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Briney, Carol EMy Journey with Prisoners: Perceptions, Observations and Opinions
MLS, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Liberal Studies Program
Carol E. Briney is the founding executive director of Reentry Bridge Network, Inc. and Reentry Solutions, Inc. Briney believes that a systematic approach is required to reduce the likelihood of recidivisim. For nearly a decade, she has written and facilitated holistic pro-social programs inside prisons and in community forums. Her programs support bridging the gap between prison and community by focusing on human value, grief-impairment, daily literacy, reentry and job readiness, trauma-informed care, the healing arts, and understanding poverty. Briney's work is founded on her strong belief - If we can’t help people to realize their own universal value, how can we expect them to see the value in their victims or their environment? This is gained through asset building, not punitive action. It takes community to reduce recidivism.

Committee:

Richard Berrong, PhD (Advisor); Clare Stacey, PhD (Committee Member); Manacy Pai, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Studies; Aging; Art Criticism; Art Education; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Black History; Black Studies; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Communication; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Criminology; Cultural Anthropology; Cultural Resources Management; Curriculum Development; Developmental Psychology; Divinity; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Tests and Measurements; Elementary Education; Evolution and Development; Experimental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Fine Arts; Forensic Anthropology; Gender Studies; Gerontology; Individual and Family Studies; Inservice Training; Instructional Design; Journalism; Kinesiology; Language; Linguistics; Literacy; Logic; Mental Health; Metaphysics; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern History; Modern Literature; Occupational Psychology; Organizational Behavior; Pastoral Counseling; Peace Studies; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Personality Psychology; Philosophy; Political Science; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Administration; Public Policy; Religion; Religious Education; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Social Research; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociolinguistics; Sociology; Spirituality; Teacher Education; Theology; Urban Planning; Vocational Education; Welfare; Womens Studies

Keywords:

prison; reentry; trauma; poverty; grounded theory; universal value; punitive; recidivism; corrections; Retablo; play therapy; male prisoners; female prisoners; socio-metaphysics; grief-impairment; grief and loss; truth-telling; poverty; hood; prison art

Hall, Tracy D.Internet-based Family Therapy from the Perspective of the Therapist: A Qualitative Inquiry
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2013, Counselor Education and Supervision-Marriage and Family Therapy
The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to learn more about the process of Internet-based Family Therapy and to discover the advantages and disadvantages of using Internet-based Family Therapy as part of a practice. The overarching question asked, “How do therapists experience the phenomenon of Internet-based Family Therapy?” The sub-questions were: (1) How is Internet-based Family Therapy defined by therapists claiming to do it? (2) What are the presenting issues for Internet-based Family Therapy going forward? Heuristic Inquiry was used for data collection and analysis. Five participants were interviewed using online text-chat. Each participant had experience doing Internet-based Family Therapy and appropriate credentials. The core themes discovered were as follows: (1) The sites may be deemed not truly therapeutic. (2) The use of video is highly recommended in Internet-based Family Therapy. (3) More severe clients are contraindicated for Internet-based Family Therapy. (4) Face-to-face Family Therapy is better than Internet-based Family Therapy, however Internet-based Family Therapy is better than nothing. (5) The use of theory in Internet-based Family Therapy is much the same as in face-to-face Family Therapy. (6) The main concerns with Internet-based Family Therapy are confidentiality, crossing state lines & harm to self. A final interview dealt with Ethical dilemmas in Internet-based Family Therapy, Internet-based Family Therapy standards, limitations of Internet-based Family Therapy and handling harm to self or others when doing Internet-based Family Therapy. The findings are discussed, as well as considerations for therapists and directions for future research are suggested.

Committee:

Karin Jordan, Dr. (Advisor); Suzanne Mac Donald, Dr. (Committee Member); Cynthia Reynolds, Dr. (Committee Member); Linda Perosa, Dr. (Committee Member); Rebecca Boyle, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Counseling Psychology; Educational Psychology; Educational Technology; Experimental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Individual and Family Studies; Personal Relationships; Personality Psychology; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Social Psychology; Social Research; Technology; Therapy

Keywords:

Internet; Internet-based; online; on-line; family therapy; therapy; counseling; psychology; internet therapy; internet counseling; online therapy; online counseling; online family counseling; internet family counseling; distance therapy; video therapy

Leichtman, RobinMen Making Meaning of Eating Disorders: A Qualitative Study
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2015, College of Education and Human Services
There is a stark contrast between the research and published accounts reflecting women’s experiences in coping with an eating disorder in comparison to men’s narratives. Because of this, many medical and mental health providers do not consider an eating disorder as a possible diagnosis when men present with symptoms associated with an eating disorder. This notion was confirmed by Menstuff® (2012), who reported men are often not diagnosed and/or are embarrassed by being diagnosed with an eating disorder because eating disorders have become more associated with a problem women or gay men experience. Assumptions that eating disorders are a female or gay disease need to be disputed to relay the reality that eating disorders are nondiscriminatory. It is necessary to create a safe path for men to seek treatment. According to Andersen, Cohn, and Holbrook (2000), men account for one in six eating disorder cases. The intention of this dissertation is to give voice and provide insight into the males’ experiences. The main research question of this dissertation is, “how do men make meaning, from etiology to recovery, of their experience in having an eating disorder?” The six men who participated in this dissertation research helped answer that question by telling their stories. While I cannot generalize these findings into the general male population, the stories of these six participants contributes to the literature in understanding how men experience acquiring an eating disorder, the treatment process, and the recovery/maintenance stage. This dissertation study further explored understanding the interdependence between self-concept and eating disorders. A treatment protocol focused on treating symptoms can often threaten the psychotherapeutic relationship and prevent the patient from becoming wholly healthy. Rogers (1951) theorized that the more aware and accepting an individual is about all parts of self, the clearer, integrated, and actualized a person’s self-perception will become. A holistic approach recognizes the multidimensional overlapping of fluid energy between body, mind, and spirit and restores vitality. According to Gestalt theory, “change does not take place by trying coercion, or persuasion, or by insight, interpretation, or any other such means. Rather, change can occur when the [client] abandons, at least for the moment, what he would like to become and attempts to be what he is” (Beisser, 1970, p. 77). In other words, the potential for change occurs when individuals find compassion and acceptance for self. My findings suggest that treatment interventions, like exploring the client’s context and contact style, could assist individuals in developing a healthier self-concept whereby eating disorder symptoms would dissipate and organic self-regulating processes would be restored by way of a dialogic relationship that goes beyond correcting behavior.

