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Roane, Nancy LeeMisreading the River: Heraclitean Hope in Postmodern Texts
BA, Oberlin College, 2015, Comparative Literature
Ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus, known for his theory of "constant flux," may be one of the most misunderstood and misquoted thinkers of Western philosophy. The way that the protagonist of Julio Cortazar’s Rayuela misreads Heraclitus serves as one example of this phenomenon wherein poorly-conceived postmodern inquiries that seek to weaken the idea of a Truth lead to a nihilistic apathy. Horacio Oliveira misunderstands Heraclitus’ doctrine of constant flux and uses this misreading to “logically” justify his sexist and elitist behavior towards others. This phenomenon crops up again in Samuel Beckett’s absurdist play Fin de Partie through Hamm, a patriarch that no longer sees any point in trying because the world as he knows it is disintegrating. We can use Heraclitus as a central theoretical point for parsing through what exactly goes wrong with the ethical decisions of these characters. Carole Maso’s AVA serves as a counterexample to Rayuela and Fin de Partie, for the novel revolves around similar theoretical questions but provides us with a more properly “Heraclitean” approach for how to confront a world without fixed meaning. Studying these failures and successes supply us with examples of how Postmodern thought can be used for harm or for good. A Heraclitean reading of these texts shows us how, properly understood, Postmodernism moves not only towards deconstructing structuralized systems of violence and marginalization, but also towards building something out of the rubble.

Committee:

Claire Solomon (Advisor); Jed Deppman (Committee Chair); Benjamin Lee (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Ancient Languages; Classical Studies; Comparative; Comparative Literature; Epistemology; Ethics; European Studies; Gender Studies; Latin American Literature; Latin American Studies; Literature; Metaphysics; Modern Literature; Philosophy; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Heraclitus;Julio Cortazar;Cortazar;Rayuela;Hopscotch;Samuel Beckett;Beckett;Fin de Partie;Endgame;Carole Maso;Maso;AVA;Postmodernism;Ancient Greek philosophy;Poststructuralism; Deconstruction; Cixous;Derrida;Deleuze;Kahn; TM Robinson

Thorsteinsson, VidarDiachronic Binding: The Novel Form and the Gendered Temporalities of Debt and Credit
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Comparative Studies
Contributing to Victorian novel studies, literary theory, and gender studies, this dissertation studies individual indebtedness and speculation as testing-grounds of the management of the self, highlighting the role of novelistic narrative in the attendant subjective experiences and practices. Its central conclusion is that self-government in the credit economy takes the form of a uniquely temporal sensibility or form which is here named “diachronic binding.” Diachronic binding, as is shown, consists of a continuous motion between speculation and austerity, where the violence and disciplining of the latter often takes on particularly gendered expressions. In the Introduction, the historical-comparative dimensions of the project are discussed and its contours charted through a reading of Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s painting Found. Following Chapter 1, which is devoted to outlining the theoretical basis of the argument concerning time, gender, and the credit economy, Chapter 2 opens on to an engagement with the Victorian novel, starting with an analysis of the figure of what is here called the “rootless woman.” Living in a state of constant suspense and flight, is is considered how Becky Sharp of Vanity Fair personifies the haunting presence of an irreducibly unpaid quantitative gap at the heart of capitalist value production. The rootless woman, it is concluded, simultaneously stages the general fear of failing to profitably engage temporal market forms and the desire to exclusively associate women with these failures so as to rhetorically legitimate their exclusion from the market and subjection to domestic patriarchy. The analysis of George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda, in Chapter 3, continues to consider the unevenly gendered enactments of value. In contrast to Daniel’s successful engagement of the binding dynamic between future speculation and past validation, it is considered how Gwendolen is set up to fail in her motion from speculation to austerity. The `Hermione’ episode where Klesmer ambiguously complements Gwendolen’s “plastik” as she freezes in horror at the sight of the painting that forebodes her future tragedy is read closely, and interpreted as exposing the desperation of Gwendolen’s self-preservation in the face of economic instability, a brittle and fragile protective armor that stands in opposition to Daniel’s suppleness of form. Building on the engagement with Thackeray and Eliot, the fourth and final chapter moves on to consider the afterlives of Victorian forms, tropes, and narrative patterns in contemporary Icelandic fiction set during the country’s recent period of hyper-financialization. The presence of a marketable yet abject feminine subjectivity which is simultaneously plastic and fragile is identified in Icelandic novelist Steinar Bragi’s 2008 financial horror thriller, Women. The novel’s protagonist, Eva, undergoes a violent and literal process of bodily forming that invokes the performative techniques of modern finance while harkening back to the speculative core of capitalist value-production. The dissertation ends with a short conclusion which discusses the historical and cultural counterpoints between the Victorian period and the contemporary trans-Atlantic world.

