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Bonadio, Francis TonyWho benefits from usual care? Using latent profile analysis to identify differential treatment outcomes
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Psychology/Clinical
As more treatments are developed to address youth behavioral and emotional problems, an increasing number of studies seek to identify subgroups of youth for whom treatments are more effective. Previous research has shown differential treatment effects when grouping youth based on characteristics such as comorbidity, problem severity, gender, and age. However, the vast majority of this research has been conducted with evidence-based treatments (EBTs), and to date no research has directly examined differential treatment outcomes within usual care. Usual care receives minimal attention in research, and thus little is known about its effects. Additionally, the term usual care can include a variety of services including but not limited to standard outpatient, intensive outpatient, home-based services, and psychiatric services. Given the prevalence of usual care as a form of treatment, it is necessary to further explore its treatment effects. Further, the vast majority of studies exploring differential treatment outcomes use moderation as the primary method for subgroup analyses. However, moderation analyses have several limitations, and there has been a recent call for more person-centered approaches, such as latent profile analysis (LPA), as a more appropriate means of conducting subgroup analyses. The current study aims to advance the understanding of usual care by determining if some subgroups of youth, identified through LPA, are better served by specific types of usual care. The current study utilized 953 parent-reports and 553 youth-reports of youth emotional and behavioral symptoms across multiple time points, as well as archival records of usual care services received at a local community mental health center (CMH). Symptoms and demographic data collected at intake were used in a LPA to identify subgroups of youth arriving for treatment. Subgroup differences in treatment outcomes were then explored across the array of usual care services. Results indicated that usual care services were related to a significant reduction in symptom severity across time, and that there were differences in the relation between usual care services and outcomes across subgroups. These results suggest that different subgroups of youth respond differently to certain types of usual care services. Implications for future research and clinical applications are discussed.

Committee:

Carolyn Tompsett, Ph.D. (Advisor); Raymond Swisher, Ph.D. (Other); Eric Dubow, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Russell Matthews, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

treatment outcome; latent profile analysis; person-centered approach; usual care; comparative effectiveness

Daffon, Jennifer KThe Effects of Gender and Perception of Community Safety on Happiness
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2017, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
Income-based indicators of happiness have been shown to be limited in their ability to predict happiness. Alternative measures of happiness have been gaining prominence in happiness research, and two predictors of happiness were investigated in the current study. The extent to which happiness (measured by affect, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being) could be predicted by gender and perception of community safety was investigated with 19,644 participant responses to The Happiness Alliance Survey. Multiple linear regression models indicated that gender and community safety are significant predictors of affect, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being. The effect of the predictor variables was similar for all three of those happiness measures. B values indicated that both predictor variables had the greatest impact on psychological well-being and the least impact on life satisfaction. While all three models were statistically significant, they did not similarly predict the satisfaction with affect, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being scores. The results suggest that while gender and perceptions of community safety should be considered as part of the whole picture that supports a full life, there are likely other variables and life domains that have stronger influences on happiness.

Committee:

Suzanne Engelberg, PsyD (Committee Chair); Alejandra Suarez, PhD (Committee Member); Laura Musikanski, J.D, M.B.A (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Psychology; Public Policy; Social Psychology

Keywords:

happiness; positive psychology; community safety; gender; Sustainable Seattle; Happiness Alliance; multiple regression; quantitative; subjective well-being

Grugan, Cecilia SpencerDisability Resource Specialists’ Capacity to Adopt Principles and Implement Practices that Qualify as Universal Design at a 4-Year Public Institution
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2018, Educational Leadership
Due to the continuous growth of diverse student bodies on college campuses, creating accessibility for each unique student needs to be considered. Students who have a disability or disabilities are a substantial part of this growing diverse student body. Since disability resource specialists play a significant role in creating accessibility for such students, they can consider implementing practices that qualify as Universal Design. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore where disability resource specialists fall on Lewin’s (1951) continuum of change and Reynold’s (2009) levels of expertise in regards to implementing practices that qualify as Universal Design. Six participants were included in this study out of eight who were invited to participate. Out of those six participants, the study showed that all participants demonstrated a strong presence in the Unfreezing stage of Lewin’s (1951) continuum of change. Also, the study showed that all participants showed a level of knowledge as the second tier to Reynold’s (2009) levels of expertise. Limitations as well as recommendations for future research included recruiting a larger sample of participants to provide greater analysis of the study.

Committee:

Carol Patitu, Ph.D. (Advisor); Suzanne Franco, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Stephanie Krah, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory; Engineering; English As A Second Language; Experiments; Instructional Design; Intellectual Property; Labor Relations; Management; Mass Communications; Mental Health; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Occupational Health; Occupational Therapy; Personal Relationships; Public Administration; Public Health; Public Health Education; Public Policy; Reading Instruction; Recreation; Rehabilitation; Robotics; Robots; School Administration; Secondary Education; Special Education; Speech Therapy; Systems Design; Teacher Education; Transportation

Keywords:

Universal Design; Accommodations; Accessibility; Organizational Change; Proactive Practices; Disability; Disability Resource Specialists; Disability Services; Higher Education; Student Affairs

