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Mark, Margaret WoodrowPracticing Sacred Encounters: A Narrative Analysis of Relational, Spiritual, and Nursing Leadership
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
This research examined one large health system that has, through a stated mission outcome that every encounter is a sacred encounter, sought to enhance relationships occurring within the health care environment. Seeking to understand the lived experience of sacred encounters through the lens of nurse leaders in one acute care hospital settings this study examined how nurse leaders experienced their leadership role in realizing sacred encounters. Participants were defined as nurse leaders from one hospital setting and included nurse managers, directors and one vice president. A narrative thematic analysis framed by situational analysis was the method of inquiry. Data was gathered through an intensive interview process eliciting an in-depth exploration of the experience of the participants, along with their personal interpretation of that experience. Two questions were asked to each participant, the first to gain an understanding about their personal experience with sacred encounters and the second to allow the nurse leader to reflect on his or her personal leadership behavior as it related to the realization of sacred encounters within their primary area(s) of responsibility. A review of research of current literature focused on relational leadership, spiritual leadership and nursing leadership theory. The major finding was that organizational culture can be defined from the top of the organization and, through well-defined and purposeful leadership behaviors, be realized at the point of bedside care. This study was limited to a one-faith-based hospital. Future research should focus on broadening the scope of inquiry about organizational culture and how espoused culture can be translated into action through purposeful leadership behaviors. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA, https://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Hollaway, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Peter Vaill, D.B.A. (Other)

Subjects:

Health Care Management; Nursing; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

nursing; nurse managers; leadership; nurses; relational leadership; spiritual leadership; spirituality; organizational culture; narrative inquiry; organizational psychology

Doyle Scharff, Maureen Female Faculty Members in Medical Schools: An Exploratory Analysis of the Impact of Perception of Job Satisfaction, Culture, Opportunities for Advancement, and Formal Mentoring on Intent to Stay
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Educational Administration (Education)
Challenges with institutional fit, burnout, overall job satisfaction and retention of female faculty in medical schools continue to persist. Fueling much of this is the omnipresent disparities between male and female faculty in senior and leadership positions, leaving junior female faculty little hope for advancement. Faculty development programs that include formal mentoring which can influence perception of culture have been shown to improve job satisfaction of female faculty, thus improving retention of this important resource. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were used to evaluate similarities and differences between female faculty members in medical schools who plan to stay employed at their current institution and those who plan to leave or are undecided. Personal and workplace status characteristics, as well as perception of job satisfaction, culture, career advancement opportunities, and participation in a formal mentoring program were the specific attributes studied. In addition, a binomial logistic regression was conducted to assess the predictive value of one or more of these variables with a goal of determining whether or not participation in a formal mentoring program can predict intent to stay. Results of the analysis showed statistically significant differences between female faculty who intend to stay and those who plan to leave their institution or are undecided. The model, including perception of global job satisfaction, interpersonal culture (fit/collegiality) and equal opportunity for all faculty members, coupled with participation in a formal mentoring program, was statistically significant and was able to predict intent to stay.

Committee:

Yegan Pillay (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Medicine; Organization Theory

Keywords:

Mentoring; Female Faculty; Medical Schools; Job Satisfaction; Culture; Career Advancement

Hottenstein, Kristi NA Qualitative Case Study on Human Subject Research Public Policy Implementation at One Council on Undergraduate Research Institution.
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2016, Higher Education
Regulations for research involving human subjects in higher education have long been a critical issue. Federal public policy for research involving human subjects impacts institutions of higher education by requiring all federally funded research to be passed by an IRB. Undergraduate research is no exception. Given the literature on the benefits of undergraduate research to students, faculty, and institutions, how human subject research public policy is being implemented at the undergraduate level was a significant gap in the literature. This qualitative single case study examined the human subject research policies and practices of a selective, Mid-western, Council on Undergraduate Research institution. The purpose of the study was to determine how this institution implemented human subject research public policy to benefit its students. This institution used a hybrid approach of public policy implementation that met federal requirements while capitalizing on the role local actors can play in the implementation process. This model resulted in a student friendly implementation emphasizing various learning outcomes and student mentoring. Although there is considerable research and public discussion on the negative aspects of IRBs, if approached in a manner that embraces student learning, the IRB experience can be an extremely beneficial aspect of the institution’s learning environment.

Committee:

David Meabon (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Biomedical Research; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory; Higher Education Administration; Operations Research; Organization Theory; Social Research

Keywords:

IRB; institutional review board; CUR; council on undergraduate research; undergraduate research; UR; public policy; implementation; human subject research; implementation theory; hybrid theories; student mentoring; benefits of undergraduate research

Saiz, Carolina Del CarmenOpportunities for Conversion to More Sustainable Practices by Houses of Worship through Team Performance Enhancing Strategies that Include Leadership with Facilitative Skills
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies
This research focused on assessing the performance of teams of volunteers in Houses of Worship (HOWs) in the State of Massachusetts that are successfully planning, advancing and completing sustainable initiatives. The sustainable initiatives included solar photovoltaic (PV) installations, city public parks cleaning projects, efficient windows installations, efficient lighting fixtures installations, and building insulation improvements. The goal of this research was to assess the dynamics of a total of eight successful teams, including the relationships among team members and their leaders with facilitative skills that they perceived were instrumental to their effective and efficient performance. The role of team leadership was more relevant than anticipated, and it presented statistical interdependence with team interpersonal processes such as: collaboration, cooperation, cohesion, communication, coordination, trust, and especially conflict resolution. Based on this knowledge and qualitative data from interviews, a set of guidelines on “best practices” was produced, containing recommendations on how to build and manage HOW teams to conduct local sustainability projects. Key words: sustainability best practices, team, leader with facilitative skills, House of Worship (HOW), solar energy, energy efficiency.

