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Otto, Jeffrey ScottA philological survey of late 15th-century Wallachian edicts in the Hilandar Monastery Library
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1994, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
none

Committee:

Charles Gribble (Advisor)

Subjects:

Religious History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Trude, Brian J.The Reality of the Provinces and Other Stories
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2016, English (Arts and Sciences)
This thesis is a collection of four stories and a critical introduction titled "Ferris Wheels in Winter." The introduction explicates the common theme uniting the various stories, that of the author's attempt to confront despair by writing about characters who struggle with belief, disillusionment, and disjunction between self and place. This thesis includes the following titles: "The Reality of the Provinces," "The Tourists," "Low-hanging Fruit," and "A Pilgrim's Notes."

Committee:

Patrick O'Keeffe (Advisor)

Subjects:

Literature; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Reality; Provinces; Tourists; Low-hanging Fruit; Ferris Wheels in Winter; Reality of the Provinces; Notes; Russia; short stories; disjunction; disillusionment; despair; Camus; Dostoevsky

Lohwater, Susan W.The Great Sinner Redeemed: A Reinterpretation of Stavrogin
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1992, Slavic and East European Studies

Committee:

Irene Masing-Delic (Advisor); Mateja Metejic (Committee Member); George Kalbouss (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Slavic Literature

Sabbag, Kerry AnnWomen as Readers in Alexander Pushkin's Eugene Onegin, Ivan Turgenev's Rudin and Karolina Pavlova's A Double Life
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1997, Slavic and East European Studies
This study explores the image and function of the female protagonist as a reader in Alexander Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, Ivan Turgenev’s Rudin and Karolina Pavlova’s A Double Life. In these novels the motif of reading serves as an indication of and guide to the protagonist’s self-knowledge and development or bildung. In The Voyage In: Fictions of Female Development, Elizabeth Abel, Marianne Hirsch and Elizabeth Langland establish the idea of a specifically female type of Bildungsroman. Their expanded definition of the genre takes into account the following classical features: belief in a coherent self, faith in the possibility of development, insistence on a time span in which development occurs, and emphasis on social context. Using these parameters this study identifies each text as a Bildungsroman for the female protagonists and explores the role of reading as a tool for and impetus to their development. Chapter One traces the path of Pushkin’s heroine Tatiana as she progresses from a naive to a sophisticated reader whose critical reception of literature enables her to reinvent and refigure her personality. The high authority of Pushkin’s novel in verse in the Russian literary tradition has made Tatiana a model which has influenced, either directly or indirectly, many later works. Chapter Two explores the female protagonist of Rudin, (written in prose) Natalia, as an inscribed reader of, among other texts, Eugene Onegin. Turgenev’s reconfiguration of the Tatiana model reflects both the differences in referential aspect and literary mode of the two texts. Chapter Three focuses on Pavlova’s A Double Life, written partly in prose and partly in verse. It has respectful but nonetheless polemical relations to the Tatiana model. Cecilia, the protagonist, does not present as overt a portrait of an inscribed reader as do the other two heroines, for she can only interact with literature in her dreams. Moreover, unlike Tatiana and Natalia she is not only a reader but a poet herself. Each heroine’s bildung involves an awakening to the societal limitations imposed on her during the time of personal maturation and quest for a coherent self. Their significant emotional and intellectual development before the time of marriage is largely aided by acts of reading and internalization of literary models.

Committee:

Lyubomira Parpulova-Gribble (Advisor); George Kalbouss (Committee Member); Irene Masing-Delic (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Slavic Literature

Myers, Elena K.Distribution of Uncontracted and Contracted Imperfect Verbs in the 11th Century Russian Manuscript of the Sinaiskij Paterik
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2011, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
The Sinaiskij Paterik, one of the oldest written documents in Old Russian literature , was translated from a 7th century Greek original. Scholars are divided on the topic of the place and time of translation of this document into Old East Slavic. The majority of linguists postulate that it was translated in Bulgaria in the 10th century while others believe that the Sinaiskij Paterik was translated in the 9th century by Saint Methodius, and yet others think that the translation took place in Old Rus' in the 11th century. The original text is known as Λειμωνάριον 'meadow', and represents a series of didactic stories about lives of monks. The fact that this is a translation does not mean an absence of variation in the Old Russian text. Indeed, the document contains different kinds of variation. One instance of such variation is the presence in the manuscript of both uncontracted and contracted imperfect forms. It is a very interesting phenomenon as the majority of the imperfects used in Old Russian documents represent a contracted variety, reflecting a process evident already in Old Church Slavonic. The objective of my research was to investigate the factors which might have possibly influenced the use of uncontracted forms in the document and to determine which factors, if any, had conditioned such use. My exhaustive analysis of all conceivable factors led me to conclude that only individual preferences of scribes and the length of words might have influenced the choice of uncontracted forms, whether in the translation or the copying process.