Kalkan, BilalProblematic Internet Use, Online Gaming, and Online Gambling, and Their Relationships with Depression and Quality of Life among College Students
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Counselor Education (Education)
Young adults on college campuses are surrounded by information and communications technology and have limitless access to the Internet on college campuses. The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence and extent of problematic Internet use, online gaming behavior, and online gambling behavior, and their relationships with depression and quality of life among college students. The study utilized a non-experimental cross-sectional research design employing quantitative research methodology. The current study aimed to answer two research questions: (a) Is there a relationship between depression and a linear combination of the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), the Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire (POGQ), and the Online Gambling Symptom Assessment Scale (OGSAS) among college students? and (b) Is there a relationship between quality of life and a linear combination of the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), the Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire (POGQ), and the Online Gambling Symptom Assessment Scale (OGSAS) among college students? Results of the first research question indicated that the IAT statistically significantly predicted depression. Results of the second research question also indicated that IAT statistically significantly predicted quality of life. Problematic Internet use was positively correlated with depression and negatively correlated with quality of life. Although online gaming was significantly correlated with depression and quality of life, it did not predict depression and quality of life among college students. Online gambling was also significantly correlated with quality of life, but did not predict quality of life among college students. Supplemental analyses showed the similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate level, and male and female students on their IAT, POGQ, OGSAS, BDI-II, and WHOQOL-BREF scores. Weekly Internet usage statistics were also presented and showed usage time differences between undergraduate and graduate, and male and female students. The findings of the current study contribute to understanding problematic internet use, online gaming and online gambling in college students but must be considered in the light of limitations of the study. The study helps inform clinical practice and the treatment of problematic internet among college students.

Committee:

Christine Bhat (Advisor)

Subjects:

Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Mental Health; School Counseling

Keywords:

problematic internet use; online gaming; online gambling; dysfunctional online behaviors; depression; quaily of life; mental health; counseling

Bridge, LaurieContributing Factors of Substance Abuse: Mental Illness, Mental Illness Treatment and Health Insurance
Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Youngstown State University, 2017, Department of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science
To gain a better perspective of contributing factors to substance abuse this thesis will examine the relationship between substance abuse, mental illness, previous mental health treatment and health insurance coverage. It is estimated that about 4 million of the 17.5 million people diagnosed with a mental illness also suffer from substance abuse (Important Statistics on Dual Diagnosis, n.d.). This study is a secondary analysis on the results from the 2013 National Survey of Drug Use and Health. The results from this survey is provided by random households in the United States from individuals aged 12 years and older. I test the following research questions: Is there a correlation between a person's mental health and their likeliness to abuse illegal drugs? Does previous mental health treatment decrease the likelihood that an individual will abuse drugs? Lastly, does not having health insurance increase the likelihood of drug abuse? The findings indicate that the presence of a mental illness, especially a severe mental illness, is correlated with a higher substance abuse rate than individuals without a mental illness or who are suffering from a less severe mental illness. It was also found that persons who had received mental health treatment were more likely to abuse substances than someone who had not received treatment. Lastly, the results showed that individuals without health insurance were more likely to abuse substances than someone with health insurance.

Committee:

John Hazy, PhD (Advisor); Richard Rogers, PhD (Committee Member); Christopher Bellas, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Criminology; Mental Health; Psychology; Statistics

Keywords:

Substance abuse; Mental illness; Previous mental illness treatment; Health insurance

Jackson, Kendra L.A Qualitative Study Understanding the Perceptions of Black Pentecostal Pastors towards Mental Health and Collaborating with Mental Health Counselors
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Counselor Education (Education)
Counseling and mental health treatment has been in existence for decades. This progressing profession continues to meet the needs of our diverse society. Despite the professions progression, the African American population remains undeserved; therefore, the Black Church and religious leaders have become a resource addressing spiritual, religious, emotional and psychological needs. Although, pastors are often the primary and only source of support for addressing mental health and spiritual needs, pastors are confronted with issues beyond their scope of practice, specifically knowledge surrounding severe pathology and DSM diagnoses (Farrell & Goebert, 2008; Weaver, 1995). Regardless of limited knowledge and skills in mental health, options for a referral by Black pastors for external mental health services are slim and in some cases, nonexistent. As a solution, pastors have implemented their own methods, such as casting out demons and divine healing to address mental health issues in the Pentecostal Church (Belcher & Hall, 2001). Mental health counselors are beginning to view the Black Pentecostal Church as a gateway to reach an undeserved population through the means of fostering collaboration. However, literature suggests reluctance in Black Pentecostal pastors collaborating with mental health counselors (Mollica et al., 1986). The perception of Black Pentecostal Pastors is influential in how they address mental health, and can contribute to their reluctance in referring their parishioners for external mental health services, especially if the presented issue of the parishioner is perceived as a spiritual matter (Petty & Krosnick, 2014). To understand the perceptions of Black Pentecostal Pastors towards mental health and collaborating with mental health counselors, this research investigation used in-depth semi-structured interviews with six Black male Pentecostal Pastors as the main data collection method to address the following questions: 1) What are the perceptions of Black Pentecostal Pastors towards mental health treatment? 2) How do Black Pentecostal Pastors address mental health issues with their church congregants, and 3) What are the perceptions of Black Pentecostal Pastors towards collaborating with mental health counselors? Critical Race Theory, Systems Theory, and Yalom’s Therapeutic Factors serve as the theoretical and conceptual framework for this study; in addition, a phenomenological case study was used as the methodological approach for this study. A phenomenological approach was implemented to analyze the collected data.

Committee:

Mona Robinson, PhD (Committee Chair); Adah Ward-Randolph, PhD (Committee Member); Nikol Bowen, PhD (Committee Member); Adrienne Erby, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; Counseling Education; Mental Health; Pastoral Counseling

Keywords:

Black Pentecostal Pastors; Mental Health; Collaborating with Mental Health Counselors