Committee:

James Gruber, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); James Jordan, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Robert Pojasek, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Energy; Environmental Studies; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Sustainability

Keywords:

sustainability; team; leadership; facilitative skills; House of Worship; solar energy; energy efficiency; environment; climate change

Scott, Nehemiah D.Antecedents and Outcomes of Ambidexterity in the Supply Chain: Theoretical Development and Empirical Validation
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2015, Manufacturing and Technology Management
As the degree of uncertainty and intensity within the complex business environment continues to increase, firms are forced to make timely changes to their product and process technologies. Such environments are often characterized by unpredictable demand patterns, rapid industry clockspeed, and heightened competitive intensity. As a result, firms face many difficulties in realizing sustained and superior performance, and are at risk of realizing decreases in market and financial performance. Firms can alleviate this risk by engaging in innovation practices that enable them to secure current profitability (efficiently serving existing customer segments) alongside future viability (adapting to meet the demand of new customer segments). Simultaneously serving existing and breakthrough product markets means that organizations must be able to balance paradoxical tensions in their innovation management capabilities. Ambidexterity is one such capability, in which the successful balance of exploration and exploitation promises to offer supernormal business performance. While the performance benefits of ambidexterity have been noted, research has not yet adequately sought to understand whether a firm’s decision to pursue ambidexterity is contingent on certain business environment factors. Likewise, research has also not yet explored the intangible resources a firm must build and/or acquire and manage after deciding to pursue ambidexterity. Additionally, because no single firm can adapt and survive without the same being achieved by its supply chain partners, ambidexterity in supply chain capabilities is vital. However, the literature base examining the importance of ambidexterity in the supply chain is scarce. Lastly, ambidexterity and the process for implementing it within the firm and across the supply chain remains misunderstood amongst practitioners. To fill the aforementioned research gaps, this study builds a strategic innovation-based and interdisciplinary theoretical framework of ambidexterity that links environmental antecedents, ambidextrous resources, ambidextrous supply chain capabilities, innovation outcomes and firm performance. The central purpose of this research is to explore and advance the scholarly understanding of how organizations within complex business environments can leverage their supply chains to successfully implement ambidexterity, and to empirically validate assertions concerning the antecedents and outcomes of ambidexterity within the supply chain. This research seeks to explore how characteristics of a complex environment influence a firm’s decision to invest in internal (ambidextrous firm resources) and external (ambidextrous alliance portfolio) resources. This study also examines the relationship between ambidextrous supply chain capabilities (ambidextrous supply chain collaboration and supply chain adaptability), innovation outcomes (innovation ambidexterity) and firm performance (market and financial performance). In fulfilling this purpose, this research utilizes and integrates literature from the strategy, organizational management, operations and supply chain management, and innovation management research streams. The hypotheses are based on practitioner and academic rationale, and the rich theoretical premises of ambidexterity theory, paradox theory, environmental determinism, strategic choice theory, contingency theory, resource-based view, and resource dependency theory. This study makes the following assertions: (1) ambidexterity is a higher-order paradox that is comprised of micro-paradoxes; (2) a way to achieve adaptable and endurable performance is by managing innovation through the ambidexterity paradox; (3) as the business environment becomes more complex, firms will tend to invest more in both internal and external ambidextrous resources; (4) ambidextrous supply chain collaboration and supply chain adaptability are essential capabilities that mediate the association between ambidextrous resources and innovation ambidexterity; (5) realization of innovation ambidexterity enables a firm to achieve greater financial and market performance relative to its competitors. A primary data collection methodology was employed in this study. Specifically, an online survey was used to facilitate the large-scale data collection process. Data from 215 respondents representing manufacturers across five industries was collected and analyzed. To test the proposed hypotheses, covariance-based structural equation modeling (CB-SEM) was used. The findings indicate that firms do not wait for external environment factors to control their pursuit of ambidexterity. Instead, it is the strategic choice of firm leaders that results in their proactive development of internal and external ambidextrous resources. Also, a firm’s internal ambidextrous resources such as absorptive capacity, ambidextrous leadership and organizational mindfulness are critical for (1) developing an ambidextrous alliance portfolio based on function, structure and attributes, and (2) increasing supply chain adaptability. The study also finds that ambidextrous alliance portfolio is a strong and direct antecedent of ambidextrous supply chain collaboration, while ambidextrous firm resources has a positive and significant indirect impact on ambidextrous supply chain collaboration. Furthermore, ambidextrous supply chain collaboration and supply chain adaptability are found to enhance a firm’s achievement of innovation ambidexterity. Lastly, innovation ambidexterity has a positive and significant association with firm performance (market and financial performance). This study makes multiple contributions. First, this study has progressed the existing conception of ambidexterity by infusing it with tenets of paradox theory. Secondly, this study employs an interdisciplinary framework of ambidexterity that has been empirically tested. Third, this is the first empirical study to develop ambidextrous firm resources, ambidextrous alliance portfolio and ambidextrous supply chain collaboration constructs and model relationships between them. Fourth, a scale has been developed to measure ambidextrous alliance portfolio. Additionally, this study provides findings that are both expected and counterintuitive. This study ends with a detailed discussion of the aforementioned contributions, research and managerial implications, research limitations and opportunities for future research.

