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West, Sarah M."Serviam": A Historical Case Study of Leadership in Transition in Urban Catholic Schools in Northeast Ohio
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2017, College of Education and Human Services
The purpose of this historical case study was to explore, through the lens of knowledge transfer, answers to the following two questions: how did the Sister-educators from one community in Northeast Ohio prepare themselves for leadership, and when it became clear that the future of their urban school depended on transitioning to lay leadership, how did Sister-principals prepare their religious communities and their school communities for that change. This qualitative study focuses on six members of one active, engaged, service-based community which has supported schools Northeast Ohio for over a century. The research revealed that a successful Sister-to-laity leadership transition will have its foundation in charismatic love, encourage faith-filled mentoring of faculty and students, honor the mission of the founding community, and support an overarching leadership culture of magnanimity to all stakeholders. This model can be employed in other educational and nonprofit settings where non-hierarchical servant leadership would be an effective approach.

Committee:

Marius Boboc, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Catherine Hansman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Elizabeth Lehfeldt, Ph.D (Committee Member); Adam Voight, Ph.D (Committee Member); Matt Jackson-McCabe, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education History; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; School Administration; Teaching

Keywords:

qualitative research, case study, religious education, Catholic school culture, urban school leadership, religious congregations, Catholic school leadership, leadership models, education policy, Northeast Ohio Catholic education, education history

Pollock, Asher WPhase Shift
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Ohio University, 2017, Studio Art
Phase Shift is the thesis of Asher Pollock, submitted for graduation from the Honors Tutorial College of Ohio University. It contains writing and paintings that collectively question concepts, genres, and methods of story-telling known well to many audiences.

Committee:

Laura Larson (Committee Chair); Jennie Klein (Advisor)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Art Criticism; Art Education; Art History; Arts Management; Performing Arts; Personal Relationships; Personality; Personality Psychology; Philosophy; Religious History; Rhetoric; Social Research; Spirituality; World History

Keywords:

queer, poseidon, neptune, phase, shift, water, story, stories, painting, paintings, art, artist, man, they, them, gay, men, myth, mythology, mythic, myths, gods, god, family, love, loneliness, despair, ice, independence, conceptual, contemporary, modern

Grugan, Cecilia SpencerDisability Resource Specialists’ Capacity to Adopt Principles and Implement Practices that Qualify as Universal Design at a 4-Year Public Institution
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2018, Educational Leadership
Due to the continuous growth of diverse student bodies on college campuses, creating accessibility for each unique student needs to be considered. Students who have a disability or disabilities are a substantial part of this growing diverse student body. Since disability resource specialists play a significant role in creating accessibility for such students, they can consider implementing practices that qualify as Universal Design. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore where disability resource specialists fall on Lewin’s (1951) continuum of change and Reynold’s (2009) levels of expertise in regards to implementing practices that qualify as Universal Design. Six participants were included in this study out of eight who were invited to participate. Out of those six participants, the study showed that all participants demonstrated a strong presence in the Unfreezing stage of Lewin’s (1951) continuum of change. Also, the study showed that all participants showed a level of knowledge as the second tier to Reynold’s (2009) levels of expertise. Limitations as well as recommendations for future research included recruiting a larger sample of participants to provide greater analysis of the study.

Committee:

Carol Patitu, Ph.D. (Advisor); Suzanne Franco, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Stephanie Krah, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory; Engineering; English As A Second Language; Experiments; Instructional Design; Intellectual Property; Labor Relations; Management; Mass Communications; Mental Health; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Occupational Health; Occupational Therapy; Personal Relationships; Public Administration; Public Health; Public Health Education; Public Policy; Reading Instruction; Recreation; Rehabilitation; Robotics; Robots; School Administration; Secondary Education; Special Education; Speech Therapy; Systems Design; Teacher Education; Transportation

Keywords:

Universal Design; Accommodations; Accessibility; Organizational Change; Proactive Practices; Disability; Disability Resource Specialists; Disability Services; Higher Education; Student Affairs

Groman, Jennifer LynnFrom Calling to Crisis: The Growth Process of Teachers Through Crisis-Like Incidents
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2015, Elementary Education
The phenomena of crisis in the formation and development of teacher identity is not unknown in the field of educational research, yet the study of these phenomena tends to focus on preservice and novice teachers. The purpose of this research is to discover through veteran teacher narratives, descriptions of crisis-like incidents, as well as any growth and transformation they may have experienced in the context of the profession. By studying teacher stories I hope to contribute to the understanding of how teachers navigate their teaching lives and shifting identities, especially in the face of difficulty, and gain insight into the value of collectively sharing and talking about the stories together. This Organic and Narrative based inquiry engaged three veteran teachers in conversations about the difficulties and challenges (crisis-like situations) of their teaching lives. The stories of crisis-like incidents (Veteran Stories) varied greatly, but themes emerged, such as: passion for the profession; varying needs for reflection; conflict of personal beliefs and institutional beliefs; conflict of belonging and not belonging; harmed and healed relationships; and the presence of a strongly held core belief. The process of sharing crisis stories in a safe and caring environment was quite transformative for participants. Their reflections indicated increased understanding of self and others, desire to be of service, a sense of wellbeing and personal implications, as well. They concluded that teachers often cause crisis-like incidents for other teachers, and that reflecting on incidents, while emotionally difficult, proved valuable to them. The researcher gained increased awareness of the vulnerabilities and risk in teaching, and now views herself as moving into teacher Elderhood. Early readers responded to the stories of crisis with stories of their own, demonstrating the truly widespread nature of crisis-like incidents in the lives of public school teachers. Recommendations for the profession include increased time and space for teachers to talk to one another about their philosophical beliefs and values and the value of a healthy, trusting school culture. Further research is needed to unearth aspects of critical incidents among teachers with varying philosophical viewpoints, as well as the phenomena of teachers causing critical incidents to other teachers.

