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Srivastava, RohiniGreen Roof Design and Practices: A Case Of Delhi
MARCH, Kent State University, 2011, College of Architecture and Environmental Design
In climates where air conditioning is essential for creating acceptable indoor environment in offices, green roofs increase the heat capacity and provide shade to the building. This not only lowers the ambient and indoor temperature but also provides comfort to the inhabitants by reducing the heat gain through the roof. A number of studies have confirmed the thermal benefit of using green roofs in extreme climates, however, the same lacks for composite climates. This study looks at the thermal benefits green roofs offer in composite climates by assessing their role in the city of New Delhi and formulating design guidelines for future use. The evaluation of the suitability of green roof system is carried out via the EnergyPlus module of Design Builder V 2.0. The data collected from the simulation of various building configurations, orientations, and retrofit green roofs is used to formulate strategies for future practice. The guidelines are then used to design an office building (with a green roof) in New Delhi, to highlight the success of green roof systems in Delhi.

Committee:

Adil Sharag Eldin, Dr. (Advisor); Jonathan Fleming, Mr. (Committee Member); Oscar Rocha, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architectural; Architecture; Landscape Architecture; Sustainability

Keywords:

Green roofs; Thermal benefit of green roofs in composite climate; Performance evaluation of green roofs in Delhi

van Strien, David SamuelAmerican Electric Power: Surface, Model, & Text
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2017, Art
This thesis examines my work. I am interested in how we encounter and experience architectural representations. I will address how my work explores this through the typology of corporate modernist architecture as represented by the American Electric Power (AEP) building in Columbus, Ohio. I make several types of work including rubbings, laser etchings of photographs of models, text pieces, graphite drawings, and digital 3-D models. In this thesis I will analyse these practices, focusing on the rubbings, laser etchings and text pieces. I am especially interested in exploring how we see, experience and interpret architecture, and how the work complicates this relationship for the viewer. I will describe how and why I have researched and accessed the building, the kinds of work this has produced, and the implications that these different forms of architectural representations possibly might have. I am driven by the question of how I can challenge and reject the notion that there is a singular or correct way of reading architecture. At its core, my project is about how and where architecture, and its experiences, exist. A large part of my practice has been research based, in the form of archival visits and readings. These informed my work in relation to the AEP building, as well as other ideas that have not yet found artistic form. Part of this paper will describe this aspect of my work.

Committee:

George Rush (Advisor); Laura Lisbon (Committee Member); Michael Mercil (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Architectural; Architecture; Art History; Economic History; Fine Arts; Landscape Architecture; Mass Media; Modern History; Urban Planning

Keywords:

typology, corporate modernist architecture, American Electric Power building, art

Schonhardt, Donald A.Mediating Between Icon and Experience
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2007, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)

As a result of globalization, mass communication, and a consumer culture obsessed with the powerful yet fleeting impact of the image, a clear transformation has occurred in our sensory and perceptual experience of the world most clearly reflected in the arts and architecture. The current trend towards separating identity and function in architecture has divided the interaction that takes place between the building, the user, and the environment, leading to a renewed desire for an integration of functionalist solutions and aesthetic practices.

Current problems of representation in architecture will be addressed through creating a more meaningful architectural interaction between aesthetics and function. Acting as a mediator of internal and external flows, the buildings utility and identity can become apparent, responding to both seen and unforeseen events resulting from a dialogue between program, time, and technique. The investigation will become a hermeneutic approach to design in which deeper meaning can be created through material and immaterial forces used to question the relationship between the interior and exterior. The design process reacts to external and internal stimuli, transforming the form and aesthetics through feedback between a subject and the environment and between architecture and its milieu.

Committee:

Michael McInturf (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture; Architecture

Keywords:

fashion; mediation; performance; icon; experience

Roberts, David AThe Changes in American Society from the 17th to 20th Century Reflected in the Language of City Planning Documents
Master of Arts in English, Youngstown State University, 2014, Department of English
The study of the documents involved in the planning of these American cities allows for an understanding of the methodology behind the design. With some interpretation, it is possible to draw out of the documents the kinds of things Americans expected from their city. While urban planning was not a field of study until the 20th century, a great deal of planning went into many cities. This was especially true for American cities. As with anything, certain things change with time and changes can be evidenced from the design plans over the centuries in the United States. A great deal of the society’s wants and needs are embedded in these city plans as the designers of the city kept a keen eye on those requirements. With this consideration in mind, it is possible conjure an image of what each city’s citizens were like through the writings. This thesis focuses on the cities of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Savannah, Georgia, Cleveland, Ohio, and Chicago, Illinois, each representative of a different time in American history to allow for the similarities and differences of American society to be illuminated. The goal is to identify these societal changes over the 300 years that spanned the founding of Philadelphia to the redesign of Chicago through the plans for the cities themselves.