Committee:

Sarah Toman, PhD (Committee Chair); Catherine Hansman, PhD (Committee Member); Kathryn MacCluskie, PhD (Committee Member); Brian Harper, PhD (Committee Member); David Prybock, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Health; Health Care; Individual and Family Studies; Medicine; Mental Health; Personality Psychology; Physiological Psychology; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Health; Social Psychology; Social Work; Sociology; Therapy

Keywords:

Eating Disorders, Men with Eating Disorders, Males with Eating Disorders, Self-Concept, Gestalt Approach, Holistic Approach, Qualitative, Phenomenological

Hickey, Chris L.The Phenomenal Characteristics of the Son-Father Relationship Experience
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2013, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine what the son-father relationship experience feels like (the phenomenology of the son-father relationship), and how the relationship experience affects leadership development, specifically in the son. I chose to reverse the order of the typical reference on this topic (father-son) in order to emphasize the significance of the son (role) being the central character or object of interest, even in instances where the character is a father in addition to being a son. Additionally, it should be noted that all fathers are sons, but not all sons are fathers (biologically, and/or socially, and/or conceptually). My central research question is: How is leadership development influenced by the phenomenological characteristics of the son-father relationship experience? I address this question through a series of interviews with adolescent boys age 17 and men between 18 and 45 years of age. The foundation of my interview protocol is built on a series of theory-based questions (Wengraf, 2001) that are outlined below. Analysis of these interviews is presented along with a comparative review of the scholarly literature on leadership development in adolescents. The primary value of this research is its applicability to youth leadership development programs with respect to the potential to add an emphasis on values and practices that cultivate healthy sustainable relationships that are consistent with responsible and effective parent involvement and planning, family leadership, and community support. While there is considerable consideration being acknowledged to an anecdotal connection between how boys are, or should be, affected by the leadership qualities of their fathers, very little was articulated about how the participants felt their own leadership development was influenced by the relationship experience, particularly juxtaposed to the amount of attention the participants spent on describing their feelings and emotions about their son-father relationship experience. In this respect, what is particularly noteworthy is the richness of the interviews with respect to the participant’s accounts of the phenomenal characteristics of the son-father relationship experience, including how sons articulate their feelings about the relationship, at and over time. This dissertation is accompanied by an Author’s Introduction supplemental file [mp4]. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Philomena Essed, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Holloway, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Michael J. Diamond, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Toby Miller, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; Asian American Studies; Behavioral Psychology; Black Studies; Cognitive Psychology; Communication; Counseling Education; Developmental Psychology; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Elementary Education; Ethnic Studies; Experimental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Gender Studies; Hispanic American Studies; Individual and Family Studies; Literacy; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Personality; Personality Psychology; Philosophy; Preschool Education; Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Research; Social Structure; Social Studies Education; Social Work; Sociology; Special Education

Keywords:

Phenomenal Characteristics; Phenomenology; Father-son relationship; Leadership Development; Adolescents; Family leadership; Leadership Qualities; Fathers; Feelings; Emotions; Male Development; Attachment Theory; Father Hunger

Keirsey, Stacie RaeExperiences of Neurotypical Siblings of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Qualitative Exploration
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
In recent years, the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been on the rise, prompting a simultaneous increase in scientific study regarding cause, impact, and intervention (Hughes, 2009; Ravindran & Myers, 2012). Research has proposed advances in the treatment of the individuals diagnosed and focused efforts on scholastic, parental, and professional intervention and supports. However, the siblings of ASD children have largely been neglected in this scientific investigation. The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study was to explore neurotypical siblings’ experiences in living with a child diagnosed with ASD. Seven adolescents were selected using criterion, convenience, and snowball sampling. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and were analyzed using thematic reflection (van Manen, 1990). Data analysis uncovered seven themes: (a) personal impact, (b) familial impact, (c) social impact, (d) relational understanding, (e) socio-cultural influence, (f) future outlook, and (g) advice. Findings indicated neurotypical sibling experiences contain both positive and negative perceptions of living with a brother or sister diagnosed with ASD. Perceptions were often influenced by the cultural and societal value placed upon normal behaviors. The need for appropriate education regarding ASD etiology, symptomology, and treatment was deemed to be important for NTD siblings, parents, professionals, and society at large. Additionally, the development of social supports for NTD siblings was suggested.

