Search Results (1 - 25 of 102 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Christopher, Yvonne M.Welfare Dependency and Work Ethic: A Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2017, Applied Behavioral Science: Criminal Justice and Social Problems
This study examined relationships between work ethic and welfare dependency. The 65-item Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile (MWEP) (Miller, Woehr, & Hudspeth, 2002) and the 28-item MWEP (Meriac, Woehr, Gorman, & Thomas, 2013) with attached socioeconomic surveys were administered to n=338 and n=247 adult subjects, respectively. A negative correlation between the two variables was anticipated, so that as levels of agreement with work ethic increase, reported use of welfare benefits decrease. After running correlation matrices to examine Pearson’s r, hierarchical regressions were conducted, culminating in a model which partially predicts the connection between the variables. Bivariate analyses for the 65-item MWEP data indicated that marital status, age, sex, centrality of work, waste time, delayed gratification, self-reliance, morality/ethics, hard work, and leisure were statistically significantly correlated. Bivariate analyses for the 28-item MWEP data indicated that centrality of work and hard work were statistically significantly correlated. These findings could be used in the design of a comprehensive assessment tool to be utilized at the point of entry into the welfare system.

Committee:

Gary Burns, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jacqueline Bergdahl, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Jonathan Varhola, M.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Demographics; Labor Economics; Public Policy; Social Research; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociology; Statistics; Welfare

Keywords:

Work ethic; welfare; dependency; labor force; unemployment; disability; SNAP; food stamps; TANF; temporary assistance for needy families; welfare reform

Brooks-Turner, Brenda ElaineExploring the Coping Strategies of Female Urban High School Seniors on Academic Successes as it Relates to Bullying
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2016, College of Education and Human Services
Bullying has become a worldwide problem of pandemic proportion and degree. (Thomas, Bolen, Heister & Hyde, 2010). In the United States over thirty-five percent of school-aged students were directly involved in bullying incidents. Tragic news stories about suicides and school violence raised awareness about the importance of addressing this global issue (Van Der Zande, 2010). To date reports further indicate that more females are involved in indirect relational bullying than males. Unfortunately, as technology becomes more and more accessible, relational bullying has become one of the fastest growing epidemics (Brinson, 2005; Rigby & Smith, 2011). Current research explanations were limited as to how female seniors who are victims of bullying showed resilience to academically succeed despite incidences of bullying throughout their high school experiences. Therefore, the purpose of this mixed method study was to explore the coping strategies utilized by12th grade female urban high school seniors who have experienced school success despite their involvement as victims of bullying. In this study, 32 high school female seniors completed the online Olweus’ Bullying Questionnaire which included self-reported attendance, discipline referrals, grade point average, and participation in extracurricular activities as it related to their bullying experiences. Additionally, the researcher randomly selected eight focus group participants were involved in two focus group sessions to provide rich descriptions of their experiences as victims of bullying. These victims expressed the coping strategies used to successfully defeat the negative connotations associated with bullying, and specifically acknowledged their personal triumphs. When students understood the intricacies of bullying, and were empowered to use effective coping strategies, their experience of school success should increase as the prevalence of bullying decreases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to decrease the number of bullying incidences in schools by providing students with effective resources or coping strategies that enabled them to no longer be victims of bullying, but to have opportunities to experience success as they develop, and learn in a safe and hostile-free environment.

Committee:

Frederick Hampton, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Brian Harper, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ralph Mawdsley, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Paul Williams, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mittie Davis Jones, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Elementary Education; Families and Family Life; Gender; Gender Studies; Health Education; Individual and Family Studies; Law; Legal Studies; Multicultural Education; Personal Relationships; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Policy; School Administration; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociology; Teacher Education; Urban Planning

Keywords:

bullying;coping strategies;academic success;academic achievement;female;urban high school;graduating seniors

Crano, Ricky D'AndreaPosthuman Capital: Neoliberalism, Telematics, and the Project of Self-Control
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Comparative Studies
The goal of this dissertation is to demonstrate some of the ways in which neoliberal social and economic discourse, in particular the work of Friedrich Hayek and Gary Becker, has influenced the cultural evolution of the late-twentieth and early-twenty-first centuries. Chapter One introduces the scope and methods of the project and situates market-oriented social epistemology alongside the development of complexity theory in the physical and information sciences. Chapter Two situates Hayek’s philosophies of social science and communication within the broader science cultures of the postwar decades, arguing that his conceptualization of prices and markets is deeply rooted in coterminous projects of cybernetics and general systems theory. Consequently, Hayek’s ideas about autonomy, information, and cultural transmission are seen to dovetail with the dominant scientific paradigms and media technologies of the late twentieth century. Chapter Three argues that contemporary financial markets and telematic screen cultures have become operationally analogous in their actualization of neoliberal rationality and social thought. Expanding my reading of neoliberalism beyond Hayek’s macrological approach to examine the emerging and all-consuming micrological approach of “human capital” theorists like Becker, this chapter details the ways in which new media platforms, algorithmic cultural practices, and what cultural critics have named the “financialization of daily life” have become primary agents of governmentality today. Chapter Four offers an original interpretation of Michel Foucault’s 1979 lectures on neoliberalism, one that reads the abrupt change of course in his research—which, directly following his interrogations of Hayek, Becker, and others, jumped from contemporary political economy to ancient cultures of self-care—as an attempt to locate a genealogical precedent for the subjectivist governmental rationality he had revealed as a dominant theme of neoliberal discourse.

