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Brind'Amour, KatherineMaternal and Child Health Home Visiting Evaluations Using Large, Pre-Existing Data Sets
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Health Services Management and Policy
Introduction: Although popular and prevalent nationwide, maternal and early childhood home visiting interventions are, in many cases, of uncertain effectiveness. Methods: For Studies 1 and 2, the Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) Columbus, Ohio location was evaluated via propensity score matching with non-participants for its impact on a range of health outcomes. For Study 3, the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) was used to create a nationally representative profile of the home visiting population using descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis. Results: In Studies 1 and 2, matching revealed greater likelihood to have a C-section, low birth weight, and to be enrolled in WIC for women and infants participating in the Columbus NFP compared to non-participating matches. In Study 3, descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis indicated substantial differences between participants and non-participants. Conclusions: There is no conclusive evidence that the Columbus NFP program is effective at achieving its stated goals; however, the studies’ limitations were considerable. The national profile created using the NSCH supports that there are substantial differences between participants and non-participants, with home visiting participants reflecting greater health and environmental risks and lower socioeconomic status, but perhaps better parental engagement. Improved data collection and evaluation methods, as well as confirmatory factor analysis and changes in questions for the NSCH data, may help improve opportunities for home visiting evaluation in the future.

Committee:

Thomas Wickizer (Committee Chair); Phyllis Pirie (Committee Member); Sharon Schweikhart (Committee Member); Sarah Keim (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Evaluation; Families and Family Life; Health; Health Care Management; Health Education; Nursing; Public Administration; Public Health; Public Health Education; Womens Studies

Keywords:

home visiting; prenatal intervention; home health; program evaluation; public health; maternal and infant health; MIECHV; Nurse Family Partnership; National Survey of Childrens Health; propensity score; factor analysis

Adkins, Christopher J.Examining the X and Y Generations' Motivation for Choosing Law Enforcement: My How Things Have Changed?
Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Youngstown State University, 2015, Department of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science
The topic of motivation has been researched extensively, including where it affects job satisfaction and performance. Current research suggests that motivating factors may be evolving with younger generations entering the work force. This research was designed to compare current generation law enforcement recruits to recruits from earlier research in terms of preference in self-serving motivations over altruistic motivations. Current police academy cadets (N=176) were surveyed in northeastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania, and were asked about their motivation for choosing a law enforcement career. Statistical analysis of the data included comparisons between groups in the sample and against previous research. This research suggests that law enforcement motivation has remained stable over the past 30 years. The results reflect few significant variations in motivation based on year of birth. Additionally, few significant differences were seen by gender, race, social class, educational levels, and law enforcement and military experience. However, significant variances were present between Ohio and Pennsylvania academies. Future research should focus on comparisons of motivation between states and evaluating motivation changes over time.

Committee:

John Hazy, PhD (Advisor); Richard Rogers, PhD (Committee Member); Gordon Frissora, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration; Sociology

Keywords:

Law enforcement motivation; Police; Hiring; Recruiting; Motivation; Job satisfaction; Law enforcement

Jung, HyejinThe Impact of Entrepreneurship in Regional Resilience: A Spatial Analysis of the Gulf Coast Region
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies and Public Affairs, Cleveland State University, 2015, Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs
The purpose of this study is to examine whether entrepreneurship is an important factor of regional economic resilience. For this purpose, this study analyzes the regional economic resilience of the regions affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and the 2008-2009 economic recession. It is assumed that some regions in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas where different types of disturbances occurred are effective research areas to examine the role of entrepreneurship in the recovery process. From the dynamic panel analysis, this study finds that entrepreneurship is positively related to employment and population growth in the affected regions. In line with previous studies showing that entrepreneurship can contribute to economic growth, this study adds to the extant literature on the role of entrepreneurship by considering external shocks. However, this study reveals that entrepreneurship does not significantly affect per capita income growth. It reflects that the effect of entrepreneurship can differ according to the measurement used. From the quasi-experimental analysis, regions with high entrepreneurial activities show higher levels of employment and population than regions with low entrepreneurial activities after natural disasters. When other regional economic structures and the effects of hurricanes are controlled, the difference in the levels of employment and population is explained by entrepreneurship. Once the national economic recessions begin, however, the difference between high and low entrepreneurship counties disappears. This reflects that the role of entrepreneurship can differ according to the attributes of disturbances. Based on the empirical results, this study demonstrates that entrepreneurship can be an important element of regional economic resilience. To be specific, its role is conspicuous in employment and population growth after natural disasters. Furthermore, this study contributes to previous studies by illustrating that the effects of entrepreneurship depend on measurement and disturbances. With regard to empirical finding, this study suggests several policy implications that can increase regional economic resilience.

Committee:

William Bowen, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Edward Hill, Ph.D (Committee Member); Haifeng Qian, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration

Holland, Vincent D.REFORM WHERE IS THY VICTORY?: A STUDY OF THE REFORM EFFORTS IN SUMMIT, ALLEGHENY AND CUYAHOGA COUNTIES
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies and Public Affairs, Cleveland State University, 2014, Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs
Reform is a concept that public administration has struggled to define since its inception. The corruption crisis in Cuyahoga County led the region to vote to implement a home-rule government, and replace the three commissioner system with a single county executive and an eleven-member county council under the guise of reform. In addition, Allegheny and Summit Counties each previously implemented similar executive-council elected reform governments for reasons akin to Cuyahoga. Reform efforts are often the product of crises in the government process, and open doors for researching the process of how power works, is implemented, co-opted and consolidated. These events afforded researchers opportunities for studying if merely structural reform took place or if a deeper reform occurred, and what were the elements that determined if structural or a deeper reform occurred. This Dissertation used Clarence Stone’s Urban Regime Theory and Jon Pierre’s Urban Governance Theory as frameworks in order to study how some elite actors viewed their reform efforts. The questions explored were the following: Was their region’s reform was a change in structure only, as there were more unelected row positions and new positions but the operations, governance and leadership operated as in the past? Was their regions reform effort a deeper government reform, where there was more accountability, transparency, efficiency, sustainability, inclusion, checks-and balances and ethical behavior? Public Administration still struggles with defining reform, and this qualitative study looks at the perceptions held by those elite actors as to their views pertaining to what transpired in their region. The study looked at the perceptions of reform held by those who were interviewed through an interpretative lens. As this was an interpretive study, research questions were generated and analyzed with the understanding that there are limitations on drawing inference from the collected data. However, one can ascertain that there are factors that impact on reform. One can also assert that Urban Regime Theory gives researchers a process for studying if structural or a deeper reform occurred. Interviews conducted with those elite person who were directly involved, or knowledgably about their reform efforts indicated that maintaining, consolidating or co-opting power were of significant importance. However, the information collected must be understood within the context of the limitations of an interpretive perspective