Committee:

Mary Wieneke, Ph. D. (Committee Chair); Steve Curtis, Ph. D. (Committee Member); Ned Farley, Ph. D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Early Childhood Education; Families and Family Life; Personal Relationships; Personality; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Social Psychology; Special Education

Keywords:

Autism Spectrum Disorder; Developmental Disorder; Sibling; Adolescent; Teenager; Hermeneutic; Phenomenology; Qualitative; Interview; Exploratory; Intervention; Family; Relationship; Relational; Advice; Education; Impact; Support

Tackett, D. PatriciaResilience Factors Affecting the Readjustment of National Guard Soldiers Returning From Deployment
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2011, Antioch Santa Barbara: Clinical Psychology
Following the September 11, 2001 attack on the United States, there has been increased utilization of the Reserve Components (RC) by the military to fight the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Service members in the National Guard and Reserve (NG/R) represent approximately 40% of the forces involved in these conflicts. Current research indicates that NG/R personnel and their families may be at greater risk to deployment stressors than their Active Component counterparts. Estimates for the development of mental health problems including PTSD among returning RC personnel, range as high as 42%. The focus of this study was to advance the identification of factors that minimize the negative effects of experience in a combat environment, and promote healthy reintegration of military personnel back into society. This research examined self-efficacy, social support, and spirituality with regard to their effects on service members' symptoms of PTSD and levels of resilience subsequent to deployment. Self-report questionnaire data were collected from 223 California Army National Guard soldiers between six to eighteen months following their return from Iraq or Afghanistan. Consistent with previous research, findings showed that the level of combat exposure was the most salient factor predictive of PTSD. Self-efficacy had a small positive effect on PTSD, yet social support and spirituality were not significant. When examining the determinants for resilience, higher levels of self-efficacy, social support, and spirituality were associated with higher levels of resilience, although combat exposure retained a negative influence. Significant differences were found between soldiers who were still under a service commitment with eight years or fewer in the military, and those with more than eight years time in service. The results of this study are encouraging for developing programs designed to better prepare NG/R soldiers for deployment. Implications for future research and military training are discussed. An electronic version of this is available in the open-access OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Michele Harway, PhD (Committee Chair); Barbara Lipinski, PhD, JD (Committee Member); Dawne Vogt, PhD (Committee Member); Chris Howard, PsyD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Armed Forces; Behavioral Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Military Studies; Neurobiology; Personal Relationships; Physiological Psychology; Psychology; Social Psychology; Spirituality

Keywords:

Self-efficacy; Social Support; Spirituality; Resilience; Combat; Posttraumatic Stress Disorder; National Guard; Reserve Components; Military; Deployment; Iraq; Afghanistan; Operation Iraqi Freedom; Operation Enduring Freedom; OEF; OIF

Hartman, Lynne IA Narrative Study of Emotions Associated with Negative Childhood Experiences Reported in the Adult Attachment Interview
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2015, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
Attachment patterns, which tend to be stable over time, are passed from one generation to the next. Secure attachment has been linked to adaptive social functioning and has been identified as a protective factor against mental illness. The parents’ state of mind with regard to attachment—as measured with the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) (Main, Goldwyn, & Hesse, 2002)—predicts the attachment classification for the infant in Ainsworth’s Strange Situation Procedure (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978). Earned-secure individuals have overcome negative childhood experiences to achieve a secure state of mind in adulthood. Earned security, like continuous security, strongly predicts infant security in the next generation. Preoccupied anger is one of the main constructs measured in the AAI that may lead to classification of an insecure, preoccupied state of mind. The current study was an analysis of the narratives of eight individuals whose AAIs indicated mild to high scores for preoccupied anger. All of these individuals have spent considerable energy and resources in grappling with negative childhood experiences. Participants were interviewed regarding how their feelings changed over time and what, if any, events contributed to how their feelings changed. For most participants, the emergence of sustained subjective anger was reported in late adolescence, or even adulthood. Those whose transcripts were judged earned-secure at the time of the study were associated with narratives that indicated progressive gains in Hoffman’s (2008) stages of empathy and Perry’s (1968) scheme for intellectual and ethical development. Reappraisal was identified as a key emotional regulation strategy that contributed to security. Supports for executive function also featured as important factors in the attainment of therapeutic goals. Attachment researchers may be especially interested that Hoffman’s stages emerged as a possible link between metacognitive processes for earned- and continuous-secure individuals alike. In contrast, the study’s findings regarding integrative processes associated with post-formal cognitive development, and mediators for implicit learning as predictors of behavior, suggest that earned security may be a different construct from continuous security. The results of this study hold important implications for treatment and social policy. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Patricia Linn, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Alejandra Suarez, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Judith Glass-Collins, Ph.D., R.D.T., T.E.P. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Cognitive Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Health; Health Sciences; Individual and Family Studies; Mental Health; Neurosciences; Personal Relationships; Personality; Personality Psychology; Psychological Tests; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Social Psychology; Social Work; Spirituality; Therapy

Keywords:

attachment; earned security; earned-secure; psychodrama; anger; childhood development; adult development; therapy; personality development; Adult Attachment Interview; narrative; angry preoccupation

Bonnett, Heather RExploring the Relationship between Ego Development and Mental Health
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2016, College of Education and Human Services
The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between ego identity in adults (ego development), symptoms of psychological distress, and self-esteem. Ego identity was operationalized using Loevinger’s (1976) stage theory of ego development, further modified by Cook-Greuter (1994; 2010). The test used to measure ego development was the Sentence Completion Test Integral (SCTi). Symptoms of mental disorders or psychological distress were measured using Derogatis’ (1994) Symptom Checklist 90 Revised (SCL-90-Revised). Self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). It has been thought there would be noticeable differences in the relationship between ego development and the types of psychological symptoms or between ego development and self-esteem but no studies have been done to explore this (Cook-Greuter, personal communication, 2016). In summary, my hypotheses were that graduate students would have later ego development than the norms for the general population, that participants at conventional stages of ego development would report different psychological symptoms than participants at later stages of ego development, that participants in this sample who score at post-conventional levels of ego development would report more depression while those at conventional levels of ego development would endorse more anxiety, and that participants at post-conventional stage of ego development would report higher self-esteem than those at conventional levels of ego development. In this study, ego development functioned as a non-metric (ordinal) variable studied in comparison to two ratio variables (psychological symptoms endorsed and self-esteem). The SCTi tests were scored by professional raters certified by Cook-Greuter and Associates. The SCL-90-R and Rosenberg self-esteem scale were scored by the researcher and the dissertation director. Analysis of variance of all study variables was run by ego development level. Also, a process called data imputation was conducted to see if the trend-level results of the analysis would have been stronger with a larger sample. Though it was not one of my hypotheses, subjects at so-called “transitional” ego stages reported a broader array of psychological symptoms than subjects at so-called “stable” stages of ego development.