Committee:

Brian Rotman (Committee Co-Chair); Philip Armstrong (Committee Co-Chair); Eugene Holland (Committee Member); Kris Paulsen (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Comparative; Economic Theory; Philosophy; Philosophy of Science; Social Research; Social Structure; Technology; Web Studies

Keywords:

neoliberalism; cybernetics; autopoiesis; posthumanism; social control; Hayek; Becker; Foucault; digital culture; subjectivity; epistemology; human capital theory; human sciences; governmentality; networks; new media; intellectual history

Appleman, Michael JEmerging Adulthood: The Pursuit of Higher Education
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2015, Educational Foundations-Social/Philosophical Foundations of Education
The introduction of this thesis project will provide an overview of emerging adulthood and the context of higher education in contemporary society. In chapter two, a conceptualization of emerging adulthood will be provided. Given the social psychological nature of emerging adulthood, chapter two will explain the influence of identity development and social factors on emerging adults. In chapter three, self-authorship will be discussed as a theory for considering how emerging adults make meaning of their experiences, progress toward mature thinking, and assume responsible roles in adult life. Next, chapter four will provide an analysis of the relationship between emerging adults and higher education. An emphasis in chapter four will be the Learning Partnerships Model which articulates the potential for higher education to foster the development of self-authorship. This will provide one example of the way higher education cultivates individuals, and the implications for emerging adults. Lastly, a conclusion follows in chapter five to discuss the intersections between emerging adulthood, self-authorship, and higher education, with an emphasis on the social and cultural implications of emerging adulthood as a newly theorized phase in the human lifespan.

Committee:

Suzanne Mac Donald, Dr. (Advisor); Li Huey-Li, Dr. (Committee Member); Sandra Spickard-Prettyman, Dr. (Committee Member); Megan Moore-Gardner, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Aging; Cognitive Psychology; Curriculum Development; Education Philosophy; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Individual and Family Studies; Multicultural Education; Social Psychology; Social Structure; Sociology; Teaching

Keywords:

emerging adulthood; higher education; self-authorship; educational philosophy; social and cultural foundations; lifespan; student development; identity development; decision-making; possible selves; future-oriented thinking; student learning outcomes

DeLong, Tyler BenjaminEucharistic Unity, Fragmented Body: Christian Social Practice and the Market Economy
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2015, Theology
The following is an interpretive synopsis of Henri de Lubac and Karl Polanyi's particular thought about how human sociality is organized around the formal influence of theological and economic structures, giving shape to the practice of everyday life. For De Lubac, social fragmentation and unity are central theological categories for understanding both the first instance of sin and the unfolding of salvation in history. God is at work in the world as an active agent in the reparation of discordant humanity, restoring humankind to its original state as one collective body in the Church. Karl Polanyi's analysis of the rise of market economics gives us a historical instance of social and ecological fracture, providing the possibility of relating de Lubac's theological argument in a particular historical context. Two competing logics of social formation emerge: 1.) the Eucharist implicates human sociality toward deep forms of community in the Church; and 2.) the mechanism of the self-regulating market actively dissolves these thick forms of community, organizing sociality around capital markets and production. Placing de Lubac and Polanyi in conversation provides a way of thinking theologically about the history of unity and break in an increasingly dispersed social era.

Committee:

Vincent J. Miller, Ph.D. (Advisor); Kelly Johnson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Portier, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agriculture; Economic History; Economic Theory; Economics; Environmental Economics; Environmental Justice; Ethics; Home Economics; Labor Economics; Religion; Religious History; Social Structure; Sociology; Theology

Keywords:

Eucharist; Henri de Lubac; Karl Polanyi; Catholic Church; Ecclesiology; Capitalism; Free Market; Economics; Thomas Aquinas; Agrarianism; Ecology; Creation; Sociality; Christian Social Practice; Community; Distributism; Unity

Burns, David UtechtURBAN DIVISION AND SOCIAL ANTAGONISM: THE POWER OF PLACE IN THE CREATION OF NEIGHBORHOOD IDENTITIES IN DULUTH, MINNESOTA
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2010, Geography
This thesis is primarily a historical examination of place-based collective identities in Duluth, Minnesota. I argue that the city’s underlying social, economic and political conditions gave rise to collective identities and fostered neighborhood antagonism over time. These conditions, which converged to create place and the identities formed therein, were constructed in large part by economic circumstances and hegemonic forces present in the area during the late 19th century. The natural landscape of Duluth and the nature of the industrial economy during the settlement period convened to form two distinctive residential sections of the city: a blue collar area for the workers and a wealthier area inhabited by capitalists. Over time, these identities continued to be class-based, and were both articulated through and reproduced by key urban controversies that occurred in the history of the city and the social institutions that continue to exist today.

Committee:

Bruce D'Arcus, PhD (Committee Chair); David Prytherch, PhD (Committee Member); Stanley Toops, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Geography; Social Structure

Keywords:

Duluth, MN; collective identity construction; social memory; landscape production; place;

Kurfi, Mustapha HashimSocietal Responses to the State of Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) in Kano Metropolis- Nigeria
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2010, African Studies (International Studies)
This study uses qualitative methodology to examine the contributions of Non-Governmental Organizations in response to the conditions of Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) in Kano metropolis. The study investigates what these organizations do, what methods, techniques, and strategies they employ to identify the causes of OVC's conditions for intervention. The study acknowledges colonization, globalization, poverty, illiteracy, and individualism as contributing factors to OVC's conditions. However, essentially, the study identifies gross misunderstanding between paternal and maternal relatives of children to be the main factor responsible for the OVC's conditions. This social disorganization puts the children in difficult conditions including exposure to health, educational, moral, emotional, psychological, and social problems. The thesis concludes that through "collective efficacy" the studied organizations are a perfect means for solving-problem. The associations operate on existing family structures, cement relationships, provide social networking among the contending relatives, and most importantly positively impacting the lives of the OVC.