Committee:

Lawrence Keller, PhD (Committee Chair); Michael Spicer, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Jaquay, Atty (Committee Member); Vera Vogelsang-Coombs, PhD (Committee Member); Fred Bolotin, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration

Keywords:

County Reform; Home Rule; Urban Regime Theory; Governance

Choo, YeunKyungStrategies for Urban Cultural Policy: The Case of the Hub City of Asian Culture Gwangju, South Korea
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Arts Administration, Education and Policy
In the field of urban cultural policy, hardly any non-Western studies have researched the initial stage of policy design and the role of culture, despite its significance in today’s evolving policy design processes. The purpose of this dissertation study is to explore the role of culture under the influence of policy paradigm shift and to gain a comprehensive understanding of contemporary urban cultural policy design. Based on a complementary set of preexisting models and studies that challenge the limitations of the Multiple Streams Model, this study investigates multiple aspects of the Hub City of Asian Culture (HCAC) project in South Korea. Conducting an in-depth case study by incorporating document analysis, personal interviews, and several timelines, the study provides a thick description on the new urban cultural development model of HCAC. The findings indicate that there is a significant paradigm shift in contemporary urban cultural policy design, and culture has been operationalized as an innovative and autonomous tool to manage the complexity of policy design, situations, and networks. The HCAC policy design adopted multiple culture-driven tools from precedent international cases and strategically integrated them to the policy design and initial implementation processes for the sustainable management of the project. Finally, the study makes recommendations for future researchers to advance the policy analysis model for exploring undiscovered cases around the world. The study also recommends cultural policy makers to recognize the need to minimize the government’s intervention in policy making, and learn how to collaborate with and nurture the vitality of policy communities.

Committee:

Margaret Wyszomirski (Advisor); Edward Malecki (Committee Member); Wayne Lawson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management; Public Administration; Public Policy; Regional Studies; Urban Planning

Keywords:

culture policy, urban cultural policy, culture-led urban regeneration, Gwangju, the Hub City of Asian Culture, new governance, Multiple Streams Model, Alternative Lenses Analysis, operationalized culture, culture and decentralization

McCray, Jacquelyn YvonneCivic Deliberative Dialogue and the Topic of Race: Exploring the Lived Experience of Everyday Citizens and Their Encounters with Tension and Conflict
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
The research explored the interactions and experiences of participants and facilitators in civic deliberative dialogue and how they worked through tension and conflict. The dissertation question asked: What is the lived experience of participants and facilitators of civic deliberative dialogue and how do group members collectively move beyond tensions and disagreements that surface during dialogue processes? The study analyzed the joint influences of tension and disagreement within the context of seven deliberative dialogues convened on the topics of race, race relations and racism. Grounded theory methodology was used to analyze qualitative research data collected from participant volunteers and facilitators. A constructivist approach, grounded theory allowed for evaluation of the interactions of participants derived from informal observations of the deliberative dialogue process and from research data gathered through semi-structured interviews, open and axial coding, and constant comparison. Using dimensional analysis, theoretical propositions emerged which convey new understanding about the ways deliberative dialogue participants confronted the difficult topics of race and racism, their shifts in perspective, and new understanding and insights generated during the process. Civic deliberative dialogue puts everyday people at the center of local problem solving. As a form of local engagement, it arms civic groups with an approach and practice for tackling difficult issues through authentic conversations that build relationships and offers a means for peeling back divergent thoughts, opinions, and interests. The civic dialogue literature includes little about confrontation and opposition during deliberative dialogue. The research produced three theoretical propositions ("creating space to move from tension to healing"; "heart stories, hurt stories—hearing and understanding differently"; and "sustaining the conversation, bridging the divide"), adds to the body of scholarly literature on civic engagement and lends understanding about how sustained deliberative dialogue promotes grassroots leadership, and creates an environment of civility and working through (Yankelovich, 1991) for healthier, more productive communities. This dissertation is accompanied by a video file (MP4), author introduction, and a PDF of a PowerPoint file used during the dissertation defense. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/etds/ and OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Philomena Essed, PhD (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Member); Patricia Stewart, PhD (Committee Member); Bob Pease, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

African Americans; Political Science; Public Administration; Social Research; Urban Planning

Keywords:

civic dialogue; civic engagement; grounded theory; race; tension; conflict; lived experience; deliberative dialogue; citizen participation; racism; African Americans; Whites; Melungeons; grassroots leadership; urban planning

Andrea, Hernandez LeighEffective Networked Nonprofit Organizations: Defining the Behavior and Creating an Instrument for Measurement
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
This correlational research design, which included a convenience sample of 157 nonprofit staff and board member responses to a Likert-type survey, was used to conduct a principle components analysis (PCA) to develop subscales related to networked nonprofits. As defined in the study, a networked nonprofit has a set of intentionally built trusting relationships and has systems and strategies that engage various stakeholders in meaningful conversations. They achieve their missions by developing strong partnerships where they invest in the goals of other organizations to mobilize resources for a common shared mission and values. While there were correlations between the level respondents rated their organization as a networked nonprofit, or networkedness, and effectiveness reported by respondents, the two networked nonprofit subscales revealed as a result of PCA (Stakeholder/External and Systems Vision/Internal) included elements found in effective as well as networked nonprofits. Also, the Maturity of Practice items were narrowed and reviewed through bivariate correlation. While they correlate to one another, they did not correlate to the networkedness or effectiveness measures. This seems to indicate a disconnect between the actual practice of networkedness as evidenced through social media and evaluation measures and the networked mindset or organizational culture. In other words, the way respondents perceive their levels of effectiveness and networkedness may indeed not align with actual behaviors. My ETD may be copied and distributed only for non-commercial purposes and may not be modified. All use must give me credit as the original author. A video author introduction in MP4 format accompanies this dissertation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivatives 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd and Antioch University's AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Kusy Mitchell, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Wergin Jon, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Renz David, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Freiwirth Judy, Psy.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Psychology; Public Administration; Social Work; Sociology