Committee:

Elliot Ingersoll, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Brian Harper, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ann Galletta, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kathryn MacCluskie, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Stephen Slane, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Sarah Toman, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Research; Sociology

Clarfield, Cynthia E“You’re Doing Fine, Right?”: Adolescent Siblings of Substance Abusers
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
There has been a rising interest in addiction medicine and addiction treatment in both the medical and behavioral health science fields. Research suggests having a family member with a substance abuse problem has negative impacts on both physical and mental health (Orford, Copello, Velleman, & Templeton, 2010a). Despite advances toward understanding the experiences of family members affected by a loved one’s addiction, the siblings of substance abusers have been largely excluded from scientific research and literature. As a result, little is known about how siblings experience the impacts of a brother or sister’s addiction; even less is known about the experiences of adolescent siblings sharing a home with a substance-abusing sibling. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of and meanings made by adolescents living with the phenomenon of a sibling’s addiction. Five adolescents participated in a semi-structured interview exploring the question: What is it like to be the brother or sister of a person with a substance abuse problem? Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to analyze data and six themes were identified: personal impact; familial impact; social impact; coping strategies; shared ways of knowing, being, and seeing; and ways of understanding. The results indicated siblings experience profound emotional and relational impacts, which include stress, anxiety, sadness, and anger as a result of the trauma, betrayal, and grief associated with a sibling’s substance abuse. Experiences of invalidation within the family and stigmatization within the community were associated with strained relationships and increased isolation. A comparison of the results to existing research on adult siblings of substance abusers revealed the negative impacts experienced by adolescent siblings of substance abusers continue into adulthood. Participants’ ability to identify and describe these negative impacts directly contributes to the health care field’s current dearth of data on the subject. Results challenge the misconception that siblings of substance abusers are “doing fine” and highlight an opportunity for researchers and treatment providers to expand their knowledge of this largely underrepresented population. Participants’ perspectives on expanding interventions for affected family members to include the siblings of substance abusers are also discussed. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohio Link ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Mary Wieneke, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jane Harmon-Jacobs, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Barbara Lui, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Phil Cushman, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Health Care; Health Education; Health Sciences; Mental Health; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Health; Public Health Education; School Counseling; Social Psychology; Social Research; Social Work; Therapy

Keywords:

Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis; IPA; adolescence; siblings; addiction; substance use; substance abuse; siblings of substance users; siblings of substance abusers; siblings of addicts

Foster, Hiram S.Functions of Mentoring as Christian Discipleship
Bachelor of Science of Communication Studies (BSC), Ohio University, 2014, Communication Studies
Mentoring has always been defined as a relationship consisting of only two attributes: psychosocial support and instrumental support. This study attempted to develop and refine the old definition of mentoring by adding three more attributes: development, hierarchy, and mutuality. Three hypotheses stated that mentoring relationships will differ according to the presence or absence of each of the new attributes (hierarchy, development, and mutuality). One research question asked how each of the five attributes affected the mentee's valuation of the mentoring relationship. A second research question asked how mentees described their mentoring relationships with respect to each of the five attributes. The sample population were students involved with Cru, a Christian organization for college students. Mixed-methods research collected qualitative with semi-structured interviews and quantitative data with an online survey. The psychosocial and developmental attributes accounted for 55% of the variance in evaluations of mentoring relationships, demonstrating how a personal relationship with the mentee is fundamental for successful mentoring. In the interviews, mentees described all five attributes and their effect upon the relationship. The five attributes are interconnected and interdependent; each attribute affects other attributes and the entire relationship. Concluded that the old definition of mentoring is insufficient; more research should be conducted about the three new attributes for further evidence of their necessity.

Committee:

Anita James, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Behaviorial Sciences; Bible; Biblical Studies; Communication; Counseling Psychology; Education; Educational Psychology; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Occupational Psychology; Pastoral Counseling; Personal Relationships; Personality Psychology; Psychological Tests; Psychotherapy; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; School Counseling; Social Psychology; Social Research; Spirituality; Teaching

Keywords:

mentoring; Cru; Campus Crusade for Christ; Christianity; discipleship; psychosocial; instrumental; student mentoring; development; hierarchy; mutuality; multifactor leadership; questionnaire; friendship; mentee; mentor; interpersonal; leadership; protege

Miller, Renee CatherineReflections of the Insanity Defense in German Literature: Enlightenment to Expressionism
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2014, German
The insanity defense is a controversial practice that has developed over time in the Western world. This controversy is especially seen in the general public's attitude, which seems to lag behind legal and medical developments of the insanity defense and mental illness. The introduction gives an overview of the legal developments of the insanity defense in the Western world, providing a comparison between Germany and the U.S. In order to fully investigate the notion of criminal insanity in German literature, this thesis will take a close look at Faust by Goethe (enlightenment period, 1808), Der Sandmann by ETA Hoffmann (romanticism period, 1816), Bahnwarter Thiel by Gerhard Hauptmann (naturalism, 1888), and Die Blendung by Elias Canetti (expressionism, 1935). This thesis will demonstrate how the literary view of insanity develops from considering it almost a metaphysical issue (Goethe); to an artistic/demonic possession in the case of Hoffmann; to a force of nature (Thiel); to a Freudian (or anti-Freudian) perspective with Canetti. Gretchen, one of the main characters in Goethe's Faust, suffers from a bout of insanity at the end of the novel, killing her mother and drowning her child. In Hoffmann's Der Sandmann, Nathanael experiences a downward spiral into insanity during the course of his life. Similar experiences are witnessed in Hauptmann's Thiel and Canetti's Peter Kien in Die Blendung. However, for Thiel, the loss of his son leads him to murder his second wife and child, while Kien commits suicide at the end after setting fire to his library. Parallels can clearly be seen between literature and criminal law as the insanity defense has developed over these time periods. The thesis concludes with another brief look at current public attitudes towards the insanity defense, ending with the thought that even though our Western society has come a long way in the way of legal and medical developments since the Enlightenment, the public's view seems, at times, to have not changed along with these recent developments.