Committee:

Jay Gordon, Ph.D. (Advisor); Steven Brown, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Stephanie Tingley, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; American Studies; Architecture; Area Planning and Development; Landscape Architecture; Language; Urban Planning

Keywords:

city design; urban planning; rhetoric of city planning; cities in early america; philadelphia; savannah;cleveland; chicago; american studies; early american history

Baradaranfallahkhair, NaseemTransitional Shelter for Displaced people
MARCH, Kent State University, 2014, College of Architecture and Environmental Design
Displacement of people’s settlements is a part of human experience. Fleeing, disaster or violence is among the least desirable aspects of the human condition, and remains among the world most difficult challenges. According to Guardian Press, the number of refuges passed 50 million for the first time since the second World War II. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNCHR) also releases number of refugees every June, in an annual report. By June 2014, the number of forcibly removed refugees was 51.2 million. Based on UN definitions, a refugee is someone who fled her or his home and country owing to “a well-founded fear of persecution because of her/ his race, religion, nationality, member in a social group or political opinion,” according to United Nation 1951 refugee convention. The emergence of organizations such as United Nations (UN), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNCHR), World Health Organization (WHO); and the great increase in number of temporary and permanent shelters; from planned camps to self-settled camps; show the need for studies on displaced people and their needs. The interrelationship between shelters and peoples’ behavior and the mental well-being of displaced communities holds environmental psychologists attention, meanwhile efforts have been made by many architects to design shelters in these environments, a majority of them focused on the construction of these shelters, not people’s and communities’ behaviors in these built environments. Most of the architects and designers consider these shelters as single units but they fail to consider people and their physical and behavioral operations. From 2011, civil conflicts arose in parts of Middle East what has been called “The Arab Spring”. In the spring of 2011 conflicts arose between the Syrian government and some political groups, which lead to a civil war, and many people, left the country. In March 2013, UNCHR announced that the number of refugee fleeing the Syrian conflict had reached the one million mark. Since that time, the refugee exodus has continued, the largest numbers of people fleeing to Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq and Egypt. Responding to this emergency, the Assistant High Commissioner for Operations (AHCO) requested the Policy Development and Evaluation Service (PDES), to lead a review of UNHCR’s response to this refugee emergency, focusing on Jordan. On the other hand, in recent years, many designers have come up with innovative designs for transitional shelters, but dealing with cost, weight, volume, land rights, and political barriers make it difficult for organizations in charge to implement them. One of the biggest refugee agencies, UNCHR, is mostly working with Stanford University and Ennead Architects in New York City to design and build transitional and permanent housing in respond to post disasters. Political, organizational and economic factors are at play in choosing the appropriate types of housing for displaced populations. There is a need for organizations and architects to study and consider human behavior in these built environments. Refugees are affected by different factors; losing their homes, leaving their home country or victimized by political or tribal violence, they may have already attained mental and behavioral damages, and they need care to heal traumas of those damages and circumstances. Behavioral scientists have studied the effects of built environment on displaced people. UN, UNCHR and other humanitarian organizations performed much research on the refugees housing issues. UNCHR promotes exchange of information among policy makers, researchers, humanitarians, planners and architects. But architects focused mostly on the construction of shelters and failed to consider other aspects of it such as cultural sensitivity. According to Syam Rachma Marcillia and Ryuzo Ohno’s article on refugee camps and their residents’ adjustments; “Housing reconstruction cases without cultural sensitivity resulted in rejection.” Housing displaced population without considering their culture will result in rejection and misbehavior. Creators of these environments must consider inhabitants previous life style, dwelling and their cultural and behavioral identity. By studying and analyzing images of refugee camps, I realized that residents of camps adjust their physical and behavioral life to their current housing and environment to sustain and protect a feeling of security and attachment to their new environment.