Klima, Kerry Lee BelvillHidden, Supported, and Stressful: A Phenomenological Study of Midlevel Student Affairs Professionals' Entry-Level Experiences with a Mental Health Condition
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2018, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the experiences of midlevel student affairs professionals who navigated a mental health condition as a new professional and remained in the field. New professionals’ attrition and retention concerns continue to warrant further exploration through research. Research is lacking on new professionals group was those with a mental health condition. Mental illness is prevalent in our society, and as evident in this study, professionals do negotiate their mental illness as professionals in the field. I interviewed nine midlevel student affairs professionals from across the United States. Each of the professionals worked at a variety of institutions and within many functional areas in student affairs during their first five years in the field. I lead eighteen interviews with nine participants. In addition to the interviews, all of the participants responded to one journal prompt. To mask the identities of my participants, the professionals selected pseudonyms and I used these names throughout my manuscript. The participants shared their experiences comprising five main themes: (1) coping with mental health conditions, (2) student affairs competence and mental health, (3) influential relationships, (4) disclosure, and (5) organizational influences. Three primary findings emerged following the analysis of the experiences and the review of the literature. Participants experienced fear of discrimination. They shared about negotiating the personal nature of the experiences and their own self-advocacy. Lastly, the professionals’ community was instrumental in connecting to their retention. With these themes and findings, I developed implications for practice and future research. Implications for practice include a proposed paradigm shift in our organizations; the important role of supervisors, administrators, and colleagues; the use of a universal design model; and the value of structures to support those with mental health conditions. Future research could explore the identities of people with a mental health condition, the various community structures, and the role of the influential relationships in coping with a mental health condition.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson (Advisor); Michael Coomes (Committee Member); Neal Jesse (Committee Member); Hyun Kyoung Ro (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Education; Educational Psychology; Health; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Mental Health; Occupational Health; Psychology

Keywords:

mental health; student affairs; student affairs professionals; mental health condition;

Mitova, Mariana A.Relationship Between Investments in Self and Post-Graduation Career Satisfaction Among Apparel and Textiles Majors
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
Rachel Vannatta Reinhart, Advisor The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to explore the relationship between investments that students make in themselves while enrolled in a higher education program and their post-graduation career satisfaction, and (2) to gather information about the importance apparel and textile professionals place on selected competencies identified by the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA). Graduates (n=123) of an apparel and textiles (A&T) program at a four-year, public research institution were surveyed to examine which investments in self best predict post-graduation career satisfaction. The Survey of A&T Graduates’ Career Satisfaction consisted of 86 items measuring perceived importance and preparation of the ITAA meta-goals and competencies, career satisfaction, co-curricular activity involvement, on-the-job training, health and well-being, career competencies, and willingness to relocate. Multiple regression showed that Career Competencies and Health and Well-being best predicted participants’ post-graduation career satisfaction. Participants rated the Professional Development meta-goal; the Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal; and Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goal of highest importance. These same meta-goals received highest perceived preparation ratings. Lastly, ANOVA findings revealed that buyers, retail managers, marketing professionals and others indicated differences in perceptions of competencies and meta-goals. The buyers/merchandisers rated the Industry Processes and the Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goals of higher importance than retail managers. Retail managers perceived the Global Interdependence meta-goal as less important than marketing professionals did. The Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal was perceived more important by retail managers than “others” category did. Graduates’ career satisfaction differed mostly by Income levels. Those who reported earning lower salaries were overall less satisfied with their careers. Results suggest that current leaders of apparel and textile programs should enhance their curricula with pedagogy methods that facilitate learning of teamwork, leadership, clear communication, ethics, and social responsibilities. Internships and experiential learning are recommended to enhance the on-the-job training of students in A&T programs. In addition, all investments in self, with exception of Willingness to Relocate, are related to Career Satisfaction. Lastly, Post-graduation career satisfaction is best predicted by graduates’ Career Competencies and Health and Well-being.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta Reinhart (Advisor); Gregory Rich (Other); Barbara Frazier (Committee Member); Joyce Litten (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Economic Theory; Economics; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Health; Health Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Home Economics; Home Economics Education; Mental Health

Keywords:

Higher Education; College; Well-being; Health; Students; Career Satisfaction; Apparel; Textiles; Internships; ITAA; Graduates; Professionals; On-the-job Training; Internships; Curriculum; HCT; Human Capital Theory; economic theory; assessment

Ballas, Thomas N.Betrayals, Mental Health, and the Role of Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2016, Psychology, Clinical
When a betrayal occurs within an intimate relationship the experience of negative and detrimental mental health symptoms (i.e., stress, anxiety, depression) can vary widely from person to person (Gottman, 2014; Kiecolt-Glaser & Newton, 2001). The primary goal of this study is to examine how a variety of factors (i.e., Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem, Attachment Style, Attributions, and Rumination) influence the degree to which an individual experiences negative mental health symptoms following a betrayal. The present study further strengthens the field of research and offers insight into the association between personality characteristics and the workings of the relationship dyad. The present study used data collected from a population of students attending a private Mid-western university. Participants were administered questionnaire packets inquiring about a betrayal within their romantic relationship and subsequently answered questions regarding their contingency on the relationship, attachment style to their partner, attributions processes, and how often they ruminated about the betrayal. It was hypothesized that high Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem would be associated with high Anxious Attachment, a replication of the finding by Knee et al. (2008). Additionally, individuals with high Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem would experience more severe negative mental health symptoms following a betrayal, would ruminate excessively about the betrayal, and be less satisfied with their relationship. Further, internal, generalized, and stable attributions were hypothesized to mediate the relationship between Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem and relationship satisfaction. Due to the positive correlation between Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem and Anxious attachment as documented by Knee, Canevello, Bush, & Cook (2008), the above hypotheses were mirrored for individuals with high Anxious Attachment. Results indicate that Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem and Anxious attachment are positively correlated, replicating Knee et al. (2008). Anxious Attachment was found to be associated with more severe mental health symptoms and excessive rumination about the betrayal. Internal, generalized, and stable attributions were found to mediate the association between Anxious Attachment and Relationship Satisfaction. Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem was not related to negative mental health symptoms, relationship satisfaction, or rumination. Further, attributions did not mediate the relationship between Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem and relationship satisfaction. These findings suggest that while Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem is a unique construct, it is not universally negative. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

Committee:

Lee Dixon, Dr. (Advisor); Erin O'Mara, Dr. (Committee Member); Jackson Goodnight, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem; Mental Health; Betrayal; Anxious Attachment