Committee:

Kristie Foell, Dr. (Advisor); Geoffrey Howes, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Biology; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Counseling Psychology; Criminology; European History; European Studies; Foreign Language; Germanic Literature; International Law; Language; Law; Legal Studies; Literature; Personality; Personality Psychology; Romance Literature; Social Psychology; Social Research

Keywords:

Goethe; Faust; Hoffmann; Sandmann; Hauptmann; Thiel; Canetti; die Blendung; insanity defense; insanity; madness; german literature; mental illness

Glenda, Toneff-Cotner E.Transformation or Tragedy? A Retrospective Phenomenological Study of School Closure
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2015, College of Education and Human Services
School closure has become an accepted method of school reform policy as outlined in federal legislation found in The No Child Left Behind Act. The academic literature regarding school closure is limited and tends to be quantitative in design, focusing on the relationship between student achievement and school closure and/or student transitions. Qualitative studies around this topic have only recently emerged, focusing on the immediate impact of school closure and transition. There is a need for a retrospective study, reflecting on the long-term effects of school closure on individuals and their communities, as told by the students who experienced it. This study seeks to understand the experience of DeVilbiss students who attended the high school in the year its closure was announced, and who transitioned to a neighboring high school for the 1991-1992 school year. Using semi-structured interviews to explore issues related to transitions, the study will examine identity, social capital, relational trust, community connectedness and engagement, school and community pride, tradition, and the sense of belonging. The study will offer insight into the long-term effects of school closure, particularly through the eyes of those who experienced the closing of DeVilbiss High School. The study has implications for current and future policy decisions.

Committee:

Anne Galletta, Ph.D (Committee Chair); Joanne Goodell, Ph.D (Committee Member); Marius Boboc, Ph.D (Committee Member); Brian Harper, Ph.D (Committee Member); Leigh Chiarelott, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Economic Theory; Education; Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Psychology; Public Policy; School Administration; School Counseling; School Finance; Social Psychology; Social Research; Sociology; Sustainability; Teacher Education; Urban Planning

Keywords:

Disaster Capitalism; Human Capital; No Child Left Behind Act; Place Attachment; Place Identity; Privatization of Education; Race to the Top; School Choice; School Closure; School Transition; Social Capital; Systems Thinking; Urban Renewal; White Flight

Kwon, Julie HWHAT ARE THE EXPERIENCES OF SOUTH KOREAN IMMIGRANT PARENTS WHO HAVE A CHILD WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER
PHD, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Health Sciences
The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of South Korean immigrant parents who have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The participants in this study were interviewed utilizing the phenomenological qualitative research method. The participants were asked to answer semi-structure open-ended questions throughout two to three interviews. The participants in this study were six South Korean immigrant parents, ages 36-48, of children who have been diagnosed with ASD. The results of this study suggest five major themes supported by the data provided by each participant. The themes were: a) Familial support during adjustment, b) Religion and spirituality, c) Guilt and shame over diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, d) Bitterness, and e) Cultural differences during adjustment. More details were covered under each sub-theme of the major themes. Further research should be completed in order to study more South Korean immigrant parents from different parts of the country. The research can also extend to other Asian and minority populations, such as Chinese and Japanese immigrants, who share the same views of shame, guilt, and embarrassment toward individuals with special needs.

Committee:

Jason McGlothlin (Committee Co-Chair); Steve Rainey (Committee Co-Chair); Maureen Blankemeyer (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Asian American Studies; Asian Studies; Behavioral Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Early Childhood Education; Education; Educational Psychology; Mental Health; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Special Education; Teacher Education; Therapy

Keywords:

South Korean; autism; immigrant; immigration; adjustment; acculturation; special needs; phenomenological; qualitative; autism spectrum disorder; bi-culturalism; parent experiences; Korean;

Pack, Jessica SpencerEffect of Localized Temperature Change on Vigilance Performance
Master of Science (MS), Wright State University, 2015, Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology MS
This study examined the influence of localized temperature change on vigilance performance. Additionally, the effect of stressor appraisals on the relationship between localized temperature change and vigilance performance was investigated. A total of 36 male and female participants between the ages of 18 and 45 completed a stressor appraisal scale before completing a 40-minute simulated air traffic control vigilance task. Depending on the condition, either a hot, cold, or neutral temperature change was induced using a thermoelectric pad and blanket 20 minutes into the vigilance task. Although localized temperature change did not have a significant effect on vigilance performance 25-30 minutes into the task, those who were randomly assigned to the cold condition did experience a significant reduction in their vigilance decrement over time when compared to the neutral condition. Participants were classified as challenged or threatened, depending on their task appraisals. A marginally significant main effect of stressor appraisals on vigilance performance was observed. Challenged individuals appeared to perform better over time than threatened individuals. Although a moderating effect was not observed, these results suggest that individually both localized temperature change and stressor appraisals tend to influence vigilance performance over time.

