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Alyoser, Abdulaziz ZSELF-REPORTED ATTITUDES AND PRACTICES OF MUSIC INSTRUCTORS IN KUWAIT REGARDING ADULT MUSIC LEARNERS
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, Music Education
The purpose of this qualitative descriptive research was to determine the self-reported attitudes and practices of music instructors in Kuwait regarding adult music learners. Of central importance to this investigation was how instructors approach adult music education in terms of preparation, goal-making, materials, and evaluation. Participants included 14 university faculty members from one music department in a high-population urban setting in the state of Kuwait. The research questions that guided the study included: (a) How do music instructors in Kuwait prepare for becoming teachers of adult music learners? (b) What are instructors’ goals in teaching adult music learners in Kuwait? (c) What are instructors’ chosen materials for adult music students in Kuwait? and (d) How do instructors in Kuwait approach evaluating their students as well as themselves? Data were gathered through a self-reported open-ended questionnaire that was developed by the researcher. Findings indicated that participants supported formal education opportunities for teachers, such as seminars and workshops. Teachers claimed that they wanted to see their students develop an appreciation for music, remain motivated, and become professional musicians. The participants used numerous resource materials for instruction, including materials designed specifically for adult music learners as well as teacher-modified materials. The educators also employed a variety of formal and informal evaluations such as tests and live feedback. Implications include implementing lifelong music making teaching practices in Kuwaiti music education, enhancing teaching practices and evaluation methods, improving the student-teacher relationship, and understanding adult music learners’ characteristics and their previous experience.

Committee:

Nathan Kruse, Dr (Committee Chair); Kathleen Horvath, Dr (Committee Member); Matthew Garrett , Dr (Committee Member); Denise Davis, Dr (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Music; Music Education

Keywords:

adult music learners, andragogy, lifelong music making, lifelong learning, Kuwait

Kern, RuthCommunity aspects of the orchestra
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1946, Music
N/A

Committee:

Eugene Weigel (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Music

Welch, SarahEffects of Bench Height Variation on Muscle Activation in Pianists
Bachelor of Arts (BA), Ohio University, 2016, Music
Pianists, particularly collegiate and professional pianists, often suffer from debilitating playing-related injuries. Poor playing technique, including inefficient ergonomics, has frequently been forwarded as a cause of these injuries, though the literature lacks epidemiological studies to confirm this causative agent. Arts medicine literature and most piano pedagogy methods suggest that a bench height that produces a forearm horizontal to the floor is the preferable bench height. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effect of bench height variation, and its resulting effect on forearm position, on pianists’ muscle activation during three specific playing activities. This was undertaken with the clinical goal of determining whether bench height variations, which affect the relative position of the forearm to the floor, impact the playing mechanism. The specific research questions were [1] Which position of the forearm minimizes muscle activation while playing? And [2] Do pianists identify that position as their optimal playing position?

Committee:

Jeff Russell (Advisor)

Subjects:

Medicine; Music; Music Education; Pedagogy; Performing Arts

Keywords:

Arts medicine; performing arts medicine; piano; pedagogy

Hanshumaker, James RichardA Survey of the Opinions of Administrators and Music Teachers in Regard to Large Group Music Competition
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1956, Music

Committee:

William B. McBride (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Lenzo, Terri BrownOnline Professional Development in Preschool Settings: Music Education Training for Early Childhood Generalists
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College of the Arts / School of Music
TERRI BROWN LENZO, PH.D., DECEMBER, 2014 MUSIC ONLINE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN PRESCHOOL SETTINGS: MUSIC EDUCATION TRAINING FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD GENERALISTS Dissertation Adviser: Dr. Craig Resta Preschool generalists are often responsible for leading musical activities despite the fact that they may not have received training. The online format showed promise for ameliorating training barriers such as time commitment, cultural misconceptions regarding music education, and self-efficacy for leading musical activities. Therefore, the purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the effectiveness of an online training program for increasing preschool generalist self-efficacy for leading musical activities. This was research of the quasi-experimental genre in which a one-group pretest-posttest design was utilized. The researcher conducted four preschool music classes which were videotaped by an assistant. Selected recordings were combined with narrated PowerPoint presentations to create three separate video-training modules focused on teaching techniques for leading singing, instrumental, and movement activities. The modules were posted online and designed to allow unlimited asynchronous access for a two-week period. Using purposeful sampling methods, participants were recruited by contacting affiliates of the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Snowball sampling was also employed. The sample (n = 26) included classroom educators working in child care centers and independent settings from all six regions of the United States. Data were collected via Qualtrics online survey service and analyzed with IBM SPSS. At an alpha level of .05, overall teacher self-efficacy for leading musical activities increased significantly (p = .005). Self-efficacy for leading specific singing, instrumental, and movement activities increased in 21 of 22 categories, and 14 of those findings were statistically significant. The significant findings for teaching musical concepts and facilitating the development of creativity were particularly meaningful as previous researchers have found these activities lacking in preschool curricula. Significant results were also obtained for beliefs about inherited musical talent. Given an appropriate training design, study data support the use of an online delivery method for the music education professional development of in-service preschool generalists. Implications exist for the training of other generalist populations and music specialists. Considering the critical nature of early childhood musical development, additional training programs should be implemented with classroom teachers and music educators.