Committee:

Brian Joseph, Dr. (Advisor); Daniel Collins, Dr. (Committee Member); Charles Gribble, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Language; Linguistics; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Slavic linguistics; historical linguistics; Old Russian; Old Church Slavonic

Mulcahy, Robert AlanA Hero of Two Times: Erast Fandorin and the Refurbishment of Genre
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
This study investigates the popular Adventures of Erast Fandorin series of Boris Akunin, Russia’s best-selling author of detective fiction. With the aid of Mikhail Bakhtin’s concepts of the chronotope and the zone of maximal contact, it addresses questions of genre (in a transnational context), serialization, and the role of zlobodnevnye voprosy (`current issues’) in historical fiction. My analysis locates Akunin in the history of international detective fiction in order to appraise his contribution not only to the genre but also to modern Russian literature. To account for Akunin’s influential status in his home country, I hypothesize the reasons for the extraordinary success of his works and the cult around the protagonist of the series, as well as the significance of Fandorin’s values for contemporary Russian society.

Committee:

Helena Goscilo, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

East European Studies; Literature; Modern Literature; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Kostetskaya, Anastasia GThe Water of Life and the Life of Water: the Metaphor of World Liquescence in Russian Symbolist Poetry, Art and Film
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Slavic and East European Studies
The Symbolist period in Russian culture emphasized intense cross-pollination and hybridization of the arts. The purpose behind these "poetics of blending" was to show the existence of a spiritual world beyond physical-material reality and that the boundaries between them were not insurmountable. In my dissertation, I claim that this vision of the creative process as pursuing various strategies of blending draws on the overarching metaphoric conceptualization of our world, and the human domain as its integral part, as not "solid", but "fluid matter". I employ conceptual metaphor and blending theory approaches from the field of cognitive linguistics to account for the following: how three interactive arts of the period, poetry, painting and film, use the metaphor of world liquescence in their attempts to transcend the material world, realia, and to reach spiritual reality, realiora. The concept of world liquescence reveals itself not only in the choice of water as a physical substance present in the space of a given poem, canvas or film. The Symbolist arts with their close attention to the inner depths of the human psyche attempt to capture and symbolize the slightest stirrings of the soul through the domain of water and very often introduce this element through the plasticity of music. The "endless" Wagnerian melody reveals itself in poetry through protracted poetic meters and specific types of rhyme as well as various phonetic and semantic devices; in painting it is "endless, monotonic, impassive line without angles", in early filmmaking it is the use of movement vs. stasis, special lighting effects and long takes, including (extreme) close-ups of a person's face. In this connection we can also speak about moving water as a traditional metaphor for time: thus the introduction of music as a temporal element into both the temporal art of poetry and the spatial art of painting marks an attempt to convey its flow in both a congenial dynamic art and in a less congenial static art; film blends both temporal and spatial dimensions, and thus reveals time's liquescence in both modes. My focus is on the following three artists of the period: the poet Konstantin Bal'mont, the painter Viktor Borisov-Musatov and the film director Evgenii Bauer. All three rely on blending artforms traditionally considered incompatible. They therefore offer rich materials for the conceptual integration and hybridization approach.

Committee:

Helena Goscilo (Advisor); Irene Delic (Committee Chair); Myroslava Mudrak (Committee Member); Vitaly Bergelson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Film Studies; Fine Arts; Literature; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Conceptual metaphor theory; conceptual blending theory; Russian Symbolism; Russian Poetry; Russian Art; Russian Film; Konstantin Balmont; Viktor Borisov Musatov; Evgenii Bauer

Fuh, JasonMusical Means in Mussorgsky’s Songs and Dances of Death: A Singer’s Study Guide
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2017, Music
Modest Mussorgsky’s song cycle Songs and Dances of Death is a series of four miniature dramatic scenes. The text was supplied by Arseny Golenishchev-Kutuzov, who developed a keen relationship with the composer when they shared an apartment. A glance at Mussorgsky’s musical life and growth in the “Mighty Handful” circle helps us comprehend the evolution of his compositional style. At the peak of his musical maturity, the composer devoted himself to compositions in the realist, nationalist style. However, Songs and Dances of Death seems to have softened the edge of his style by incorporating lyricism, and possibly also impressionism and symbolism, into his works. Mussorgsky’s music in Songs and Dances of Death is tonal but it does not adhere to a traditional Western music theoretical analysis. Therefore, the musical analysis presented is based on defining the terms musical environment and musical energy as they emerge from the compositional components, an approach that provides yet another dimension of musical understanding in works like Mussorgsky’s. Russian diction is discussed in great detail along with a comprehensive summary of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) system for the Russian language.