Committee:

Jonathan Fleming (Advisor); Ellen Sullivan, Dr. (Committee Member); William Willoughby (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Shelter, displaced people

Popa, John C.Archi[tech]: Materializing Immaterial Data Streams
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2014, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
The rapid development of digital media technology is changing social, cultural, and economic interaction from the traditional “space of place,” or material world, to the immaterial “space of flows,” undermining the traditional ways in which public space creates a dynamic relationship with visitors. This mutation from material to immaterial is deteriorating public space and its ability to manifest the connections among users, public space, and programmatic processes. This thesis proposes a direct response to the dematerialization of the space of communication through the innovative interaction of the space of flows (specifically crowd sourced social media inputs) with the space of place (Pittsburgh’s Market Square). As a piece of public architecture this hybrid spatial condition will act as a cultural and social bridge between the immaterial and material. The design of this thesis will utilize communication and information from current Social Media sites (Twitter, Facebook, and Foursquare) to create and dynamically modify a set of architectural interventions. A dynamic conversation between the visitors and the space will be driven by constant information flows and responses. The dynamic dialogue will embrace temporality and constant change, common characteristics of the virtual realm, in order to intensify public activities, dialogues, and connections in the material world.

Committee:

John Eliot Hancock, M.Arch. (Committee Chair); Michael McInturf, M.Arch. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Data Stream;Social Media;Immaterial;dynamic architecture

Moe, Joshua J.Food | Immigrants|Future| Place Adapting Identity for Callender, Iowa
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
Rural Iowa’s current path is economically, socially and ecologically unsustainable: rural flight (depopulation) has left many farming communities lacking jobs, social interaction and basic amenities like schools, hospitals, banks and grocery stores. Once independent, small towns now function as distant ex-burbs tens of miles from functional cities. As energy (transportation) costs rise, these small towns will become increasingly unlivable. Thus, a livable future for rural Iowa hinges upon radical transformation. Energy costs will also affect large cities that require food to be shipped long distances—frequently thousands of miles—from field to table. As energy (transportation + production) costs raise and cities sprawl, the cost of food will explode. Cities will need food produced close to them. A recent study conducted by the Leopold Center at Iowa State University projected an ecologically and economically sustainable transformation for both small towns and cities in the Midwest founded on growing fruits and vegetables rather than corn and soybeans. This economic and ecological transformation implies dramatic corollary transformations in the physical and cultural landscape of rural communities; specifically, implementing this system would create thousands of seasonal jobs likely fulfilled by transient, non-white, migrant laborers. Additionally, the industrial facilities required to support the new industry are foreign—in scale and function—to rural Iowa. This thesis envisions the social and structural challenges that one community in rural Iowa—Callender—will have when implementing the Leopold Report. Through a process of mapping the past and projecting the future, tactics are developed to mitigate the global needs of the future (rethinking food production) with the local desire for place and identity. The mitigation of this conflict materializes in the design of a hybrid distribution facility and the reuse of an historic gain elevator.

Committee:

George Bible, MCiv.Eng (Committee Chair); Aarati Kanekar, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Iowa;rural;agriculture;vegetable;depopulation;identity

Levinson, Natalie MRust Belt Revival: A Future for Historic Industrial Sites
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2013, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
Identity, whether it refers to a person or a country, is a fluid concept. It relies on layers of time and experience. Erasing built fabric in the city is comparable to erasing a person's memory, inevitably altering an overall character and sense of self. The rich industrial heritage of the U.S. survives in its architectural landmarks; but, in a postindustrial society, such places often fail to stay relevant to their surroundings. They face demolition or prolonged physical decay. These pockets of broken fabric elicit anxiety and uncertainty from a city's residents, representing a sort of cultural hesitation over how to proceed. This body of research explores the shift in the American psyche from industrial to postindustrial life, and the potential for reconciling conflicting American identities at former industrial sites through adaptive reuse.

Committee:

Michael McInturf, M.Arch. (Committee Chair); Aarati Kanekar, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

rust belt;industrial;factory;hotel;Ohio;historic preservation

Miller, Lindsey ANo 9 I The Boutique Terminal Network
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2013, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
Throughout the past hundred years, airports have been reduced to brutally functional, people processing machines that contribute to the disengaged mentality of the passenger. This thesis proposes an alternative model of air travel that optimizes passenger experience within environments using architecture as a catalyst for behavioral change. The new model will serve as an all-inclusive membership based time-share franchise that for the first time, gives passengers the opportunity to invest in a luxury transit lifestyle. The Boutique Terminal Network, or BTN, will operate as a private airline servicing flights between a primary hub and a selection of key satellite destination terminals. This thesis will focus on designing a seamless luxury transit service from an international BTN departure hub at Miami International Airport to a satellite terminal at Cyril E. King International Airport on the Caribbean island of St. Thomas. Airports embody the characteristics of what phenomenology defines as heterotopic space. Passengers are neither here, nor there--they temporarily exist in a fantastical reality, lost in transition. Analyzing the psychological implications associated with modern airport design reveals conceptions that will inform consciously experienced environments versus unconsciously perceived space. Passenger become part of a larger, carefully articulated spatial configuration that shifts from a state of animated limbo to pleasurable suspension through experiential branding.