Committee:

Howard Steve (Committee Chair); Diane Ciekawy (Committee Member); Godwyll Franciss (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Social Structure; Social Work; Sociology; Welfare

Keywords:

Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC); Kano Metropolis; Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs); Collective efficacy; Nigeria; Underprivileged Children; Family values; Patriarchy; Social Disorganization; Community-Based organizations (CBOs); Juveniles.

Crum, Melissa ReneeTHE CREATION OF BLACK CHARACTER FORMULAS: A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF STEREOTYPICAL ANTHROPOMORPHIC DEPICTIONS AND THEIR ROLE IN MAINTAINING WHITENESS
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2010, African-American and African Studies

The mass media industry as a hegemonic entity has played a vital role in displaying fallacious accounts of black life. Grounded in ideas from scholars like Richard Schechner, Patricia Ticineto, Joseph Roach and Sara Ahmed, this research is a critique of the ways in which memory, and its possible manifestations, plays in non-blacks’ (specifically whites) interpretation, motivation, and perception of stereotypical visual portrayals of blackness. The focus will be on how the continuing phenomenon of stereotyping blackness in the 20th and 21st centuries is perpetuated in child-targeted feature-length animations with animal characters. I argue that the possible furtive and/or involuntary visual manifestations of “black identity” in animation have their sources in a white historical memory that clings to the desire to maintain whiteness. This work demonstrates how ideas of blackness in white memory were not solely constructed from the imaginations of producers of mainstream culture. Rather black stereotypes are the result of a combination of black protest against negative portrayals, blacks as accomplices in perpetuating their negative stereotypes, and whites’ imagined ways of blackness.

Following the work of Anna Everett and Robin Kelly and commentary from Bert Williams and George Walker, the perpetuation of whiteness through imagined black identities in media outlets does not take into account the ways in which blacks think of and present themselves within black communities, the ways blacks display their identity outside the constraints of white imagination, or how blacks openly or discreetly oppose stereotypical caricatures. However, the change in the portrayal of black people after the Civil Rights Movement (1945-1964) is the result of the powerful black collective voice influencing change in nefarious deceptions of African-Americans in media outlets. This change, according to Donald Bogle, Robert M. Entman and Andrew Rojecki, however, simply gave new faces to old caricatures. Therefore, the continued practice of stereotyping blacks by way of dated Enlightenment thinking regardless of black protest speaks to the pervasiveness of “blackness” via the malignant ideology of whiteness. The desire to sustain ideologies and practices of mainstream media has prevented the erasure of black caricatures. The compromise between portrayals of whiteness and holistic portrayals of black life is more sophisticated making black caricatures more elusive, but still evident. Through a critical evaluation of Scrub Me Mama, Shark Tale and Madagascar, this research will demonstrate how ideas of Enlightenment theories of race from the 17th and 18th centuries has a prolonged history that leads to anthropomorphic animation of the 21st century.

Movies have the ability to be used as a critical space for the interpretation and evaluation of stereotypes. When typecasts are confronted, they can be used to make more complex black characters and the information acquired during critical evaluation can be used to interrogate the trends seen in housing, employment, and judicial discrimination against people of color. The ultimate goal of this project is for audience members to be conscious consumers of media products and recognize that movie characters have the ability to influence real-life interactions with the people those characters supposedly represent.

Committee:

Horace Newsum, PhD (Committee Chair); Maurice Stevens, PhD (Committee Member); Kenneth Goings, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; American History; American Studies; Black History; Gender; Mass Media; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Motion Pictures; Philosophy; Social Structure; Womens Studies

Keywords:

African American and African Studies; Cultural Studies; Cinema and Media Studies; Critical Race Theory

Rai, PronoyThe Indian State and the Micropolitics of Food Entitlements
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2013, International Development Studies (International Studies)
The objective of this research is to understand, how people in different socio-economic groups access food, the role of the state in facilitating or hindering access to food, and what constitutes the 'politics of access' to food for people. The data for this research was collected from interviews conducted among four socio-economic groups, and was analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis. This research identified market-based entitlements as the most significant form for all the groups to access food, and identified indigenous laborers as lacking access to major endowments and entitlements, amongst all the groups. Finally, this thesis points to the significance of transfer entitlements across the socio-economic groups, and in doing so details the nature of politics, especially those practiced by the state, that help people gain access to the schemes or denies access to them.

Committee:

Thomas Smucker, PhD (Advisor); Haley Duschinski, PhD (Committee Member); E.Edna Wangui, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agriculture; Cultural Anthropology; Environmental Justice; Environmental Studies; Geography; Labor Economics; Public Policy; Regional Studies; Social Research; Social Structure; South Asian Studies; Welfare

Keywords:

India;Food Security; Entitlements; Amartya Sen; Maharashtra; Politics; Micropolitics; Hunger; Agricultural Laborers; South Asia; Development; Rural Poverty; Social Welfare; Social Policy; Food Access

Driscoll, MeredithATTACHMENT TO PLACE: INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN A HOUSE BECOMING A HOME
MA, Kent State University, 2011, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences
Older adults typically prefer to age in place. They often have an attachment to their home and neighborhood, but how does attachment to place occur and what factors are associated with attachment? This study used data from the second wave of the Midlife in the United States survey (MIDUS II) to examine how demographic and contextual variables are associated with attachment to place. The findings support the notion that older adults are most attached to their home and do prefer to age in place. It was also found that marital status, socioeconomic status, length of residence, home ownership, health status, and social network contact are all associated with attachment to place. It is important to focus on ways to help older adults achieve their desire to remain in their current home whether through public policy, social services, assistance programs or family support.