Committee:

Craig Resta, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Behavioral Sciences; Curricula; Early Childhood Education; Inservice Training; Instructional Design; Music; Music Education; Teacher Education; Technology

Keywords:

online training; self-efficacy; early childhood; musical development; music education; musical activities; child care centers; preschool students; classroom teachers

Jimenez, Samantha DAn Exploration of Teaching Music to Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2014, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
The purpose of this grounded-theory qualitative study was to explore how music teachers successfully work with students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Many individuals with ASD are impacted daily by social and communication difficulties, sensory sensitivities, executive functioning challenges, and restricted or rigid behaviors. Current research, literature, media, and ASD and music circles support that music is a powerful medium for individuals with ASD. Benefits of music for individuals with ASD include therapeutic advantages, various improvements in skills, social opportunities, emergence of gifts and talents, and emotional outlets. Regular exposure to learning music in the U.S. is typically through music lessons or classes. Therefore, it was critical to seek a better understanding of how individuals with ASD can receive optimal learning experiences for music. Using a qualitative grounded theory approach, interviews were conducted with four music teachers who currently teach individuals with ASD. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, and the transcriptions were analyzed. The data analysis yielded a theory drawn from both the unique and similar experiences shared by the music teachers. The participants have been successful in teaching their students with ASD because of the following three elements: music as the goal (fostering music enjoyment and experience), different levels of success (acceptance of variable abilities and skills and adjusting expectations for each individual), and positivity (creating opportunities for empowerment and confidence). The participants also identified strategies that support and drive these elements: concrete strategies (tools used to accommodate needs), stylistic strategies (non-traditional and flexible teaching approaches), and attitudinal strategies (deeper understanding of students). These elements and strategies can be utilized as foundational guidelines for music teachers, giving them important material to consider if they plan to work with individuals with ASD. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Patricia Linn, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jane Harmon-Jacobs, Ph.D. (Committee Member); John Whitehead, Psy.D. (Committee Member); Alejandra Suarez, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education; Psychology; Recreation; Teaching

Keywords:

autism spectrum disorder; autism; music; grounded theory; music teachers; music teaching

Tucker, Eric HoyJanice Harsanyi: Profile of an artist/teacher
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 1998, Music

When considering musicians who have combined a highly successful performing career with an equally successful academic teaching career in the 20th century, the professional life of Janice Harsanyi should be considered as one of the longest and most prolific. Not only has Harsanyi maintained a career that exemplifies the Artist/Teacher profession, but she has also made many significant contributions to the musical scene of the 20th century.

Harsanyi enjoyed a professional singing career that began in 1954 and continued well into the early 1990s. During a forty-two year professional singing career, she has sung in forty-four states and six European countries. At the height of her career, during the 1960s and the 1970s, Harsanyi was performing over ninety concerts a year! These figures by themselves represent a very successful career of which many professional singers would be envious. However, throughout her entire performing career, 1951 to the present, Harsanyi's teaching record in academe has been equally impressive as she has taught at four of the most prestigious schools of music in the United States.

By making a chronicle of the concert and teaching career of Janice Harsanyi, this study documents a career filled with many achievements both in academe and in the professional performing world that may well serve as a reference for those individuals who aspire to an Artist/Teaching career. By documenting certain aspects of her career, this document will also show her contributions to the musical world of the 20th century.

Committee:

Charles Patrick Woliver (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Harsanyi, Janice; vocal mus

Klonowski, Craig ThomasFactors Affecting Student Motivation Related to Enrollment and Retention in Music and Performing Ensembles Outside of the School Environment
Master of Music, Cleveland State University, 2009, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Despite extensive research regarding student motivation in performing ensembles, little is known about student motivation in ensembles outside of the school environment. The literature regarding motivation in school ensembles shows motivation comes from five main categories: parents and family, peers, directors, environment, and the students themselves. This study asks basic questions regarding motivation of students in a large community performing ensemble, and compares them to responses from the same students regarding their school ensemble experiences. The responses to the questionnaire suggest that motivating factors in community ensembles fall into the same basic categories, but have slightly different nuances based on the environment. Looking through the context of Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, this study adds to a growing body of research regarding student motivation, emphasizing the importance of parents, peers, and the director in student motivation and retention in ensembles both in and out of the school setting.

