifications (i.e., sensitivity) exceeded the evaluative guideline for interpretation, nevertheless, they were low. The probabilities of true-positive results (i.e., OPM and hardship positive) were lower than those for false-negatives (i.e., OPM negative but hardship positive). It was more likely the OPM would erroneously classify families as nonpoor. The correct negative classifications (i.e., specificity) for all but one hardship indicator failed the evaluative criterion and were uninterpretable. The probabilities of false-positive results (i.e., OPM poor but without hardship) were too near the probabilities of OPM positives. The OPM’s capability to predict a true-positive or true-negative was also low or uninterpretable. Therefore, a positive or negative OPM prediction had little association with the presence or absence of hardship. The OPM’s sensitivity to material hardship (i.e., the odds of a true-positive result) varied across the sociodemographic and labor-power variables associated with poverty. Families with an unemployed primary person had statistically significantly greater odds of an OPM true-positive result for all ten hardship indicators. The presence of two, three, or four children in a family was statistically significantly associated with greater sensitivity across all hardship indicators, except three children and an adult without food for a day. Families with a lone-parent or without a high school diploma were not statistically significantly associated with greater odds of a true-positive result for eviction, a day without food for a lone man or a primary person with no high school diploma, or utility disconnection and phone disconnection for family heads with no high school diploma. African American racial identification had no statistically significant association with OPM sensitivity. Asian identification was associated with greater odds of a true-positive for unmet essential need and eviction but lower odds of a true-positive for skip or cut meal. Indigenous or Native Persons identification was associated with lower odds of a true-positive for a day without food. Hispanic or Latino(a) families had greater odds of a true-positive for five of the hardships. Families with a physical or mental disability had statistically significantly lower odds of a true-positive for skip or cut meals. Veteran status was not associated with any of the ten hardships.

Committee:

Lisa Raiz, PhD (Committee Chair); Audrey Begun, PhD (Committee Member); Joseph Guada, PhD (Committee Member); Erinn Hade, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Social Work

Keywords:

poverty; material hardship; Official Poverty Measure; OPM; Basic Needs and Food Insecurity measure; classification probabilities; predictive values; sensitivity; specificity;

Jacomet, Gregory A.The Use of Unschooling as a Potential Solution to the Complex and Chronic Problem of Educating Foster Children
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2018, Educational Administration (Education)
Pedagogical and existential problems of the foster child population were examined including the history of orphan management and current methods for care. Also examined was the increasingly popular practice of homeschooling as well as its most autonomous variant, unschooling. Utilizing the methodology of bricolage, I leveraged the literature spanning both foster care and homeschooling juxtaposed against my own unschooling practice (with my own children) and interviews with other unschoolers to suggest a potential avenue for improvement to the education and subsequent life outcomes of the fostered population.

Committee:

Charles Lowery (Committee Chair); Krisanna Machtmes (Committee Member); Karl Wheatley (Committee Member); Laura Harrison (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Pedagogy; Social Work

Keywords:

foster care;foster children;aging out;emancipation;homeschooling;unschooling

Wingate, Tiah JAn Examination of Instrumental Support Received by Parents of Children with Special Health Care Needs Throughout the Life Course
MA, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences
The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the instrumental support received by parents of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) throughout the life course. The study sample included 489 parents of CSHCN obtained from the Wave III sample and the Refresher sample of the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) survey. The study provided a description of the sources of unpaid assistance for the parents of CSHCN and yielded significant findings regarding variations in support receipt associated with life course variables. Parents receive significantly more instrumental support from informal sources than from formal sources at each stage of the family life cycle. Additionally, a significant positive relationship exists between the amount of support received from formal sources and the amount of support received from informal sources. The receipt of support from various specific sources also demonstrates a relationship with the receipt of support from other specific sources. Finally, life course variables including religious participation and gender were associated with the receipt of support from formal sources, whereas family life cycle stage was associated with the receipt of support from informal sources. Parents from families with young children reported receiving significantly more unpaid assistance from informal sources than parents from families at all other life cycle stages. These findings help inform service providers as to parents who may potentially need assistance securing instrumental support as well as point to potential areas for future research.