Keywords:

networked; nonprofit; nonprofits; not-for-profits; networked nonprofit; networked nonprofits; nonprofit effectiveness; networkedness; Maturity of Practice; effectiveness; social media

Low, Kelly JExploring the Quality of Stakeholder Representation in Regional Planning
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2014, Urban Studies and Public Affairs
The purpose of this study was to explore the facet of external stakeholder representation in the regional planning process. Specifically, the intent was to determine best practices ensuring a high quality of the representation of external stakeholders within new regional planning entities – those created for the sole purpose of generating one long-term regional plan. To accomplish this, a qualitative study was performed analyzing the levels of involvement of the Board of Directors (internal stakeholders) of a regional planning consortium. The Northeast Ohio Sustainable Communities Consortium, a product of the HUD Sustainable Communities Grant Program, is used as the case study. Four qualitative components evaluated the internal stakeholders and three of four showed that the quality of representation was low. The final component demonstrated underrepresentation by attendees of the focus groups. Overall, the quality of stakeholder representation was deemed medium to low, using this case study. The qualitative methods used produced baseline criteria for a new model for future regional planning consortia to attain a higher quality of representation of external stakeholders.

Committee:

Raymond Cox III, Dr. (Advisor); Sanda Kaufman, Dr. (Committee Member); Ghazi Falah, Dr. (Committee Member); Ray Gehani, Dr. (Committee Member); Namkyung Oh, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Area Planning and Development; Environmental Management; Land Use Planning; Natural Resource Management; Public Administration; Regional Studies; Urban Planning

Keywords:

stakeholder; stakeholder representation; regional planning; Sustainable Communities; regional plan; board of directors; NEOSCC; Northeast Ohio Sustainable Communities Consortium; representation

Ferguson, DavidGrade-Level Readability of Municipal Websites: Are They Creating Digital Inequalities of Opportunities that Perpetuate the Digital Divide?
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2014, Urban Studies and Public Affairs
The adoption of information technologies as a platform for disseminating government information has influenced traditional roles of public service delivery and citizen participation. There is concern whether the readability of government websites where public information found is creating digital inequalities of opportunities that perpetuate the digital divide. This study aimed to access the readability level of a sample of municipal websites in the U.S. to determine if municipal websites are being written at too high of a level for citizens to comprehend. The research utilized population data from the 2010 U.S. Census of municipalities to create a data set for analyzing readability of websites. This dissertation sought to answer six research questions. What is the readability ease score and grade level of a sample of municipalities’ websites with population greater than 5,000 citizens? Are the states’ mean Flesch-Kincaid reading grade levels different from the national average reading grade level Do municipal websites’ main pages read at the targeted state’s standard reading grade level? Is the mean Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level of the city webpages within the state equal to the targeted state’s standard reading grade level? Is there difference between the FKGL score mean difference among cities (small, medium, and large)? Do city websites offer audio or visual portals? Implementing new writing strategies that focus on high readability of text and issues of communication with the audience can assist in guiding decisions that improves effectiveness of municipal websites’ online instructions and text. The findings revealed that municipal web pages are being written at levels greater than the national average reading grade level. In addition, the majority of municipal websites are absent of audio visual alternatives to text. This can impose a significant challenged to (all) citizens trying to access important information that can influence their lives economically, socially, and politically. Today, being able to access information from e-government websites is more important than ever, given the world we live in. Identifying high readability of text and issues of communication can assist in guiding decisions that improves effectiveness of municipal websites’ online instructions and text.

Committee:

Raymond Cox III, Dr. (Advisor); Camilla Stivers, Dr. (Committee Member); Ghazi-Walid Falah, Dr. (Committee Member); Francis Broadway, Dr. (Committee Member); Namkyung Oh, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration; Public Policy

Keywords:

Readability;digital divide;municipal websites

Ortega Pacheco, Daniel VicenteInvestigating the role and scale of transactions costs of incentive-based programs for provision of environmental services in developing countries
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2010, Public Policy and Management
The use of incentives for the provision of environmental services occupies a critically important place in the international development agenda. The use of local approaches for watershed services provision and international efforts for global provision of climate change land-based mitigation services are among promising management options. These two options have the potential to significantly reduce the overall costs of meeting environmental targets through market-based institutional arrangements. Despite widespread agreement that transaction costs are important, existing research has not yet considered the scale and role of transaction costs in determining: 1) the rate of adoption of incentive-based schemes for the provision of watershed services in the developing world, and 2) the supply of mitigation services associated with avoided emissions from deforestation, particularly in a developing country context. To address the former, the first chapter of this dissertation identifies patterns of adoption and the exogenous and endogenous factors that help to explain the number of incentive-based programs adopted during the last decade. Using an econometric model, it suggests that the degree of adoption can be interpreted as diffusion of interdependent induced institutional innovations. The second chapter presents a conceptual framework for transaction costs and reports results of field data collection and empirical estimates of the scale of transaction costs of mitigation through land-based activities in Ecuador taking place under alternative incentive-based institutional arrangements. The third chapter of this dissertation develops an econometric model to estimate the elasticity of land supply in Ecuador and evaluates the effect that transaction costs have on incentive-based mitigation activities. Knowledge generated from this research aims at enriching the scholarly debate on policy diffusion and climate change policy and provides critical insights for policymakers interested in incentive-based institutional arrangements for the provision of environmental services.