Rankin, Wendy M.Exploring Relationships among Strengths Use, Spirituality, Religion and Positive Mental Health of College-Attending Emerging Adults
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2015, Counselor Education (Education)
This exploratory study examined the relationships among strengths use, spirituality, religion, and positive mental health of 109 traditional undergraduate, college-attending emerging adults in a public university in the southern region of the United States, often referred to as the Bible-Belt. Constructs of the study were guided by a student program for strengths development and engagement, the idea that spirituality is fundamental to students’ lives while commitment to a specific religion decreases (Astin, Astin, & Lindholm, 2011), and prior research indicating strengths use contributed to well-being (Govindji & Linley, 2007; Proctor, Maltby, & Linley, 2009). Participants completed the Strengths Use Scale (SUS; Govindji & Linley, 2007), the Daily Spiritual Experience Scale (DSES; Underwood, 2006), the Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire (SCSORF; Plante & Boccaccini, 1997a) and the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF; Keyes, 2002, 2009). Seven research questions were generated from study variables and data were analyzed using Pearson’s product-moment correlations and multiple regressions. Positive correlations were found among strengths use, spirituality, and positive mental health. Multiple regression analyses showed that strengths use contributed to 18.1% of the variance of positive mental health. Positive mental health could be predicted solely from strengths use; and strengths use, in turn, could be predicted solely from spirituality. Therefore, findings suggest that strengths use is possibly an intermediary variable between spirituality and positive mental health. Implications for the fields of counseling, counselor education, and higher education are discussed along with limitations and suggestions for future research.

Committee:

Christine Suniti Bhat, Dr. (Committee Chair); Peter Mather, Dr. (Committee Member); Connie Patterson, Dr. (Committee Member); Dianne Gut, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Counseling Education; Higher Education; Mental Health; Religion; Spirituality

Keywords:

positive mental health; strengths use; spirituality; religion; college students; emerging adults; Bible-Belt; counseling; counselor education; higher education

Dynes, Morgan E.A National Study of Child and Family Therapists: The Relationships between Parent Engagement, Supervision and Training, and Burnout
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Psychology/Clinical
Extensive previous research has included investigations of the importance of parent engagement in the effective implementation of empirically-supported treatments (ESTs) for children and families, and the role that service-providers play in the engagement process. Additionally, past studies have explored the associations between staff outcomes such as burnout and professional efficacy, and organizational factors such as constraints and supervision, to examine their impact on treatment delivery (Ingoldsby, 2010; McCurdy & Daro, 2001; McGuigan, Katzev, & Pratt, 2003). The overarching goal of this study was to examine the relationships between service providers’ experiences with parent engagement, organization-level factors, and therapist outcomes of burnout and professional efficacy using a national online survey. Participants were 148 (19 males and 129 females) child and family therapists who work at mental health facilities across the United States. Therapist parent engagement efficacy mediated the relationship between barriers to parent engagement and the Personal Accomplishment sub-scale of burnout. Supervision and training were not associated with any variables of interest. However, therapist perceptions of organizational constraints were found to be significantly correlated with all variables of interest. Serial multiple mediation analyses suggest that the effects of organizational constraints on parent engagement efficacy are mediated by barriers to parent engagement, and the effects of organizational constraints on emotional engagement and personal accomplishment are mediated by both barriers to parent engagement, and parent engagement efficacy. Future directions and implications are discussed with respect to furthering research efforts and the clinical applications for workforce development and improved delivery and implementation of evidence-based practices.

Committee:

Carolyn Tompsett, Ph.D. (Advisor); Eric Dubow, Ph,D. (Committee Member); Dara Musher-Eizenman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Starr Keyes, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Mental Health; Organizational Behavior; Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Work

Keywords:

parent engagement; supervision; training; professional efficacy; efficacy; burnout; child therapist; counseling; social work; organizational constraints; usual care; routine practice; evidence-based treatment

Schaad, Amanda LAn Interview with Three Deaf Lesbians: Intersectionality and Saliency of Identity Variables
Doctor of Psychology (PsyD), Wright State University, 2016, School of Professional Psychology
LGBQ and Deaf communities have experienced parallel histories of oppression, medicalization, and discrimination that results in poor access to sexual health information and support around sexuality. Moreover, when the two identities intersect the impacts are magnified. Both populations experience vulnerabilities to sexual abuse, and inadequate sexual health information and /or sex education, compared to the majority population. Therefore, there needs to be a better understanding of their experiences with sex education and how mental health services could be helpful, particularly when these identities intersect. The aim and purpose of this study was to explore the interaction between LGBQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Queer) and Deaf community identity. Specifically, to interpret the level of integration of both identities within each perspective community (LGBQ and Deaf) and to investigate sex education related issues in both populations. Three hypotheses were formed which were: there is a lack of inclusive sex education, identification with one community will be more salient than the other, and there is more reported experiences of discrimination within this subpopulation. Sixteen questions were developed with the input of persons within the Deaf community and professionals who work within the Deaf community. A focus group was conducted with three Deaf lesbian women. Results indicated that the women experienced multiple layers of oppression from both the hearing world and heterosexuals. All women identified that deafness was their most salient identity variable. All participants reported a lack of inclusive sex education and a disengagement from the LGBTQ community. Themes reflecting internalized oppression related to sexual orientation were expressed. Further research with this subpopulation is needed to inform the needs of these individuals. Specifically, more focus groups should be conducted with varying races, sexual orientations and ages so that results can be used to develop methods of assessment and/or interventions.