Committee:

Kelly Cichy, PhD (Advisor); Maureen Blankemeyer, PhD (Committee Member); Rhonda Richardson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Families and Family Life; Health Care; Social Research; Social Work

Keywords:

children with special health care needs; parents of CSHCN; social support; instrumental support, parents of children with illness or disability; instrumental support for parents of children with special needs

Kaloga, Marissa Elaine PrinzThe Role of Social Capital in Cooperative Groups: A Mixed-Methods Study of Women’s Collective Savings Groups in Conakry, Guinea
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Social Work
Financial inclusion programs have seen remarkable growth throughout the last two decades, with continued annual growth of up to 15% predicted for micro-credit along in the Sub-Saharan African region over the next three years. However, as private investment funds begin to dominate microfinance funding streams, there is debate about the benefits of microcredit for the population most targeted with these funds: women in the Global South. One aspect of this debate concerns the need for social capital, resources embedded in social networks, for the success of microcredit lending. While its necessity is acknowledged, the way that social capital is created, structured, and employed in women’s groups is not adequately understood. By better understanding these aspects of social capital, microcredit programs can be better designed, and the ethical implications of expanding microfinance services can be better understood. Employing a mixed methodology of qualitative interviewing and social network analysis, this study explores the phenomenon of social capital across a diverse sample of 12 women’s collective financial groups, including both informal savings clubs and micro-credit groups located in the West African urban capital of Conakry, Guinea. A multi-dimensional model of social capital developed by the World Bank was modified for use with this research population and included six domains: Access to Resources, Trust, Communication, Cooperation, Social Cohesion, and Empowerment. In depth qualitative interviews with 84 members of collective finance groups were analyzed to answer the question: What are Guinean women’s experiences as members of collective financial groups? Upon developing an understanding of the groups, this study then asked: How is social capital structured in the groups, and how do the social capital networks of collective financial groups function? Sociometric network analysis examined a global measure of social capital as well as analysis of each of six domains in the multidimensional model. A third phase of analysis combined characteristic features of the social capital networks with the qualitative transcripts to answer the question: How do the experiences of participants at characteristic structural locations within a social capital network differ? Qualitative analysis yielded a typology of collaborative financial groups as well as a set of principles in groups that supported solidarity. Djamakourou, a Guinean concept related to the promotion of social relationships, emerged as foundational to participants’ ability to create and sustain the groups. Results of social network analyses show that social capital in Guinean women’s groups is built from the inside out, relying on strong relationships between a core set of group members. Characteristic positions and accompanying perspectives within social capital networks were produced from combined qualitative and social network analysis. These results provide a contextualized perspective of individual members, illustrating the heterogeneity of experiences within the groups. This study provides new insights into the way social capital is created and used in women’s collaborative financial groups, and can inform future microfinance interventions as well as address the ethical implications of expanding these services across Sub-Saharan Africa.

Committee:

Mo Yee Lee, PhD (Committee Chair); Sharvari Karandikar, PhD (Committee Member); Keith Warren, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Studies; Social Work; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Financial Inclusion; Africa; Guinea; ROSCA; Social Capital; Djamakourou; Social Network Analysis; Qualitative Interviewing; Mixed Methods; Microcredit; Microfinance; Women; Gender; Feminism; Social Development; Social Work