Committee:

Michael McInturf, M.Arch (Committee Chair); Aarati Kanekar, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Airport;Luxury;Airline;Boutique;Destination;Hospitality;

Miller, AugustVertical Urbanism
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2013, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
The modern skyscraper is a building type that is being continuously created all over the world; it defines our cities and creates the dense urbanity of the modern city. The number of these towers being constructed is staggering and exponential, fulfilling a rapidly increasing need for space. The skyscraper, however, is still buried in a real-estate production cycle demanding profits and leaving public functions to the city and the street. Skyscrapers are designed with efficiency and profitability as their primary driving forces. This model, though, does not represent the potential of this building type – it does not address the social and urban possibilities of building vertically nor the economic or environmental value that can be achieved. With global increases in population, urbanity, and density, the skyscraper must respond to a changing type of efficiency. Compounding these issues are dense modern cities that consist of a high proportion of high rises and towers stacking more people vertically and relying on the street to provide all functions of community while simultaneously distancing people from street life. This creates environments that are over saturated and neglect the human scale, both within the skyscraper and on the street. Instead of simply stacking programs, the skyscraper should rely on a stacking of urbanity: intensification of program, function and use that becomes a continuously active vertical multi-use neighborhood. The proposed solution is for urbanity to work inside the skyscraper as an internalized system that acts as an extension of street and city life by creating diverse and active realms within the skyscraper. By defining which urban typologies can be interpreted vertically, the skyscraper and city can become more dense and efficient without sacrificing the benefits of the urban realm. The thesis is organized around three concepts: the compact vertical city, vertical placemaking, and modulation of the skyscraper. Each concept is built around the interpretation of urban models into a vertical system, and when combined create a theoretical body of knowledge that is then applied and tested in a design concept.

Committee:

Michael McInturf, M.Arch (Committee Chair); Aarati Kanekar, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

architecture;skyscraper;vertical;urbanism;modulation;parametric;

Bornhorst, Charlotte SophieFragments of Time: Politics of Memory in Contemporary Berlin
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2009, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
After 17 years of heated debate, the German government decided in 2003 to demolish the former Palace of the Republic, once the site of the first free elections and German reunification. This heavily contested site was previously occupied by the baroque City Palace, which is now the focal point of the “Humboldt Forum” competition aiming to create a world cultural museum in a reconstructed shell of the palace. The heavy symbolism, connection to identity, and historical past factor into the difficulty of creating a new structure with an appropriate program. It is simply not enough to reconstruct an old baroque palace and thus use preservation as an act of forgetting historical events and structures that once occupied the site. Preservation must use a new and inclusive approach to address the complexity of this urban site in the heart of Berlin and thus give future generations the ability to witness structures from the past that help shape their future.

Committee:

Elizabeth Riorden (Committee Chair); John Hancock (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Berlin; Palace of the Republic; Schlossplatz; Humboldt Forum

Popescu, Viorica AnamariaBeyond Modernism: A reassessment of modern architectural metaphysics in light of Martin Heidegger’s “The Age of the World View”
MS ARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2009, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture

The problem of Modernity and Modern architecture has been a constant focus for the scholars of architectural theory in the last fifty years and yet, despite the critical reactions it generated, we are neither fully aware of the philosophical ground that sustained it nor its subversive influences on contemporary architecture. Although architectural theorists like Alberto Perez- Gomez (1989) and Colin Rowe (1992) have had very important contributions through revealing the connections between modern architecture and modern science from the 17th century on, their investigation did not further acknowledged the metaphysical foundations of both these areas.

Exemplifying with significant architectural writings, I will trace the philosophical origin of twentieth century themes of concern, such as the moral task of the architect (the desire to solve the problems of society through architecture), or value and the criteria for value in architecture, to a tradition, started with Plato and refined by Descartes, that has a particular take on the question of the nature of the existent (Being) and on the nature of truth. This analysis will be guided by Martin Heidegger’s essay, “The Age of the World View” (1976), a critical exploration of the nature of modern times, which concludes that modernity distinguishes itself by the change of the essence of man in that man becomes a subject (“man becomes the center to which the existent as such is related”) and the transformation of the world into a world view (the existent is understood as existent “when and to the degree to which it is held at bay by the person that represents it and establishes it”).