Committee:

Robin Rice (Advisor); Edward Bak (Committee Member); Alexander Burry (Committee Member); Katherine Rohrer (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Performing Arts; Slavic Literature

Keywords:

Mussorgsky; Songs and Dances of Death; danse macabre; Golenishchev-Kutuzov; Russian IPA;

Fortney, Thaddeus WilliamCrime and Violence in the Mode of Absurdity: The Importance of Sherlock Holmes in the Works of Daniil Kharms
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2006, Slavic and East European Studies
Daniil Kharms was one of the last members of the early Russian avant-garde of the 1920s and 1930s. He was prolific in several genres, but is perhaps best known for his children’s poetry and two late works; the Sluchai cycle and the short story, Starukha (Incidences and The Old Woman respectively). Scholars have noted that the thirty pieces that compose Sluchai seem unrelated and because of this, the normal thematic and stylistic links that warrant interpretation of a piece as a cycle are difficult to identify. It is my contention that there exists a possible link between the events of Sluchai and Sherlock Holmes that could classify the text as a cycle, and possibly offer a new interpretation of the work. This analysis suggests that Sluchai can be read as a Holmesian view of Soviet Russia in the 1930s, and posits that importance of Sherlock Holmes to the work of Daniil Kharms is worthy of further research. Though scholarship has noted that Kharms would often dress up as Holmes, it has yet to suggest any further significance between the English detective and Kharms. Considering the history of zhiznetvorchestvo or life-creation and its lineage in the Symbolist and Futurist tradition, it stands to reason that acting as Holmes was not merely and absurdist stunt, but perhaps the inclusion of an aesthetic motif. The Symbolists and Futurist often used their vestiary theatrics as a means to include another realm of life into art, or vice versa. Perhaps Kharms was following similar aesthetic philosophies in his choice to don the famous deer-stalker and pipe, but this does not yet offer any insight into his literature. Using the world of Sherlock Holmes as a reference point will reveal that the events of Sluchai are perhaps not so disconnected or absurd. Considering the social climate of Russia in the 1930s, there was a need for a detective to expose the secret injustices of the Soviet government. Kharms’s choice to become a widely recognized symbol of justice reveals his attempt to defy the government and protect the Russian people. In Sluchai, it is necessary to investigate as a detective each piece to gain a certain level of understanding, and this offers a united motif that would suggest the collection is a cycle. Along with this, the results of the investigation often expose the atrocities carried out by the Soviet government under Stalin again uniting the pieces to some degree. Sluchai proves that Sherlock Holmes was not just a marginal influence in the work of Daniil Kharms, and that other works could benefit from a Holmesian interpretation.

Committee:

Irene Masing-Delic (Advisor); Alexander Burry (Committee Member); Yana Hashamova (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Slavic Literature

Orr, Sara CeilidhThe Scrivener De-Scribed: Logos and Originals in Nineteenth-Century Copyist Fiction
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
This dissertation examines works of copyist fiction by Nikolai Gogol, Herman Melville, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Gustave Flaubert. I argue that, through their exploration of copies and originals, these authors anticipate questions about the nature of language and literature posed a century later in post-structuralist texts like Jacques Derrida's The Double Session and Gilles Deleuze's Difference and Repetition. Rather than a simple sociological exposition of the plight of the little man, copyist fiction is a reaction to a world destabilized by the absence of an authoritative text (Logos), and the act of copying is presented variously as a search for Logos, a new language of immediacy that replaces Logos, and an abolition of meaning. In the process, copyist texts interrogate the relationship between language and the human subject, the physicality of writing, and the limits of mimetic art as (potentially) a type of copying.

Committee:

Alexander Burry (Advisor); Angela Brintlinger (Committee Member); Helena Goscilo (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature; Literature; Slavic Literature

Keywords:

literature; copyist; copy clerk; scrivener; scribe; Bartleby; Overcoat; Bouvard; Pecuchet; Poprishchin; Myshkin; Idiot; Poor Folk; post-structuralism; nineteenth-century; Russian; Dostoevsky; Flaubert; Melville; Gogol; copying; mimesis; logos

Bilynsky, GloriaThe Myth of Petersburg as Promulgated by Gogol's Petersburg Tales
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1971, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures

Committee:

Jerzy Krzyzanowski (Advisor)

Subjects:

Slavic Literature

Goldenberg, Amy Rachel"Vasilisa and Staver": The Russian Version of the International Narrative "Woman Dressed As a Man Rescues Her Husband"
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1996, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
The Russian epic song (bylina) "Vasilisa and Staver" is a national rendition of the international narrative theme "Woman dressed as a man rescues her husband." I place the song in the context of several renditions of this theme in non-Russian traditions. I also compare it to two other byliny that are centered around the relations between a female warrior and her spouse. I then outline the set of characters, the repertoire and the sequence of the motifs in twelve variants of "Vasilisa and Staver." This allows me to construct the invariant (i.e., type) of this bylina.