Committee:

Dr. Paul Hong (Committee Co-Chair); Dr. Monideepa Tarafdar (Committee Co-Chair); Dr. Jenell Wittmer (Committee Member); Dr. Mark Gleim (Committee Member); Dr. Lakeesha Ransom (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Management; Operations Research; Organization Theory; Technology

Keywords:

organizational ambidexterity; exploration; exploitation; supply chain; innovation management; complex business environment; theoretical development; empirical validation

Hayes, Susan M.A Mixed Methods Perspective: How Integral Leaders Can Contribute to the Growth of Emerging Leaders
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2015, Leadership and Change
Given that organizational complexity continues to increase, leaders are looking for credible information, and a process that helps them become a better leader. Emerging leaders are faced with trying to be the best leader they can be while leading teams of people who think and act differently from them. To assist emerging leaders with their leadership, this study explores the literature and looks to highly respected and admired leaders for how they became the leader they are today. The purpose of this study was fourfold: first, to identify and describe first and second tier integral theory leaders from a sample of leader respondents from a U.S. Midwestern city; second, to describe how first and second tier integral theory leaders define leadership; third, to determine what second tier integral leaders see as leading to their becoming the leader they are today; and fourth, to identify the integral leader’s perspectives and advice that can be shared with emerging leaders. This study focused on the convergent space of three theories. The first theory is the field of adult development theory with transformational leadership, the constructive-developmental theories, and meaning making; the second is the field of integral theory with Wilber’s all quadrants, all levels (AQAL) theory, and first and second tier consciousness; and the last is the hero’s journey as described by Joseph Campbell, and the quest for truth. The (AQAL) framework was used in a mixed methods perspective to explore how people assessed as integral leaders defined leadership, developed into integral leaders, and how they can contribute to the growth of emerging leaders. This study was dual-phased: Phase 1 was a quantitative and qualitative survey completed by 624 leaders, and Phase 2 was a telephone interview with eight integral leaders. From the thematic analysis of all the data, four themes emerged: looking inward, looking outward, being a good leader and paying it forward by mentoring others. Implications for emerging leaders, leadership and change, and future research are discussed. This ETD is available in open access in OhioLink ETD, http://ohiolink.edu/Center and AURA http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ron Cacioppe, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Rica Viljoen, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

mixed methods; integral theory; hero journey; spiral dynamics; tier one development; tier two development; leader; leadership; adult development; emerging leaders

Dixon, Deirdre PainterSTAYING ALIVE: THE EXPERIENCE OF IN EXTREMIS LEADERSHIP
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, Management
Staying Alive: The Experience of In Extremis Leadership Abstract by DEIRDRE DIXON In extremis situations present unique and difficult demands on a leader because they involve highly unstable conditions and life threatening danger for all involved. Not surprisingly, leading during in extremis situations is one of the least studied areas of leadership. This research helps to fill this gap by using a mixed-methods approach that includes three distinct phases. Each phase utilizes the in extremis setting to distill core elements of leadership that emerge in that unique context. The goal is to help leaders to be more effective when entering situations where their lives and the lives of others are in immediate danger. In the first phase, I interviewed thirty US Army platoon leaders who had recently returned from Iraq and/or Afghanistan about their experience of in extremis leadership. The findings that emerged were modeled and tested with a 494 leader sample from all military branches. Those findings were then extended to professions that are often considered to be facing similar life threatening situations, with a sample that included 514 in extremis leaders from police and fire fighting as well as the military. xiv Results of the first qualitative study included finding a simultaneous, rather than a sequential occurrence, of sense-making and sense-giving during in extremis situations.. This suggests that the process proceeds best when leaders are in a heightened state of situation awareness. Training facilitates leaders’ sense-making by freeing up cognitive capacity, and sense-giving can be an interdependent social activity with subordinates in certain circumstances. The second study revealed that situation awareness and team training were most relevant to outcomes. The final study explored leader characteristics and their impact on situation awareness and self-efficacy across a broader set of professions facing in extremis situations. The findings show that a leader’s mental flexibility can be a delicate balance between being too flexible and not enough. Surprisingly, it was found that leaders in the dangerous occupations of police, fire, and military experience perilous environments in different ways. This suggests that understanding the different in extremis experiences of these three occupations is imperative, especially because they are often grouped together for social science studies.

Committee:

Richard Boland, Jr. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

in extremis; leadership; situation awareness; sensemaking, sense giving,self-efficacy; mental flexibility; stress tolerance; military; Army

Wolfberg, AdrianA Theory of Overload and Equivocality Effects on Learning during Knowledge Transfer within Policy Making Dyads
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, Management
In this thesis I develop a theory of how overload and equivocality affect knowledge transfer in high stakes policy making contexts, how interaction mechanisms between a knowledge provider and decision maker are used, and how these interaction mechanisms affect the way the provider learns. The empirical research leads to the discovery of unique archetypes of how knowledge providers learn during knowledge transfer with decision makers: under conditions of low overload and low equivocality the provider achieves mental model shifts through cooperative learning, the co-discovery with the decision maker to increase shared understanding; under high overload and low equivocality, the provider’s mental shifts occur through focused learning, the provider’s ability to control cognitive focus on self-selected tasks; under high overload and high equivocality, the provider’s mental shifts occur through survival learning, the provider’s desire to focus on what is understandable through prioritization that reduces attention excess generated by ample external inputs; and under low overload and high equivocality, the provider’s mental shifts occur through reflective learning, the provider’s introspective and creative effort to overcome limitations in meaning-making. The theory opens the “black box” of knowledge transfer and explains why high overload often confounds high equivocality – a self-destructive tendency. This is because in survival learning individuals embrace the known rather than explore the unknown and thus thwart innovation and novelty. While the empirical results confirm the benefits of conversing with each other in organizational settings, the findings suggest that such benefits accrue only under the condition of cooperative learning, and to expect such benefit in other conditions is unrealistic. The research compels managers to become aware of a counterintuitive phenomenon: not only may the decision maker learn as a result of knowledge transfer, but also the knowledge provider experiences shifts in mental models. This fact behooves the decision maker to not only be attentive to what the provider knows, but to have an in-depth familiarity with the way the provider learns.