Committee:

Kelly Cichy, PhD (Advisor); Mary Dellmann-Jenkins, PhD (Committee Member); Manacy Pai, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Behavioral Sciences; Families and Family Life; Gender; Gerontology; Health; Social Structure

Keywords:

Attachment to Place; Place Attachment; Attachment to Home; Aging in Place; Age

Shuster, GabrielaThe Management Of Feral Pig Socio-Ecological Systems In Far North Queensland, Australia
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies

The development of management programs for socio-ecological systems that include multiple stakeholders is a complex process and requires careful evaluation and planning. This is particularly a challenge in the presence of intractable conflict. The feral pig (Sus scrofa) in Australia is part of one such socio-ecological system. There is a large and heterogeneous group of stakeholders interested in pig management. Pigs have diverse effects on wildlife and plant ecology, economic, health, and social sectors.

This study used the feral pig management system as a vehicle to examine intractable conflict in socio-ecological systems. The purpose of the study was to evaluate: (a) stakeholder beliefs and values about pig management, (b) stakeholder socio-political relationships, and (c) how stakeholder relationships impact management practices. I used an action research approach that included the collection of oral histories, individual interviews, sociograms, participant observation, and a survey to investigate the socio-political relevance of pigs to hunters, growers, managers, government representatives, and traditional land owners in the Cassowary Coast Council of Far North Queensland. Data was collected between 2007-2009.

Despite differences in values and beliefs, I found that stakeholder groups all consider management outcomes resulting in pig control acceptable. There are multiple socio-political barriers that impede successful application of management strategies. These barriers include poor communication, competing stakeholder social structures, limited resources, and property access. Additionally, illusory barriers compound conflict and are tied to the influence of negative stereotypes on stakeholder behavior. The use by managers, of traditional management practices focusing on equilibrium resilience, conflicts with the more ecological resilience oriented practices of other stakeholders. The result is a division of the landscape that leads to poor management outcomes.

This study describes useful tools for the engagement of stakeholders. Frame analysis can clarify the values and positions of stakeholders and suggests strategies for reframing intractable conflicts. The evaluation of stakeholder social structures provides information about the social context of management issues. It is important to operationalize participation and determine the amount of participation desired by stakeholders throughout the research process. The electronic version of this dissertation is freely available in the open access OhioLINK ETD Center http://etd.ohiolink.edu.

Committee:

Beth A. Kaplin, PhD (Committee Chair); Tania Schusler, PhD (Committee Member); Diane Russell, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agriculture; Animals; Communication; Conservation; Ecology; Environmental Management; Environmental Studies; Management; Natural Resource Management; Social Structure; Sociology; Wildlife Conservation; Wildlife Management

Keywords:

socio-ecological systems; conflict; participation; resilience; frame analysis; adaptive management; stereotypes; action research; multiple stakeholders; community engagement; natural resources; management; social context; socio-politics; hunter; landscape

Yost, Kimberly S.A Search for Home: Navigating Change in Battlestar Galactica
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
This dissertation explores the various ways in which the multiple leaders portrayed in the science fiction television series Battlestar Galactica (2003-2009) navigate extreme conditions of continual change. In addition, the dissertation contains a discussion of the larger narrative themes of love, forgiveness, redemption, and embracing the Other as principles effective leaders must cultivate. Through an interpretation of this specific popular media text, a deeper emotional sensitivity to and understanding of leadership, positive and negative, during extreme crises is gained. Furthermore, the series serves as a vehicle through which viewers can reflect on and engage in their own self-awareness about issues surrounding leadership and reconsider personal paradigms based on the depiction presented in the narrative. The choice for using an interpretive hermeneutic method for this dissertation comes from the specific desire to understand the visual text of Battlestar Galactica in relation to leadership studies. The goal is neither to predict behaviors nor to examine an individual case against theory. My intent is to develop our further and deeper understanding of leadership in extremis, while questioning how the visual text may influence our perceptions of leadership theory and practice. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Chair); Lize Booysen, DBL (Committee Member); Holly Baumgartner, PhD (Committee Member); Kristin Bezio, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Management; Mass Media; Motion Pictures; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Religion; Social Structure; Spirituality

Keywords:

crisis leadership; charismatic religious leadership; emergent leadership; shared leadership; science fiction; television; Battlestar Galactica; love; forgiveness; redemption; otherness; home; interpretive hermeneutics; popular culture