Committee:

Lyubomira Parpulova-Gribble, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Folklore; Slavic Literature

Rewinski, Zachary D.Dostoevsky and Tolstoy's Oblique Responses to the Epidemic of Chernyshevskian Philosophy
BA, Oberlin College, 2010, Russian

This paper focuses on Fyodor Dostoevsky and Lev Tolstoy's subtle responses to the work and philosophy of the radical intelligent, literary critic and philosopher Nikolai Gavrilovich Chernyshevsky. Dostoevsky and Tolstoy had deep qualms about Chernyshevsky's ideas and their consequences, both for the individual and Russian society at large. The goal of this paper is to describe these ideas and consequences as they appear in two of the most famous and important works of 19th century Russian and world literature, Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment" and Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina."

Discussion begins with exegesis of the radical utilitarian and utopian philosophy advocated by Chernyshevsky in his influential "What is to be Done?" and "The Anthropological Principle in Philosophy". Having discussed the main tenants of Chernyshevsky's philosophic system, the author continues to investigate the appearance of these ideas in "Crime and Punishment" and "Anna Karenina" through an analysis of primary and secondary characters in each novel. The polyphony of Dostoevsky's prose extends, the author claims, to issues of Chernyshevsky's philosophy and its influence on Russia, and characters of "Crime and Punishment," primarily Raskolnikov, Razumikhin and Luzhin, are analyzed through this lens. Karenin, Vronsky, Anna Karenina and Levin provide the primary focus for analysis of Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina."

As much as is possible, the author aspires to include biographical and philosophic detail about Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in order to remain close and true to the two authors' respective visions for and understandings of Russia. Dostoevsky and Tolstoy held views of human nature, Russia, and man's interactions with fellow man which drastically differed from those of Chernyshevsky and the radical intelligentsia. Dostoevsky and Tolstoy's hesitance to embrace Chernyshevsky's philosophy appears in their works, at times with great subtlety, and elucidation of the literary manifestations of their philosophic responses serves as the primary impetus for this paper.

Committee:

Thomas Newlin (Advisor); Arlene Forman (Committee Member); Heather Hogan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Russian History; Slavic Literature

Keywords:

Chernyshevsky; What is to be Done?; Dostoevsky; Crime and Punishment; Tolstoy; Anna Karenina; Russian radical intelligentsia

Bilocerkowycz, SonyaOn Our Way Home from the Revolution
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2017, English
In this collection of essays, Sonya Bilocerkowycz explores the cyclical nature of government-sanctioned violence in the post-Soviet world and her family’s dissident legacy in order to ask: Can we ever truly be at home in a political state?

Committee:

Lina M. Ferreira (Advisor); Angus Fletcher (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literature; Political Science; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