Committee:

Rita Klinger, PhD (Committee Chair); Birch Browning, PhD (Committee Member); Howard Meeker, Professor (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Fine Arts; Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Music; motivation; participation; retention; maslow; hierarchy of needs;

Hayes, William FellowsRetention of 8th Grade Band Students During the Transition to High School
Master of Education, University of Toledo, 2004, Music Education
For band directors, the retention of students during the transition from junior high school to high school is a very important issue. At a time when high school graduation requirements are rising and elective credits are decreasing, directors must be focused on the reasons students decide to remain in band. For these reasons, a survey of band directors has been completed that attempts to gauge what they perceive as the most important factors in student retention. While all of the questions in the survey were important with regards to retention, the most important aspects dealt with the parental, musical and social aspects of band. The survey also seems to indicate, from the directors' point of view, that students have a wide variety of needs. Directors who can adapt their teaching philosophy to meet student needs will be the most likely to retain students during the transition to high school.

Committee:

Timothy Brakel (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music; Music

Keywords:

music; music education; education; band; retention; band retention; music retention; band attrition; music attrition; attrition

Spring, Erin K.The Interdisciplinary Collaborative Competency in Music Therapy: Terminology, Definitions, and Teaching Approaches
Master of Music (MM), Ohio University, 2010, Music Therapy (Fine Arts)
While a majority of music therapists report using collaboration in their music therapy practices, little information exists regarding how the AMTA competency on interdisciplinary collaboration is addressed within music therapy training programs. In order to investigate the teaching of this competency at the undergraduate level, a survey was sent to 65 music therapy program directors at AMTA approved institutions. The survey sought to identify and define the terms and teaching models used to address this competency, as well as its value and placement within the undergraduate curriculum. Interdisciplinary was the most commonly selected term to address the competency over the terms collaboration, multidisciplinary, consultation, transdisciplinary, and interprofessional. Definitions selected by respondents indicated confusion continues to exist regarding the definitions and use of collaborative terminology. Additionally, results showed that program directors strongly value the competency and that the preparation for interdisciplinary collaboration may benefit from more information on this topic. Collaborative definitions and teaching approaches are recommended.

Committee:

Anita Louise Steele (Advisor); Kamile Geist (Committee Member); Dorothy Bryant (Committee Member); Richard Wetzel (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Health Care; Higher Education; Linguistics; Music; Music Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Music Therapy; Collaboration; Education; Terminology; Undergraduate; Program Directors

Terban, Jessica L.Strategies Used by Women High School Band Directors to Meet the Challenge of Balancing Career and Family
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Music Education/Comprehensive Music Education

The lack of women band directors, especially at the high school and collegiate levels, is an area of concern for music educators. Previous research has identified balancing career and family responsibilities as a challenge for professional women, and a possible factor in the inequality of men and women in the band directing profession.

The purpose of the study was to investigate strategies used by women high school band directors to meet the challenge of balancing career and family. College band directors in Michigan and Ohio nominated women high school band directors based on the following criteria, (a) female, (b) current or former high school band director in Michigan or Ohio, (c) married or divorced, and/or caregiver of a child during the period of employment as a high school band director. Semi-structured, open-ended live interviews were conducted with four women exhibiting a range of experiences with balancing a career as a high school band director and family responsibilities. Interviews were recorded and subsequently transcribed. The analysis initially focused on issues presented in previous research, such as spousal support, childcare methods, time management, and family and career planning and was further guided by the interview of each subject allowing the researcher to identify challenges and strategies related to balancing a career as a band director and family responsibilities.

Analysis and coding of data within and across cases revealed challenges and strategies commonly related to a theme of time. Participants reported challenges and strategies related to the time requirements of the high school band director position and parenting. Numerous afterschool and weekend commitments contributed to participants' emotional distress and guilt from being separated from their children, maintaining personal relationships, and difficulty staying healthy. Strategies used by participants to cope with their time commitments included: relying on their spouses for support; depending on family, friends, and daycare providers for quality childcare; setting priorities; scheduling meticulously; and living near their families and schools.

Identifying strategies used to meet the challenge of balancing a career as a band director and family responsibilities may benefit women who desire to achieve their professional goal of becoming a successful high school band director and personal goal of having a family.

Committee:

Elizabeth A. Menard, PhD (Advisor); Vincent J. Kantorski, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Gender; Gender Studies; Music; Music Education

Keywords:

music education; women band directors; high school band directors; college band directors; career and family; challenges; strategies