Committee:

Gary Holliday, Dr. (Advisor); Renee Mudrey-Camino, Dr. (Committee Member); Alfred Daviso, Dr. (Committee Member); Sandra Spickard-Prettyman, Dr. (Committee Member); Rebecca McElfresh, Dr. (Committee Member); Diane Montgomery, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Psychology; Elementary Education; Middle School Education; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Philosophy; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Spirituality; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Crisis, critical incidents, teaching, teacher training, organic inquiry, narrative inquiry, transpersonal psychology, stories, narratives, teacher stories, teacher identity, identity

Brooks-Turner, Brenda ElaineExploring the Coping Strategies of Female Urban High School Seniors on Academic Successes as it Relates to Bullying
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2016, College of Education and Human Services
Bullying has become a worldwide problem of pandemic proportion and degree. (Thomas, Bolen, Heister & Hyde, 2010). In the United States over thirty-five percent of school-aged students were directly involved in bullying incidents. Tragic news stories about suicides and school violence raised awareness about the importance of addressing this global issue (Van Der Zande, 2010). To date reports further indicate that more females are involved in indirect relational bullying than males. Unfortunately, as technology becomes more and more accessible, relational bullying has become one of the fastest growing epidemics (Brinson, 2005; Rigby & Smith, 2011). Current research explanations were limited as to how female seniors who are victims of bullying showed resilience to academically succeed despite incidences of bullying throughout their high school experiences. Therefore, the purpose of this mixed method study was to explore the coping strategies utilized by12th grade female urban high school seniors who have experienced school success despite their involvement as victims of bullying. In this study, 32 high school female seniors completed the online Olweus’ Bullying Questionnaire which included self-reported attendance, discipline referrals, grade point average, and participation in extracurricular activities as it related to their bullying experiences. Additionally, the researcher randomly selected eight focus group participants were involved in two focus group sessions to provide rich descriptions of their experiences as victims of bullying. These victims expressed the coping strategies used to successfully defeat the negative connotations associated with bullying, and specifically acknowledged their personal triumphs. When students understood the intricacies of bullying, and were empowered to use effective coping strategies, their experience of school success should increase as the prevalence of bullying decreases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to decrease the number of bullying incidences in schools by providing students with effective resources or coping strategies that enabled them to no longer be victims of bullying, but to have opportunities to experience success as they develop, and learn in a safe and hostile-free environment.

Committee:

Frederick Hampton, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Brian Harper, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ralph Mawdsley, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Paul Williams, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mittie Davis Jones, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Elementary Education; Families and Family Life; Gender; Gender Studies; Health Education; Individual and Family Studies; Law; Legal Studies; Multicultural Education; Personal Relationships; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Policy; School Administration; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociology; Teacher Education; Urban Planning

Keywords:

bullying;coping strategies;academic success;academic achievement;female;urban high school;graduating seniors

George, Christopher EricCan I Get a Witness?: Reclaiming the Baptist Testimony Tradition to Enhance Sense of Community in a Church Congregation
Doctor of Ministry, Methodist Theological School in Ohio, 2015, Practical Studies
This Doctor of Ministry research project was motivated by a pastoral concern about loss of community in a specific congregation. Inspired by conversations with members of the congregation, the project sought to address people’s need for a community characterized by freedom and love. In the process, the project discovered a larger issue present in American society, namely the loss of community and sense of connectedness which permeates our culture. The Christian church, following the Biblical mandate to seek reconciliation, advances God’s mission by fostering unity and strengthening community. Recognizing the value of storytelling in the creation and strengthening of community, this research project reclaimed the Baptist testimony tradition and encouraged Christian storytelling in the context of a local church, namely First Baptist Church of Mobile. The project sought to empower a community of believers to discover and share stories with one another in an effort to foster friendship and mutual understanding. In the process, the project not only strengthened community in the context of this congregation, but provided a model for other congregations and church leaders who are committed to meeting a growing need for community in the Christian church specifically and American society generally.

Committee:

Diane Lobody, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Clergy; Families and Family Life; Personal Relationships; Religious Congregations; Religious History

Keywords:

community, church, congregation, testimonials, storytelling,

Knight, Katherine R.Malone University as an Intentional Community: An 1892 Friends Bible Institute Simulation
Undergraduate Honors Program, Malone University, 2015, Honors Thesis
Malone University was founded by J. Walter and Emma Malone in 1892 as an Evangelical Friends Bible training school. At the founding, the school was an intentional community referred to as the Friends Bible Institute. In simulating four days in the life of an 1892 Friends Bible Institute student body, participants had the opportunity to learn experientially about the history of Malone University, intentional communities, evangelism, and the nature of true community. True community involves conflict resolution, commitment, and common goals. Malone University today still carries out the intentions of the founders of the Friends Bible Institute, just in a different format. However, it is possible that Malone University in 2015 does not emphasize the Friends value of evangelism and social reform as much as it did at its founding.