Committee:

Julie Williams, PsyD, ABPP (RP) (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Mental Health; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Therapy

Keywords:

LGBTQ; Deaf; Lesbian; Identity; Deaf Culture

Hrouda, Debra R.Factors Associated With Readiness For Treatment In A Sample Of Substance-Dependent, Trauma-Exposed Incarcerated Women
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, Social Welfare
Substance use and posttraumatic stress disorder are significant factors in criminal-justice-involved women. While mandated treatment may help engage some in treatment, there remains a significant proportion of offenders who do not respond, relapse, and end up back in the criminal justice system - especially for people who are ambivalent and/or do not recognize a need for treatment. The Transtheoretical Model of Change (TTM) recognizes that people are at different levels of readiness to change behaviors related to substance misuse. Studies have shown that following the stage-based approach leads to greater engagement and retention in treatment ultimately leading to better outcomes overall. If mandated treatment approaches followed the TTM, it is likely offenders at all stages of readiness will be engaged and stay in treatment leading to improved criminal justice outcomes. Methods: This is a secondary data analysis of a sample of 187 incarcerated women who met criteria for at least one substance dependence disorder and were trauma-exposed. Subjects were interviewed while incarcerated to determine SOCRATES scores; PTSD and Cocaine diagnoses; criminal justice; and demographic characteristics. It employed ordinal logistic regression to explore the relationship between demographic, criminal justice, and behavioral health-related factors and the newly-developed SOCRATES variable: Ambivalence in the context of Recognition Findings: Results supported the use of the SOCRATES in this population; offered a framework for examining Ambivalence in the context of Recognition (heretofore missing); and reinforced the contention that factors previously found to be associated with mandated treatment outcomes (and traditionally used to determine criminal justice sanctions) do not adequately predict stage of change readiness. Similarly, trauma-related factors were not significantly associated with Ambivalence in the context of Recognition - perhaps indicating that trauma factors may not inhibit readiness. Implications: Ambivalence in the context of Recognition was not related to any of the factors previously shown to predict success with criminal justice sanctions (e.g. mandated treatment). Policy-makers, those who make recommendations to the courts, as well as treatment providers might consider adding the direct assessment of readiness, ambivalence, and recognition to provide a more complete picture of potential targets and approaches.

Committee:

Kathleen Farkas, PhD (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Tracy, PhD (Committee Member); David Hussey, PhD (Committee Member); Christina Delos Reyes, MD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Criminology; Gender; Gender Studies; Legal Studies; Management; Mental Health; Public Policy; Social Work; Womens Studies

Keywords:

women; jail; Transtheoretical Model; behavior change; ambivalence; problem recognition; substance dependence or abuse; trauma exposed; PTSD; engagement; mandated treatment; SOCRATES; motivation; cocaine; criminal justice; sanctions; offender; TTM

Natinsky, Ari SimonPsychotherapy and the Embodiment of the Neuronal Identity: A Hermeneutic Study of Louis Cozolino's (2010) The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Healing the Social Brain
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2014, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
In recent years, there have been several ways in which researchers have attempted to integrate psychotherapy and neuroscience research. Neuroscience has been proposed as a method of addressing lingering questions about how best to integrate psychotherapy theories and explain their efficacy. For example, some psychotherapy outcome studies have included neuroimaging of participants in order to propose neurobiological bases of effective psychological interventions (e.g., Paquette et al., 2003). Other theorists have used cognitive neuroscience research to suggest neurobiological correlates of various psychotherapy theories and concepts (e.g., Schore, 2012). These efforts seem to embody broader historical trends, including the hope that neuroscience can resolve philosophical questions about the relationship between mind and body, as well as the popular appeal of contemporary brain research. In this hermeneutic dissertation I examined a popular neuropsychotherapy text in order to explore the historical fit between neuroscience and psychotherapy. The study identifies the possible understandings of the self (i.e., what it means to be human) that could arise from Western therapy discourses that are based on neuroscientific interpretations of psychotherapy theories. The methodology of this dissertation consisted of a critical textual analysis of Louis Cozolino's (2010) The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Healing the Social Brain. The primary content, rhetorical strategies, and recurring themes in Cozolino's book were outlined and interpreted from a hermeneutic perspective. This included a historical critique of Cozolino's claims about the origins, purpose, and efficacy of psychotherapy, his assertions about the relationship between self and brain, and examples of his psychotherapy case vignettes. Rhetorical strategies in his writing included analogy, ambiguity, speculative language, and figures of speech such as metaphor and personification. A discussion of these findings addressed the implications of Cozolino's efforts with regards to patient care, psychotherapy theory integration, and the possible effects that these efforts may have on the profession of psychology. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd .

Committee:

Philip Cushman, PhD (Committee Chair); Alejandra Suarez , PhD (Committee Member); Gary Walls, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Mental Health; Modern History; Neurosciences; Philosophy; Philosophy of Science; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Science History; Therapy

Keywords:

hermeneutics; neuroscience; interpersonal neurobiology; neuropsychotherapy; brain-based psychotherapy; neuroimaging; biomedicine; self; selfhood; psychotherapy; clinical psychology; theoretical and philosophical psychology; textual analysis; rhetoric

Bull, J. DavidAdolescent Attitudes Toward Help-Seeking and Mental Illness: A Rural-Urban Comparison
Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.), Xavier University, 2011, Psychology
The present study investigated attitudes toward help-seeking and mental illness between adolescents residing in rural and urban areas in the Southeastern United States. On a single occasion, a total of 182 students from grades nine through twelve (89 students in rural sample, 93 students in urban sample) completed a series of questionnaires that assessed their attitudes toward mental illness and seeking help for psychological problems. To make the samples similar, this study controlled for an indicator of participants' socioeconomic status (SES). Results revealed that the rural adolescent sample endorsed significantly more negative attitudes toward seeking help for psychological problems compared to the urban adolescent sample. In contrast, results indicated no significant difference between rural and urban adolescents' attitudes toward mental illness. Both rural and urban adolescents, however, endorsed somewhat negative attitudes toward mental illness. Results of additional research questions provide information regarding what kinds of problems rural and urban adolescents might seek help for, whom rural and urban adolescents might seek help from, and what might prevent rural and urban adolescent from seeking help for a psychological problem. This study has implications for future mental health educational efforts and for addressing the unmet mental health needs of rural and urban youth.