Committee:

Tamera Schneider, Ph.D. (Advisor); Kevin Bennett, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Lloyd Tripp, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Climate Change; Cognitive Psychology; Experimental Psychology; Personality Psychology; Physiological Psychology; Psychobiology; Psychology

Keywords:

vigilance; temperature; stressor appraisals; challenge; threat

Williams, Jaclyn HardestyThe Relationship of Trauma Severity, Rumination, and Restructured Core Beliefs to Posttraumatic Growth
Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.), Xavier University, 2015, Psychology
Exposure to trauma is a pervasive problem that can result in a myriad of symptoms and pathologies and affects individuals across all demographics. Following trauma exposure, some individuals reconstructed their world views, sought meaning and experienced the phenomenon of posttraumatic growth (PTG). Undergraduate participants (N=106, Mage= 20.75) were recruited to complete phase 1, which was an online, 15 minute questionnaire. Participants who acknowledged trauma exposure completed phase 2, which consisted of four additional measures. Ninety-three participants (87.7%) reported exposure to at least one traumatic event. The sample’s multiple correlation coefficient was .78, indicating that approximately 60% of the variance of PTG was accounted for by the linear combination of the predictors of trauma severity, core beliefs, and degree of intrusive and deliberate rumination. Deliberate rumination and core beliefs were both positive correlated with and accounted for significant variance of PTG; trauma severity was not a significant predictor. A follow-up exploratory analysis revealed that deliberate rumination (when entered without trauma severity and core beliefs) accounted for 53% of the variance of PTG. These results coupled with results from an exploratory analysis provided insight that deliberate rumination is a key component in facilitating PTG, and were consistent with other findings (Benetato, 2011; Stockton, Hunt & Joseph, 2011).

Committee:

Janet R. Schultz, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Charles J. Kapp, Ph.D. (Committee Member); W. Michael Nelson III, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Experimental Psychology; Psychological Tests; Psychology; Therapy

Keywords:

posttraumatic growth; trauma; growth; trauma severity; rumination; core beliefs

Lanham, Michelle E.The Relationship Between Gratitude and Burnout in Mental Health Professionals
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2011, Psychology, Clinical
This study investigated the relationship between gratitude and burnout in mental health professionals. Participants consisted of 65 mental health treatment providers from community mental health agencies and a university counseling center. Consistent with hypotheses, both workplace specific gratitude and dispositional gratitude were positively related to job satisfaction and personal accomplishment. Workplace specific gratitude was also negatively related to emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Gratitude predicted job satisfaction and burnout after controlling for demographic, job contextual variables, and hope. Workplace specific gratitude predicted emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and job satisfaction after controlling for dispositional gratitude but not vice versa. Dispositional gratitude predicted personal accomplishment after controlling for workplace specific gratitude but not vice versa.

Committee:

Mark Rye, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Keri Brown Kirschman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jack Bauer, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Carolyn Roecker-Phelps, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Behaviorial Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Labor Relations; Management; Mental Health; Occupational Psychology; Personality Psychology; Psychological Tests; Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Work

Keywords:

gratitude; burnout; mental health; job satisfaction; positive psychology; employment

Armstrong, Jennifer BLoneliness and Perceived Stigmatization Among Older Adults Enrolled in Opiate Substitution Treatment Programs and the Utilization of Mental Health Services
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2015, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
Little research has examined the role that loneliness and perceived stigmatization play in the decision to seek mental health services among older adults enrolled in opiate substitution treatment. Researchers studying this at-risk population have called for more studies to examine services that can be implemented within current opiate substitution treatment settings. This study advances research in the field by utilizing standardized self-report measures to examine the relationship between loneliness, perceived stigmatization, and the impact of said variables on the utilization of available mental health services among older adults enrolled in opiate substitution treatment programs. Ninety-four 50-71-year-old adults from an opiate substitution treatment program completed self-report measures querying age, degree of perceived stigmatization, perception of loneliness, and engagement in mental health services. Results indicated that participants who reported feeling greater loneliness and perceived stigmatization were more likely to utilize available mental health services, not supporting the primary hypothesis; however, identifying that participants’ experiencing greater difficulty were willing to seek supportive services. A significant relationship was identified between loneliness and perceived stigmatization, supporting a secondary hypothesis regarding the impact of compounding factors experienced by older adults in opiate substitution treatment. This study demonstrated the importance of the availability of mental health services for older adults in opiate substitution treatment settings, particularly targeting those experiencing a higher degree of loneliness and perceived stigmatization. Mental health services may help to alleviate the burden of the complex interaction of substance abuse and aging. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Alejandra Suarez, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Bill Huesler, Psy.D. (Committee Member); Douglas M. Kerr, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Behavioral Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Ethics; Families and Family Life; Health Care; Health Care Management; Psychology; Public Health; Quantitative Psychology; Rehabilitation; Therapy

Keywords:

Aging; Methadone Maintenance; Loneliness; Perceived Stigmatization; Older Adults; Quantitative; Mental Health; Opiate Substitution Treatment; Substance Abuse; Addiction; Elderly; Self-Report; Survey; Chemical Dependency; Multiple Regression

Torres, Misty DawnFinding Childcare for the Disabled Child: The Process and Decisions Through the Primary Caregiver’s Lens
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2015, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
In this qualitative, Grounded Theory study, the researcher examined the process that primary caregivers go through when selecting a childcare placement for children who have special needs. Data were collected through participant interviews with primary caregivers (n=10) who responded to recruitment notices posted on (1) listservs by organizations directly affiliated with early intervention and child care services; (2) local Internet classified sites; and (3) through word of mouth. The research demonstrated that caregivers who learned of their child’s disability in a prenatal diagnosis or prior to an adoption identified with having a greater sense of choice and control over their circumstances, and had more confidence in their ability to make competent, informed decisions regarding their child’s needs than caregivers unaware prenatally of a diagnosis. The same was true for parents who had a primary support system in a spouse or significant other, thereby offering additional options over those available to a single parent. Second, due to poor provider training and education with special needs populations, caregivers were more likely to keep their child in the home and work around whatever financial hardship may result. Third, caring for a disabled child is an emotional paradox that is difficult, yet rewarding, and it is the unconditional love that caregivers have for their children that drives them to give tirelessly against the odds. Based upon the data, recommendations for future practice include a community model in which individual and/or family therapy is coupled with a strong referral base that places the family into contact with relevant early intervention resources within the community. By working closely with the family and helping them to connect with organizations and professionals in their community, the therapist can empower the family by way of resources, psychoeducation, and support. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Patricia Linn, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Elin Björling, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Michelle Felker, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Early Childhood Education; Education Policy; Educational Psychology; Families and Family Life; Preschool Education; Psychology; Social Psychology; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Special Needs Education; Individual Education Plan; IEP, Section 504; Childhood Diagnosis; Daycare; Preschool; Decision Making; Primary Caregivers; Impact to Family,