Committee:

Lauren Seifert (Advisor); Welling Jacci (Committee Member); Jay Case (Committee Member); Malcolm Gold (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Behavioral Psychology; Bible; Education History; Personal Relationships; Personality Psychology; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; Religious History; Sociology; Spirituality

Keywords:

Malone University; J Walter and Emma Malone; Friends Bible Institute; 1892; intentional community; conflict resolution; community; evangelism; spiritual formation; simulation; Christianity

Golsan, Kathryn B.Assessment of Embedding Peer Tutors in the Basic Communication Course: Examining Student Engagement, Classroom Climate, Affective Learning, and Communication Competence
MA, Kent State University, 2012, College of Communication and Information / School of Communication Studies
Recent instructional research has suggested that students have expressed their need to be actively and emotionally engaged in the classroom. Student engagement decreases student attrition and increases student retention. Instructors who promote positive communication and facilitate relationship developments in the classroom influence positive classroom climates, which helps satisfy the social and emotional needs of students. Although student-centered instructors can satisfy these needs, the instructor-student ratio in the classroom may keep some students invisible, therefore, potentially unengaged. Instructional methods have begun to recognize the relational and individualized communication potential of peer learning, specifically peer tutoring. Moreover, peer learning engages students through observational and vicarious learning experiences of positive student models. This project explores the inclusion of peer tutors as positive student models embedded within the communication basic course and the potential affects this may have on student engagement, classroom climate, affective learning, and communication competence.

Committee:

Jeffrey T. Child, PhD (Advisor); Paul M. Haridakis, PhD (Committee Member); Jennifer L. McCullough, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Curriculum Development; Education; Educational Evaluation; Higher Education; Instructional Design; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Teacher Education

Keywords:

Student-Teacher Relationships; Communication Basic Course; Peer Tutoring; Peer Modeling; Personalized System of Instruction; Individualized Communication; Student Engagement; Classroom Climate; Affective Learning; Communication Competence

Taggart, Molly B.“What’s Love Got to Do with It?” The Effect of Love Styles on the Motives for and Perceptions of Online Romantic Relationships
MA, Kent State University, 2011, College of Communication and Information / School of Communication Studies
From a uses and gratifications perspective, this research project investigated the effects of love styles on motives for using the Internet to create new romantic relationships as well as on perceptions of online romantic relationships. Information about participants’ demographics, Internet use, and background experiences with romantic relationships was also collected in an effort to further characterize members of the sample. Results indicated that participants believed that adult romantic relationships created via the Internet are better able and equipped to fulfill individual, personal motives based on sex rather than motives based on love. While this study offered a first attempt at answering questions about the interconnectedness of love styles, motives, and perceptions, these findings unearthed a more complex mystery that needs further investigation. Future research in this line of inquiry has the power to make a positive impact on understanding of specific Internet usage, online dating services/functions, and most importantly, on the real people who use or may consider using the Internet in the search for romantic relationships.

Committee:

Janet Meyer, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Communication; Demographics; Gender; Mass Communications; Mass Media; Multimedia Communications; Personal Relationships; Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Research; Web Studies

Keywords:

online communication; mediated communication; uses and gratifications theory; motives; gratifications sought; the Internet; love; sex; romantic relationships; online dating; perceptions; attitudes; stereotypes; survey methods; facebook; college students

Stephenson, Pamela ShockeyPeer Involvement in Adolescent Dating Violence
PHD, Kent State University, 2011, College of Nursing

Adolescent dating violence (ADV) is a significant public health problem with broad social implications. ADV has many physical, psychological, and relational adverse consequences. Furthermore, ADV is associated with intimate partner violence during adulthood. The purpose of this study was to examine the ways that peers were involved in the dating violence of other adolescents.

This study is part of a larger, parent project. The study entitled, “Adolescent Dating Violence: Development of a Theoretical Framework” (ADV) was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and utilized grounded theory to develop a theoretical framework of how dating violence begins, unfolds and ends. Seven categories of violent relationships between adolescent couples were identified. They included, maltreating, turbulent, volatile, brawling, deprecating, bickering, and intrusive relationships.

This research used the narratives from the ADV (n=88) study to explain and describe the ways that peers were involved in ADV. Peers were involved in maltreating relationships by “participating in the aggression” (males) and by “deserting the recipient” (females). Peers were involved in turbulent relationships by “agitating the aggression” (males) and by “cheating with the boyfriend” (females). Male and female peers were involved in volatile relationships by “ignoring the aggression.” Male and female peers were involved in brawling relationships by “confronting a partner.” Peers were involved in deprecating relationships by “being the competition” (males) and by “being the audience” (females). Peers were involved in bickering relationships by “joking with the dating partner” (males) and by “needling the dating partner” (females). Peers were involved in intrusive relationships by “keeping tabs on the recipient” (males) and by “helping the recipient” (females).

This research provides an important contribution to the literature by developing a typology of peer involvement by relationship type and by gender. This advancement can serve as a useful guide to future research and clinical intervention.