Committee:

Kalle Lyytinen (Committee Chair); Linda Argote (Committee Member); Richard Boland (Committee Member); John Paul Stephens (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Management; Organization Theory

Keywords:

knowledge transfer; learning; dyad; overload; equivocality; feedback; mechanism; mental model; mitigation; amplification; policy making

Andrea, Hernandez LeighEffective Networked Nonprofit Organizations: Defining the Behavior and Creating an Instrument for Measurement
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
This correlational research design, which included a convenience sample of 157 nonprofit staff and board member responses to a Likert-type survey, was used to conduct a principle components analysis (PCA) to develop subscales related to networked nonprofits. As defined in the study, a networked nonprofit has a set of intentionally built trusting relationships and has systems and strategies that engage various stakeholders in meaningful conversations. They achieve their missions by developing strong partnerships where they invest in the goals of other organizations to mobilize resources for a common shared mission and values. While there were correlations between the level respondents rated their organization as a networked nonprofit, or networkedness, and effectiveness reported by respondents, the two networked nonprofit subscales revealed as a result of PCA (Stakeholder/External and Systems Vision/Internal) included elements found in effective as well as networked nonprofits. Also, the Maturity of Practice items were narrowed and reviewed through bivariate correlation. While they correlate to one another, they did not correlate to the networkedness or effectiveness measures. This seems to indicate a disconnect between the actual practice of networkedness as evidenced through social media and evaluation measures and the networked mindset or organizational culture. In other words, the way respondents perceive their levels of effectiveness and networkedness may indeed not align with actual behaviors. My ETD may be copied and distributed only for non-commercial purposes and may not be modified. All use must give me credit as the original author. A video author introduction in MP4 format accompanies this dissertation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivatives 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd and Antioch University's AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Kusy Mitchell, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Wergin Jon, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Renz David, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Freiwirth Judy, Psy.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Psychology; Public Administration; Social Work; Sociology

Keywords:

networked; nonprofit; nonprofits; not-for-profits; networked nonprofit; networked nonprofits; nonprofit effectiveness; networkedness; Maturity of Practice; effectiveness; social media

Carr, Susie J.Developing a Measure of Teachers' Perceptions of Organizational Invisibility
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2013, Educational Administration (Education)
This study theorized and operationalized a new construct: Organizational Invisibility (OI), through naming and describing, then quantifying the construct. OI is a characteristic of the participants within the organization rather than of the organization itself. Following a process of instrument development, the study produced an 11-item, double-factor scale (explaining 58% of scale covariance) with high reliability (alpha = .90). OI characterizes a mindset that reflects individual detachment and an unclear view of the common purpose and cooperative participation that constitutes organization. Suppositions drawn from the literature served as the impetus to create an initial item pool. Professional educators (colleagues and an expert panel) critiqued and helped me revise the initial item pool. Development of the instrument relied on principal component analysis (with varimax rotation) and reliability analysis (Cronbach's alpha) across two phases: a pilot study (n=177) and a field test (n=616). The field test also involved an assessment of concurrent validity using four measures that the relevant literature and original theorizing commended as competing, or even redundant, measures (OES, Bohn, 2010; OSTES, Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2000; TES, Hoy & Woolfolk, 1993; TBS, Dworkin, 1987). The most strongly related concurrent measure (OES, Bohn, 2010) shared just 29% of variance with OI. I conclude that OI is a functional construct, within the limitations of the study.

Committee:

Craig Howley, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); William Larson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jerry Johnson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Valerie Conley, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Organization Theory

Keywords:

Organizational Invisibility; OI; Teacher perceptions; Individual detachment; Unclear view of organizational purposes; Unclear view of cooperative participation; Instrument development

Weinblatt, BrianAn Examination of Academic Decision-Making During Two University Mergers
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2012, Higher Education

This study examined decision-making processes during two university mergers, instances of major organizational change. Processes were evaluated in the context of traditional and modern academic decision-making models. A qualitative method of inquiry, designed as a multiple instrumental case study, entailed interviews with 6 participants at a pilot site, followed by 37 interviews and document analysis at two case study sites. Interview transcripts and documents were coded and analyzed, yielding a thematic evaluation.

Four major themes were found pertaining to the two mergers: avoidance of conflict, need for validation, momentum, and disconnect among views. The study found that more traditional models of decision-making were employed at one institution, while more modern models were used at the other. Both institutions exhibited administrative leadership utilizing tools to exert influence to effect the mergers. Conclusions included a highlight on American higher education institutions in transition from traditional to more modern approaches of decision-making, described as a “grey zone” between the models. Implications of the study included the necessity for modern higher education administrators to maintain a delicate balance between traditional and evolving modern approaches of higher education decision-making.