Schaad, Ashley M.An Examination of the Cognitive Aspects of the Stigma of Obesity
Master of Arts, Marietta College, 2012, Psychology
Several studies have shown that obese individuals often internalize the obesity stereotypes (ex: Puhl, Moss-Racusin, & Schwartz, 2007). Lekas, Siegel, and Schrimshaw (2006) revealed that among female participants with HIV/AIDS, internalizing the stereotypes against individuals with HIV/AIDS caused the participants to report feeling discrimination even when they could not report a single incidence of discrimination against themselves personally. The researcher sought to test this idea with the stigma of obesity. Participants underwent a perspective taking measure before playing Cyberball. The participants were ostracized throughout the game, then given the chance to report discrimination by the other players. As predicted, discrimination based on weight was reported by participants who undertook the perspective-taking measure significantly more than participants without the perspective-taking measure.

Committee:

Mark Sibicky, PhD (Committee Chair); Christopher Klein, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Cognitive Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Experimental Psychology; Psychology; Public Health; Social Psychology; Social Research

Keywords:

obesity; discrimination; weight discrimination; stereotype

Lotycz, Amanda L.THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SOCIAL SKILLS INSTRUCTION ON PRO-SOCIAL BEHAVIORS IN AN ELEMENTARY, ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER POPULATION
Master of Science, Miami University, 2011, Educational Psychology
This paper reports on a study that examined the effect of participation in a tier two social skills program and the relationship between language proficiency and social skills acquisition in an ELL (English Language Learner) population. The participants were fourth grade students identified as ELL and who meet the English proficiency standards. This study also included non-ELL fourth grade students who teachers consider “leaders” in the classroom. A related samples,pre-post test research design was employed and results were analyzed via use of nonparametric measures including the Wilcoxon Signed Ranks and Spearman’s Rho tests. This analysis was used to (1) examine the effects of the tier two social skills intervention and (2) explore the relationship between language proficiency and social skills. Results are discussed within the context of best practices in school psychology and interventions for English Language Learners. Study limitations and directions for future research are also included.

Committee:

Michael Woodin, PhD (Committee Chair); Susan Mosley-Howard, PhD (Committee Member); Doris Bergen, PhD (Committee Member); Geralyn Timler, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; Clinical Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Early Childhood Education; Education; Educational Psychology; Elementary Education; English As A Second Language; Mental Health; Psychology; School Counseling

Keywords:

English Language Learner; Social Skills; Prosocial; Tier Two; School Psychology; Mental Health

Gammon, Hannah LeeThe Student Perspective: An Exploration of the Experiences and Needs of University Students with Mental Illness
Doctor of Psychology (PsyD), Wright State University, 2014, School of Professional Psychology
There is a gap in the current literature concerning the study of university students with mental illness. Particularly, very few qualitative studies have been conducted in which interviews with university students with mental illness have yielded knowledge about the population's experiences and needs. The present study, employing a Participatory Action Research (PAR) approach, was designed to promote a more accurate perception of the lives of university students with mental illness by allowing the voices of members of this group to be heard. Eight matriculating university students who self-identified with mental illness participated in this exploratory PAR initiative. The study involved open-ended questioning of participants through mixed methods including a demographics sheet, self-administered questionnaire, and focus group interviews. Results reflected numerous salient themes based on both written and verbal interactions with participants. For instance, potential barriers to success and suggestions for ways to best serve university students with mental illness were revealed. Also, mental health stigma and disability issues were addressed. Implications for future research and action are discussed.

Committee:

Julie Williams, Psy.D., CRC, ABPP (Committee Chair); Robert Rando, Ph.D., ABPP (Committee Member); Erendira Lopez-Garcia, Psy.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Clinical Psychology; Continuing Education; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Education; Educational Psychology; Health Care; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Mental Health; Psychology; Public Health

Keywords:

mental illness; psychiatric disability; university students; participatory action research; mental health; college students; stigma; mental health stigma; disability; academic accommodations

Vassillière, Christa TheresaThe Spatial Properties of Music Perception: Differences in Visuo-spatial Performance According to Musicianship and Interference of Musical Structure
BA, Oberlin College, 2012, Psychology
Spatial cognition has been implicated in the perception and production of music within both behavioral and neurological experimental paradigms. Using performance on mental rotation of a three-dimensional object, the present study examined the visuo-spatial abilities of conservatory and non-conservatory students. Participants performed the rotation task under no distraction followed by performance with an interference task, which consisted of detecting either tempo or pitch changes. Conservatory students performed better on the mental rotation task both with and without interference. Musical structure (Western classical versus Indian classical) and musical aspect (tempo changes and pitch changes) influenced how much interference was produced in the mental rotation task. The results confirm the relation between music cognition and spatial cognition with the complexity introduced by the musical structure itself.