creative nonfiction; essay; post-Soviet; Ukraine; dissent; revolution

Zhang, ChenRussian Writers Confront the Myth: The Absence of the People’s Brotherhood in Realist Literature
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
This dissertation explores the way nineteenth-century Russian writers depict the lower classes, in particular the Russian peasants, in realist literature. In both the pre- and post-emancipation periods, Slavophiles, Westernizers, radicals, populists, pan-Slavists, and academic authors such as historians and ethnographers all explored the mentality of the Russian people, or narod, and their supposed exemplary moral character. Under the influence of this cultural myth about the lower-class Russian masses’ morality and spirituality, critics of realist literature often claim that lower-class characters possess spiritual strength and collectively forge a Christian brotherhood. Close reading of realist literature, however, reveals that influential writers such as Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, and Ivan Turgenev also depict the Russian peasants as morally flawed. By uncovering the way such writers subvert the myth of the people’s brotherly union, this research compares the ambivalent portrait of Russian peasants in literature with their idealized image in academic writings. I argue that the realist writers questioned the unambiguously optimistic vision of the Russian people’s unity and called for a universal endeavor to build a Christian brotherhood. Demarcated from both nineteenth-century intelligentsia and contemporary academics, the realist writers in the age of radicalism were concerned that the spiritual brotherhood of the Russian people was far from emerging. To demonstrate their ambivalent and pessimistic observations on the peasants’ moral condition, I first explore the realist writers’ portrayals of their communal life. In the first chapter, I demonstrate that although academic studies tend to regard peasant communes in Imperial Russia as models for realizing villagers’ mutual love and egalitarian values, realist writers depict peasant characters’ rage, violence, and conflicts in their seemingly collectivist communities. Second, while by traditional lines of inquiry, the Russian people are usually analyzed as humble souls who are willing to suffer for one another, realist writers deviate from this optimistic evaluation in their fiction and portray the peasants as self-destructive, unable to love each other, and even irrationally evil, as I will show in Chapter Two and Chapter Three. Third, realist writers’ portrayals of peasant women and Old Believers, discussed in Chapter Four and Chapter Five, reinforce the impression that the lower-class people fail to realize mutual care and Christian love in their earthly world. In literature, peasant women are shown to be seductive and tragically evil, while sectarian characters are violent and deprived of faith. These peasant figures demonstrate an absence of mutual love and the fall of collective brotherhood in the fictional world of realist writers. In several chapters, I also pay attention to realist writers’ non-fictional statements in their journalistic or public writings, which may further contrast, complicate, or nuance the seemingly positive images of their peasant characters in literature. For instance, one of the important sources for Chapter One is Dostoevsky’s commentary on the new postreform jury system in A Writer’s Diary. The sources in Chapter Two, on the Russian people’s alcoholism, include Tolstoy’s post-conversion didactic writing. Realist writers’ biographical backgrounds, such as their personal involvement with peasant women or sectarians, are helpful for my analyses in Chapters Four and Five. By focusing on the spiritually troubled and disunited peasants in these writers’ works, this study reveals realist writers’ anxiety that in the lower-class people’s world moral integrity is in peril and a Christian brotherhood is yet to be founded.

Committee:

Alexander Burry (Advisor)

Subjects:

Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Myers, Elena KA Semiotic Analysis of Russian Literature in Modern Russian Film Adaptations (Case Studies of Boris Godunov and The Captain’s Daughter)
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
Abstract The current study analyzes signs and signifiers that constitute the structural composition of Pushkin’s historical works Boris Godunov and The Captain’s Daughter and compare them with their Soviet and post-Soviet screen adaptations. I argue that the popularity of these literary works with filmmakers is based on their inexhaustible topicality for Russian society of the Soviet and post-Soviet periods, and therefore reassessment of their film adaptations guides us towards developing a better understanding of the sociopolitical complexities in modern Russia. The analysis employs methods of semiotics of film, which is a relatively young science, but has already become one of the most promising fields in the theory of cinema. The research is based on the scholarship of such eminent theorists and semioticians as Metz, Bluestone, Barthes, Lotman, Bakhtin, and others. By performing semiotic analysis of Russian intermedial transpositions and Pushkin’s source texts, the study demonstrates the parallels between the historical periods and contemporary Russia.

Committee:

Brian Joseph (Advisor); Alexander Burry (Advisor)

Subjects:

Film Studies; Foreign Language; History; Literature; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Russian literature; Russian cinema; Russian film; Russian classics; Russian film adaptations; Russian literature of the nineteenth century; semiotics of film; semiotics of cinema; semiotics of literature; historical film; semiotics of film adaptations

Wise, William D Science and Medicine in Liudmila Ulitskaia’s Kazus Kukotskogo
BA, Oberlin College, 2015, Russian
Science and medicine play a fundamental role in Liudmila Ulitskaia's 2001 novel Kazus Kukotskogo. This paper argues that Ulitskaia employs science and medicine as a concrete means of considering such diverse questions as social life, morality, and religion in the work.

Committee:

Thomas Newlin (Advisor)

Subjects:

Slavic Literature

Keywords:

Kazus Kukotskogo;Liudmila Ulitskaia;

Roney, James NormanStructuralism/humanism: Janusz Slawinski and Polish literary methodology
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Slavic and East European Studies

Janusz S l awinski has been writing on literary theory, historyand methodology for the last twenty years. His research hasgone virtually unnoticed because from the perspective of Slaviclinguistic structuralism it represents a derivative structuralism with"eclectic" features. Those "eclectic" features reveal S l awinski'sbelief that individual conscious activity and social interactioncreate scholarly and literary conventions. His scholarship grew outof a Polish emphasis on individual consciousness and the social atmosphere of the Stalinist period.

The insights which S l awinski's research provides into the nature of literary scholarship allow one to reach the following conclusions:

The much heralded "crisis in the humanities" is related to the modern penchant for technological utopia and to the attempt to develop a linguistic science of literature. The humanities will continue to exist in an eclectic form as long as human consciousness exists;

The "scientific" study of literature actually began with the positivist use of the inductive projective method in the last century. Any science of literature which uses only the projective method relies on some form of determinism;

The non-theoretical eclecticism which dominates American literary scholarship relies on "public taste" to control literary research;

There are several methodological alternatives within the Slavic formalist-structuralist tradition;

S l awinski combines Roman Ingarden's phenomenology with Witold Gombrowicz's "interhuman form" and Jan Mukarovsky's structuralism;

There is a need for intensive research into the methodological diversity and historical origins of Slavic structuralism.