Committee:

Penny Poplin Gosetti, PhD (Committee Chair); David Meabon, PhD (Committee Member); Ronald McGinnis, MD (Committee Member); Robert Yonker, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

university decision-making; higher education decision-making; university mergers; higher education mergers; university consolidation; higher education consolidation

Lytle, Brittney E.Efficacy of Codes of Ethics in Nonprofit Organizations
Master of Liberal Studies, University of Toledo, 2010, Liberal Studies
Studies on ethics and codes of ethics exist in great numbers. However, the research on ethics is lacking in the nonprofit sector. One year ago, a study was conducted that dealt with codes of ethics in a nonprofit organization. Most of the employees did not know their organization had a code of ethics. This thesis expands that study and analyzes ethical conduct and codes within the literature on nonprofit organizations and ethical conduct and codes within five nonprofit agencies in the Northwest Ohio/Southeast Michigan region. Unlike the original investigation, all individuals interviewed were well aware of their organizations’ codes of ethics. The participants also showed great interest in becoming more involved in the creation and updating of their codes of ethics. However, 44 percent of the participants have witnessed a breach in ethics at their agency. Annual training and encouragement of staff to take part in updating the agencies’ codes of ethics could decrease the unethical misconduct that is apparent within these ventures.

Committee:

Kilmer D. Pualette, Dr. (Advisor); Amy Capwell Burns, Dr. (Committee Member); Richard J. Knecht, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Community; Communication; Management; Organization Theory; Philosophy

Keywords:

Ethic; Ethics; Nonprofit; Non-profit; code of ethics; nonprofit ethics; non-profit ethics

Wang, BryanThe Relationships among Organizational Characteristics, Lean Practices, HRD Practices, and the Institutionalization of Lean Practices in Small and Medium-sized Manufacturers
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, EDU Physical Activity and Educational Services
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among organizational characteristics, lean practices, HRD practices, and the institutionalization of lean practices in small and medium-sized manufacturers. Results showed that the institutionalization of lean practices is related to the type of production and the level of implementation of certain HRD practices. Further interviews assisted in interpreting the results of the study. This study suggested the importance of HRD to support organizational change.

Committee:

Ronald Jacobs, PhD (Advisor); Joshua Hawley, EdD (Committee Member); Shahrukh Irani, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Industrial Engineering; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

HRD; lean; Institutionalization

Hall, Sarah HippensteelCitizen Professionals: The Effective Practices of Experts Helping Community Organizations
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2010, Leadership and Change
Although numerous local, state, and federal laws and policies address water pollution, many problems remain. To address these problems thousands of groups of citizens, who are concerned with their water resources - rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, and groundwater - organized around the U.S. over the past several decades. To succeed, these community organizations need the resources and capacity to reach their goals. To gain capacity, some community organizations turn to people outside the organization for assistance. Citizen professionals are helpers who work jointly with an organization to help develop an organization's adaptive capacity to deal with challenges and achieve goals. Participatory action research exemplifies a process in which local stakeholders work collaboratively with a citizen professional. This study examines the role of the citizen professional as a combination of the principles of effective participatory action research and a helping relationship. The purpose of this study is to discover whether those characteristics, when utilized by someone who is helping a citizens group, such as a watershed organization, can continue or increase citizen participation and empowerment in community organizations as well as the successful pursuit of organizational goals. This study examines 14 cases of the helper's role in eight community-based watershed organizations; compares the helper's actions with the characteristics of citizen professionalism; examines the helper's actions for their impact on the success of the watershed organizations; and the continued or increased forms of participation and empowerment of the organization's citizen members. This study deals with the critical issues of watershed organizations and their role in the preservation and restoration of water quality. The significance of these issues extends to the role of citizens in policy issues; of citizen professionals in increasing the effectiveness of community organizations to participate in policy issues; and to democratic practice and civil society. The results of this study suggest: (1) the need for a bridge of shared leadership over the chasm of leaders and followers, and (2) the possibility of an avenue to approaching adaptive work in order to meet challenges such as environmental quality. The electronic version of the dissertation is accessible at the Ohiolink ETD center, http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd/.

Committee:

Richard Couto, PhD (Committee Chair); Al Guskin, PhD (Committee Member); Randy Stoecker, PhD (Committee Member); Tomas Koontz, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Agriculture; Environmental Science; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Social Psychology; Social Research; Sociology

Keywords:

community-based watershed organization; collaborative watershed management; nonpoint source pollution; citizen professional; participatory action research; civil society; empowerment; citizen participation; helping relationship; adaptive leadership

Espinoza, ChipMillennial Integration: Challenges Millennials Face in the Workplace and What They Can Do About Them
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
There is a monumental changing of the guard that is currently taking place in organizations due to demographic metabolism. One of the largest birth cohorts or generations in history (Baby Boomer) is beginning to retire while their predecessor (Builder) is almost completely out of the workforce. Gen X is hitting stride and on the cusp of inheriting the proverbial organizational mantle. The three aforementioned age cohorts have learned to play in the organizational sandbox together. However, a new age cohort (Millennial, a.k.a. Gen Y), equal or greater in size to the Baby Boomer cohort started entering the playground approximately ten years ago and they are kicking up sand. The etymology of the Millennial story began with a discussion "about" Millennials. The conversation quickly moved to strategies for recruiting them. Talk then shifted to on-boarding and managing Millennials. I desire to broaden the dialogue by inviting a discussion with Millennials about how they are experiencing work life. As is the case with any transition, there is great potential for conflict and angst. The purpose of this qualitative study is to identify the challenges Millennials experience while trying to integrate into organizations and the skills that will help them make a successful transition into the workforce. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Alan Guskin, PhD (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Roger Heuser, PhD (Committee Member); Luis Calingo, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Demographics; Management; Organization Theory; Social Research