Steelesmith, Danielle LCounty Level Suicide Rates in the United States from 2000 to 2014: Changes over Time and Associations with Contextual Factors
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2018, Social Work
Suicide is a public health problem that takes the lives of more than 40,000 Americans every year. The impact of suicide is far reaching, effecting families and communities while also carrying a large economic burden. Previously, suicide rates have been shown to be higher and increasing more rapidly in rural areas than in urban areas. Reasons suicide rates are higher in rural areas have been attributed to factors such as high socioeconomic deprivation and a lack of availability of mental health services. However, few studies exist that examine how these factors impact rural and urban areas differently. The following study examines patterns and trends in suicide rates over a 15-year period, stratified by gender, age, and geographic location. It then examines the relationship between a variety of contextual factors and suicide rates, and whether the associations vary by geographic location. All individuals who died by suicide between 2000 and 2014, were between ages 25 and 64, and resided in the US at the time of death were included in the study. Suicide decedents were aggregated in five three-year periods at the county level and combined with population data to calculate suicide rates and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). Numerous contextual variables were collected at the county level and reduced to measure socioeconomic deprivation, social fragmentation, social capital, provider availability, veteran population, gun availability, and drinking establishments. Suicide rates and trend tests were calculated over time, smoothed SMRs were calculated and mapped, and negative binomial regression was used to find factors associated with suicide rates. The results show increasing suicide rates across all groups, regardless of age, gender, or geographic location. Suicide rates increase 23% overall, with the greatest increase in rural areas (40.6%). The youngest age group, 25 to 34, had the greatest difference between rural and urban counties, with the most rural counties having suicide rates 2.2 times higher than large metro counties in the final study period. SMRs show an excess risk for suicide across the western US and throughout portions of Appalachia and the Ozark mountains. Two contextual variables, social capital and psychiatrist ratio, were associated with decreased suicide rates, while four variables, socioeconomic deprivation, social fragmentation, veterans, and gun availability, were associated with increased suicide rates. Deprivation and gun shops varied by geographic location, with deprivation having a greater impact in rural counties compared to large metro counties and gun shops having less impact in rural counties compared to large metro counties. These findings show that suicide rates are still higher in rural areas than urban areas and multiple factors are associated with increasing suicide rates. Existing suicide prevention programs, such as those used in schools, colleges, and police departments, may be successful if adapted to communities with high suicide rates. Improving the socioeconomic outlook and promoting connectedness within a county may also be useful to reduce suicide rates. Additional research is necessary to understand variations by age, gender, and method of suicide and to evaluate how effective suicide prevention programs are at the county level.

Committee:

Keith Warren (Advisor)

Subjects:

Public Health; Social Work

Keywords:

suicide; longitudinal; geographic location

Herr, Kathryn G.An ethnographic study of adolescent pregnancy in an urban high school /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1988, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Sapp, Carlton M.Advocacy strategies and Medicaid reform : a descriptive look at the characteristics of agencies that engage in advocacy strategies to pos[i]tively affect Medicaid reform policies for persons with HIV/AIDS /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2000, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Jarrett, Alfred AbiosehA social work curriculum design for a national school of social work in Sierra Leone West Africa /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1984, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Keywords:

Social work education;Schools of social work

Shibley, Kathleen PhillipsThe revisitation of the psychosocial issue of trust/mistrust in new mothers /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2000, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Lathrop, Patricia A.A comparison of the process of offending for juvenile and adult child sexual offenders /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1997, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Joseph, Alfred LouisThe tracking of school children : a comparison of life outcomes /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1995, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Gillette, YvonneIndividual differences in clinical judgments of mother-child interaction /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1990, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Mauldin, Rosetta JohnsonThe relationship between selected sociodemographic characteristics and perceived power of board members of nonprofit social service agencies /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1990, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Snyder, Frank R.A study of Jungian personality typology and values of future administrators and social work clinicians /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1988, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Leung, Yuk-hi PatrickAn evaluation of a nontraditional job training program for women in Ohio : an evaluation of a pilot project conducted by PREP-Ohio /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1986, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Keywords:

Occupational training for women;Women

Chung, Douglas K. N.A pilot study of a volunteer intervention model in helping chronically mentally-disabled patients adjust to community placement.
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1982, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Keywords:

People with mental disabilities;Volunteer workers in rehabilitation

Brzuzy, StephanieLiving alone or living with parents : a comparison study of adult survivors of head injuries /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1995, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Murphy, Sara K.Factors utilized in screening and substantiation decisions of reports of maltreatment of children in out of home care /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1994, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Woehrle, Kathleen LouiseInterprofessional Practice of Social Workers and Educators: Factors That Influence The Coordination of The Safe and Drug Free Schools Program in Ohio /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1996, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Sheridan, Martha AnnEmerging themes in the study of deaf children /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1996, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Social Work