Prewitt, SpencerA Comparison of Teacher-Guided Instruction and Self-Guided Student Practice Strategies
Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA), Bowling Green State University, 2013, Contemporary Music
It is commonly understood that the foundation of private instrumental studies at the collegiate level is one, hour-long, teacher-guided private lesson per week followed by self-guided student practice until the next lesson. This model allows a teacher to tailor instruction to fit a student's particular needs, however, because the majority of a student's time with an instrument is during self-guided practice, there are unique challenges that must be addressed. Students must recognize key concepts from a private lesson, know how to produce desired results technically, devise a strategy that will solidify key concepts in familiar and novel domains, and demonstrate their success in the next week's lesson. However, the processes involved in skill acquisition transcend domain and have been studied both in musical and non-musical contexts. In this research I will observe and compare the behaviors of students during private lessons with students' behaviors during subsequent self-guided practice sessions. The purpose of this study is to: 1. Determine if there is a measureable difference in student behavior during a private lesson and during a self-guided practice session. 2. Identify factors that mediate differences, if present. 3. Determine if accumulated lessons affect self-guided student practice. 4. Provide insight as to why different behaviors occur by comparing the findings from each student. A series of three private lessons and three subsequent student practice sessions from three students were video taped and analyzed, and after all video data were collected, an exit interview was conducted with each student participant. Descriptive statistics from each private lesson were compared with descriptive statistics from each self-guided practice session, and responses from the student exit interview were used to add additional insight to this comparison. It was found that there are measureable differences between student behavior during a private lesson and during a self-guided practice session. The results indicated that specific performance directives during a private lesson translate into self-guided student practice behaviors that are more focused and productive. Further research is needed to explore the effect of varying types of feedback during a private lesson on self-guided student practice. The results do not suggest that accumulated lessons affect self-guided student practice; however, it is likely that observations over a longer period of time would affect that result. The data show that further research is needed to provide insight as to why different behaviors occur among students, but the data suggests that individual differences between students is the primary cause of differing behaviors.

Committee:

Kevin Schempf (Advisor); Elaine Colprit (Committee Member); Laura Melton (Committee Member); Steven Boone (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Music Education; Practice Behavior; Music; Private Music Lessons;

Hill, Laura KerrUniversity Music Unit-Sponsored, Non-Music Major Orchestras in the United States.
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Music
The purpose of this study was to investigate university music unit-sponsored, non-music major orchestras (NMOs) from across the United States during the 2014-2015 academic year. A sample of 216 four- year universities/colleges was collected by a stratified random selection process that used the National Association for Schools of Music 2014 Higher Education Arts Data Services Data Summary Report. Research questions asked if NMOs existed, if the NMO was a part of the university or music unit mission, how NMOs were administered by providing rehearsal space, funding, and conducting personnel, NMO participant description and motivation for enrollment. Data were collected via administrator and participant surveys and music department website review. Data revealed the existence of 57 NMOs from all regions of the United States. The NMOs satisfied the mission statement of either the university, music department, or both. NMOs functioned budgets less than $1000 a year, they rehearsed in a music building on campus, and were conducted most often by faculty members. Membership to the NMO was open to undergraduates and graduates, most allowing non-student performers to participate. Nearly half of the NMOs did not require an audition to participate. Administrators identified lack of faculty interest and lack of student interest as the primary barriers to establishing an NMO. Non-music major orchestra participants were typically first and second year Engineering or Science/Technology undergraduates who had experience performing in school orchestras prior to college. NMO participants took private lessons prior to college. The NMO participants enrolled to satisfy their social needs but their musical needs were met better. NMO participants intended to play in an orchestra after college graduation and encourage other universities to offer a similar ensemble.

Committee:

Robert Gillespie (Advisor); Jan Edwards (Committee Member); Anna Gawboy (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Higher Education; Music; Music Education; Performing Arts

Keywords:

Collegiate Orchestras; Non-music Majors; Lifetime Music Participation; Motivation

Brand, Emily KatherineHumanistic Vocal Pedagogy: Exploring a Voice Teacher’s Scope of Practice through a Perspective of Wellness
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2016, Music
The teaching of singing is, by its very nature, a humanistic endeavor. The instrument being trained is part of the human body and thus part of a human being. Many pedagogic perspectives attempt to separate the instrument from the artist for the sake of isolating vocal technique. But, since it is impossible to remove the instrument from the singer’s body, it must be addressed as a part of the singing artist. A human being is an intricate creature that has many interrelated parts that can have great effect on one another; if one aspect of a person is changed, it will inevitably influence other aspects of that person to varying degrees. This complexity necessitates the inclusive awareness of all aspects of that person in any endeavor that seeks to alter a person’s body, mind, or spirit. Teaching singing with an individual’s needs and complexities in mind is, by definition, humanistic. A voice teacher’s scope of practice has always been vague, which has been both beneficial and detrimental to the profession. There are ethical guidelines provided by professional organizations and suggested practices throughout the literature, but the profession is not one that requires specific training, certification, or legal licensure, and therefore cannot easily be regulated or unified in scope or method. Regardless of teaching style, teachers may find that they need to play many roles beyond that of vocal technician when working with a voice student; a humanistic approach to teaching singing makes this inevitable. But it is important that voice teachers understand the boundaries of their practice along with those of related professions so they may provide their students with appropriate guidance and resources, and refer knowledgeably to other professionals as needed. The Clinical and Educational Model of Wellness, though intended for use by counselors, is perfectly designed to help voice teachers assess the needs of their students, and to create and execute goals that will help them to achieve their optimal state of well-being. When singers are well, they have the possibility to reach their full potential vocally, artistically, and personally; if singers are unwell, even in a way that is seemingly unrelated to their art, they will be inhibited, making vocal and artistic progress much more difficult. Teaching singing humanistically and through a perspective of wellness is not only an effective way to assist a student’s vocal and artistic development but also will help them to achieve personal wellness giving them a better quality of life.