Keywords:

participatory action research; Millennials; onboarding; generational analysis; generations; Gen Y; next generation; diversity; multi-generational; young adult; stereotype; management; leadership; workplace; organizational psychology

Yost, Kimberly S.A Search for Home: Navigating Change in Battlestar Galactica
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
This dissertation explores the various ways in which the multiple leaders portrayed in the science fiction television series Battlestar Galactica (2003-2009) navigate extreme conditions of continual change. In addition, the dissertation contains a discussion of the larger narrative themes of love, forgiveness, redemption, and embracing the Other as principles effective leaders must cultivate. Through an interpretation of this specific popular media text, a deeper emotional sensitivity to and understanding of leadership, positive and negative, during extreme crises is gained. Furthermore, the series serves as a vehicle through which viewers can reflect on and engage in their own self-awareness about issues surrounding leadership and reconsider personal paradigms based on the depiction presented in the narrative. The choice for using an interpretive hermeneutic method for this dissertation comes from the specific desire to understand the visual text of Battlestar Galactica in relation to leadership studies. The goal is neither to predict behaviors nor to examine an individual case against theory. My intent is to develop our further and deeper understanding of leadership in extremis, while questioning how the visual text may influence our perceptions of leadership theory and practice. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Chair); Lize Booysen, DBL (Committee Member); Holly Baumgartner, PhD (Committee Member); Kristin Bezio, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Management; Mass Media; Motion Pictures; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Religion; Social Structure; Spirituality

Keywords:

crisis leadership; charismatic religious leadership; emergent leadership; shared leadership; science fiction; television; Battlestar Galactica; love; forgiveness; redemption; otherness; home; interpretive hermeneutics; popular culture

Byars, Janet L.Holographic Leadership: Leading as a Way of Being
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2009, Leadership and Change
Holographic Leadership integrates values-based leadership into an understanding of an energetic holographic world. It is a world where the unseen is the primary influencer, where the smaller is more powerful (Bohm, 1994). I will synthesize many diverse ideas into an exploratory theory that will suggest new insights into sustainable leadership. I will propose a new model of practice from which to work. I suggest that it is through an internal state of physiological coherence and psychological balance that a leader can truly learn to “hold steady” (Heifetz, 1994), creating an intentional holding environment, a coherent group dynamic, which draws forth potentials from the unseen world. My hybrid dissertation marries theoretical suppositions with a model of practice, and is based on my own heuristic knowledge from the business world. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Carolyn Kenny, PhD (Committee Chair); Mitch Kusy, PhD (Committee Member); Rollin McCraty, PhD (Committee Member); Jonathan Reams, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Business Community; Cognitive Therapy; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Psychobiology; Psychology

Keywords:

leadership; intention; integrity; coherence; holding environment; theoretical model of practice; organizational psychology

Elias, Maria VeronicaCommunity: An Experience-Based Critique of the Concept
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2008, Urban Studies and Public Affairs

Are social science definitions of community adequate? Or do community members have anything to say about that? Mary Parker Follett (the relevant work is her The new state, 1918) suggests that understanding community is a key to resolving the problem of political participation.

Taking the reader through a conscious protocol of asking people about their idea of community, the author seeks to show that the so called "subjects" do have something to say to experts in concept formulation. The case of the community concept is used to challenge a basic assumption of social science, the fallacy that all social experience can be reduced by a methodological individualism.

The Public Administration literature at large looks at community from the outside in, in a static way as if it were an object, an immutable entity. My interest lies in the lived process of participating in community as a foundation for democratic politics. This seems to require searching out the meanings that people attach to community when they use it to describe their experiences of living with one another in a way that shapes their civic engagement experiences. The research question guiding this study is: What does community mean to the people who live in one? It presents a seldom visited epistemological approach, that of phenomenology (Husserl 1970, Heidegger 1962, Schutz 1962), which finds its roots in people's experiences. My motivation leads my investigation; that is, my own experience of political unfreedom in Argentina is the trigger that has led me to inquire into the nature of the relationship between community and democracy. This dissertation seeks to make a case for practice illuminating theory (Hummel 1998) along with the plausibility of broadening the dialogue about community from the ground up.

A substantive contribution of this dissertation to the understanding of community is the discovery that community as a process, far from being an abstraction, constitutes an everyday practice in neighborhood group dynamics, the political community that the ancient Greeks praised as true democratic governance.

Committee:

Ralph P. Hummel (Advisor); Camilla Stivers (Advisor); Sonia Alemagno (Other); Greg Plagens (Other); Kathy Feltey (Other)

Subjects:

Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Philosophy; Political Science; Public Administration; Social Psychology; Social Work; Sociology; Urban Planning

Keywords:

political participation; democratic politics; community as a process; active citizenship; democracy; citizen participation; Public Administration; democratic governance; political philosophy; Mary Parker Follett; creative experience

Edgar, PerezDeveloping a Resilient Network Ambidexterity Scale
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this study was to develop a resilient network ambidexterity scale. While numerous research efforts have considered the dimensions of social capital, resilience, and adaptive capacity to evaluate organizations and communities, few have explored social network indicators within organizations that can be used to mobilize ambidextrous strategies during times of disruption. The emphasis here was to understand the tendencies and behaviors that networks possess to sustain or achieve success along the parallel strategies of optimization and exploration. This study progressed in three specific phases toward filling this void in organizational development literature, using a mixed-methods approach. Phase 1 was the development of the item pool and analysis of the scale to establish face and content validity. Phase 2 included administering an online survey to 344 participants. Data collected were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis, followed by a partial confirmatory factor analysis These revealed a two-factor solution central to identifying resilient network ambidexterity: Optimizing Organizational Boundaries and Exploring Novelty. Phase 3 involved getting feedback on the revised scale from organizational leaders and practitioners working in innovative fields to refine the final RNA instrument. This research made connections between resilience and ambidexterity in organizations through ongoing inquiry on ways that fusing distinct paradigms impacts organizational outcomes. The development of this scale can serve as a useful tool for organizations to assess their level of resilience and mobilize the features of optimization and exploration. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Donna Chrobot-Mason, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Elizabeth Holloway, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Adaptive capacity, Ambidexterity, Mixed methods, Social networks, Social capital, Resilience, Scale development, Organizations