Valicenti, Elizabeth AnneThe Tangled Web: How Nonprofit Board Members Experience Organizational Crisis
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this grounded theory study was to develop an understanding of what board members experience during a time of organizational crisis. Major corporate and nonprofit failures of previously successful organizations in recent years have raised questions and led to speculation about the role of boards of directors through the crises. In this study twenty board members of nonprofit organizations who had experienced an organizational crisis during their board service were interviewed. Participants were asked to share their perceptions and explore how they identified and made meaning of the events and board processes that went on as the crisis became apparent and progressed. The overall research design was grounded theory guided by Schatzman’s and Charmaz’ methodological contributions. A dimensional analysis was employed to create explanatory matrices that focused on theory development. From dimensional analysis the core dimension, the Tangled Web, and primary dimensions Recognizing, Responding, and Stepping Up emerged. The model of a Tangled Web depicts the processes that obstruct a board’s ability to recognize and respond to signs of crisis. Complexity theory, governance, crisis and turnaround, and group process all contribute to the understanding of the research question. The electronic version of this dissertation is available through the OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Shah Hasan, PhD (Committee Member); Judith Millesen, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Business Community; Organizational Behavior; Social Structure

Keywords:

grounded theory; governance; board of directors; crisis and turnaround; dimensional analysis; nonprofit governance; board role in crisis; group process; board member perceptions; stepping up; recognizing signs of crisis; leadership

Munn, Christopher WThe One Friend Rule and Social Deficits: Understanding the Impact of Race on Social Capital in an Interracial Congregation
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, Sociology
Social capital scholars suggest that race influences an individual’s ability to access and mobilize resources. Since social capital is embedded in social relationships and not individuals, understanding the context of relationships is imperative for understanding social capital development. Organizations facilitating access to racially and socioeconomically diverse network ties are rare; however, interracial religious congregations may illuminate the mechanisms that influence interracial social development. Using data from in-depth interviews of 37 interracial congregation attendees in Columbus, OH, I investigate the influence of race on social capital development. Results reveal racial mechanisms impact how people characterize their close friendships and interracial resource exchanges. Using qualitative analyses, two major themes emerge: 1) people of color perceive comparatively greater relational intimacy with whites and, consequently, invest more frequently and with greater magnitude in resource exchanges and 2) whites include weak, institutionally tied friendships in their close network for cultural legitimation. Both themes, respectively named social deficits and the one friend rule, comprise the nuanced view of the impact of race on social capital development in interracial churches.

Committee:

Korie Edwards, PhD (Advisor); Frank Reanne, PhD (Committee Member); Bartley Timothy , PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Religion; Religious Congregations; Social Research; Social Structure; Sociology

Keywords:

sociology; social capital; race; ethnicity; inequality; interracial congregations; interracial churches; multiracial congregations; black church; religion

Hoy, Janet M.Outcomes and Incomes: Implementing a Mental Health Recovery Measure in a Medical Model World
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2008, Social Welfare

Because social work practice and policy changes are often not easily implemented under everyday conditions, increasing attention is being focused on implementation (NIMH, 2002, 2005). The aims of this qualitative case study are twofold: (1) to describe how frontline clinicians and clients implement a state-mandated mental health policy; and, (2) to articulate the system processes connected to and embedded in frontline implementation experiences. Ethnographic methodology was employed to explicate the processes through which frontline clinicians implemented a state mental health policy mandating completion and clinical utilization of a 67-question outcomes survey with adults living with severe mental illness (mental health consumers). Data was collected through participant-observation of 17 consumer-clinician dyads (n= 17 consumers and 9 clinicians recruited from 4 mental health centers) completing and/or discussing the survey. To trace processes embedded in clinical experiences, a bottom-up, snowball sampling interview strategy was used to collect data from other stakeholders (n =22).

Atlas.ti was used to manage and analyze data. Thematic analysis provided descriptive information about the processes through which unplanned confluences of system-level/institutionalized processes manifested in frontline experiences and served to hinder implementation efforts. Consumers and clinicians identified several overlapping work processes related to what both groups of participants referred to as doing the outcomes.

Embedded within and across these processes were two overarching, institutionalized processes: a paradigm conflict between the medical model and mental health recovery (manifesting at the frontlines as difficulty in integrating a symptom-focused treatment plan with an outcomes measure of broader mental health recovery constructs such as empowerment); and compliance-driven organization of time with regards to clinical documentation. These institutionalized processes served to undermine consumer and clinician attempts to meaningfully use the outcomes measure.

Grounded in frontline experiences, this study offers a detailed description of an implementation in which interrelated system processes converge, manifest and are negotiated at the frontlines. Through taking up perspectives of frontline workers in naturalistic settings, problematic confluences of system processes where the rubber meets the road can be explicated and intervened upon, rather than remaining unarticulated barriers to implementation.

Committee:

Jerry Floersch, PhD (Committee Chair); Sharon Milligan, PhD (Committee Member); Kathleen Wells, PhD (Committee Member); Kurt Stange, PhD, MD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Social Structure; Social Work

Keywords:

implementation; mental health recovery; outcomes; ethnography

Acevedo Callejas, Michelle L."When He Forgets Them [Medicines]…I Can Hardly Stand to be Around Him": The Influence of Stress, Frequency of Challenges, and Coping on the Relational Quality of Partners whose Significant Other Has a Mental Health Condition.
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2015, International Development Studies (International Studies)
This study applied Lazarus and Folkman’s (1984) stress and coping framework and the concept of dyadic coping (Bodenmann, 1995, 1997) to explain why individuals with mental health conditions have less successful romantic relationships. I constructed a direct path model to test the extent to which: stress is negatively associated with relational quality, frequency of challenges is negatively associated with relational quality, and frequency of challenges moderates the negative association between stress and relational quality. I also constructed simple and multiple mediation models to show which coping strategies, and at which level of dyadic and individual coping, mediate the aforementioned associations. The models partially supported the study’s hypotheses. Specifically, findings fully supported the hypotheses that stress and the frequency of challenges due to mental health conditions are negatively associated with relational quality, and partially supported the hypothesis that frequency of challenges moderates the negative association between stress and relational quality. Additionally, results showed that dyadic coping and several individual coping strategies (e.g., behavioral disengagement) mediate the association between stress and relational quality. Furthermore, findings from the simple mediation models suggest that frequency of challenges might exacerbate the negative association between stress and relational quality through strengthening the negative association between stress and dyadic coping.