Committee:

Jerzy Krzyzanowski (Advisor)

Subjects:

Slavic Literature

Rucker-Chang, Sunnie T.Cultural Formation in post-Yugoslav Serbia: Divides, Debates, and Dialogues
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2010, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures

During the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s, Serbia fought to preserve a unified Yugoslavia, as its preservation also could have maintained the primacy of Serbian identity in place since the creation of the first Yugoslavia. Serbian identity had been inextricably linked to Yugoslavia, for Serbs comprised the federation’s dominant nation, culture, and language. Yet with each cease-fire at the end of each secession war, the importance of Serbian cultural products diminished along with the conflation of Serb and Yugoslav. The NATO bombing in 1999 solidified the sense of Serbia’s demise, and proved Serbian political and cultural insignificance. This revolutionary change in the Serbian nation, both in the country and its people, was not greeted with jubilation as in other Eastern Bloc countries. Serbia did not want independence; however, it was the inevitable outcome of the fracturing of Yugoslavia and its people into distinct nations with culturally exclusive expressions of identity.

The tendency to characterize Serbia’s transition from Socialist to post-Socialist nation as exceptional is common. However, much of the academic literature focuses on the nature of the transition of ex-Eastern Bloc nations into respectable and recognizable democratic states, based on Western standards. Therefore, Yugoslavia’s wars are viewed as extreme anomalies, incompatible with the trajectories of other countries’ successful transition to democracy. Thus, Serbia was viewed as particularly backward; not only was it seemingly incapable of conforming to the Western norm, its people, and politicians were supportive of recalcitrant policies that isolated Serbia, virtually bereft of regional and international support, except from Russia, whose stances were nuanced and culturally loaded.

This dissertation offers perspectives on Serbia’s transition to post-Communist, and draws from post-Socialist scholarship on Eastern Europe as a basis for understanding. In this way, this dissertation departs from conventional post-Communist scholarship on contemporary Serbia, and is engaged in a dialogue on Serbia’s political, cultural, historical, and social components of Serbia’s transition. This dissertation argues that Serbia’s transition to democracy bears little resemblance or relation to that of the other nations. As proof, I use historical events and literature on internal colonization to illustrate how Serbia’s position of privilege in Yugoslavia set a dangerous paradigm for sustaining Serbian hegemony and dominance. I contrast Serbia’s elevated position in Yugoslavia to its insignificance today, both regionally and internationally.

In order to provide the cultural context for this contemporary reality of Serbia, I analyze the rifts in society between particular imaginings of the ideal direction for Serbia, as a preference of either Local or Western paradigms. These contrasting standpoints on Serbia’s cultural and political future materializes primarily through generational differences, whereby the Local is championed by artists and writers of the older generation, or the Yugoslav generation, whereas the West garners support from the younger generation, or the Serbian generation.

Committee:

Yana Hashamova, PhD (Advisor); Theodora Dragostinova, PhD (Committee Member); Jessie Labov, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Slavic Literature

Keywords:

post-Yugoslav; Serbia; Post-Communism; Post-Socialism

Potvin, Allison LeighBodies in Transition:Physical Transformation in Postmodern Russian Fiction and Visual Culture
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
This dissertation investigates the representation of the human body in postmodern Russian literature and visual culture, including painting, sculpture, performance, and film. As Russia has gone through political and social change from Khruschev’s thaw to Putin’s rise, the image of the body in literature and art has shifted, with an increasing emphasis on the body as an object in flux. Faced with advances in technology, new theoretical approaches, and the fragmentation of identity in postmodern culture, artists have brought into question what it means to be human. Bodies expand, multiply, and transcend boundaries. They blur the lines between male and female, single and multiple, partial and whole, human and animal, human and machine, and subhuman and superhuman. The image of the fragmented, multiple, and contradictory postmodern body challenges authoritative discourse and cultural myths, while, at the same time, artists reuse, cite, and quote the art and literature of official culture. This study will place Russian postmodernism within the context of global and historic trends in literature and art, while emphasizing the influence of the Russian avant-garde and formalist criticism on postmodern aesthetics. Viewing literary and artistic practice together will yield a more complete picture of the postmodern attitude towards the body at the end of the twentieth century and the beginning of the new millennium. My intent is not to give a comprehensive overview of the body in Russian literature and art, but to show the scope and application of the imagery of bodily transformation.