Committee:

Anand Desai (Advisor); Andrew Keeler (Committee Member); Brent Sohngen (Committee Member); Trevor Brown (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration; Public Policy

Keywords:

water; climate change; mitigation; institutions; Payment for environmental services; transaction costs

Matheny, Erica M.A Survey of the Structural Determinants of Local Emergency Planning Committee Compliance and Proactivity: Towards an Applied Theory of Precaution in Emergency Management
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies and Public Affairs, Cleveland State University, 2012, Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs
Millions of factories, chemical facilities, and highways store or convey extremely hazardous substances (EHS) in proximity to populated residential and commercial areas. The proliferation of hazardous chemicals in manufacturing has led to thousands of facilities that store and utilize them throughout the United States. There is inherent risk to neighborhoods and populated areas located near facilities that use and store hazardous chemicals. Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) were created in 1987 as stakeholder based, primarily volunteer organizations that address hazardous chemical accident mitigation. In addition, LEPCs were mandated with the intent of engaging communities in the debate about hazardous materials. Public safety has also increased in salience in the United States in particular since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and the 2005 Hurricane Katrina devastation in New Orleans. More recently, the earthquakes in Argentina, Chile, New Zealand, and most notably Japan have refocused efforts worldwide on examining policies and practices surrounding disaster management and response. This dissertation is an examination of compliance and proactivity in LEPCs and how use of limited resources influences these factors. A convenient sample of LEPCs in Ohio was surveyed to gather data for this causally probative study. LEPCs that are more compliant and proactive were expected to be in counties with larger, more urban populations that have more accident experience, and are expected to be in line with disaster management strategies that emphasize public involvement. The results of this study show a positive correlation between number of extremely hazardous substance facilities in a county and the compliance of that county’s LEPC. Other findings include limited emphasis on provision of information to the public. Emergency planning resources have been stretched further and further, with additional responsibilities of homeland security in addition to chemical safety tasks, and little to no additional funding. The researcher proposes LEPCs look more towards collaboration as a means of ensuring community security within their limited capacity. Collaboration has been noted amongst emergency planning agencies between LEPCs and County Emergency Management Agencies (EMAs), often in the form of shared staff or resources. Collaboration can lead to greater success for all involved parties. Future research also needs to be completed to re-conceptualize the idea of LEPC “proactivity” to better capture the diversity of LEPC activities that may fall under this umbrella. In particular, emphasis on precautionary or mitigation activities may be a better use of emergency managers’ limited resources. One of the most significant weaknesses of the current approach, in light of the original intent of LEPCs as stakeholder-inclusive entities, is access to information. As hazardous chemical information access has become more limited and restrictive, collaboration between involved parties and the public is also therefore limited. This may call for more proactive, creative solutions on the part of regulated industry to ensure emergency plans contain complete hazard information with proper security protocols maintained.

Committee:

William Bowen, PhD (Committee Chair); Wendy Kellogg, PhD (Committee Member); Nicholas Zingale, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Environmental Health; Environmental Studies; Public Administration; Sustainability; Urban Planning

Keywords:

LEPC; Local Emergency Planning Committee; precaution, proactivity, risk, mitigation, EHS, extremely hazardous substances

Gurney, Karen A.THE LOCAL ECONOMIC GROWTH IMPACT OF BROADBAND INFRASTRUCTURE 1998 TO 2008
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies and Public Affairs, Cleveland State University, 2012, Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs
This dissertation presents estimates of the relationship between early investment in broadband infrastructure and a number of local economic indicators using a data set of communities (by zip code) across the U.S. Data is matched from the FCC (Form 477) on broadband infrastructure availability with demographic and other socio-economic data from the U.S. Population Censuses and Business Trends Surveys. Spatial econometric techniques are utilized. Even after controlling for community-level factors known to influence broadband availability and economic activity, it was found that between 1998 and 2008, communities in which broadband was available by 1999, compared to those that did not, experienced a greater difference in the growth of 1) rents, 2) salaries, 3) employment, and 4) overall establishments. In addition, broadband contributed to the share of different industry structures lending support to the GPT hypothesis. This research replicates and extends Lehr et al. (2005).

Committee:

Robert Scherer (Committee Chair); Joel Elvery (Committee Member); Haifeng Qian (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration

Keywords:

Economic development; regional science; broadband; infrastructure; spatial econometrics

Ramadan, Wael HasanThe Influence Of Organizational Culture On Sustainable Competitive Advantage of Small And Medium Sized Establishments, Best Business Practices For Achieving World-Class Status, And the Link Between Business And Region
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies and Public Affairs, Cleveland State University, 2009, Levin College of Urban Affairs
This is a three-essay dissertation that examines the effects of objective aspects of business organizational culture and the region on objective measures of the outcomes of sustainable competitive advantage. The first essay examines the association of objective aspects of business organizational culture on objective measures of sustainable competitive advantage. The first essay recommends that firms increase the number of training hours devoted annually to each employee and increase the percentage of production employees participating in empowered work teams. The second essay describes a conceptual model and provides recommendations for best business practices for manufacturing firms that realize the ultimate ability to generate competitive advantage when their resources are exposed to global market processes. The third essay explores the link between the firm and the region. This essay recommends economic development policy makers and business leaders to consider new business models that take advantage of regional economies in order to stay competitive.

Committee:

Edward Hill, PhD (Committee Chair); Larry Ledebur, PhD (Committee Member); Rajshekhar Javalgi, PhD (Committee Member); Joel Elvery, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration

Keywords:

WORLD-CLASS; ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE; supply chain; COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE; employee; talent pool

Alsarraf, Hani A.POLICY ADMINISTRATION AND POLITICAL RIGHTS: THE EXPERIENCES OF HIGH-LEVEL WOMEN IN THE KUWAITI GOVERNMENT
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies and Public Affairs, Cleveland State University, 2008, Levin College of Urban Affairs
Women in Kuwait were traditionally excluded from the formulation of public policy because they lacked political rights. In mid 2005, women received the right to vote and to run for office. There is little known today about the influence of these political rights on women who work with the implementation of public policies in the higher administrative levels of government. Little is known specifically about the influence of the franchise on promotion of women to high administrative posts. The purpose of this study is to lay a foundation for research on the factors that encourage women's access to high positions in government by exploring the experience of high-level women both before and after enfranchisement. The experiences of leading women who work for the public sector are critical to understanding any relationship between women's political rights and their access to high positions. The interpretation of female work experiences provides suggestions to help expand and enhance women's access to high positions in public administration. This study employs the phenomenological method for data collection and interpretation. The findings of this study support the argument that political participation exerts a positive influence on high-level women in government. This study shows that Kuwaiti high-level women agree that they have started to experience a positive influence in their work since the franchise due to the new political power that they have gained. I argue that whether or not high-level women have personally experienced any positive change in their work due to gaining their political rights, they still affirm the occurrence of this positive change. This study finds that this positive influence is reflected in better representation in official meetings, more interactions with state leaders, an increasing ability to express concerns to top levels, and enhancing their self-confidence to lead. This study notes other significant factors that should be considered by women in order to enhance their numbers in leading positions of government: competency, communication, knowledge, and leadership. Based on these factors, three sets of recommendations are presented: for mid-level women in the public sector, for the Kuwaiti public administration, and for womens organizations in society.