This investigation will demonstrate that in spite of revealing the scientific approach of architecture, that the modern movement practiced, as problematic, its authority is still acting upon contemporary architecture through the philosophical concepts that originated it. As a result of providing a more appropriate account for the origins of modern architecture, this study will raise consciousness and a critical attitude concerning the presuppositions and implications of ideas that pertain to the contemporary theoretical discourse and practice in architecture.

Committee:

John Hancock, MArch (Committee Chair); James Bradford, MA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Modern Architecture; Martin Heidegger; science; aesthetics; Colin Rowe; Alberto Perez-Gomez

BAUSER, PAUL JHIGH ASPIRATIONS: THE SKYSCRAPER AS A CORPORATE ICON
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
Driven to gain increasing market shares, corporations are compelled to formulate distinct public imagery. Since the advent of the high-rise typology the skyscraper has provided an architectural means to this end. The end of the 19th century saw development of the corporate headquarters building as the new power structure, conveying images of opulence and wealth through increasingly tall towers. Today, the speed and pace of our contemporary, media culture has rendered architecture a slow and antiquated mode of communication. Our lives are saturated with fast-paced, adaptable, graphic, imagery. Buildings cannot keep pace. Architecture lags behind current culture; its ideas outdated before ground is broken. The question arises, what will become the enduring symbol of the corporation? Imagery, and the creation of a pictorial language have long been driving forces of communication enterprises. Since the establishment of the Christian church, icons have conveyed a greater depth of meaning. As the manifestation and condensation of an array of ideas and principles into a single, recognizable object, icons became powerful tools of influence and control, most recently through the corporate application of branding. This corporate persona is a powerful construct, one to be vigilantly maintained, but as high-rise building can no longer keep pace with evolving corporate imagery, designing a purely iconographic image of the corporate headquarters tower is no longer a valid architectural response. Rather, imagery should be found rather than sought. This thesis seeks to establish a 21st century architectural icon for Western & Southern Financial Group by allowing the pictorial, to result from objectivity. Rather than designing an image for the corporation, a contrived process likely to prove ineffective, the project aims to promote the corporation through an architecture that is responsive to specific scales of influence: sustainability, visibility, connectivity, and employability. This set of ideals formulates specific design parameters capable of generating distinctive imagery that can be endowed with meaning over time. In allowing image to result from these objective design processes, the tower becomes a collector rather than a generator of meaning; an adaptable construct capable of reinterpretation, promising longevity over obsolescence; an icon.

Committee:

Michael McIntruf (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Corporation;High-rise;Skyscraper;Icon;Iconography;Tower;Urban;Identity;Branding;Image;Company;Architecture;Structure

OConnell, David MichaelInformation Convergence: Technological Space in the 21st Century Library
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2009, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
Technology and information play a critical role in society today. The public library systems in the United States, formerly the centers of information and learning for many communities, have fallen behind in these areas due to an outdated methodology that is incompatible with the ever accelerating rate of technological advancement. New ways of interacting with information such as the Internet, wireless communication, and digital media have been forced into a 20th century model of information storage and interaction that does little to benefit either the libraries or the content itself. Rather than treating all media the same, the history of libraries and information technology must be used as a guide to inform how the contemporary library integrates the three topics of space, technology, and information. Through an exploration of the relationships of virtual information space and architectural space, this thesis proposes a radical intervention into the public library in order to transform it into a place focused on technology, learning, and enriched social interactions with information.

Committee:

Vincent Sansalone (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Riorden (Committee Co-Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

public library system; information technology; emergent design; social libraries; Public Library of Cincinnati

TEAL, SUSAN J.INTERCONNECTION: NATURAL PROCESSES AND THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2004, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
There is a fundamental relationship between the human experience and the natural ecology. However, modern technological developments have left this relationship clouded. This disconnection becomes increasingly acute in dense urban conditions, where the built environment has overcome the natural. Design, with an increased sensitivity towards natural processes, as well as our interpretation of them, can help to reestablish this connection. Therefore, this thesis is to be a study of the philosophy of the environment as it relates to environmental design. Also, it is the study of large-scale infrastructure as the physical embodiment of how nature is mediated with the city. Looking closely at the role of nature in the city, it critically investigates the twenty-first urban waterfront condition that accommodates recreation with function through means that are sensitive to the local marine ecology. The design of an environmentally sensitive stormwater treatment landscape integrated with public recreation space on the East River in Lower Manhattan serves as a vehicle for this investigation.