Committee:

J. Robin Rice (Advisor); Paul Granello (Committee Member); Scott McCoy (Committee Member); Mark Rudoff (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Counseling Education; Fine Arts; Music; Music Education; Pedagogy; Performing Arts

Keywords:

singing; pedagogy; vocal pedagogy; wellness; counseling; scope of practice;

Williams, Blair ARural School String/Orchestra Programs: Profile and Recommendations
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Music
The purpose of this study was to examine the profile of rural string/orchestra programs and identify factors critical for successfully establishing new rural string/orchestra programs. Self-labeled rural survey respondents (n =108) were K-12, string/orchestra teachers and members of the National Association of Music Education (NAfME) from rural states. There were 343 total responses for a response rate of 12%. The researcher discovered there was no way to directly contact rural string/orchestra teachers or isolate a representative sample using available means. Because of these limitations, the researcher concluded that serving not only rural string/orchestra teachers, but also all rural music teachers, is currently not possible. It is evident that a representative database of those teaching music in rural school districts does not exist. From the data gathered in the current study, rural music teachers acknowledge they need more support. Additional observations were made about the values and rationales for string/orchestra instruction, culturally responsive music instruction offered in rural areas, and the need for updated advocacy statements that reflect a more contemporary community of string instrument teachers and learners. Special attention was given to creating a bibliography since one on teaching music in rural school districts did not previously exist.

Committee:

Robert Gillespie (Advisor); Jan Edwards (Committee Member); Alan Green (Committee Member); Julia Shaw (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Music; Music Education

Keywords:

rural; school; music; education; string; orchestra; program; class

Ripley, Angela N.Surviving Set Theory: A Pedagogical Game and Cooperative Learning Approach to Undergraduate Post-Tonal Music Theory
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Music
Undergraduate music students often experience a high learning curve when they first encounter pitch-class set theory, an analytical system very different from those they have studied previously. Students sometimes find the abstractions of integer notation and the mathematical orientation of set theory foreign or even frightening (Kleppinger 2010), and the dissonance of the atonal repertoire studied often engenders their resistance (Root 2010). Pedagogical games can help mitigate student resistance and trepidation. Table games like Bingo (Gillespie 2000) and Poker (Gingerich 1991) have been adapted to suit college-level classes in music theory. Familiar television shows provide another source of pedagogical games; for example, Berry (2008; 2015) adapts the show "Survivor" to frame a unit on theory fundamentals. However, none of these pedagogical games engage pitch-class set theory during a multi-week unit of study. In my dissertation, I adapt the show "Survivor" to frame a four-week unit on pitch-class set theory (introducing topics ranging from pitch-class sets to twelve-tone rows) during a sophomore-level theory course. As on the show, students of different achievement levels work together in small groups, or “tribes,” to complete worksheets called “challenges”; however, in an important modification to the structure of the show, no students are voted out of their tribes. Challenges are graded individually, and these grades are averaged together to yield a score for each tribe. At the end of the unit, each member of the tribe that earned the highest cumulative average score on the challenges receives a modest gift card as a non-academic prize. While students’ grades are based solely on their own work, the game element promotes peer mentoring through cooperative learning (Johnson and Johnson 1999; Slavin 2012) and inspires constructive peer pressure that motivates all students to do their best. Aspects of the game designed to enhance student enjoyment and build tribe unity include tribe names, a customized logo, and an opening credits video. I present empirical results of implementing Set Theory Survivor in the classroom and discuss student responses to questionnaires exploring their attitudes toward post-tonal music, their self-perceived abilities to use set-theoretical analysis to study post-tonal music, and their views of Set Theory Survivor as a framework for studying pitch-class set theory. The self-reported ability of students to perform specific set-theoretical operations increased to a statistically significant extent during the unit, and the majority of students enjoyed the game-like format. By combining the peer support of cooperative learning with the motivational force of constructive competition and the fun of a pedagogical game, Set Theory Survivor provides an innovative approach to a subject that often sparks student resistance and presents a valuable tool with which to enhance the pedagogy of pitch-class set theory.