Committee:

Donna S Martsolf, PhD, RN (Committee Chair); Claire Burke Draucker, PhD, RN (Committee Member); Gregory P Knapik, PhD, MA, RN (Committee Member); John West, Ed.D., LPCC-S (Committee Member); Cynthia Symons, D.Ed., CHES (Other)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Nursing; Personal Relationships; Psychology; School Counseling; Social Work

Keywords:

adolescent dating violence; peers; grounded theory

Grubbs, Joshua Briggs“WHY DID YOU MAKE ME DO THAT?” ANGER AT GOD IN THE CONTEXT OF MORAL TRANSGRESSION
Master of Arts, Case Western Reserve University, 2012, Psychology
Transgression has been a focus within the psychological community for many years, with special focus on moral transgressions as a type of spiritual struggle. Recent research has placed an emphasis on another spiritual struggle, anger toward God, which appears is often associated with blaming God for a negative life event. The present study explored the relationship between these two struggles. In the context of a web-based survey, undergraduates (N=138) reflected upon an instance of personal moral transgression and then completed a series of questionnaires assessing attitudes and beliefs in the context of transgression. Consistent with hypotheses, the extent to which individuals viewed their transgressions as arising from dispositional or trait-like qualities robustly predicted negative evaluations of God. This association demonstrates a previously unexplored link between two forms of spiritual struggle and provides insight into the manner in which spiritual struggles interact.

Committee:

Julie EXLINE, PhD (Committee Chair); Heath Demaree, PhD (Committee Member); TJ McCallum, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Experimental Psychology; Health Care; Pastoral Counseling; Personal Relationships; Psychology; Religion; Religious Congregations; Social Research; Sociology

Keywords:

RELIGION; SPIRITUALITY; GOD; TRANSGRESSION; ANGER; RELIGIOSITY; DEITY

Carson, Evelyn D.The Importance of Relational Communication for Effecting Social Change in HIV/AIDS Prevention Messages: A Content Analysis of HIV/AIDS Public Service Announcements
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2010, Communication Studies (Communication)

Since 1987, the government has produced public service announcements (PSAs) to provide information and education to the public about the nature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). By 2005, PSAs produced by the government continued, but now include nongovernmental organizations (NGO) that also produce PSAs to help fight HIV/AIDS through ongoing public education. Contained in the government/NGO PSAs is information that explains modes of how HIV/AIDS is contracted (e.g., unprotected sex, needle exchanges during drug use) and strategies to prevent infection of HIV (Gunn-Brooks, Boyer, & Hein, 1988; Kim, Stanton, Li, Dickersin, & Galbraith, 1997; Stanton, Kim, Galbraith, & Parrott, 1996). A content analysis of public service announcements by government and nongovernment organizations was conducted to ascertain the targeted audience, the communication strategies that are portrayed (i.e., identification, identity, face, dialectics, and sexuality) and a comprehensive analytical framework grounded in interpersonal communication theory, principally relational communication theory, based on general systems theory and cybernetics, which treats communication as processual and interactional rather than linear and individual (Beck, 1997).

The findings revealed that females are represented as dominant figures in HIV/AIDS PSAs; however, females are still underrepresented compared to males. Next, the findings showed that females have expanded discussions of issues (i.e., HIV testing) and how females are represented, such as experts. Nevertheless, the portrayal of females as qualified or trustworthy had decreased in HIV/AIDS PSAs. Verbal and nonverbal interpersonal communication strategies are incorporated in HIV/AIDS PSAs. This illuminated relational communication strategies of identification, identity, facework and sexuality embedded in HIV/AIDS PSAs. Implications of this study offer practitioners valuable tools to understand and implement relational communication during the inception and creation of HIV/AIDS PSAs.

Committee:

Christina Beck, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Jerry Miller, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Mary Tucker, PhD (Committee Member); Devika Chawla, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Gender; Health Education; Marketing; Mass Media; Personal Relationships; Public Health; Social Research; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Relational Communication; Health Communication; Social Constructivism; HIV/AIDS PSAs; Effecting Social Change; Health Education; Sexuality; Gender

Franklin, JoeyAn Excuse I've Been Working on for Awhile
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2009, English (Arts and Sciences)
The following seven personal essays represent the author’s attempt to resurrect certain elements of his past, not merely to understand himself better, but also to provide the reader with an opportunity to examine his or her own life, through the lens of the author’s experience. Relying heavily on the characters, places, emotions, and impressions of memory, the author essays on fatherhood, marriage, hair loss, chocolate addiction, plasma donation, coal mining, language, lust, and the inevitability of his mother’s death.

Committee:

Dinty W. Moore (Committee Chair); Joan Connor (Committee Member); Janis Holm (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Biographies; Families and Family Life; Literature; Personal Relationships

Keywords:

essay; memoir; creative nonfiction; parenthood; fatherhood; chocolate; addiction; sexuality; masculinity; poverty