Committee:

Patricia deWinstanley (Advisor); Arnie Cox (Committee Member); Al Porterfield (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Cognitive Psychology; Experimental Psychology; Experiments; Music; Psychological Tests; Psychology; Quantitative Psychology

Keywords:

Spatial cognition;music;conservatory;music cognition;change;interference;performance;Conservatory of Music;Oberlin College;college students;

Treadway, MonaYoung Adults in Transition: Factors that Support and Hinder Growth and Change
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
Young adults between 18 and 24 years of age with mental illness are significantly less likely to receive mental health services than adults in older age groups. Nationally, higher rates of depression, substance abuse, and psychiatric issues are reported in this age group. A therapeutic model referred to as young adult transition programs has emerged to better address the unique developmental challenges found in this age group. This study examined 317 critical incidents that supported or hindered young adults in a therapeutic transition program. The research design used a combination of an instrumental case study and critical incident technique (CIT). Using interviews and the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2, the study explored indepth the experiences of 17 young adults who were alumni of a young adult transition program. The research focused on critical incidents that supported or hindered the young adult in their process of growth and change while in treatment and whether meaningful change lasted beyond treatment. Its objective was to better understand the transition experience from a participant perspective and, through the findings, inform program development and evaluation for young adult transition programs. Several significant findings emerged from the data, among them the importance of interpersonal relationships, experiential education and adventure, individualized programming, and community and culture. An understanding of these findings leads to a discussion on transformational mentoring and leadership as well as relational cultural practice and how this can support leaders of transition programs in further research and program development. The limitations of the study are discussed and suggestions for future studies are offered. This dissertation is available in open-access at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd and AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Elizabeth Holloway, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ellen Behrens, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Katherine Clarke, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Entrepreneurship; Health Care; Individual and Family Studies; Mental Health; Psychology; Recreation; Social Work; Systems Design

Keywords:

young adults; young adult treatment; critical incident technique; case study; mental illness; personal relationships; relational cultural theory; transformational leadership; transformational mentoring; anxiety; depression; failure to launch

Biermann, Jeanette S.Improving Cognition in Normally Aging Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness Meditation (Samatha) as a Treatment for Attentional Inhibitory Deficits
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2011, Counseling Psychology
According to Hasher and Zacks's (1988) Inhibitory Deficit Theory (IDT), a decline in the ability to inhibit task-irrelevant information from grabbing one's attention is the underlying cause for age-related differences in cognitive abilities. Unlike some other theories of cognitive aging, IDT provides a leverage point available to older adults for a low-cost, non-pharmaceutical intervention that could prevent or at least slow the decline in cognitive functioning with age: attentional functioning, or more specifically, inhibitory attentional functioning. This study investigated the efficacy of attentional process training in the form of meditation (samatha) on the neuropsychological functioning of cognitively intact older adults. Forty-two community dwelling adults (average age 73 years) participated in a 4 week, randomized wait-list-controlled clinical trial. Compliance with twice-weekly attendance and at-home practice, and a self-evaluation of achievement at the end of the training indicated that older adults can and will learn samatha. Objective efficacy measures consisted of participants' change scores on the Trail Making Test (TMT) and the Reading-with-Distraction Task (RwDT) from pretreatment baseline to assessment after completion of the experimental group's samatha training. The Attention-Related Cognitive Errors Scale (ARCES) and the Everyday Memory Failures Scale (MFS) were used as subjective measures. Improvement on the RwDT was statistically significant (d = .75), suggesting that the intervention had a beneficial effect on inhibitory attentional functioning. Improvement on TMT B (d = .40) did not reach statistical significance. Hence the study failed to provide strong evidence that the 4 week intervention could effect improvement in cognitive functioning beyond attention. MFS and ARCES change scores had small, statistically non-significant improvements, indicating that, on average, participants did not perceive improvement in their memory and attentional functioning. Implications for practice and further research and the study's strengths and limitations are discussed.

Committee:

James R. Rogers, Dr. (Advisor); Paula Hartman-Stein, Dr. (Committee Member); Kevin Kaut, Dr. (Committee Member); John Queener, Dr. (Committee Member); Charles Waehler, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Behavioral Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Counseling Psychology; Experimental Psychology; Gerontology; Mental Health; Psychological Tests; Psychology; Psychotherapy

Keywords:

attention; cognition; aging; mindfulness; meditation; samatha; shamatha; Trail Making Test; Reading with Distraction Test

Kain, Megan MarieBind, Tether, and Transcend: Achieving Integration Through Extra-Therapeutic Dance
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch Santa Barbara: Clinical Psychology
The purpose of this study is to examine the lived experience of achieving integration through the fine art form of dance, using a phenomenological method coupled with narrative and arts-based research. Research material illustrating the various manifestations of integration will be derived from interviews of ten professional dancers representing the non-dominant cultural discourse. Through the application of theoretical underpinnings of somatic psychology, interpersonal neurobiology, psychoneuroimmunology, and relational psychotherapy, this qualitative research seeks to articulate the esoteric healing forces derived from creative movement that fortifies self and fosters resilience within individuals. While dance might constitute an effective processing and coping mechanism for handling everyday stress, this may be especially true for those dealing with histories of childhood adversity and trauma. Healing, integrative properties of dance may aid the individual in navigating both current life challenges as well as coping with the struggle for re-integration in the aftermath of trauma. The electronic version of this dissertation is available free at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Sharleen O'Brien, PhD. (Committee Chair); Chris Howard, PsyD (Committee Member); Paula Thomson, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Art Education; Clinical Psychology; Communication; Cultural Anthropology; Dance; Developmental Psychology; Early Childhood Education; Education Philosophy; Ethnic Studies; Fine Arts; Gender Studies; Glbt Studies; Health; Kinesiology; Mental Health; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Neurobiology; Performing Arts; Personality Psychology; Physical Education; Psychobiology; Psychology; Public Health; Social Psychology; Spirituality; Therapy

Keywords:

dance; dancers; trauma; expressive arts therapy; integration; childhood adversity; non-dominant cultural discourse; phenomenology; arts-based research; nonverbal interventions; somatic; neurobiology; affect regulation; spirituality; attunement; resilience

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