Committee:

Charee Thompson, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Amy Chadwick , Ph.D. (Committee Member); Bob Walter, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Families and Family Life; Health; Health Sciences; Psychology; Public Health; Social Psychology; Social Research; Social Structure

Keywords:

Mental health conditions; relational quality; relational satisfaction; stress; dyadic coping; individual coping

Joslin-Knapp, Sydney M#inspo: a Written Companion to Continuance (Physical Environmental Immersion #1)
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Ohio University, 2016, Studio Art
This paper complements Continuance (Physical Environmental Immersion #1), my senior thesis installation. It consists of two sections. #IRL? is a series of anecdotal writings on specific objects from the installation, ranging from personal stories to cultural inspirations. It is a separate endeavor from the writing of #inspo and includes photographs and digital collages of the work discussed. #IRL? is contained in the Appendix. #inspo is an essay exploring the conceptual components of my practice and connects them to other artists whose work confronts some of the same topics. #inspo is divided into five sections: The Everyday, Memory and Home, Venues, Community, and Empathy. Claes Oldenburg, Louise Bourgeois, Zoe Strauss, and Bunny Rogers are the artists discussed. The variety they encompass gives #inspo a much broader perspective and underscores that Continuance (Physical Environmental Immersion #1) is not a singular entity without precedent. When #IRL? and #inspo are read together they contextualize Continuance, my work, my artistic and social goals, and strengthen each of the components of my thesis.

Committee:

Laura Larson (Advisor)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Fine Arts; Personality; Social Structure

Keywords:

art practice; Zoe Strauss; Claes Oldenburg; Bunny Rogers; Louise Bourgeois; art and life

Ashkinadze, RimmaUrban squatting: an adaptive response to the housing crisis
BA, Oberlin College, 1996, Sociology
From introduction: Urban squatting is the unauthorized occupation of empty buildings. Squatting is usually thought to be a Third World phenomenon associated with urbanization, poverty, and rural-urban migration. However, there is a history of squatting in the US and Europe as well. Squatting has been reported in New York, San Francisco, Newark, Boston, Philadelphia, Detroit, and Los Angeles. Since World War II and particularly in the last thirty years, urban squatting has received much attention in Europe. The major European centers for squatting have been London, Amsterdam, and Berlin.' In Britain, the squatting of buildings scheduled for renovation or demolition became an organized and public movement. In the United States, squatting is a criminal offense and has not been widely publicized. Squatting has a dual purpose. It can provide immediate shelter while being a political tactic to draw attention to neighborhood neglect, the lack of available and affordable. low-cost housing, the dwindling stock of housing, and homelessness. This direct-action technique serves to empower its participants who are usually people disempowered through their participation in the housing system. Squatting has a long history in the United States. It was a common form of tenure during the pioneer and settler days of this country. The homesteading acts of the nineteenth century institutionalized it. Since then we have had different terms for the same actions. Whereas homesteading is a legal and institutionalized means of taking over and rehabilitating an abandoned building, squatting is not. Squatting is most common during periods of economic recession or depression. During the Great Depression, many squats or shantytowns appeared in towns all over the country. These "Hoovervilles" protested the lack of government response to the financial crisis. Additionally, they were organized and focused on mutual aid.

Committee:

Daphne John (Advisor)

Subjects:

Economics; Social Psychology; Social Structure; Urban Planning

Keywords:

squatting;homestead;urban squatting;city;housing;crisis

Wilson, Alex J.Mothers’ Wealth: Matrilineality and Inheritance Among the Fantse of Ghana
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2011, Curriculum and Instruction Social Studies Education (Education)

Ghanaians are still looking forward to enacting a law on inheritance and succession, though many attempts have been made since 1884. Policy-makers and academics who try to address the problem are divided, with many of them showing their personal biases. For example, Appiah (1992) questioned the rationale behind the Akan customary practice that deprives sons and daughters of a deceased the right to enjoy a fair share of their fathers’ estate. Nzegwu (2001) reacted that Appiah (1992) ignored the matrilineal implication of the Asante and underwrote a neocolonial Africanist career by privileging a particular conception of family. Awusabo-Asare (1990) contended that the Intestate Succession Law of Ghana had created problems for people in matrilineal societies because it contravened some principles about the matrilineal system of inheritance.

In this dissertation, I adopted functionalism and postcolonialism as theoretical frameworks and used qualitative research design, specifically, critical ethnography to examine the problems associated with inheritance systems of the matrilineal Fantse-speaking Akan. I selected five settlements in the Central Region of Ghana for observation, and conducted in-depth interview with 32 participants made up of five chiefs, two queen mothers, 10 clan heads, 10 widows and five widowers. The study sought answers for the following research questions:

- What is the nature of the social organizations of the Fantse?

- What are the rights and obligations that these social institutions confer on their members?

- What are the changes that have taken place in the family systems of the Fantse?

- What is the influence of national laws on the Fantse family systems and their customary practices?