Committee:

Dr. Camilla Stivers, PhD (Committee Chair); Dr. Jennifer Alexander, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Ralph Hummel, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration

Keywords:

public administration; public policy; women, political rights; enfranchisement; implementation; public sector; high positions in government; work experiences; interpretive theory; phenomenology

Chunnu, Winsome M.Whither Are We Drifting? Primary Education Policy in Jamaica
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2009, Curriculum and Instruction Cultural Studies (Education)

This study sought to understand the factors that influenced primary educational policy implementation between 1980 and 1985. Then Minister of Education Mavis Gilmour stated that 80 to 90% of the Jamaican population received no form of education beyond the primary level, and 52% of students who graduated from primary school were unable to read or write. She insisted that major changes had to take place at the primary level to improve the overall education system. This study examines the polices that were introduced to “fix” primary education in Jamaica.

This was a qualitative study conducted in two Jamaican parishes; Kingston and St. Thomas. A case study design was utilized in order to gain indepth insight into the policy implementation process, using postcolonial and the political model as theoretical frameworks. Interviews and document analysis were used as the main sources of data.

The study revealed that education officers in the ministry stated that policies were communicated, while the majority of teachers insisted that they were never informed by the ministry or education officers about these policies. Instead, they heard about them on television, the radio, or read them in the newspaper if they knew at all. Teachers also insisted that they were never provided with guidelines and policy goals were never communicated to them.

The majority of teachers were not aware of an evaluation process although the education officers and the ministry personnel all indicated that an evaluation process was in place. It was also evident that there was a high level of confusion among the implementation team.

Lack of parental involvement, poverty and unemployment significantly influenced the consciousness of the value of education. These challenges are compounded by teenage mothers, absentee fathers, uneducated parents, and a low educational level as well as a low literacy level in communities, all of which influenced primary education.

There needs to be significant improvement in communicating policies as well as in involving teachers in the consultation and implementation process. Providing policy implementation guidelines is also critical. Policy should be tailored to fix specific problems instead of the “cookie cutter” approach in use now.

Committee:

Francis Godwyll, Ph.D (Advisor); Peter Mather, Ph.D (Committee Member); Rosalie Romano, Ph.D (Committee Member); Thomas Smucker, Ph.D (Committee Member); Dauda Abubakar, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Evaluation; Political Science; Public Administration

Keywords:

Mavis Gilmour; Policy Implementation in Jamaica; Jamacian Primary Education

Redaelli, EleonoraLocating Cultural Economy and Exploring its Connections with Urban Policymaking: A Case Study of Columbus, OH
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, Arts Policy and Administration

The cultural economy of American cities emerged as an important topic in cultural policy at the end of the 21st Century, when cultural policy makers started to highlight the multifaceted dynamics of cultural activities and city officials started to pay attention to their great potentials for the growth and well-being of the city. This moved cultural policy from the national to the local level and two main problems emerged. First, it is not always agreed what constitutes cultural economy; the academic literature and reports are not consistent in the language, and their object of analysis is defined by different boundaries. Second, the connections between the cultural economy and urban policymaking are unclear due to the lack of standardized structure in city bureaucracy and the intricacy of metropolitan governance, in particular, for what concern suburbanization.

The purpose of my dissertation is to inform decision making for cultural planning by exploring the connections between cultural economy and urban policymaking. To this end, I develop a research strategy that entails two steps: (1) build a definition of cultural economy that can be operationalized, and (2) find an analytical approach that can link the data about the cultural economy to the complexity of urban policymaking. First, I review a broad range of literature, categorizing the different approaches and identifying three main domains: industries, institutions, and districts. They are characterized by three main differences - foundational concepts, economic functions, and interaction mechanisms - but merge in an inclusive definition of the cultural economy.

Second, I use a geographical information system (GIS) as method of analysis. GIS is a powerful analytical tool; creating maps, it grasps the administrative, social, and economic aspects intertwined with culture.

My empirical analysis focuses on Columbus, Ohio, USA, and its suburbs. I locate their cultural economy identifying its breadth and articulation. Then, I explore the connections of cultural economy with urban policymaking: I analyze the Neighborhood Liaison Areas and their socioeconomic characteristics, I map the situation in the suburbs, and, finally, I overlay and compare the Neighborhood Liaisons Areas with the suburbs.

Committee:

Margaret Wyszomirski, J. (Advisor); Trevor Brown, L. (Committee Member); Wayne Lawson, P. (Committee Member); Edward Malecki, J. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Public Administration; Sociology

Keywords:

cultural policy;cultural economy; urban policymaking

Elias, Maria VeronicaCommunity: An Experience-Based Critique of the Concept
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2008, Urban Studies and Public Affairs

Are social science definitions of community adequate? Or do community members have anything to say about that? Mary Parker Follett (the relevant work is her The new state, 1918) suggests that understanding community is a key to resolving the problem of political participation.

Taking the reader through a conscious protocol of asking people about their idea of community, the author seeks to show that the so called "subjects" do have something to say to experts in concept formulation. The case of the community concept is used to challenge a basic assumption of social science, the fallacy that all social experience can be reduced by a methodological individualism.