Committee:

David Saile (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

sustainability; phenomenology; infrastructure; New York City; process

Pescovitz, Ari SamuelSpeaking Through Details: creating an architecture of meaning through the art of ornament
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
This thesis explores, through the lens of the synagogue, how architecture in the 21st century can create buildings that speak about the ‘immeasurable’ elements of design, such as symbolism and narrative, through an exploration of the art of expressive detailing. Throughout history many architects and theoreticians have explored the role of small-scale design in an effort to awaken meaningful engagements between the inhabitant and the architectural place. As the synagogue architect Maurice N. Finegold once said, “Architecture speaks. It expresses what we value from the past, what our needs are now, and, at its best moments, looks to the future.” Unfortunately since the middle of the 20th century much of the field of architecture has abandoned the art of detailing and ornament, and thus has lost its voice. With the use of the design project, this investigation revitalizes the teachings of Otto Wagner, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Carlo Scarpa in order to develop architecture appropriate for a contemporary synagogue design. Much as they sought to enrich their architecture with symbolism and meaning through their use of expressive detailing, this project seeks to develop a similar relationship between the “construction and the construing” of architecture through the lens of Jewish texts, history, culture, community, and worship.

Committee:

Jeffrey Tilman, PhD (Committee Chair); John Eliot Hancock, MARCH (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

synagogue;detail;ornament;judaism;;;

LEMASTERS, JENNIFER GRACETELNET CONSTRUCT
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2003, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning : Architecture
By the year 2025 there will be five billion city dwellers, the majority residing in economically weak, developing countries. Due to time and distance barriers from the center city, periphery locations develop without necessary institutions, such as medical care, and struggle to gain healthy integration and development. This thesis explores urban and architectonic processes promoting connection within a standardized medical system displaced throughout the Mexican culture. The process is executed through the design of a telemedical network, connecting two geographically dislocated places through telecommunication, providing like services to distinctly different regions. A three-part medical system allows interchange amongst rural-mobile units, peripheral clinics, and interior physicians. The networked buildings are designed with a standardized, prefabricated systems approach to allow for flexibility, while rooting in location stylistically thru vernacular evolution, expanding newly defined places. A distribution of interior institutions will allow greater access to the expanding population in an effort of urban-upgrading.

Committee:

Dr. Aarati Kanekar (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

access; telecommunications; population growth; developing cities; prefabricated architecture

Renangi, KarteekAnalysis of Cache Networking by NoC and Segmented Bus
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Engineering : Computer Engineering
Large on-chip caches are the next big thing in the field of multiprocessors. Extensive research has gone into modeling memory cells and designing performance enhanced cache banks, but now is the time to shift our focus towards interconnects, which seem to dominate the proceedings with the continuous shrinkage observed in process technology. As we move down into deep sub-micron technology, the interconnect parameters begin to hinder the advancements in cache utilization. It is important to address this issue by coming up with new interconnection architectures for caches which help us improve the performance in terms of latency, power and throughput of the system. Apart from network on chip and the hybrid architectures presented in earlier works, we propose new on-chip communication architectures and perform mathematical analysis for these new architectures to determine the latency and energy. Further, these mathematical expressions help us explore and bring out a comparative study of these architectures.

Committee:

Wen-Ben Jone, Dr (Advisor); Carla Purdy, Dr (Committee Member); Yiming Hu, Dr (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture; Design; Engineering; Mathematics

Hunsaker, Carrie ElizabethDeconstructing the Fourth Wall: Immediacy in Performative Architecture
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
Art in the age of digital reproduction thrives as a commodity. Freed from its place of origin and consolidated into data, art can be endlessly replayed anywhere, anytime, in an unchanging, reliable form. As a result, one's ability to distinguish authentic art from its representation is becoming more ambiguous and considerably less crucial while the performing arts, one of few art forms that cannot be reproduced or commoditized, is not surprisingly experiencing a crisis of identity. Competing for entertainment dollars, the nature of live performance is now being questioned. Is the live art form becoming irrelevant? Should live performance be spliced with digital media to capture it as data, thus modernizing and validating it? In response to these questions, two current attitudes behind the design of live event space can be observed. The first adopts a purist's stance in perceiving the legacy of the live event to survive only if it stands firmly in opposition to forces of mediation, envisioning live event space as a container for the illusion of spectacle. The other perceives an inevitable demise of live performance in technology's wake and chooses a proactive position, envisioning live event space as a container for a layered, complex multimedia performance. Finding these responses, which either wholly reject or subsume forces of mediation, to be inadequate, this project argues for a third approach that is commensurate to live performance's immediate, unmediated tradition, while at the same time eager to incorporate current technologies as not a mediating force (or conversely a generator of meaningas- spectacle) but rather a necessary tool for event execution. In the design of a performing arts center in the mountains of Boulder County, Colorado, this thesis proposes that the design methodology for live event space should arise out of a sensibility for the immediate, contextual character of live performance that views the building an extension of, rather than a container for, the performance. Recognizing that the inherent authenticity of a live event binds it to its locality and subjects it to its immediate surroundings, this project conceives of architecture as an event – a dynamic confrontation in real time that implicates forces of site and use – rather than a preconceived, static object.