Committee:

David Clampitt, Ph.D. (Advisor); Anna Gawboy, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Johanna Devaney, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Theory; Music; Music Education; Pedagogy; Teaching

Keywords:

music theory; theory pedagogy; teaching music theory; pedagogical game; Survivor; pitch-class set theory; post-tonal music; atonal music; twentieth-century music; cooperative learning; constructive competition; intergroup competition; challenge; tribe

Selle, AndrewFracture
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Music Composition
Fracture investigates the differences and considerations that must be addressed when writing for wind ensembles across various proficiency levels. This thesis focuses specifically on the compositional differences between high school and collegiate ensembles. The project consists of two musical works (approximately six minutes each) that are versions of the same piece written for each proficiency level. The musical work, entitled Fracture, was first written for a high school level ensemble and was subsequently revised in terms of instrumentation, orchestration, and technical difficulty, to create a second version of the work that is more suitable to an advanced wind ensemble. Throughout the process I consulted representative works by and interviews with other composers in order to understand how they have effectively composed for ensembles of both proficiency levels. Both compositions’ forms are through composed but include a recapitulative statement of initial material. The opening builds to a semi-improvised aleatoric section featuring the works’ primary motivic elements, eventually giving way to an active rhythmic section. This rhythmic section provides forward momentum into the final section of the piece, where the initial elements are again presented, this time as closing material. The works’ musical elements derive from initial rhythmic and intervallic germs whose orchestration, timbre, metric placement, registral placement, and rhythmic content and complexity vary as the pieces evolve. Traditional tertian harmonic structure is ubiquitous in the wind band genre. Because of this relationship, I sought to extend Fracture’s harmonic palate, employing harmonic and melodic content derived from extended tertian theory. As with the piece’s other musical elements, the advanced work contains more extended sonorities than the lower level work. Likewise, the piece’s rhythmic content varies between the two proficiency levels, with the advanced work’s rhythmic content expanding on that from the lower-level version. Both works are beat-oriented and open with the same percussive rhythmic germ. The advanced ensemble’s work exhibits greater rhythmic complexity, featuring more syncopation and tuplet figures. Through this investigation, I conclude that the salient differences between the proficiency levels of wind ensemble music include density of orchestration, rhythmic complexity, and students’ abilities to play independently, which influences harmony and counterpoint.

Committee:

Elainie Lillios (Advisor); Bruce Moss (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

band; wind ensemble; composition; proficiency; grade level;

Lagerstrom, Elizabeth HopePreparation for Music Degree Programs: Undergraduate Music Majors’ Perceptions of the Degree Program and the Activities that Helped Them Prepare
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2011, Music
Undergraduate music majors were surveyed to determine how helpful different activities were in preparing them for a collegiate music degree program, and whether their perceptions of the degree program had changed since matriculation into the program. Findings indicate that respondents found activities such as in-school performing ensemble and private individual or group lessons were most helpful while ensemble contest was found to be least helpful. Upon matriculation to the university, respondents held similar perceptions regarding their collegiate music degree program. These perceptions changed little over the course of the program, although there was a high degree of variability in both initial and current perceptions. Perceptions of stress had the greatest change in magnitude over time, with stress being perceived as more negative over time.

Committee:

Daryl Kinney, PhD (Advisor); Patricia Flowers, PhD (Committee Member); David Huron, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

music education; music performance; college preparation; college perception

Rosenbalm, Kelly LaneSample Lessons Plans to Effectively Incorporate Group Lessons Into the Private Studio of Young Beginning Suzuki Piano Students
Bachelor of Arts, Miami University, 2010, School of Fine Arts - Music
Through my personal experiences as a student and a teacher, I have discovered there is a lack of integration of theory and musicianship in private music lessons. Therefore, a balance is needed; one possible solution would be to develop group lesson plans to teach students theory and general musicianship to supplement their private instruction. In this paper, I give a survey of three early childhood music education methods. Furthermore, I include several exercises that incorporate the ideas of the educational approaches. In order for the students to connect the concepts learned in the class with their private lessons, I use the repertoire of the early volumes of the Suzuki Piano School. In Appendix I, I have included several complete lesson plans incorporating all my research.

Committee:

Richard Green (Advisor); Siok-Lian Tan (Committee Member); Brenda Mitchell (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Education; Elementary Education; Fine Arts; Music; Music Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

piano pedagogy; teaching piano; Dalcroze; Suzuki; Orff; Music Mind Games; group classes

Sisley, Beth AnnA Comparative Study of Approaches to Teaching Melodic Dictation
MA, Kent State University, 2008, College of the Arts / School of Music
Recent studies show that tonic induction, pitch collection induction, development of memory, and attentive listening are important for a melodic dictation class. Melodic dictation textbooks published in the twenty-first century reflect these findings and have changed their emphasis when compared to earlier publications. In newer textbooks, there is a greater emphasis on hearing melodies in a functional context and memorizing the melodies. Less information is provided for score setup of melodic dictation exercises in newer textbooks. Students are expected to infer the key, tonic, and starting pitch. In some cases, they are expected to determine the meter signature. This study will describe several different methods currently used for melodic dictation, and it will provide a curriculum for working with college freshman musicians. There is little published research on this topic, and I hope that this study will be useful to current and future theorists in their teaching.