Committee:

Angela K. Brintlinger, PhD (Advisor); Irene Delic, PhD (Committee Member); Yana Hashamova, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Slavic Literature

Keywords:

Russian Postmodernism; Grotesque; Cyborg; Body; Nonconformist art

North, NaomiFall Like a Man
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Creative Writing/Poetry
This thesis explores Polish emigration through poetry from the present of the third generation in terms of loss of familial patriarchs, loss of the Polish language as an American monolingual English speaker, and loss of ethnic group identity. That is, this thesis explores what it means for a Polish American to be foreign to oneself. The speaker of these poems, in order to connect with an identity larger than herself, tries to regain a sense of Polish national identity by speaking to the dead patriarchs of her family and meditating on their deaths. By doing so, she attempts to make some kind of sense of her grief and of her life. This thesis utilizes formal restlessness and the themes of language, prayer, memory, dream, nature, drink, and work to connect the speaker with the unseen world that is now absent to her in the physical, visible world in which she dwells.

Committee:

Sharona Muir (Advisor); Larissa Szporluk Celli (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Bible; Bilingual Education; Dance; Earth; East European Studies; Ecology; Energy; English As A Second Language; Environmental Philosophy; Ethics; Ethnic Studies; European History; Families and Family Life; Fine Arts; Folklore; Foreign Language; Forestry; Gender; History; Holocaust Studies; Human Remains; Language; Language Arts; Literacy; Literature; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern History; Modern Language; Modern Literature; Multicultural Education; Multilingual Education; Peace Studies; Performing Arts; Personal Relationships; Personality; Regional Studies; Religion; Religious History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies; Spirituality; Theology; Therapy; Womens Studies; World History

Keywords:

poetry; poems; Polish; Poland; death; grief; ethnic identity; nature; bilingual poetry; elegy; patriarch; loss; contemporary poetry; solidarity movement; emigration; immigration; third-generation immigrant; Wigrance; Pittsburgh; working-class poetry

Erken, Emily AlaneConstructing the Russian Moral Project through the Classics: Reflections of Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, 1833-2014
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Music
Since the nineteenth century, the Russian intelligentsia has fostered a conversation that blurs the boundaries of literature, the arts, and life. Bypassing more direct modes of political discourse blocked by Imperial and then Soviet censorship, arts reception in Russia has provided educated Russians with an alternative sphere for the negotiation of social, moral, and national identities. This discursive practice has endured through the turbulent political changes of the Russian revolution, Soviet repression, and the economic anxiety of contemporary Russia. Members of the intelligentsia who believe that individuals can and should work for the moral progress of the Russian people by participating in this conversation are constructing the Russian moral project. Near the end of the nineteenth century, members of the intelligentsia unofficially established a core set of texts and music—Russian klassika—that seemed to represent the best of Russian creative output. Although the canon seems permanent, educated Russians continue to argue about which texts are important and what they mean. Even Aleksandr Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin (1825-1833), a novel-in-verse that functions as the cornerstone of this canon, remains at the center of debate in a conversation about literature that is simultaneously a conversation about Russian life. Pushkin is considered the founder of Russia’s literary language, and Russian readers and critics have endowed him with a saint-like status. His image has become a secular icon of Russian creative potential. The heroine of his magnum opus, Tatiana Larina, has in turn become an icon of Russian morality. As Russians interpret Onegin’s themes and describe its characters, they also express what matters most in their own lives. The history of Onegin reception thus reflects the development of Russian ideas about life over the course of the last two centuries. Beginning in 1844, composers, theater directors, and choreographers have adapted Pushkin’s novel for the stage, often challenging the dominant readings of their well-loved source text. For example, Tchaikovsky’s opera adaptation follows Tatiana rather than Eugene, as she develops her own creative voice through the musical romances of her childhood; ultimately, her creative development allows her the moral strength to refuse Eugene. At the Bolshoi Opera Studio in 1922, Konstantin Stanislavsky represented Tatiana as a simple-hearted woman. In 1944, Boris Pokrovsky presented Tatiana as a socialist realist heroine, a strong woman with the integrity to refuse an unworthy suitor. Since the collapse of state socialism, post-Soviet citizens have continued to negotiate their turbulent world through and with Onegin. In 2006, Dmitri Tcherniakov radically reinvisioned Tchaikovsky’s Onegin at Moscow’s Bolshoi Theater. Artists, scholars, and critics argued about the merits of Tcherniakov’s staging and indeed its right to exist. Ordinary audience members joined the conversation by posting “spectator reviews” (zritel’skie retsenzii) to personal blogs and discussion forums online. When Boris Eifman premiered a choreographic adaptation of Onegin in 2009, audience members and critics used these same channels to lambast the corrupt present and to articulate what a better future for Russia would look like. Similarly, audience members responded to Rimas Tuminas’s 2013 play adaptation of Onegin by highlighting what they would preserve for the future. Spectator reviews of Eugene Onegin illustrate instances of individual participation in the Russian moral project.