Kozlosky, Kenneth MichaelPerception of Parkinsonian speech: Ratings by self and listeners vs. acoustic measures
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Communication Disorders/Speech-Language Pathology
Parkinson Disease (PD) has been found to have significant effects on speech production, including deficits in phonation and prosody. Studies of self-perception of speech and voice by individuals with PD suggested that individuals with PD may be unaware of their own speech deficits. It was also hypothesized previously that caregivers (or other non-neurologically impaired listeners) would show awareness of the speech deficits associated with PD. However, neither the claim that individuals with PD are unaware of their deficits, nor the claim that caregivers are aware of deficits have been comprehensively examined. The current study examined ten individuals with PD (speakers) their primary caregivers. Individuals with PD completed a paragraph reading and both those individuals and their caregivers were asked to rate the speech across six perceptual measures. Trained listeners also rated the paragraph reading across the same six perceptual measures. Perceptual measures were correlated with acoustic measures, and perceptual measures were studied for significant differences across listener types. Results showed five correlations between trained perceptions and acoustics, three (one meaningful) correlations between self-perceptions and acoustics, and no correlations between caregiver perceptions and acoustics. Across listener type, trained listener perceptions were found to be significantly higher when compared to self-perceptions on three speech characteristics, and were significantly higher than caregiver perception on one speech characteristic. Although no significant differences were found between self-ratings and caregiver ratings, descriptive analysis of the correlation results may indicate caregivers underestimate the effects of PD on speech and voice. Clinical implications are discussed, including the impact this finding may have on PD patients and caregivers regarding their abilities to seek and attend treatment for speech and voice.

Committee:

Alexander M. Goberman, PhD (Advisor); Elizabeth I. Burroughs, PhD (Committee Member); Rodney M. Gabel, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Acoustics; Communication; Health Care; Neurology; Personal Relationships; Speech Therapy

Keywords:

Parkinson; speech; voice; phonation; prosody; self-perception; listener perception; acoustic;

Hall, Sarah HippensteelCitizen Professionals: The Effective Practices of Experts Helping Community Organizations
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2010, Leadership and Change
Although numerous local, state, and federal laws and policies address water pollution, many problems remain. To address these problems thousands of groups of citizens, who are concerned with their water resources - rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, and groundwater - organized around the U.S. over the past several decades. To succeed, these community organizations need the resources and capacity to reach their goals. To gain capacity, some community organizations turn to people outside the organization for assistance. Citizen professionals are helpers who work jointly with an organization to help develop an organization's adaptive capacity to deal with challenges and achieve goals. Participatory action research exemplifies a process in which local stakeholders work collaboratively with a citizen professional. This study examines the role of the citizen professional as a combination of the principles of effective participatory action research and a helping relationship. The purpose of this study is to discover whether those characteristics, when utilized by someone who is helping a citizens group, such as a watershed organization, can continue or increase citizen participation and empowerment in community organizations as well as the successful pursuit of organizational goals. This study examines 14 cases of the helper's role in eight community-based watershed organizations; compares the helper's actions with the characteristics of citizen professionalism; examines the helper's actions for their impact on the success of the watershed organizations; and the continued or increased forms of participation and empowerment of the organization's citizen members. This study deals with the critical issues of watershed organizations and their role in the preservation and restoration of water quality. The significance of these issues extends to the role of citizens in policy issues; of citizen professionals in increasing the effectiveness of community organizations to participate in policy issues; and to democratic practice and civil society. The results of this study suggest: (1) the need for a bridge of shared leadership over the chasm of leaders and followers, and (2) the possibility of an avenue to approaching adaptive work in order to meet challenges such as environmental quality. The electronic version of the dissertation is accessible at the Ohiolink ETD center, http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd/.

Committee:

Richard Couto, PhD (Committee Chair); Al Guskin, PhD (Committee Member); Randy Stoecker, PhD (Committee Member); Tomas Koontz, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Agriculture; Environmental Science; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Social Psychology; Social Research; Sociology

Keywords:

community-based watershed organization; collaborative watershed management; nonpoint source pollution; citizen professional; participatory action research; civil society; empowerment; citizen participation; helping relationship; adaptive leadership

Quinn, Joann FarrellThe Impact Of Social Competencies And Role Factors On The Relational Construction Of Identity And Participation Of Physician Leaders
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2013, Management
Physicians as many other professionals are often promoted into leadership roles based upon their clinical or professional performance. Yet, many do not have the skills or the inclination to lead. In a response to increase the effective influence of professional physician leaders in healthcare organizations, several studies have sought to identify factors that predict effective leadership. However, no exploration has been conducted to understand how physician leaders construe or identify with their leadership roles. In this thesis, I develop a theoretical model that offers an understanding of how a physician leader constructs a leadership identity involving a higher level of participation within their leadership role. The dissertation employs a sequential mixed methods approach to explore the nature and antecedents of effective physician leadership. The initial inquiry employs a grounded theory approach to understand how physician leaders come to construe themselves as effective leaders. The results of the initial inquiry offer evidence that differences in physician leaders’ effectiveness is partly explained by the social construction of their secondary professional identity. This happens through a process of individual, relational and organizational endorsement of their leadership role. To garner further insight and clarification of this role identity and endorsement I hypothesize a research model, which posits that professional participation in leadership roles is mediated by aspects of positive psychological climate. A follow up study seeks further clarification for this effect by examining the extent to which a positive psychological climate and role endorsement mediate the relationship between social competencies and physician leaders’ professional participation in leadership. In sum, these three studies offer new insights into how physicians and other professionals understand effective leadership and the factors that lead to commit themselves as an effective leader. These results expand theories of secondary leadership and also have several implications how organizations can support such leadership.