Committee:

Ralph Lorenz, PhD (Advisor); Richard Devore, PhD (Committee Member); Thomas Janson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

melodic dictation; pedagogy; aural skills

Bonus, Alexander EvanThe Metronomic Performance Practice: A History of Rhythm, Metronomes, and the Mechanization of Musicality
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2010, Musicology

Through the analyses of treatises, scores, letters, and technologies spanning four centuries, this multidisciplinary history of rhythm charts the various, shifting meanings in musical time and movement as pedagogies and performance practices became increasingly influenced by clockwork machines—-and Johann Maelzel’s metronome most conspicuously—-over the course of the modern age. Depicting how “musical time” constitutes an ever-changing belief system in what “time” means, this study charts the ascendance of a new musical-temporal ontology brought about by Western performance-culture’s increasing reliance on metronomes.

This history explains how scientific methodologies and machines—-promoting metronomic time above all else—-were first actively applied to musicians and their performances in the latter decades of the nineteenth century. The influential work of modern scientists, pedagogues, and only later composers—-with their precision-oriented beliefs in metronomic time and rhythm—-eventually helped to create a new performance-practice tradition, a new musical culture in which mechanical objectivity became a prevailing aesthetic in the twentieth century. Highlighting the writings of philosophers such as Mersenne, Diderot, and Rousseau; musicians such as Quantz, Beethoven, and Stravinsky; scientists such as Wundt, Scripture, and Seashore; and pedagogues such as A. B. Marx, Christiani, and Jaques-Dalcroze, the narrative explicates how and why this temporal revision occurred, and what outcomes followed when scientific modes of metronomic action were imposed upon past, subjective musical practices.

As this history of musical time, metronomes, and musicality uncovers, the very meanings and cultural values underlying “rhythm” and “tempo” have palpably changed since the twentieth century due to a heretofore-unacknowledged paradigm shift: a metronomic turn in which the once-innate musical “beat” became both conceptually and audibly mechanized.

Committee:

Mary Davis, PhD (Committee Chair); Daniel Goldmark, PhD (Committee Member); Peter Bennett, D.Phil (Committee Member); Martha Woodmansee, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Dance; Education History; European History; History; Music; Music Education; Philosophy; Robots; Science History; Technology

Keywords:

metronome; metronomic; rhythm; rhythmic; meter; tempo; time; movement; mouvement; pulse; tactus; rubato; performance practices; musicality; automaton; Maelzel; Beethoven; Dalcroze; Eurhythmics; pedagogy; gymnastics; Wundt; pendulum; chronography; beat

Charles, Nicole MarieA Supplementary Book of Chinese Music for the Suzuki Flute Student
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2010, Music
Created by Toshio Takahashi and Shinichi Suzuki, Suzuki Flute School Volume 1 contains a variety of music for the beginner flutist. Children’s songs, folk music, and romantic and baroque music from Japan, France, America, and Germany provide beautiful tunes for the students to learn. Furthermore, beautiful sound is taught through tonalization, and beautiful character through strong relationships among the parent, teacher, and child. Having taught Suzuki flute classes at the Ohio Contemporary Chinese School (OCCS) since 2003, I’ve had the opportunity to learn about the beautiful Chinese culture. But I have found that many children of Chinese descent have very little exposure to traditional Chinese music and children’s songs. Due to historical patterns in China of disposing or recycling music, many of their parents do not know many Chinese songs (at least those without political undertones). The Suzuki method itself does not contain any Chinese songs. The purpose of this document is to provide a supplementary book of Chinese flute music for my students at the OCCS, one tailored to coincide with the pedagogical points of Suzuki Flute School Volume 1. Not only will this supplementary book provide a unique genre of music for my students, but it will also aim to preserve and promote traditional Chinese music within the Chinese-American culture.

Committee:

Katherine Borst Jones, MM (Advisor); James Hill, MM (Committee Member); Udo Will, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Suzuki Flute; Chinese Music