Committee:

Michael McInturf (Committee Chair); Tom Bible (Committee Co-Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Chatauqua; Boulder; Colorado; performative architecture; immediacy; event; performing arts; festival grounds; mountain architecture; fourth wall; theatre

Knapp, Petra C.The Architecture of Education: Public Schools in Akron, 1890-1920
Master of Arts in History, Youngstown State University, 2009, Department of History
In the period between 1890 and 1920, developments in curriculum, educational philosophies, and culture dramatically affected the size, scope, and interior spaces of public schools in Akron. Through the examination of original blueprints, Board of Education meeting minutes, and a collection of other primary sources, the author traces the history of schools in Akron from the passage of the Akron Law, which established a publicly funded school system, to 1920. The first chapter explores the history of Akron, including its founding and development. It also includes a study of the industries in the area, and their affect on population and culture. Chapter two discusses the period from 1890 to 1908, and ends with an analysis of the Collinwood school fire and its immediate impact on schools in Akron and throughout the nation. In the third chapter, the author examines the changes in curriculum and educational philosophies and their affect on schools built from 1909 to 1920.

Committee:

Donna DeBlasio, PhD (Advisor); Martha Pallante, PhD (Committee Member); Thomas Leary, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture; Curricula; Education History; Educational Theory; History; School Administration

Keywords:

architecture; schools; education; curriculum; school design

Bubb, Cynthia LynneSequence as Structure: Ordering the Body, Space and Architecture
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2006, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
Architectural sequences have often taken the form of linear spatial progressions. In the twentieth century the naissance of cinema, wherein linear progressions are interrupted and manipulated according to the elastic properties of the medium, suggested new forms for architectural sequence. As a result Modern and Postmodern architects appropriated cinematic concepts to architectural theory and design. In particular, Le Corbusier and Bernard Tschumi explored the implications of the frame, an intrinsic component of cinema, as a viewing device and structure to order architectural sequences. The methodology adopted for the design of a ferry terminal in Boston, Massachusetts reflects the influence of Bernard Tschumi’s theoretical exercise, The Manhattan Transcripts, particularly “MT 4: The Block.” Represented in diagram, the interaction of space, movement, event and an additional factor, time, conveys the concurrent development and influence of four spatial sequences on the design of the terminal.

Committee:

Michael McInturf (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

sequence; cinema; tschumi; manhattan transcripts; promenade architecturale; situationists; ferry terminal; boston

Chiang, Alice TCultural Identity in Contemporary Immigrant America: Placemaking in Marginal Urban Landscapes.
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2013, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
This thesis investigates architecture and the urban environment as an expression of cultural identity, specifically in Chinese-immigrant communities. For Chinese-immigrants, their experiences in the U.S are ones of transition, movement, and adaptation. Historically, immigrant enclaves served as popular destinations for immigrants upon their arrival to the U.S. These enclaves were meant only to be transition points for the immigrant's eventual migration into mainstream society, disappearing as group members attain social-economic mobility. However, Chinese-immigrants have not followed this pattern of acculturation. Despite their socio-economic mobility, many Chinese immigrants chose to remain close to these enclaves. Old Chinatown remains a regular destination whether for tourism, to purchase staples of an Asian diet, or for authentic goods. Such evidence suggests that these historic Chinatowns serve more than simply a place of transition; these enclaves sponsor a primary cultural identity for the Chinese community. Old Chinatowns continuously face challenges that threaten their existence. Urban renewal, highway construction, and expansion of downtown developments encroach on these neighborhoods and impede upon their growth. Many other Chinatowns rely on a tourism economy, which distills the identity of the neighborhood as they struggle to appease visitors and entice new customers. Using Seattle's Chinatown-International District (C-ID) as a case study, this thesis aims to address these contemporary challenges; to explore ways to support the social-cultural identity of these Chinatowns. An examination of the history, cultural associations, and the infrastructure of these enclaves reveals the role and physical character of Chinatown in contemporary Chinese-American society. More specifically, this thesis examines how theories of identity, globalization, place-making, and food culture can expand upon the influence of architecture and place-making. The result is an exploration on the design, programming, and space-making of a public marketplace and culinary school for Seattle's C-ID community. Drawing upon spatial ideas from both traditional Chinese buildings and from contemporary western culture, this thesis seeks to test strategies of public space and place-making to address the contemporary Chinese-American community today.