Committee:

Richard Boyatzis (Committee Chair); Melvin Smith (Committee Member); David Aron (Committee Member); Somers Toni (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Business Administration; Health Care Management; Management; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Research

Keywords:

physician leadership; competencies; identity; psychological climate

Hall, Tracy D.Internet-based Family Therapy from the Perspective of the Therapist: A Qualitative Inquiry
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2013, Counselor Education and Supervision-Marriage and Family Therapy
The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to learn more about the process of Internet-based Family Therapy and to discover the advantages and disadvantages of using Internet-based Family Therapy as part of a practice. The overarching question asked, “How do therapists experience the phenomenon of Internet-based Family Therapy?” The sub-questions were: (1) How is Internet-based Family Therapy defined by therapists claiming to do it? (2) What are the presenting issues for Internet-based Family Therapy going forward? Heuristic Inquiry was used for data collection and analysis. Five participants were interviewed using online text-chat. Each participant had experience doing Internet-based Family Therapy and appropriate credentials. The core themes discovered were as follows: (1) The sites may be deemed not truly therapeutic. (2) The use of video is highly recommended in Internet-based Family Therapy. (3) More severe clients are contraindicated for Internet-based Family Therapy. (4) Face-to-face Family Therapy is better than Internet-based Family Therapy, however Internet-based Family Therapy is better than nothing. (5) The use of theory in Internet-based Family Therapy is much the same as in face-to-face Family Therapy. (6) The main concerns with Internet-based Family Therapy are confidentiality, crossing state lines & harm to self. A final interview dealt with Ethical dilemmas in Internet-based Family Therapy, Internet-based Family Therapy standards, limitations of Internet-based Family Therapy and handling harm to self or others when doing Internet-based Family Therapy. The findings are discussed, as well as considerations for therapists and directions for future research are suggested.

Committee:

Karin Jordan, Dr. (Advisor); Suzanne Mac Donald, Dr. (Committee Member); Cynthia Reynolds, Dr. (Committee Member); Linda Perosa, Dr. (Committee Member); Rebecca Boyle, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Counseling Psychology; Educational Psychology; Educational Technology; Experimental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Individual and Family Studies; Personal Relationships; Personality Psychology; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Social Psychology; Social Research; Technology; Therapy

Keywords:

Internet; Internet-based; online; on-line; family therapy; therapy; counseling; psychology; internet therapy; internet counseling; online therapy; online counseling; online family counseling; internet family counseling; distance therapy; video therapy

Yost, Kimberly S.A Search for Home: Navigating Change in Battlestar Galactica
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
This dissertation explores the various ways in which the multiple leaders portrayed in the science fiction television series Battlestar Galactica (2003-2009) navigate extreme conditions of continual change. In addition, the dissertation contains a discussion of the larger narrative themes of love, forgiveness, redemption, and embracing the Other as principles effective leaders must cultivate. Through an interpretation of this specific popular media text, a deeper emotional sensitivity to and understanding of leadership, positive and negative, during extreme crises is gained. Furthermore, the series serves as a vehicle through which viewers can reflect on and engage in their own self-awareness about issues surrounding leadership and reconsider personal paradigms based on the depiction presented in the narrative. The choice for using an interpretive hermeneutic method for this dissertation comes from the specific desire to understand the visual text of Battlestar Galactica in relation to leadership studies. The goal is neither to predict behaviors nor to examine an individual case against theory. My intent is to develop our further and deeper understanding of leadership in extremis, while questioning how the visual text may influence our perceptions of leadership theory and practice. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Chair); Lize Booysen, DBL (Committee Member); Holly Baumgartner, PhD (Committee Member); Kristin Bezio, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Management; Mass Media; Motion Pictures; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Religion; Social Structure; Spirituality

Keywords:

crisis leadership; charismatic religious leadership; emergent leadership; shared leadership; science fiction; television; Battlestar Galactica; love; forgiveness; redemption; otherness; home; interpretive hermeneutics; popular culture

Jacoby, Jill BethArt, Water, and Circles: In What Ways Do Study Circles Empower Artists to Become Community Leaders around Water Issues
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2009, Leadership and Change
This research explored the use of study circles as a means of engaging artists in dialogue with their peers about water related concerns. The question driving this research was, “In what ways do study circles empower artists to become community leaders around water issues?” Secondary questions focused on emerging environmental, water, and social justice themes as well as examples of increased water awareness and behavior change occurring as a result of individual participation in the study circles. Artists have a unique way of commanding attention and communicating about environmental concerns while functioning as catalysts for activism on a variety of social topics. Barndt (2004, 2006,2008) has written extensively about the nexus between community-based art, activism and action research, as well as identifying the important differences in participation and intent behind community-based art versus art as commodity. This research incorporated the use of study circles (also known as dialogue groups, dialogue circles, or talking circles) with artists to learn how study circles empower artists to become community leaders. Literature focusing on civic engagement and the arts has looked at the process of utilizing the arts to engage the public in dialogue about a social concern. This research differs in that it focused on how a dialogue process impacts artists. Seventeen artists participated in four study circle sessions that encouraged in-depth dialogue on water quality concerns. Lohan’s (2008) Water Consciousness: How we all Have to Change to Protect our Most Critical Resources was used as a study guide and to focus the dialogue sessions. The artists participated in one-on-one semi-structured interviews to help clarify the relationship between the study circles and their own water awareness as well as community building, collaboration, and/or leadership among the artists. A focus group was used to obtain feedback on the value of study circles for social change. Key findings from this research conclude that the study circles brought about new methods for problem identification and solving, individual behavior changes, a deeper understanding for others, and the dialogue provided a powerful catalyst for collaboration, leadership and relationship building. The electronic version of this dissertation is available in the open access OhioLink ETD Center, http://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Steve Chase, PhD (Committee Member); David Attyah, MFA (Other)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Ecology; Environmental Science; Fine Arts; Freshwater Ecology; Personal Relationships; Science Education; Social Research