The Public Administration literature at large looks at community from the outside in, in a static way as if it were an object, an immutable entity. My interest lies in the lived process of participating in community as a foundation for democratic politics. This seems to require searching out the meanings that people attach to community when they use it to describe their experiences of living with one another in a way that shapes their civic engagement experiences. The research question guiding this study is: What does community mean to the people who live in one? It presents a seldom visited epistemological approach, that of phenomenology (Husserl 1970, Heidegger 1962, Schutz 1962), which finds its roots in people's experiences. My motivation leads my investigation; that is, my own experience of political unfreedom in Argentina is the trigger that has led me to inquire into the nature of the relationship between community and democracy. This dissertation seeks to make a case for practice illuminating theory (Hummel 1998) along with the plausibility of broadening the dialogue about community from the ground up.

A substantive contribution of this dissertation to the understanding of community is the discovery that community as a process, far from being an abstraction, constitutes an everyday practice in neighborhood group dynamics, the political community that the ancient Greeks praised as true democratic governance.

Committee:

Ralph P. Hummel (Advisor); Camilla Stivers (Advisor); Sonia Alemagno (Other); Greg Plagens (Other); Kathy Feltey (Other)

Subjects:

Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Philosophy; Political Science; Public Administration; Social Psychology; Social Work; Sociology; Urban Planning

Keywords:

political participation; democratic politics; community as a process; active citizenship; democracy; citizen participation; Public Administration; democratic governance; political philosophy; Mary Parker Follett; creative experience

Rice, Ketra LachellA Multi-Method Analysis of the Role of Spatial Factors in Policy Analysis and Health Disparities Research
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Public Policy and Management
The premise of this research rests on the idea that space has a significant influence on diet and health disparities and on the utilization of food assistance policies targeted towards minimizing those disparities. In the specific context of food deserts, this research integrates a multi-disciplinary conceptual approach and a multi-method approach to explore the relationships and interactions between people and spaces. The multi-disciplinary approach links spatial conceptual perspectives from rural sociology and health geography to provide the theoretical framework for the relevance of integrating space in policy analysis and diet and health disparities research. The multi-method approach provides a more comprehensive examination of diet and health disparities by allowing for the statistical testing of outcomes and the simulated exploration of policy interventions. This dissertation consists of a set of three interconnected essays. The first essay presents conceptual perspectives from a health geography and rural sociology lens and relates the perspectives to aggregate level participation rates for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Incorporating spatial econometric methods to measure county-level SNAP participation, the results from the analysis show variation in SNAP participation based on county characteristics. Understanding this geographic variation provides an opportunity to formulate SNAP policies and procedures which explicitly respond to and incorporate spatial differences across counties. The second essay expands the analysis of geographic variation by examining health outcomes at the individual-level in relationship to individual-level and county characteristics. This essay measures the consequences of lack of access to food by exploring the adverse health outcomes that can be attributed to the food environment. A hierarchical linear model is implemented and the results show that counties with a higher quality food environment predict higher levels of individual health status. The spatial disparity of the food environment on individual-level health outcomes coupled with the spatial disparity of SNAP participation suggested the need to further explore the complexity of the policy problem of diet and health disparities through an additional lens of simulation modeling. The third essay explores this using an agent-based simulation. I simulate a local food environment and observe changes in the environment as policy interventions are introduced. The results show that poor health status can persist in a poor food environment even with people-based interventions that increase low income consumers’ purchasing power. The place-based policy intervention that changed the environment subsequently changed consumption patterns and improved health outcomes. The understanding of spatial theory in policy context and the implementation of a multi-method approach for addressing the complexity of health disparities contributes to a perspective that the analysis of public policy and design of policy interventions requires a conceptual understanding of the spatial associations underlying the policies being investigated. Above all, this dissertation contributes to the body of knowledge of the complementarities of hierarchical linear modeling and agent-based modeling to examine the complexity of individual-level diet and health outcomes, and a recognition that geographic characteristics not only predict diet and health disparities but also predict the usage of assistance offered that seeks to minimize diet and health disparities.

Committee:

Anand Desai (Advisor); Rob Greenbaum (Committee Member); Linda Lobao (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration; Public Policy

Keywords:

Geography and Public Policy; Diet and Health Disparities; Food Deserts; Food Policy; Hierarchical Linear Modeling; Agent-Based Modeling

Keeley, Melissa AnnThe Benefits And Limitations Of Artist-Run Organizations In Columbus, Ohio
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2008, Arts Policy and Administration

The creative sector of any community provides important economic and social benefits. Research has shown that supporting a thriving arts and culture sector provides not only monetary returns on public investment but also helps create a positive image of a city that is in turn attractive to new businesses and a talented workforce. Furthermore, researchers have found that the presence of artists within a city is a good judge of a community's cultural vitality and that cities should look to attract and retain artists to create new and innovative arts experiences while enhancing and building the creative capital within the community.

However, attracting and retaining artists is not always easy. Artists are highly mobile and frequently leave “second tier” cities to move to the premier art cities of New York and Los Angeles. In order to attract and retain artists to a community like Columbus, Ohio the city needs to support organizations and groups that help develop a hospitable environment for artists. A hospitable environment includes access to studio space and equipment, peer support, ability to gain exposure and exhibit work, and also a high quality of life at a reasonable cost. Most cities, including Columbus, are not doing near enough to attract new artists and retain the young artists who are attending secondary educational institutions in the area. But one way Columbus can create a hospitable environment for artists is to support the creation and management of artist-run organizations.

Artist-run organizations refer to artist collectives, artist cooperatives, artist-run arts spaces and other artist-run and managed groups. Artist-run organizations are groups that share the common goal of providing peer and career support, as well as access to resources through an organization created and managed by artists. These organizations in turn also provide new artistic experiences through the promotion of innovative art that is able to reach a broad audience within their community. As a result, artist-run organizations not only provide artists with a means for professional and personal development, but also help make a city attractive to both artists and arts patrons.

Although artist-run organizations create unique benefits for their members and the community, many are plagued by poor organizational structures and limited life spans. This thesis explores four artist-run organizations in Columbus and investigates the positive achievements of these groups as well as the problems they face as organizations. By taking a critical look at four artist-run organizations with varying levels of success this thesis is able to create a prescriptive analysis of artist-run organizations and what steps these groups can take to help strengthen their group and promote organizational longevity. This thesis also examines how the existing arts infrastructure can promote successful artist-run organizations and help struggling groups through instruction, promotion, and organizational support.