I concluded that among the Fantse, the social systems are woven around the lineage and clan with rights and responsibilities molded in dual roles to the conjugal and composite families and the clan or lineage. It also emerged that changes have occurred in family in the areas of childhood construction, marriage, divorce and funeral celebrations. Finally, the inheritance was based more on customary practices that the national law. I suggested that a national conference should be organized on inheritance just as has been done for review of the constitution.

Committee:

Francis Godwyll, PhD (Committee Chair); Ron Stephens, PhD (Committee Member); Steve Howard, PhD (Committee Member); Jerry Johnson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Ethnic Studies; Families and Family Life; Gender Studies; Legal Studies; Multicultural Education; Social Structure; Social Studies Education; Sociology; Sub Saharan Africa Studies

Keywords:

matrilineality; inheritance; Fantse; Ghana; family; clan; lineage; social systems; customary law; social organization; matrilineal; patrilineal; double unilineal;

Malone, Chad AllenA Socio-Historical Analysis of U.S. State Terrorism from 1948 to 2008
Master of Arts, University of Toledo, 2008, Sociology
This thesis is a critical examination of U.S. foreign intervention from 1948 to 2008. Using a comparative/historical analysis of seven cases – Iran, Guatemala, Indonesia, Chile, Nicaragua, Panama, and Iraq – this study finds patterns of U.S. state/state-sponsored terror and intervention. Using world-system theory and G. William Domhoff’s class-domination theory of power, this study explains how and why the U.S. government, the U.S. military, the CIA, and U.S. corporations participate in economically motivated terrorist acts to support the capitalist mode of production, U.S. investments, and access to markets and natural resources. Finally, this study reveals patterns (in addition to the use of terror) that the U.S. government follows while intervening in the affairs of foreign nations.

Committee:

Elias Nigem (Committee Chair); Dwight Haase (Committee Member); Marietta Morrissey (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Economics; European History; History; International Law; International Relations; Labor Economics; Latin American History; Middle Eastern History; Military History; Petroleum Production; Political Science; Social Research; Social Structure; Sociology

Keywords:

terrorism; U.S. state terrorism; elite theory; world-system theory; state-sponsored terrorism; CIA; U.S. military; U.S. foreign policy; assassinations; Arbenz; Mossadeq; Sukarno; Allende; Noriega; Hussein; U.S. intervention; 9/11; WTC; political terrorism

Kiess, KolterRhizomatic Resistance: A Pedagogy for Social Transformation
MA, Kent State University, 2009, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English

A great deal of scholarship has been written and published on the topic of radical pedagogy and has had a large influence on educators at all levels, whether in public schools or in universities. This type of scholarship has generally placed some type of social inequity or institution, such as globalization, heteronormativity, governments, universities, public schools, racism, or commodification of students, as a social construction that it would like to see changed. However, since its inception, while a great deal of progress has been made, the advances, when compared to the effort, seems minimal. The issue, as I see it, revolves around the fact that radical pedagogy sets these abstract ideas and institutions as the focal point of change instead of the people that produce it. The problem is that inequity is produced through inequitable relationships between individuals opposed than created by these theories and institutions and then forced on a people in any given society. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis is to theorize and demonstrate a new form of radical pedagogy which will insert service, or community engagement, into classroom curriculum and, through this, seek to transform the inequitable relationships which individuals and groups of people participate on the local level. In order to do this, this thesis will combine the theories of Paulo Freire in Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Giles Deleuze and Felix Guattari in A Thousand Plateaus, and Michel Foucault in The History of Sexuality to construct a pedagogy, rhizomatic resistance, which will transform these relationships which will in turn ultimately help to transform the social system.

Committee:

Masood Raja, PhD (Committee Chair); Babacar M'Baye, PhD (Committee Member); Mark Bracher, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; African Literature; American Literature; Curricula; Education; Educational Theory; Gender; Language Arts; Literacy; Literature; Personal Relationships; Philosophy; Social Research; Social Structure; Teacher Education; Teaching; Theater

Keywords:

rhizomatic; resistance; social transformation; pedagogy; radical; education; literature;

Islas, Marina E.Se Hace Camino al Andar / The Road is Made by Walking: Women’s Participation in Community-Driven Development in Ciudad Sandino, Nicaragua
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2010, Geography (Arts and Sciences)
This research seeks to explore the ways in which the women of Ciudad Sandino have participated in community-driven development (CDD) and what impacts this participation has had on the gender relations between men and women. I am able to address this by using qualitative methods to conduct a case study of the Genesis spinning cooperative, which is part of the Jubilee House Community – Center for Development in Central America. I have found that for members of the Genesis project there have been significant changes in their lives due to their participation, however the implications of these changes is different for men than it is for women. Similarly, although gender ideologies have been challenged at the individual level due to participation, in this context, participation does not necessarily challenge the structural system in place which upholds societal views of gender roles.