Committee:

Michael McInturf, M.Arch. (Committee Chair); Aarati Kanekar, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Chinese;Culture;Identity;Placemaking;Chinatown;Landscape

Lutzel, Justine AnnMadness as a Way of Life: Space, Politics, and the Uncanny in Fiction and Social Movements
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2013, American Culture Studies
Madness as a Way of Life examines T.V. Reed's concept of politerature as a means to read fiction with a mind towards its utilization in social justice movements for the mentally ill. Through the lens of the Freudian uncanny, Johan Galtung's three-tiered systems of violence, and Gaston Bachelard's conception of spatiality, this dissertation examines four novels as case studies for a new way of reading the literature of madness. Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House unveils the accusation of female madness that lay at the heart of a woman's dissatisfaction with domestic space in the 1950s, while Dennis Lehane's Shutter Island offers a more complicated illustration of both post-traumatic stress syndrome and post-partum depression. Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain and Curtis White's America Magic Mountain challenge our socially-accepted dichotomy of reason and madness whereby their antagonists give up success in favor of isolation and illness. While these texts span chronology and geography, each can be read in a way that allows us to become more empathetic to the mentally ill and reduce stigma in order to effect change. This project begins with an introduction to several social justice movements for the mentally ill, as well as a summary of the movement over time. The case studies that follow illustrate how the uncanny and the spatial may effect the psyche and how forms of direct, structural, and cultural violence work together in order to create madness where it may not have existed at all or where it is considered a detriment when it is merely another way of living. The madhouses in the texts examined herein, and the novels from which they come, offer a way to teach us how to enact change on behalf of a community who still suffers from discrimination today.

Committee:

Ellen Berry (Advisor); Francisco Cabanillas (Committee Member); Ellen Gorsevski (Committee Member); William Albertini (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

American Literature; American Studies; Architecture; Germanic Literature; Literature; Medical Ethics; Peace Studies; Psychology

Keywords:

Politerature; Madness; Cultural Violence; Uncanny; Social Movements; TV Reed; Gaston Bachelard; Johan Galtung; Sigmund Freud; Shirley Jackson; Dennis Lehane; Thomas Mann; Curtis White

Krancer, Barbara A.Prison design and prisoner behavior: philosophy, architecture, and violence
BA, Oberlin College, 1980, Sociology
I contend that the architectural environment of the prison can directly affect prisoner behavior in terms of violence and pathology. Certain design configurations can promote inmate aggression and negative psychological effects. Thus, I shall explore the physical and philosophical state of the prison briefly through history and intensively at present, and shall attempt to present suggestions for the modification of these effects via change in the architectural environment.

Committee:

Albert McQueen (Advisor)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Architecture; Design; Sociology

Keywords:

prison;prisoner;environment;behavior;architectural;design;

Thurnauer, Mark H.Lightscape as a Design Tool for Thematic Daylighting Design
Master of Architecture, Miami University, 2001, Architecture & Interior Design
It is imperative to have visual imagery when designing for lighting, therefore most architects of the past and present have used sketches, painting, or physical models for determining if the light in a space meets the design intentions. These tools all have their limitations. The advancement of computer technology, computer light simulation software, such as Radiance, Lightscape, etc., can be used as an effective tool for thematic daylight design. This thesis focuses on Lightscape, because of its reputation and affordability. The work found the tool to have variable precision, but a lot of research effort is focused on understanding what “precision” is necessary in a design context. It also strives to develop a method to incorporate Lightscape in the architectural design process.

Committee:

Murali Paranandi (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Daylighting; Lightscape; Architecture; Kimbell; computer modeling; computer rendering; 3d animation; animation; rendering; radiosity; ray trace; texture mapping; visualization; art museum design; themes of light; qtvr; quick time

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