Committee:

Janet Schultz, Ph.D., ABPP (Committee Chair); Nicholas Salsman, Ph.D., ABPP (Committee Member); Renee Zucchero, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

Health behavior in adolescence; Mentally ill children; Research

Benson, Kathleen M.Suicide Resilience Among Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans: Sense of Coherence as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Traumatic Experiences and Suicidality
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2013, Counseling Psychology
With approximately 6,000 U.S. veteran deaths by suicide annually, the examination of protective factors against suicidality among returning veterans has received growing attention (DVA, 2010, January). This study examined the influence of one potential protective factor, a sense of coherence (SOC) as defined by Antonovsky (1979), on the relationship between combat distress and suicidality among Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) veterans. Data from 157 OEF/OIF combat veterans were collected in the primary care waiting area at a VA Medical Center. The average age in the sample was 35.67 (SD = 5.0) and was comprised of predominately White, single, and employed male veterans. Findings from correlation analyses found negative associations between SOC and suicidality, SOC and combat distress; as well as a positive association between combat distress and suicidality. No support for the associations between suicidality and time since active duty service, combat exposure and combat distress, or pre-deployment history of traumatic experiences and combat distress were found. Support was found for the primary hypothesis that predicted SOC would moderate the relationship between combat distress and suicidality. The interaction between SOC and combat distress was a significant predictor of suicidality above and beyond the significant contribution of combat distress and SOC alone. Simple slope analyses indicated that among OEF/OIF veterans with a high SOC, combat distress and suicidality are unrelated suggesting that SOC acts as a buffer. However, among OEF/OIF veterans with a low SOC, the positive relationship between combat distress and suicidality is stronger. This study has several important implications based on the findings stated above. First, it is important for researchers and clinicians to address the phenomenological experience of combat rather than exclusive reliance on mental health symptom inventories in the examination of suicidal risk. Second, the findings provide support that SOC has a mechanistic function in the construct of psychological resilience and may act as a protective factor against suicidality among OEF/OIF veterans who served in a combat-zone. Lastly, the use of theoretical frameworks in conducting resilience research is an important implication for future research examining psychological resilience among OEF/OIF veterans.

Committee:

John Queener, Dr. (Advisor); Kristin Koskey, Dr. (Committee Member); Ronald Levant, Dr. (Committee Member); David Tokar, Dr. (Committee Member); Cynthia Yamokoski, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Armed Forces; Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

OEF OIF Veterans; Suicide; Combat; Sense of Coherence; Resilience

Gavia, MiekoMieko Gavia : The Dog Project
BA, Oberlin College, 2011, Theater
This thesis chronicles my journey with my original theatrical piece, Dog, from inception to the end of its Oberlin College run, and includes a reflection of my experience and ideas for the future of the piece. I will provide both sociological and literary context for several important aspects of the show, as well as personal reflections on the process and discoveries made therein.

Committee:

Caroline Jackson-Smith (Advisor); Matthew Wright (Committee Member); Justin Emeka (Committee Member); Alicia Arizon (Advisor)

Subjects:

African Americans; Asian American Studies; Black History; Ethnic Studies; Hispanic Americans; Latin American Studies; Mental Health; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Native Americans; Performing Arts; Theater; Womens Studies

Keywords:

multiracial; race; mixed race; theater; original theater; interracial relationship; depression; bipolar; mental illness; race; play; mental health; playwright

Stephenson, Pamela ShockeyPeer Involvement in Adolescent Dating Violence
PHD, Kent State University, 2011, College of Nursing

Adolescent dating violence (ADV) is a significant public health problem with broad social implications. ADV has many physical, psychological, and relational adverse consequences. Furthermore, ADV is associated with intimate partner violence during adulthood. The purpose of this study was to examine the ways that peers were involved in the dating violence of other adolescents.

This study is part of a larger, parent project. The study entitled, “Adolescent Dating Violence: Development of a Theoretical Framework” (ADV) was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and utilized grounded theory to develop a theoretical framework of how dating violence begins, unfolds and ends. Seven categories of violent relationships between adolescent couples were identified. They included, maltreating, turbulent, volatile, brawling, deprecating, bickering, and intrusive relationships.

This research used the narratives from the ADV (n=88) study to explain and describe the ways that peers were involved in ADV. Peers were involved in maltreating relationships by “participating in the aggression” (males) and by “deserting the recipient” (females). Peers were involved in turbulent relationships by “agitating the aggression” (males) and by “cheating with the boyfriend” (females). Male and female peers were involved in volatile relationships by “ignoring the aggression.” Male and female peers were involved in brawling relationships by “confronting a partner.” Peers were involved in deprecating relationships by “being the competition” (males) and by “being the audience” (females). Peers were involved in bickering relationships by “joking with the dating partner” (males) and by “needling the dating partner” (females). Peers were involved in intrusive relationships by “keeping tabs on the recipient” (males) and by “helping the recipient” (females).

This research provides an important contribution to the literature by developing a typology of peer involvement by relationship type and by gender. This advancement can serve as a useful guide to future research and clinical intervention.

Committee:

Donna S Martsolf, PhD, RN (Committee Chair); Claire Burke Draucker, PhD, RN (Committee Member); Gregory P Knapik, PhD, MA, RN (Committee Member); John West, Ed.D., LPCC-S (Committee Member); Cynthia Symons, D.Ed., CHES (Other)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Nursing; Personal Relationships; Psychology; School Counseling; Social Work