Lee, Megan LMSW Thesis: An Exploratory Study on the Relationship Between Race, Student Perceptions of School Environment, and Student Outcomes
Master of Social Work, The Ohio State University, 2016, Social Work
This study examines the relationship between student perceptions of teacher support, student centeredness, and microaggressions, and sense of school belonging and engagement among Black, Latino, and white students. We first hypothesized that student perceptions of teacher support, student centeredness, and microaggressions would be significantly related to their sense of belonging and engagement. Secondly, we hypothesized that Black and Latino students would report more negative perceptions of their school environment, as well as a weaker sense of school belonging and engagement than their white peers. We analyzed data from a sample of 9536 middle and high school students provided by the Student Success Profile using structural equation modeling. Given prior knowledge on the microaggressions scale, we tested the other constructs in the model for invariance across the two groups (students of color and white students). We found that the measures of teacher support, student-centeredness, belonging, and engagement had too many statistically different factor loadings across the groups to be considered equivalent, which required us to test Black and Latino students separately from white students. Though we could not statistically compare results from the two models, we found that teacher support, student centeredness, and microaggressions are directly and indirectly related to sense of school belonging and engagement among Black/Latino and white students. Findings from this study provide evidence that can be used to guide future research on possible effects of student perceptions of school environment and school outcomes, and inform school practices to improve school experiences for students across racial groups.

Committee:

Natasha Bowen (Advisor); Carla Curtis (Committee Member); John Emmerich (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Social Work

Keywords:

School social work; education; Critical Race Theory; race; student perceptions; school environment; student outcomes; educational disparities; middle school; high school; belonging; engagement; teacher support; student centeredness; microaggressions

Amos, Nancy A.What is the Lived Experience of First-Time Adolescent Mothers?
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, Social Welfare
In 2014 approximately 249,000 babies were born in the United States to young women between the ages of 15 and 19. There are medical and psychological complications associated with adolescent pregnancy. One problem is the presence of maternal depression which is a serious condition with implications for both the mother and the child. Depression is experienced differently in adolescents than in adults, making it difficult to accurately assess and plan for services. Guided by Relational-Cultural Theory, this qualitative study described the lived experience of adolescent mothers in the early postpartum period. The study also examined adolescent mothers classified as depressed compared to those as nondepressed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Eight adolescent mothers between the ages of 15 and 19 were interviewed using a semi-structured interview grounded in the theoretical and empirical literature. Questions were asked about risk factors for depression and to elicit the experiences of the participants as mothers. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Atlas.ti software was used to code and merge data. Two coders were used to increase reliability of the themes observed. At the micro level, participants talked about their change of perception of themselves, change in school plans, lack of knowledge about pregnancy and delivery, and feeling the pressure of time and role conflict. At the mezzo level, participants described the loss of friends when they became mothers and about changing connections and disconnections with family members and with the father of their baby. At the macro level, participants talked about negotiating medical, daycare, and educational systems and about their perceptions of being treated differently as a reaction to their status as an adolescent mother. Participants described both connections and disconnections that improved their experience of being an adolescent mother. The participants described ways in which their connections with adults could be improved by listing ideas about what they wanted adults to know about their experience. The findings are discussed in relation to implications for social work practice, policy, and future research.