WARNER, DOUGLAS G.CURRENT TRENDS IN ALTO TROMBONE PEDAGOGY IN THE UNITED STATES
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2005, College-Conservatory of Music : Trombone
This paper examined alto trombone pedagogy from three vantage points. First an in-depth analysis of the alto trombone methods currently available was presented. The methods were analyzed with regard to progressive arrangement, readability of text and music, balance in the use of keys and registers, inclusion of a position chart and orchestral excerpts, and the pedagogical and musical quality of the etudes. The second part of this paper was a study of occurrences of the alto trombone on student recitals in the United States as reported in publications of the International Trombone Association from 1979-2004. The frequency of performances was analyzed as well as the frequency of programming of specific pieces. Finally, a survey was conducted of college-level trombone instructors in the United States. Respondents were asked to provide information about their employment level as a university teacher (full- or part-time), their own study of the alto trombone, their use of methods, solos, and orchestral excerpts to teach the instrument, whether their institution owns an alto trombone, what they believe to be the appropriate level of study to introduce the instrument to a student, their mouthpiece recommendations, and their opinions of the alto trombone methods currently available. The examination of comprehensive alto trombone methods revealed that each one differed in its areas of emphasis. Increased use of the alto trombone on student recitals in the past twenty-six years was evident; the increase has occurred primarily at the graduate level. The concerto by Wagenseil was, by far, the most frequently programmed work. The results from the survey of trombone instructors revealed significant trends. There were similarities between the materials used by teachers in their own study and those that are commonly used to teach current students. The Wagenseil concerto was the most popular choice for appropriate first solo for the alto trombone student. When instructors were asked to rate alto trombone methods, the four volume method by Sluchin received the highest scores by percentage, while the Anderson method was the most widely known.

Committee:

David Vining (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music; Music

Keywords:

alto trombone; trombone pedagogy; alto trombone literature

Baumgartner, Christopher M.A Performance Analysis of Whirlwind and Shadow Rituals, Ticheli Composition Contest Award Winning Works in 2007
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Music Education/Instrumental Music Education

The purpose of this thesis was to describe the historical and educational implications of composition contests for wind bands and to analyze the two award winning works from the 2007 Ticheli Composition Contest: Whirlwind by Jodie Blackshaw and Shadow Rituals by Michael Markowski. A detailed performance analysis of each work included: (a) program notes, (b) historical/programmatic background material, (c) a formal analysis, (d) technical considerations for rehearsal, and (e) conducting challenges. I concluded that different methods of structure were used in the composition of these two new works for beginning and intermediate wind band.

The Ticheli Composition Contest was found to be the only one of five contests that awards composers for works written for beginning and intermediate ensembles. Whirlwind was found to be structured around meter, shifting from free time to structured 3/4 time and back to free time. The entirety of the work is based on a four-note melody that is presented in solo, duet, and round form. Expression, style, and tone color were the primary foci of this work. Shadow Rituals was structured around key relationships. Markowski shifts key areas by both consonance and dissonance. This relationship is set up by the altering consonant and dissonant dyads created by the melodic line and accompanimental figure of the opening theme. The minor third is prevalent throughout the work, appearing intervallically in melodic material, as well as harmonically in tonal shifts. Both works were found to have well-conceived formal structures (e.g., rhythmically, melodically, and harmonically cohesive); and to be technically challenging and appropriate for use with beginning and intermediate ensembles.

Committee:

Kenneth Thompson, DMA (Advisor); Joyce Eastlund Gromko, DME (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

performance analysis; Whirlwind; Shadow Rituals; Ticheli; composition contest

Oshaben, Nathaniel JohnIdentification of the Characteristics of Highly Challenging and Educational Percussion Parts in Selected Intermediate School Band Literature
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2008, Music Education/Comprehensive Music Education
The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of highly challenging and educational percussion parts in selected intermediate school band literature. The term intermediate referred to the level between the second and fourth year of a percussion student's training in grades six through eight. Fifteen intermediate and high school band directors completed a survey that asked them to rank at least five pieces of intermediate school band literature of their choice that they thought contained highly challenging and educational percussion parts and to indicate the title, composer, publisher, and musical grade level of each piece. The directors suggested a total of 89 pieces of literature. Ten of these pieces were suggested by more than one director. The composer suggested most often was David Shaffer, followed by James Swearingen and Robert W. Smith. The publisher suggested most often was C. L. Barnhouse, with 20 (22.47%) of the 89 pieces. The musical grade levels ranged from grade 1 to 4, but nearly half (44.94%) were either grade 2 or 2.5 levels. Each of the 15 band directors suggested a different top choice. I analyzed the percussion parts of these 15 top choice pieces and grouped the challenges within each piece into the following categories: (a) Technical Challenges, (b) Rhythmical Challenges, (c) Ensemble Challenges, and (d) Musical Challenges. Based upon these categorizations, it seems that intermediate band directors should consider the following when selecting music that will challenge their band's percussion section: (a) snare drum parts with rudimental writing and complex rhythmic patterns; (b) mallet parts with scale based playing, arpeggios, accidentals, and double stops in several key signatures; (c) timpani parts that allow the practice of tuning; (d) the inclusion of secondary, non-traditional, and world percussion instruments; and (e) a variety of tempos, musical effects, and exposed playing.

Committee:

Dr. Vincent Kantorski (Advisor); Dr. Carol Hayward (Committee Member); Dr. Roger Schupp (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Percussion; band; literature; intermediate; challenging

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