Keywords:

adolescent dating violence; peers; grounded theory

Kissinger, Donald M.Clinicians’ Beliefs Regarding Variables That Contribute to the Honest Disclosure of Adolescent Males in Sexual Offender Treatment
PHD, Kent State University, 2009, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences
The purpose of this study was to identify the thoughts, behaviors, and events that clinicians who work with adolescent male sexual offenders perceived as assisting the offenders in honest disclosure of sexual abuse. Honest disclosure is thought by some researchers to be a critical component of sexual offender treatment. The study using Q-methodology involved 35 (16 male and 19 female) clinicians who offered sexual offender treatment. Each was asked to sort 24 statements about specific thoughts, behaviors, and events that they thought aided adolescent males in making honest disclosure of sexual offenses on a continuum from most helpful (+3) to least helpful (-3). The 24 statements comprising the sort had been garnered from interviews with a panel of clinicians who shared ideas about what assisted adolescents in honestly disclosing sexual offenses. The sorts were then factor analyzed to disclose clinicians who sorted in similar ways. These sub-groupings of clinicians thus held a common perspective of what they thought was helpful in gaining honest disclosure. Three significant sub-groupings of clinician’s perspectives were revealed. Factor 1 consisted of 7 participants and accounted for 20% of the variance. This group thought that the clinician’s expression of non-judgmental respect was most important in assisting adolescent sexual offenders to make honest disclosure of their sexual offenses. Factor 2 consisted of a group of 6 clinicians whose responses accounted for 17% of the variance. Their responses stressed the importance of having a network of judges, lawyers, probation officers, clinicians, and family members who focused on the adolescent’s honesty and accountability. Finally, a third factor was revealed consisting of 6 clinicians accounting for 17% of variance. Clinicians loading on this factor stressed the thoughts of adolescents. They thought those adolescents who assumed guilt for their offenses and thought they needed help were most likely to honestly disclose their offenses. The data suggested that adolescent sexual offenders openness to disclose their sexual offenses is influenced by both interactional patterns with others and internal factors.

Committee:

Donald Bubenzer, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); John West, EdD (Committee Co-Chair); Kele Ding, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Psychology; Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

adolescent sexual offender treatment; adolescent; sexual offender treatment; honesty; clinicians' beliefs

Bunthumporn, NutchanartEffects of Biofeedback Training on Negative Affect, Depressive Cognitions, Resourceful Behaviors, and Depressive Symptoms in Thai Elders
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2012, Nursing

Research has shown that biofeedback training reduces depressive symptoms. However, the precise mechanism for how it impacts affective, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms of depression is unknown. This study examined the effects of biofeedback training on affect (negative affect), behavior (resourceful behaviors), cognition (depressive cognitions), and depressive symptoms; explored relationships among those four variables; and evaluated the training program. The mixed-method research consisted of a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design; using open-ended questions. Hornby’s theory of human functioning, suggests that interrelationships exist among affect, behavior, and cognition and that changes in one of these may lead to changes in the other two symptoms. Two senior assisted living facilities were chosen for the study; 50 elders were assigned to receive the usual care (control group) and another 50 were assigned to participate in the biofeedback training (experimental group). Participants completed measures of affect, behavior, cognitions, and depressive symptoms before and after biofeedback training and similar intervals for the control. The training included 10, 30-minute sessions, twice a week, for 5 weeks continuously.

The study found that there were significant intercorrelations (p<.01) among negative affect, resourceful behaviors, depressive cognitions, and depressive symptoms (r(range)= .28 to .79). Furthermore, there were no significant differences (p>.05) in baseline mean values of negative affect (t(98)=-1.57), resourceful behaviors (t(98)=-.92), depressive cognitions (t(98)=.16), and depressive symptoms (t(98)=-1.02) between experimental and control groups. However, significant differences of mean values for negative affect (t(98)=5.38, p<.001), resourceful behaviors (t(98)=4.32, p<.001), depressive cognitions (t(85.792)= 3.10, p<.01), and depressive symptoms (t(98)= 8.06, p<.001) were found at post-intervention between the two groups. In addition, there were significant improvements in negative affect (F(1,98)=18.80, p<.001), resourceful behaviors (t(49)=-2.07, p<.05), depressive cognitions (F(1,98) = 5.24, p<.05), and depressive symptoms (F(1,98) = 108.14, p<.001) from pre-intervention to post-intervention. Moreover, the biofeedback training program was found to meet the six critical parameters of nursing intervention: necessity, acceptability, feasibility, fidelity, safety, and effectiveness.

The findings suggest beneficial effects of biofeedback training in reducing negative affect, depressive cognitions, and depressive symptoms and enhancing resourceful behaviors of Thai elders in assisted living facilities. This program may be a useful adjunct to exiting programs in facilities.

Committee:

Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD (Advisor); Christopher J. Burant, PhD (Committee Member); Diana L. Morris, PhD (Committee Member); Heath A. Demaree, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Gerontology; Mental Health; Nursing

Keywords:

Biofeedback Training; Negative Affect; Depressive Cognitions; Resourceful Behaviors; Depressive Symptoms; Elders

Beauchemin, Antoine T.How Parents Experience Their Child's Excess Weight: Implications for Weight Management Programs and Mental Health Practitioners
MA, Kent State University, 2009, College of Education, Health, and Human Services / Department of Adult, Counseling, Health and Vocational Education

Pediatric weight management programs have been criticized for not addressing the individual needs and barriers that families face during weight management. Given that the success of such programs depends largely on the parents’ capacity to support their child’s weight management, perhaps treatment effectiveness could be improved by learning how parents experience their child’s excess weight and by listening to what they believe could help them support their child’s weight management. Additionally, the lack of focus on the emotional aspects of pediatric weight management suggests that families may benefit from the addition of mental health services to weight management programs.

The purpose of this study was thus to learn how parents of overweight and obese children conceptualize and experience their child’s excess weight, and to explore whether these parents think mental health professionals could contribute to pediatric weight management programs. This was accomplished by conducting open-ended interviews with ten parents of families enrolled in a nutrition and exercise education program for overweight children in Kent, Ohio, USA. Interview responses were analyzed from a phenomenological research approach.

Overall, the results suggested that parents feel they need help to overcome the many challenges they face during their child’s weight management. The results also demonstrated that parents agree with the inclusion of mental health assistance in weight management programs to help families cope with excess weight and address an aspect of weight management that is evidently given less attention than it deserves. Perhaps, taking the parents’ experience into consideration would help pediatric weight management programs engage families in treatment, improve treatment effectiveness, and lower drop-out rates by addressing parents’ weight management concerns appropriately and increasing confidence in their weight-related parenting skills.