Committee:

Elizabeth Tracy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Early Childhood Education; Families and Family Life; Health Care; Psychology; Social Work

Keywords:

qualitative research; social work; adolescent mothers; lived experience

Hoffman, Jill AshleyPromoting Healthy Social-Emotional Development in Vulnerable Young Children: The Importance of Head Start Teachers and Centers
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Social Work
Children’s earliest experiences are critical for health and well-being across the lifespan. These experiences shape the development of social-emotional skills which lay the foundation by which children learn to navigate the intricacies of social interactions and complex emotions. Not all children, however, develop the social-emotional skills needed for success, with between 9 and 14% of children in early childhood exhibiting some type social-emotional deficit (Brauner & Stephens, 2006). Difficulties with early social-emotional skills may lead to behavioral, academic, and social problems during early childhood, as well as later in life (Denham & Brown, 2010). Low-income children of color often face barriers that put them at risk for poor social-emotional skill development. In an effort to support these vulnerable young children, the social settings in which they spend time should be targeted. One key setting in which many young children spend time is center-based child care. Examining this setting is a growing priority, so that the contributions of child care toward child social-emotional outcomes are maximized. Using secondary data from the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) 2009, this study examined child care as a social setting that may positively influence social-emotional skill development among young low-income, children of color. Specifically, this study used multilevel modeling to explore child care center support, and also teacher emotional support and behavior management practices, and their influence on problem behaviors and social skill development among young children. Findings revealed that neither teacher emotional support practices nor teacher behavior management practices were significantly associated with child social skills or problem behaviors. However, teacher perceived center support was significantly related to child problem behaviors among low-income children of color, with higher teacher perceived center support associated with fewer problem behaviors. In addition, results suggested that neither teacher nor center director perceived center support were significantly associated with teacher emotional support practices in the classroom. However, teacher perceived center support was significantly associated with teacher behavior management practices. Findings from the current study highlight the importance of continued research on the influence child care settings have on the social-emotional skill development of young low-income children of color. A better understanding of these center and teacher factors, as well as their relationship to child social-emotional outcomes, will allow social workers to more effectively work with child care administrators and teachers in developing and supporting social-emotional programming in centers serving low-income children of color. In the end, this work will help to create richer child care settings that ultimately better support social-emotional skill development, fostering positive long-term outcomes for vulnerable young children.

Committee:

Dawn Anderson-Butcher, PhD (Advisor); Audrey Begun, PhD (Committee Member); Buettner Cynthia, PhD (Committee Member); Logan Jessica, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Social Work

Keywords:

early childhood; Head Start; child care; social skills; problem behaviors; social-emotional development; emotional support; behavior management; center support

Zeanah, Kathryn LExperiences of Heterosexist Harassment Among Graduate Students Training to Work as School-Based Professionals: Impact on Psychological Functioning, Academic Wellbeing, and Attitudes Toward Sexual Minority Individuals
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, EDU Physical Activity and Educational Services
Graduate students in school psychology, school counseling, and school social work are training to work as school-based professionals. In their professional roles, they work with students facing a variety of academic, social, and psychological challenges, including students who are developing their understanding of their own sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression. Students whose sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression fall outside of what is considered “normal” face significant personal harassment and institutional discrimination (Kosciw et al., 2014; Rankin et al, 2010; Silverschanz et al., 2008; Waldo, 1998; Woodford et al., 2014; Woodford & Kulick, 2014). To date, no research has examined the experiences of harassment among LGBT graduate students training to work as school-based professionals. Building off of extant literature that has examined the experiences of college and graduate students broadly, this study sought to examine whether graduate students in school psychology, school counseling, and school social work face heterosexist harassment that impacts their psychological functioning, academic wellbeing, and attitudes toward sexual minority individuals. Graduate students (N = 297) in school psychology, school counseling and school social work completed an online survey examining heterosexist harassment, psychological functioning, academic wellbeing, and attitudes toward sexual minority individuals. The results of the study found sexual minority are the most likely to experience heterosexist harassment, but that heterosexual students are not immune from this harassment. Additionally, the current study found that individuals who experienced heterosexist harassment had decreased psychological functioning and less favorable perceptions of the climate of their training program. No differences were found in the frequency of harassment experienced and attitudes toward sexual minority individuals.

Committee:

Kisha Radliff, PhD (Advisor); Colette Dollarhide, EdD (Committee Member); Antoinette Miranda, PhD (Committee Member); Joe Wheaton, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Psychology; School Counseling; Social Work

Keywords:

heterosexist harassment; sexual minority; school climate; psychological functioning; academic wellbeing

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