Keywords:

action research; study circles; dialogue circles; popular education; water resources; activist art; social change; public art; environmental art; community-based art; collaborative leadership; environmental leadership; civic engagement

Newberry, Melissa AnnExamining Conceptual Understandings in the Building and Maintaining of Student- Teacher Relationships by way of Productive Reflection Practices
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, ED Policy and Leadership

Research on student-teacher relationships over the last several decades has focused on the impact that such relationships have for the student. From such research we know that the relationship between a teacher and the student does promote cognitive and social development as well as academic achievement. Research has also demonstrated that classroom teachers prefer certain personality and character traits. It is plausible that these preferences contribute to differential treatment of students. Acknowledging that differential behaviors do occur, this study intends to explore the question of why they occur and to investigate what influence, if any, productive reflection might have on those behaviors.

The purpose of this research was to examine changes in relationships between a teacher and the individual students in her class over the course of one school year. Both teacher and researcher systematically examined concepts of closeness between teacher and student through productive reflection techniques, including the creation of diagrams to physically represent the tacit closeness the teacher perceived. In addition, observations of classroom interactions, personal reflections written by the teacher, and interviews consisting of guided reflection were compared and contrasted to discover differences between the perceptions held by the teacher and what is displayed in the classroom. The findings suggest that the teacher was influenced by the interactions with her students and that those interactions in turn may indicate significant implications for how, why and with whom she created and maintained relationships, as well as the type of relationships established. Results from this study expand on recent findings regarding the factors that influence a teacher’s choice for interaction with specific students by illuminating those social concepts and processes that persuade teachers as they make relationship choices. This study concludes that classroom relationships are much more fluid than previously thought and highlights the potential effectiveness of using productive reflection techniques to promote change.

Committee:

Anita Woolfolk Hoy, PhD (Advisor); Phil Smith, PhD (Committee Member); Heather A. Davis, PhD (Committee Member); Barbara Seidl, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Psychology; Personal Relationships; Teacher Education

Keywords:

Student- teacher relationships; productive reflection; emotional labor; emotional work; teacher- student relationships; classroom relationships; differential behavior; ethical care

Lucero, Steven M.Religious Coping with the Stressors of a First Time Pregnancy as a Predictor of Adjustment Among Husbands and Wives
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Psychology/Clinical
Pregnancy is a time of heightened stress for husbands and wives undergoing the transition to parenthood for the first time. Working with a sample of 178 married couples, the present research examined how husbands'and wives'use of positive and negative religious coping strategies predicted pregnancy, psychological, and marital related adjustment variables. After controlling for demographic variables and secular coping methods in separate analyses for husbands and wives, hierarchical linear regression revealed that positive religious coping predicted positive outcomes such as increased stress related growth and spiritual emotions, while negative religious coping predicted negative outcomes such as increased depression, anxiety, and ambivalence in marriage for both husbands and wives. Pregnancy stressors moderated the relationship between positive religious coping and love in marriage for wives but not for any other outcomes for either husbands or wives.

Committee:

Kenneth Pargament, PhD (Advisor); Annette Mahoney, PhD (Committee Member); Alfred DeMaris, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Gender; Personal Relationships; Psychology; Public Health; Religion

Keywords:

religious coping; pregnancy; coping; stress related growth; labor fears; spiritual emotions; depression; anxiety; well-being; divorce proneness; love; ambivalence; marital satisfaction; pregnancy stress

Keramidas, Natacha L.Personality and Mentoring: An Investigation of the Role of Proteges' personality, Protege-initiation of Mentoring Relationships and Mentoring Received in Doctoral Programs
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2017, Psychology-Counseling
Mentoring can change the course of our lives and, in graduate education, is defined as “a personal relationship in which a more experienced faculty member or professional acts as a guide, role model, teacher, and sponsor of a less experienced graduate student or junior professional” (Johnson, 2002, p. 88). It has been posited that this type of relationship is key to more rapid progression and degree completion, program satisfaction, and retention (Campbell, 2007; Huwe & Johnson, 2003; Johnson, 2007). While most universities report providing mentoring programs, graduate students report that the prevalence of mentoring relationships is between 50 and 70 percent, leaving a significant number of graduate students unmentored and missing a number of important benefits (Johnson, 2007; Mullen, 2007; Sedlacek et al., 2007). Individual factors and personality have been hypothesized as potential barriers to the initiation of mentoring relationships, and extraversion may be key in understanding the initiation and prevalence of mentoring (Bozionelos & Bozionelos, 2010; Campbell, 2007; Clark et al., 2000; Turban & Lee, 2007). This study investigated the effect of specific personality facets of the Five Factor Model, on proteges’ initiation of mentoring relationships with faculty and mentoring received. Data were collected from 162 doctoral students in the social sciences. Mediation analyses revealed that initiation of mentoring by doctoral students mediated the relationship between friendliness, assertiveness, self-consciousness, self-efficacy, achievement striving and mentoring received. Furthermore, hierarchical regressions revealed that the best set of predictors for mentoring received included initiation, age and friendliness accounting for 26% of the variance. Similarly, the best set of predictors for initiation included assertiveness and achievement striving accounting for 16% of the variance. However adding self-consciousness rendered assertiveness non-significant indicating that self-consciousness may act as a moderator between assertiveness and initiation and pointing out the need for future research in this area. This study informs the need to educate doctoral students about the importance of initiating mentoring relationships with faculty if they want to obtain mentoring. Implications for doctoral programs in the social science and suggestions for future research are also discussed.