Committee:

Wayne Lawson, PhD (Committee Chair); Margaret Wyszomirski, PhD (Committee Member); Patricia Stuhr, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art Education; Art History; Fine Arts; Public Administration

Keywords:

artist cooperative; artist collective; artist run; arts space; creative sector; creative capital; creative class; individual artists; visual artists

Thomas, Nicole RichardsonThe Role of Assumptions in Service Delivery: Exploring minority student participation in educational decision-making
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Public Policy and Management
In a diverse society, those who decide how government services are delivered may not be similar to the service recipients, and the assumptions underlying their policies may not apply to those recipients. Scholars have identified how various factors relate to these assumptions and affect service delivery. The first purpose of this dissertation is to explore how these factors may combine to produce inequality in the delivery of government services. The second purpose is to explore how participation by service recipients in decision-making processes can interrupt these patterns. This is done using a participatory, student-centered learning program as a case study in which teachers provide educational services to students. The results have implications for research and practice pertaining to inequality in education and delivery of other services. The first essay examines how individual, environmental, and contextual factors may lead to assumptions of service providers that result in inequality. This essay describes how factors identified by institutional theorists, representative bureaucracy scholars, and those who study organizational history can interact over time to explain how assumptions may produce inequality in service delivery. Participation by service recipients from underrepresented groups in decision-making is introduced as an intervention that potentially interrupts patterns that produce inequality. The second essay focuses on the relationship between participation by underrepresented service recipients and achievement of service delivery goals. The Math Coaching Program (MCP), a participatory, student-centered learning program, serves as a case study to explore the relationship between student participation in classroom decision-making and student test scores. Estimates using a cross-classified, multi-level model indicate that the MCP is positively related to black student test scores. The results suggest that researchers and practitioners should further explore programs that elicit participation from underrepresented groups to reduce inequality that arises as the government delivers services. The third essay explores the relationship between organizational culture and the implementation of participatory programs by analyzing the relationship between teachers’ perceived school culture and their ability to implement the MCP. Results from a survey and teachers’ responses to open-ended questions suggest that teachers who reported belonging to schools with more collaborative cultures were better able to implement the MCP. This research indicates that organizational culture may be relevant to policymakers and administrators who wish to implement participatory programs. The fourth essay constructs a systems model, based upon the Bass Diffusion Model (Bass, 1963), that can be used to understand the complexity of MCP implementation. The model is holistic and captures interdependencies among its elements, including feedback dynamics. Moreover, the model provides a space for service providers to test their assumptions regarding the best ways to implement the MCP.

Committee:

Anand Desai (Advisor); Charlotte Kirschner (Committee Member); Jill Bystydzienski (Committee Member); Patricia Brosnan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education Policy; Public Administration; Public Policy

Keywords:

Underrepresentation; participation; education policy; race

Ogundimu, Adedayo The Perceptions of Students and Faculty on the Potential Impact of University-Industry Collaborations on Quality Assurance in Two Nigerian-Publicly Supported Universities
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2016, Educational Administration (Education)
The National Universities Commission (NUC) has observed that the quality and focus of training offered by Nigerian universities in recent times are not in tune with the needs of the country. Studies have also reiterated the above problems as well as their causes. These include decline in real value of government budgetary allocations for higher education; compromised university autonomy; deterioration of physical structures; incessant student and faculty strikes as well as the lack of modern teaching, learning and research resources. It has thus become necessary for Nigerian universities to consider the possibility of collaborating with industries for research and innovation as one of the feasible means of boosting their access to teaching, research and learning resources. This non-experimental, quantitative research used a questionnaire survey to collect data from students and faculty of two publicly-supported Federal Universities in Nigeria with a view to examining the perceptions of the participants on the potential impact of university-industry collaborations on quality assurance in the universities. Collected data was analyzed using the SPSS Version 21 software to run appropriate statistical tests and to count, classify and explain the perceptions of all the participants with respect to each of the research questions. Findings show that university-industry collaborations in general hold good potential impact for quality assurance with regard to the facilitation of access to teaching and learning resources. With regard to higher education policy and practice, it is recommended that future studies be conducted with the aim of putting in place a modality for developing frameworks for a national scholar-practitioner policy on preparation, purpose and practice. Such a platform could encourage publicly-supported universities to partner with industry while at the same time meeting the challenges of carrying out collaborative action research and innovation activities aimed at arriving at a national agenda for human capital development and economic growth.

Committee:

Emmanuel Jean Francois, Ph.D. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

African Studies; Comparative; Education; Educational Leadership; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Public Administration; School Administration

Keywords:

University and Industry Collaborations; Potential Impact; Quality Assurance; Nigerian Publicly supported Universities

Uko, Okon EdetPerceived farm management educational needs of part-time and small scale farmers in selected Ohio counties
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1985, Agricultural and Extension Education

Many part-time and small scale farmers (PT/ST) have been facing problems in farming. To help solve these problems, this study was conducted to determine the farm management educational needs of PT/SF within selected Ohio counties. The following objectives were pursued: (1) To describe PT/SF on the basis of their demographic characteristics; (2) To determine the farm management educational needs of PT/SF in this study; (3) To determine the relationship between the demographic characteristics and the computed farm management educational needs of PT/SF studied; and (4) To determine if the farm management educational needs of PT/SF in non-commercial counties were significantly different from that of PT/SF in commercial counties. This study was a descriptive survey research. The target population was the PT/SF in selected Ohio counties. An appropriate sample (Elliott, 1980), for a 95 percent confidence level and a 5 percent margin of error was selected. The instrument used to contact PT/SF in this study was a researcher-developed mailed questionnaire which employed a summated (Likert-type) scale for the measurement of the perceived educational needs of farmers. Findings revealed the four most needed areas of farm management education by PT/SF in the study as being: (1) farm tax management; (2) marketing farm products; (3) determining farm insurance needs; and (4) farm recordkeeping.