Committee:

Danielle Fosler-Lussier, Dr. (Advisor); Alexander Burry, Dr. (Committee Member); Ryan Thomas Skinner, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Cultural Anthropology; Dance; Gender Studies; Literature; Music; Performing Arts; Philosophy; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies; Theater; Theater History; Theater Studies; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Russia, music, morality, Eugene Onegin, Tatiana, Tcherniakov, Eifman, Tuminas, Pushkin, Online ethnography, phenomenology, reception history, Belinsky, conservatism, Moscow, Bolshoi Theater, Stanislavsky, Pokrovsky, socialist realism, blogs, social media

Souder, Eric MatthewThe Circassian Thistle: Lev Nikolaevich Tolstoy's 'Khadzhi Murat' and the Evolving Russian Empire"
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2014, History
The following thesis examines the creation, publication, and reception of Lev Nikolaevich Tolstoy’s posthumous novel, Khadzhi Murat in both the Imperial and Soviet Russian Empire. The anti-imperial content of the novel made Khadzhi Murat an incredibly vulnerable novel, subjecting it to substantial early censorship. Tolstoy’s status as a literary and cultural figure in Russia – both preceding and following his death – allowed for the novel to become virtually forgotten despite its controversial content. This thesis investigates the absorption of Khadzhi Murat into the broader canon of Tolstoy’s writings within the Russian Empire as well as its prevailing significance as a piece of anti-imperial literature in a Russian context.

Committee:

Stephen Norris, Ph.D. (Advisor); Daniel Prior, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Margaret Ziolkowski, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Literature; Russian History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies

Keywords:

Leo Tolstoy; Tolstoy; Khadzhi Murat; Hadji Murat; North Caucasus; Chechnya; Daghestan; Russian Empire; Russian Literature; Censorship; Literary Criticism; Empire; Nicholas I

Rudich, Olha VitaliivnaPresentation of Russia and the West in Mikhalkov's Barber of Siberia and Sokurov's Russian Ark
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2005, Slavic and East European Studies
For centuries Russia and the West were engaged in relations that varied from positive to negative depending on economic, social, and political conditions. The process of Westernization strongly affects Russia at the present time, and the interaction of the two cultures leads to an altering of Russian cultural values. The aim of this thesis is to demonstrate that the matter of preserving Russian national identity became urgent at the beginning of the 21st Century. This thesis analyzes two contemporary films and examines how Russia and the West are presented. Both films glorify the time of Imperial Russia and the idea of Russia’s unique culture. While one director depicts the mingling of Russia and the West in a positive way, another director views Russians as superior to other nationalities. Both films open a discussion about the influence of the West on Russia’s national identity by emphasizing the importance of preserving Russian culture and its values.

Committee:

Yana Hashamova (Advisor); Irene Delic (Committee Member); Alexander Burry (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Slavic Literature

Curtis, Matthew CowanSlavic-Albanian Language Contact, Convergence, and Coexistence
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2012, Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures
As historical relationships of Slavs and Albanians in the western Balkans have been subject to a wide range of scholarly interpretations, this dissertation seeks to present the facts of linguistic evidence of Slavic-Albanian contact, and apply them to an informed understanding of Slavs’ and Albanians’ interactions historically. Although individual linguistic features are important for establishing the historical fact of language contact, only a systematic, comprehensive analysis of the several interrelated parts of language—vocabulary, phonology, and morphosyntax—can indicate how the languages, and the communities speaking them, have been affected by the long-standing contact. This study also considers the languages from the perspective of several language-contact theories, creating a multifaceted approach that reveals strengths and weaknesses of each theory, and also paints a multidimensional picture of the effects of language contact and socio-cultural reasons for the languages’ changes. This layered analysis demonstrates that contact between Slavs and Albanians has brought about many linguistic changes, particularly in dialects that have remained in contact with one another. While the most obvious effects are the plenteous lexical borrowings, language contact is also present in phonology and morphosyntax, thus affecting every aspect of the dialects in contact. As the linguistic data shows, Albanian and Slavic communities have enriched one another linguistically and likely in other aspects of their cultural inheritances as well.

Committee:

Brian Joseph, PhD (Advisor); Charles Gribble, PhD (Committee Member); Daniel Collins, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

East European Studies; European History; Foreign Language; History; Language; Language Arts; Linguistics; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Morphology; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies; Sociolinguistics

Keywords:

Slavic; Albanian; language contact; linguistics; Balkan linguistics

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