Charney, Renee LRhizomatic Learning and Adapting: A Case Study Exploring an Interprofessional Team’s Lived Experiences
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this theoretical case study was to explore the lived experiences of members within an inter-professional team about how they learn and adapt while dedicating their lives toward the well-being of students residing in and attending a rehabilitation home school. Although there is broad literature that addresses legacy learning theories and frameworks, as well as complex-adaptive organizations, very little shows how the application of rhizome philosophy principles address learning and adapting within an organizational context. This study is a step toward addressing that gap. Using interviews, thematic analysis, and storyline networking, the study explored in depth the lived experiences of 16 administrative, therapy, and educational staff who worked at the school. By using organizational storytelling as a means to unearth and analyze the team members’ 194 stories, a rich web of connection and awareness emerged. Their stories demonstrated new ways of being, learning, and adapting both within and outside the school, and revealed alignment with rhizome philosophy principles of connection, multiplicity, heterogeneity, a signifying rupture(s), and cartography, as well as alignment with legacy and traditional learning theories and frameworks, thereby offering a new lens of learning within organizations called, Rhizomatic Learning in Organizations (RLO). This study is an opportunity to expand and enhance ways of considering learning and adapting within organizations by introducing and supporting rhizomatic behaviors and principles within collectives as they work together. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Elizabeth Holloway, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Laura Morgan Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mary Ann Reilly, Ed.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Theory; Organization Theory

Keywords:

rhizomatic learning; rhizomatic learning in organizations; rhizome theory; learning; adapting; learning in organizations; nomadic learning; unlearning; organizational storytelling; learning theory; educational theory

O'Neal, April MThe Effects of Calling and Vocational Presence and Search on Psychological Well-Being
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
This study was a quantitative exploration of 13 calling and vocational constructs related to calling presence, search and actualization to determine which best predicted psychological well-being. For this study, calling was defined using the definition established by Dik and Duffy (2009) and its three component parts: (1) an external summons, (2) viewing one’s work as a source of purpose or meaning, and (3) having a prosocial orientation or using one’s work to help others. Forward multiple regression analyses revealed that Search for Calling and Presence of Prosocial Orientation were the best predictors of well-being. Further, group differences were explored using the calling categories: calling diffusion, calling foreclosure, calling moratorium, and calling achievement (see Table 1). Results revealed that individuals who were high in searching for a calling had significantly lower levels of psychological well-being if they also had low levels of calling presence (Calling Moratorium Category). The hope of the researcher is that these as well as previous research findings lead to the future study of additional aspects of calling and psychological well-being.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta Reinhart, PhD (Advisor); Margaret Brooks, PhD (Other); Dale Dwyer, PhD (Committee Member); Judith Jackson May, PhD (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Business Education; Education; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Psychology

Keywords:

Calling; Calling Presence; Calling Search; Vocation; Well-Being

Ogundimu, Adedayo The Perceptions of Students and Faculty on the Potential Impact of University-Industry Collaborations on Quality Assurance in Two Nigerian-Publicly Supported Universities
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2016, Educational Administration (Education)
The National Universities Commission (NUC) has observed that the quality and focus of training offered by Nigerian universities in recent times are not in tune with the needs of the country. Studies have also reiterated the above problems as well as their causes. These include decline in real value of government budgetary allocations for higher education; compromised university autonomy; deterioration of physical structures; incessant student and faculty strikes as well as the lack of modern teaching, learning and research resources. It has thus become necessary for Nigerian universities to consider the possibility of collaborating with industries for research and innovation as one of the feasible means of boosting their access to teaching, research and learning resources. This non-experimental, quantitative research used a questionnaire survey to collect data from students and faculty of two publicly-supported Federal Universities in Nigeria with a view to examining the perceptions of the participants on the potential impact of university-industry collaborations on quality assurance in the universities. Collected data was analyzed using the SPSS Version 21 software to run appropriate statistical tests and to count, classify and explain the perceptions of all the participants with respect to each of the research questions. Findings show that university-industry collaborations in general hold good potential impact for quality assurance with regard to the facilitation of access to teaching and learning resources. With regard to higher education policy and practice, it is recommended that future studies be conducted with the aim of putting in place a modality for developing frameworks for a national scholar-practitioner policy on preparation, purpose and practice. Such a platform could encourage publicly-supported universities to partner with industry while at the same time meeting the challenges of carrying out collaborative action research and innovation activities aimed at arriving at a national agenda for human capital development and economic growth.