Committee:

Risa Whitson, Dr. (Advisor); Yeong Kim, Dr. (Committee Member); Edna Wangui, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Gender; Geography; Social Structure; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Ciudad Sandino; Nicaragua; gender; development; community-driven development; gender roles; participation; strategic gender interests; practical gender interests

Robbins, Kimberly D.The Origin of a Sense of Self in Women
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2012, Antioch Santa Barbara: Clinical Psychology
This phenomenological study focuses on how a strong sense of self in women changes social precepts and gender stereotypes empowering women to define themselves instead of being defined by society. A sense of self may be defined as the ability to distinguish one’s own values from those of any outside persuasions, and to do so well enough to be able to protect those ideals from unwanted external influence. Is a sense of self, realized at a young age, an innate feeling or developed over time through adversity and the maturation process? This study will specifically look at what influences can be attributed to gaining a strong sense of self. For women in the twenty-first century, the barrage of multiple directives can mean the difference between success and failure. American culture sends strong messages about who women should be, what women should be, and how they are supposed to look and behave. Eight women between the ages of 55-70 were nominated for having a strong sense of self. Mental health professionals, university professors, and colleagues were contacted with the criteria for the nomination process. These criteria included women whom they considered as having a strong sense of self, emotional stability, and the ability to maintain boundaries. The eight women nominated described their lived experience of having a strong sense of self over the course of approximately eleven hours of audio-recorded interviews. Using a phenomenological analysis a sense of self was interpreted to observe common themes.

Committee:

Barbara Lipinski, PhD (Committee Chair); Salvador D. Trevino, PhD (Committee Member); Garret Wyner, PhD (Committee Member); Roberta L. Nutt, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Aging; Behavioral Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Early Childhood Education; Ethics; Families and Family Life; Gender; Gender Studies; Mass Media; Mental Health; Personality Psychology; Religion; Social Structure; Spirituality; Ther

Keywords:

Self-esteem; Sense of Self; Women; Body Image; Self-efficacy; Empowerment; Gender identity; Parenting; Values; Boundaries; Sexuality;

Prince, RobSay Hello to My Little Friend: De Palma's Scarface, Cinema Spectatorship, and the Hip Hop Gangsta as Urban Superhero
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2009, American Culture Studies/Communication
The objective of the study is to intervene in the ongoing discourse that interrogates the relationship between fictional ultraviolent film representations and real life behavior in audiences that these types of films are marketed to. Using a case study approach to apparatus and audience reception theories, the dissertation investigates the significant role Scarface, the 1983 gangster film directed by Brian De Palma, has played in influencing the cultural and social development of young African-American males who live in American inner cities. The study focuses on how the inner city portion of the Scarface audience came to self-identify themselves as “gangstas” (a Hip-hop term for gangster) and why one particular character in the film, a murderous drug dealer, has served as the gangsta role model for heroic behavior for over twenty-five years.The study found that performing the gangsta male identity emotionally satisfies these economic and socially disconnected young men and that this group viewed the violent and illegal behavior in Scarface as offering practical solutions to their ongoing struggle to survive the hopelessness and terror rooted in their environment. The research demonstrated that film narratives can be both a window into, and a mirror of, the often paradoxically complex relationships between marginalized target audiences and savvy multi-national media corporations that successfully market negative representations to these audiences, profit from the transactions and, during the process, manipulate both mainstream and oppositional perceptions of class, race, and power.

Committee:

Donald McQuarie, PhD (Committee Chair); Priscilla Coleman, PhD (Committee Member); Halifu Osumare, PhD (Committee Member); Awad Ibrahim, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; American Studies; Black History; Fine Arts; Mass Media; Motion Pictures; Social Psychology; Social Structure; Sociology

Keywords:

Film studies; Hip-hop; Hip-hop films; Scarface; Brian De Palma; Al Pacino; Universal Studios; Gangster films; Films set in Miami; Cocaine in films; Black masculinity; audience reception; Gangstas; African-American audience reception; violence in films

Briney, Carol EMy Journey with Prisoners: Perceptions, Observations and Opinions
MLS, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Liberal Studies Program
Carol E. Briney is the founding executive director of Reentry Bridge Network, Inc. and Reentry Solutions, Inc. Briney believes that a systematic approach is required to reduce the likelihood of recidivisim. For nearly a decade, she has written and facilitated holistic pro-social programs inside prisons and in community forums. Her programs support bridging the gap between prison and community by focusing on human value, grief-impairment, daily literacy, reentry and job readiness, trauma-informed care, the healing arts, and understanding poverty. Briney's work is founded on her strong belief - If we can’t help people to realize their own universal value, how can we expect them to see the value in their victims or their environment? This is gained through asset building, not punitive action. It takes community to reduce recidivism.

Committee:

Richard Berrong, PhD (Advisor); Clare Stacey, PhD (Committee Member); Manacy Pai, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Studies; Aging; Art Criticism; Art Education; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Black History; Black Studies; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Communication; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Criminology; Cultural Anthropology; Cultural Resources Management; Curriculum Development; Developmental Psychology; Divinity; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Tests and Measurements; Elementary Education; Evolution and Development; Experimental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Fine Arts; Forensic Anthropology; Gender Studies; Gerontology; Individual and Family Studies; Inservice Training; Instructional Design; Journalism; Kinesiology; Language; Linguistics; Literacy; Logic; Mental Health; Metaphysics; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern History; Modern Literature; Occupational Psychology; Organizational Behavior; Pastoral Counseling; Peace Studies; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Personality Psychology; Philosophy; Political Science; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Administration; Public Policy; Religion; Religious Education; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Social Research; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociolinguistics; Sociology; Spirituality; Teacher Education; Theology; Urban Planning; Vocational Education; Welfare; Womens Studies

Keywords:

prison; reentry; trauma; poverty; grounded theory; universal value; punitive; recidivism; corrections; Retablo; play therapy; male prisoners; female prisoners; socio-metaphysics; grief-impairment; grief and loss; truth-telling; poverty; hood; prison art

Next Page