Within these four categories of educational needs, the 12 most needed competencies were prioritized to include: (1) determination of how local inheritance tax is paid; (2) determination of when to market products; (3) filing of the appropriate tax forms; (4) analysis of methods of marketing products; (5) interpretation of market reports; (6) making a state income tax return; (7) comparison of storage cost with selling at harvest; (8) determination of how to report federal income tax; (9) determination of the appropriate tax preparatory procedures; (10) determination of what property to insure; (11) following product price trends; and (12) determination of the appropriate time to insure.

Findings also revealed that the majority of PT/SF were males who operated model farms of 50-150 acres for 11 or more years, and were between 35-44 years of age. They were high school graduates who had principally produced crops.

Committee:

Larry E. Miller (Advisor)

Subjects:

Public Administration

Hann, Charlesa AnneCitizen Participation in Health Policy Agenda-setting: Perceptions of Those Influencing Policy
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2013, Urban Studies and Public Affairs
This study explored the experiences and perceptions of citizen participation in health policy agenda-setting held by those citizens most likely to influence the health policy process: legislators and health policy advocates. Findings from a review of the literature regarding previous studies of the process of citizen participation were used to guide a qualitative research project in North Carolina. A case study approach was employed to facilitate an in-depth exploration of the meanings and perceptions of legislative members of the North Carolina General Assembly and Executive Directors of health policy advocacy organizations in North Carolina. Using a non-probability sampling procedure, study participants of the legislative case type were purposefully selected based upon membership in legislative committees and sponsorship of particular legislation, and recruited on a volunteer basis. Study participants of the other case type – Directors of health policy organizations and health programs – were recruited by referral. This interconnected system possesses behaviors and attitudes that impact the process of citizen participation in health policy decisions. Cases were interviewed, using a semi-structured format to identify common themes regarding citizen participation in healthcare policy decision-making and agenda- setting. A total of thirteen (six legislators and seven health activists) interviews were completed: five were in-person and eight were telephone interviews. Categories of text from the interviews were analyzed for content and themes, using a holistic analysis approach. A detailed description of each case and themes within the case (within-case analysis) and thematic analysis (cross-case analysis) permitted interpretive assertions of the lessons learned. This study revealed that the attitudes and perceptions of political actors (both case types) in North Carolina impact the methods in which citizens participate and the input of their participation in health policy decisions.

Committee:

Raymond Cox III, Dr. (Advisor); Ghazi Falah, Dr. (Advisor); Namkyung Oh, Dr. (Committee Member); Lawrence Keller, Dr. (Committee Member); Kathryn Feltey, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health Care; Public Administration; Public Policy

Keywords:

Citizen Participation; Health Policy; Perceptions and Attitudes of Legislators

Russell, Blair DavidExamining the Barriers to Public Assistance Take-Up: Evidence from a Foreclosure Mitigation Program in Ohio
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Public Policy and Management
This work examines the issue of take-up of social assistance in the context of a case study of a foreclosure-mitigation program in Ohio known as Restoring Stability. The successful implementation of public assistance programs depends on a wide variety of factors, which have been the subject of much speculation, research, and debate within the field of Public Affairs. The important role of take-up in programmatic success has been relatively overlooked in the literature to date. The main contribution of this research is that take-up is not conceived of as a one-time, dichotomous choice on the part of potential beneficiaries as to whether to participate in an assistance program or not, but rather it is an iterated series of choices and actions on the part of eligible individuals and program administrators. Building on the work of Heckman and Smith (2004), it is argued here that a simple measure of the take-up rate which captures only the percentage of the total eligible population who participate in the program does not convey any information about the specific barriers to participation and, thus, is of little assistance to public administrators tasked with maximizing take-up. Instead, it is useful to decompose the take-up process into its component stages: eligibility, awareness, application, acceptance, and enrollment. This work examines several of the barriers to participation that appear at these stages and, unlike most work on the subject, assumes that administrative decisions and program design play an important role in establishing such barriers. Awareness of programs is not exogenously determined but, as least partially, is the result of program outreach and marketing efforts. As such, lessons can be taken from the for-profit marketing literature. Similarly, the application stage is not as straightforward is it is often assumed, and potential beneficiaries can face real costs in deciding whether or not to apply for program assistance. Finally, program administrators tasked with assisting applicants work through the application process can play a role in ensuring that the process is a successful one. This dissertation empirically investigates the factors involved in moving through several barriers in the take-up process. With regard to the awareness stage, it is found that some marketing efforts, such as direct mail initiatives and television advertising, can lead to greater registration numbers, which is used here as a proxy for awareness due to the low transaction costs of registering. In terms of the application process, it is found that program registrants who reside closer to application intake agencies, and thus experience lower transaction costs related to applying, are more likely to apply. Finally, with regard to the role played by front-line administrators, it is found that assignment to different counseling agencies was associated with different success rates of receiving funding. This speculative work suggests that further research is needed in order to decompose the role of front-line administrators in the take-up process.

Committee:

Robert Greenbaum (Committee Chair); Stephanie Moulton (Committee Member); Jason Seligman (Committee Member); Holly Holtzen (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration; Public Policy

Keywords:

Take-up; Social Assistance; Foreclosure Mitigation; Hardest Hit Fund; Public Marketing; Transaction Costs

Holland, James MichaelCompeting in a Confined Arena
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2013, Urban Studies and Public Affairs
This study asks: Can the Cobb and Elder model (1972) of agenda setting be applied to policy making in the United States: If so, does the Reagan presidency provide a case study sufficient for studying this theory: This study takes an empirical look at Reagan’s tax policy and drug policy and draws conclusions based on Reagan’s attempts to shape the agenda for these two policies. The Cobb and Elder model focuses on the ability of a political actor to set the agenda. This study draws on their theory by focusing on two of Reagan’s policies, tax policy and drug policy. The study finds that Reagan uses six themes to address both taxes and drugs but finds it difficult to reinforce the dominant narrative. The study also finds that complexity and concreteness are large factors in the policy discussion.

Committee:

Raymond Cox III, Dr. (Advisor); Daniel Coffey, Dr. (Committee Member); Michael Spicer, Dr. (Committee Member); Ghazi-Walid Falah, Dr. (Committee Member); Namkyung Oh, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Administration

Keywords:

Presidency, Administration, Reagan, Agenda Setting, Theory

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