Committee:

Emmanuel Jean Francois, Ph.D. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

African Studies; Comparative; Education; Educational Leadership; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Public Administration; School Administration

Keywords:

University and Industry Collaborations; Potential Impact; Quality Assurance; Nigerian Publicly supported Universities

Ellison, Thomas A.Toward Transforming Health Systems: A Practice Study of Organizing and Practical Inquiry in Academic Medicine
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2015, Leadership and Change
Transformation of health care systems will be grounded in new professional relations and collective, cross-disciplinary actions to impact care delivery. Organizing such relations and actions involves practical inquiry rather than applying professional knowledge. This dissertation presents an exploratory, performative study of the initial organizing of the Health Systems Innovation and Research (HSIR) Program in Health Sciences at the University of Utah. The HSIR program was conceived principally to catalyze cross-disciplinary innovation and health services research and enhance care delivery changes by documenting care improvements and publishing research. This study includes a composite narrative of the organizing and practical inquiry work of HSIR organizers, which highlights many questions, issues, possibilities, and priority shifts that would likely face those who would seek to transform care delivery and the cultures of academic medicine. The study identifies improvement, integration, and transformative strategies as pathways to effect change in health systems. The study includes a narrative-based analysis of cultural, dynamic, and narrative resources to enhance understanding of the HSIR story and the implications of cultural and dynamic influences for the Program’s future and health systems transformation. This analysis emphasizes the cultural and dynamic influences of academic and clinical departments and other sources of dynamic influence that were operating to hinder or facilitate the larger objectives of HSIR organizers. The study also explores the significance of collective practical inquiry, exploratory inquiry, and culture change to the practice and theory of leadership and change. The HSIR study was conducted using a practice study methodology developed from practice and narrative theories, with contributions from complexity, process, learning, organizing, social construction, and relational theories and empirical studies of professionals undergoing change. The methodology recognizes an expansive, relational complex of practice as the empirical world to be studied, and was designed to explore practical inquiry, organizing, and collective actions of professionals in changing organizational situations. Methodological design principles focus data collection and analysis on situated activities, local discoveries, practical understandings, dynamic and cultural influences, narrative connections, future possibilities, and significant matters identified by practice participants. The electronic version of this dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, http://etd.ohiolink.edu and AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Alan Guskin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Laura Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Plater, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Health Care Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Social Research

Keywords:

Practice theory; organizing; organizational change; dynamics; culture change; narrative; practical inquiry; exploration; integration; transformation; professionals; collective action; health systems; academic medicine; practice studies; leadership

Hostiuck, Katherine E.A Study of School Climate and Its Relationship to the Accountability-Focused Work of Principals
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2015, Educational Administration (Education)
A study has been conducted in order to pursue an enhanced understanding of the accountability-focused work of high school principals in a large Ohio school district. This study examines the use by the principals of climate data for the purpose of school improvement planning. This study also identifies the data sets used by principals when creating annual School Improvement Plans (SIPs), especially when engaging in the Data-Driven Decision Making (DDDM) process. Interviews were conducted with seven principals in the district, which annually provides its principals with formal climate data. These data have been collected by the district and the teachers’ association (union) from parents, students, and teachers. Principals, in this particular district, are required to create annual SIPs, but are not mandated to use any particular forms of data when creating such plans. This investigation sought to understand if the principals used the formally collected school climate data when creating SIPs and engaging in the DDDM process. Furthermore, the study sought to understand the manner in which and the extent to which the principals use climate data when creating their SIPs. The qualitative data from the interviews have been analyzed by the researcher through an emergent coding system. The study revealed that while the principals indicated that they value school climate data, they typically did not focus on the available formal school climate data when creating their SIPs and engaging in the DDDM process. Instead, the principals focused on using data sets related to state and federal school improvement mandates measured by Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) standards. Furthermore, the principals in this study described having little or no training on the use of school climate data as part of the DDDM process for school improvement. This study suggests that principals may need to focus on understanding and improving school climate, in order to make plans for continuous improvement as it relates to mandated data sets.

Committee:

William Larson (Committee Chair); Gordon Brooks (Committee Co-Chair); Jerry Johnson (Committee Member); Amy Taylor-Bianco (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Organization Theory; School Administration

Keywords:

school climate; data-driven decision making; DDDM; school accountability; school improvement; school improvement planning; SIP

Suarez, Juan FWise by Design: A Wisdom-Based Framework for Innovation and Organizational Design and its Potential Application in the Future of Higher Education
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
A wiser socio-economic system, by design and not by chance, may well benefit from a series of design principles drawn from the well of wisdom. This dissertation focused on a refined set of eight components of wisdom through research designed to explore if, how, and when they are invoked by a group of experts participating in a futures discussion about organizations in their field of practice, American higher education. The aim was to explore a set of wisdom-centered design principles (denoted as Wise By Design [WBD]) for social innovation, specifically in the design of organizations that would thrive in the future. After four rounds of engagement with a panel of experts with approximately 500 years of accumulated experience in the field, six conclusions were reached: a) an organization could be seen as wise; if leadership, management, and innovation practices are augmented by wisdom; b) the use of design principles based on wisdom and futures inquiry could help organizations develop wise processes; c) wise people develop the ability to take an objectivized balanced perspective when confronted with situations, decisions, or requests for advice; d) wisdom could be described as a multi-channel sense-and-respond adaptive system with the higher purpose of flourishing of self and others; e) interoperability and dual hybridity, both administrative and academic, could enable institutions of higher education to thrive in the future; and f) this field of research could lead into a discussion on the value of exploring artificial wisdom. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, http://etd.ohiolink.edu and AURA http://aura.antioch.edu/

Committee:

Alan Guskin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Laurien Alexandre, Ph.D. (Committee Member); R. Eugene Rice, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

wise; WBD; wise by design; higher education; artificial wisdom; wisdom augmented practice; hybridity; cognitive; intuitive; practical; experience; balanced; adaptive; aesthetic; ethical; time sensitive; futures research

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