Committee:

John Queener, Dr. (Advisor); Kevin Kaut, Dr. (Committee Member); Suzette Speight, Dr. (Committee Member); David Tokar, Dr. (Committee Member); Ingrid Weigold, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Counseling Psychology; Higher Education; Personal Relationships; Personality

Gomes, Jenna M.The Things He Left Behind
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2018, English
"The Things He Left Behind" is a short story cycle inspired by the consequences of war and the power of legacy. It follows a young soldier, Felix Rocha, through the eyes of the many friends, family, and strangers that he impacted throughout his short life. The character is based off of a real-life soldier, Felix Del Greco, who was the first Connecticut National Guardsman to be killed in Operation Iraqi Freedom. The incorporation of artifacts into the story is meant to mix fiction and reality; to present to the reader both the real Felix and the fictional Felix. As Tim O’Brien famously said, “story-truth is truer sometimes than happening-truth.” This short story cycle is meant to make a lasting impact on the reader, leaving them with the question, “What are the things that I will leave behind?”

Committee:

Meredith Doench (Advisor); David Fine (Committee Member); Christopher Burnside (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Families and Family Life; Literature; Military History; Military Studies; Personal Relationships

Keywords:

creative writing; war; iraq; operation iraqi freedom; connecticut; short story cycle; tim obrien; bruce springsteen; soldiers; national guard; family; friends; death; love; loss; military

Larson, Katie TitusAdolescents' Self-Described Transformations and Their Alignment with Transformative Learning Theory
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
This phenomenological, collaborative inquiry explored the depth of two adolescent girls’ lived experiences during their high school years and the degree to which their self-described transformative incidents aligned with transformative learning theory. Traditionally this theory has been reserved for adults, yet the current paradigm may have overlooked the capabilities of modern adolescents to not only experience, but to describe and interpret transformative learning in ways both similar to and unique from adults. My two 19-year-old co-researchers and I examined four years of their self-identified transformative incidents by breaking them into components, analyzing the language within, and seeking evidence of critical self-reflection throughout; and then compared the extent to which the incidents aligned with the frameworks of adult transformative learning theory. Findings indicate that the co-researchers did experience transformative learning as defined by several theorists and exhibited both adult-like capabilities of: critical self-reflection, rational discourse, and reflective action; and adolescent-like aspects of: the development of identity, self-authorship, and empathy. This study challenges current assumptions in the theory and adds to the holism of the field. This Dissertation is available in Open Access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu and OhioLink ETD Center, http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Lize A.E. Booysen, DBL (Committee Member); Carolyn Kenny, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Sharon Daloz Parks, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Developmental Psychology; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Psychology; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Philosophy; Teaching; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Transformative Learning; Transformative Incident; Shift in Consciousness; Adolescent Development; Self-Reflection; Phenomenology; Cooperative Inquiry; Perspective Shifts; Relationships; Leadership Development; Transformative Education; Co-Research

Keirsey, Stacie RaeExperiences of Neurotypical Siblings of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Qualitative Exploration
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
In recent years, the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been on the rise, prompting a simultaneous increase in scientific study regarding cause, impact, and intervention (Hughes, 2009; Ravindran & Myers, 2012). Research has proposed advances in the treatment of the individuals diagnosed and focused efforts on scholastic, parental, and professional intervention and supports. However, the siblings of ASD children have largely been neglected in this scientific investigation. The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study was to explore neurotypical siblings’ experiences in living with a child diagnosed with ASD. Seven adolescents were selected using criterion, convenience, and snowball sampling. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and were analyzed using thematic reflection (van Manen, 1990). Data analysis uncovered seven themes: (a) personal impact, (b) familial impact, (c) social impact, (d) relational understanding, (e) socio-cultural influence, (f) future outlook, and (g) advice. Findings indicated neurotypical sibling experiences contain both positive and negative perceptions of living with a brother or sister diagnosed with ASD. Perceptions were often influenced by the cultural and societal value placed upon normal behaviors. The need for appropriate education regarding ASD etiology, symptomology, and treatment was deemed to be important for NTD siblings, parents, professionals, and society at large. Additionally, the development of social supports for NTD siblings was suggested.

Committee:

Mary Wieneke, Ph. D. (Committee Chair); Steve Curtis, Ph. D. (Committee Member); Ned Farley, Ph. D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Early Childhood Education; Families and Family Life; Personal Relationships; Personality; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Social Psychology; Special Education

Keywords:

Autism Spectrum Disorder; Developmental Disorder; Sibling; Adolescent; Teenager; Hermeneutic; Phenomenology; Qualitative; Interview; Exploratory; Intervention; Family; Relationship; Relational; Advice; Education; Impact; Support

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