Committee:

Jason McGlothlin, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Martin Jencius, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Donna Bernert, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Families and Family Life; Health; Health Care; Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

Childhood; obesity; overweight; weight management; parenting; mental health

Burchett, Danielle L.The Need for Validity Indices in Personality Assessment: A Demonstration Using the MMPI-2-RF
MA, Kent State University, 2009, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Psychology
We examined the impact of overreporting on the validity of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scale scores by comparing the strength of correlations with external criteria for a control group of individuals who completed the MMPI-2-RF under standard instructions with correlations of individuals who completed the instrument under instructions to (a) feign psychopathology or (b) feign somatic complaints. Correlations between MMPI-2-RF substantive scales and criteria were much weaker for feigners than for controls. We also examined mean profiles, which were more elevated for feigners than for controls. Overall, results were more extreme for psychopathology feigners than for somatic feigners. Our results demonstrate the detrimental effect that overreporting psychopathology or somatic problems has on the validity of MMPI-2-RF scale scores. The findings emphasize the critical need for validity indices in self-report personality assessment so that test interpreters can detect individual protocols that are likely to have extremely invalid scale scores due to invalid responding.

Committee:

Yossef Ben-Porath, PhD (Committee Chair); John Graham, PhD (Committee Member); John Gunstad, PhD (Committee Member); Manfred van Dulmen, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Criminology; Mental Health; Psychological Tests; Psychology

Keywords:

validity scales; validity indices; overreporting; feigning; invalid responding; scale score validity; protocol validity; MMPI-2-RF

DeBonis, Julie A.The Role of Stress, Anxiety, and Alcohol in Disrupted Sleep Among a College Population
Bachelor of Arts, Marietta College, 2011, Psychology
This study examines the role of stress, anxiety, and alcohol in disrupted sleep patterns within a college population. The analysis is based upon six questionnaires administered to 64 females and 16 males from the Marietta College campus. Stress, anxiety, and alcohol use were examined in relation to their self-reported sleep disruption. The results show that stress is the largest contributing factor to sleep disruption, anxiety is a moderate predictor of sleep disruption, and alcohol use is a modest predictor of sleep disruption. In order to combat the effects that stress has on sleep habits, it is suggested that college students are provided with knowledge on how to manage stress before experiencing adverse effects on sleep habits.

Committee:

Ryan May, PhD (Advisor); Alicia Doerflinger, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

sleep; sleep disruption; stress; anxiety; alcohol; college; predictor; sleep habits; sleep patterns

Fagen, Shoshana J.Bracing for Idiopathic Scoliosis: Improving Adherence through Psychological Intervention
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2012, Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology
Poor treatment adherence is increasingly being recognized as a significant problem in pediatric medicine. For the condition Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis, poor adherence rates to the most non-surgical intervention, orthotic bracing, have become a well-established fact. This treatment modality has been correlated with multiple psychosocial areas of difficulty, including low self image, suicidal ideation, feelings of isolation, social discomfort, depression, an external locus of control, increasing risk taking behavior, high levels of stress, anger, fear, shame, and eating disorders. Since the orthotic bracing has been linked to both poor adherence and to psychosocial problems, an intervention is created to increase adherence through the use of psychosocial techniques. Cognitive behavioral therapy has been used successfully to increase treatment adherence in both adult and pediatric patients. Thus, a comprehensive program is put forth that aims to increase bracing adherence by means of a cognitive behavioral intervention. Additionally, methods for studying the psychometric properties of this intervention are proposed.

Committee:

Victor Pantesco, EdD (Committee Chair); William Slammon, PhD (Committee Member); David Hamolsky, PsyD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Health Care; Medicine; Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

Adherence; Scoliosis; Adolescent; Compliance; Group Treatment

Fago, Felicia J.Impact of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Pre-adoption Placement on School-age Functioning of Intercountry-Adopted Children
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2012, Social Welfare

Impact of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Pre-adoption Placement on School-age Functioning of Intercountry-Adopted Children

Abstract

by FELICIA J. FAGO

The current study assessed the relationship between prenatal alcohol exposure risk and pre-adoption placement risk on the social-emotional behavior, academic functioning, and adaptive functioning of school-age intercountry-adopted children. Participants included 60 children from six to 13 years of age who were adopted into the United States from foreign countries. This group was divided into high risk of prenatal alcohol exposure (HPAE = 28) and low risk of prenatal alcohol exposure (LPAE = 32) by using the 4-Digit Diagnostic Code. Linear regression, logistic regression models, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to investigate the separate and cumulative effects of prenatal alcohol exposure risk and pre-adoption placement risk on school-age outcomes. After controlling for potential confounding variables, high risk of prenatal alcohol exposure was found to be the only variable that had a significant effect on overall social-emotional behavior (β = .366, p = .004), academic functioning (β = -.528, p = .000), and adaptive functioning (β = -.385, p = .002). There was no differential effect of HPAE versus LPAE on internalizing social-emotional behavior but participants with HPAE were more likely to exhibit externalizing social-emotional behaviors. Additional research is needed for both the identification of prenatal alcohol exposure in this population, as well as interventions that effectively mitigate the impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on social-emotional, academic, and adaptive behavior functioning.

Committee:

Victor Groza, PhD (Committee Chair); Anna Mandalakas, MD (Committee Member); Sonia Minnes, PhD (Committee Member); David Miller, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Developmental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Individual and Family Studies; Mental Health; Social Psychology; Social Work; Sociology; Special Education; Teaching; Toxicology

Keywords:

Intercountry-adoption; fetal alcohol spectrum disorders; institutionalization; academic performance; social-emotional behavior; adaptive behavior; 4-Digit Diagnostic Code

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