Committee:

Eugene Holland (Committee Chair); Philip Armstrong (Committee Member); Jill Galvan (Committee Member); Ethan Knapp (Committee Member); Katherine Hayles (Committee Member); Gudni Elisson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

British and Irish Literature; Comparative Literature; Gender Studies; Icelandic and Scandinavian Literature; Literature; Modern Literature; Social Research

Keywords:

Victorian novel; William M Thackeray; George Eliot; Narrative theory; Marxism; Temporality; Capitalism; Debt; Financialization; Icelandic literature; 2008 financial crisis; Gender studies;

Neithardt, Leigh AnneNarrative Progression and Characters with Disabilities in Children’s Picturebooks
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, EDU Teaching and Learning
Children with disabilities began to appear with increasing frequency as characters in children’s books following the United States Congress’s passage in 1975 of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, the precursor to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Researchers have done important work over the past forty years by examining these books while thinking about the effects that this literature can have on its readers and their understanding of disability and disabled people, addressing elements including characters, plot, and representations of specific disabilities, pointing out problematic tropes and titles. In this dissertation, I built on this research and brought together concepts in rhetorical narrative theory, specifically narrative progression, and disability studies in order to offer an even more in-depth analysis of the designs and effects of this corpus of children’s books. By engaging in a close reading of 178 picturebooks featuring disabled characters from a rhetorical narrative theory approach, my research illuminated how the rhetorical choices that an author makes in both her text and illustrations have consequences for the way that disability is presented to her readers. Specifically, my dissertation undertook a two-step analysis of those rhetorical choices. The first step was to read the books on their own terms and the second was to assess those terms through the lens of disability studies. Each of my five chapters examined the use of one kind of narrative progression, centered around one or more disabled characters—and occasionally non-disabled characters— attending to how this progression situated its readers ethically and affectively. Each chapter also assessed the potential effects, positive and negative, on the reader’s understanding of disability, its contexts, and its consequences. I argued that readers need to be more cognizant of authorial purpose, because while many authors attempt to create narratives about disabled characters that conform to readers’ desires for endings to be upbeat and for characters to have their problems resolved, the lived experience of disability is more complex. I felt that it was also necessary to highlight work that individual authors and illustrators are doing well, and areas that need to be examined further. Applying a disability studies perspective to these narratives allowed for a close examination of five different types of narrative progressions that were experienced by a reader familiar with concepts of disability studies. These progressions differed in some ways from each other and from the progressions that authors were interested in their audiences experiencing. These analyses contributed to the two larger goals of the dissertation: (1) demonstrating the value of attending to authorial purposes and readerly dynamics; and (2) and providing a model for more nuanced discussions of the achievements and limitations of these books.

Committee:

Barbara Kiefer (Advisor); James Phelan (Committee Member); Amy Shuman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Asian Literature; British and Irish Literature; Canadian Literature; Early Childhood Education; Education; Language Arts; Literature; Special Education; Teaching

Keywords:

disabilities; disability; disability studies; narrative theory; rhetorical narrative theory; narrative progression; picturebooks; picture books; childrens literature

Soric, Kristina MariaEmpires of Fiction: Coloniality in the Literatures of the Nineteenth-Century Iberian Empires after the Age of Atlantic Revolutions
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Spanish and Portuguese
This dissertation reassesses the literatures of the nineteenth-century Iberian empires after the Age of Atlantic Revolutions, as the persistence of Spanish and Portuguese coloniality tends to be misinterpreted within their respective literatures as a result of their omission from the dominant historiographical narratives of Modern Europe. This project shifts the focus of literary analysis away from Eurocentric debates that compare Spain and Portugal to the rest of the Modern European empires, and instead compares their reinvigorated engagement with the Antilles and Africa after the significant colonial losses incurred early in the century. As such, this study calls for the analysis of colonial/hybrid texts in conjunction with the rereading of metropolitan works to elucidate the persistence of coloniality and its relevance previously unexplored within the cultures and literatures of the nineteenth-century peninsular metropolises, while also emphasizing the imperial discourses and colonial practices that not only articulated but also served to perpetuate the power dynamics of coloniality along the century. The examination of the nineteenth-century Iberian literatures by way of an archive that reflects the reach of their empires reveals the documentation of imperial ideologies and practices largely erased from the popular imperial narratives of Spain and Portugal, as well as those of the larger Modern Atlantic world: namely, the persistence of slavery and its illegal trade, the harsh realities of historically idealized miscegenation, the role of colonial subjects as protagonists in decolonization, as well as the continuing role of Iberian migration and slavery within the nineteenth-century imperial Atlantic. On the other hand, the study of the Spanish and Portuguese empires through a comparative perspective highlights the important differences between the two enterprises, offering more productive readings of their literatures as a receptacle for the particular expressions of coloniality and its resistance that led to decolonization for Spain while allowing for Portugal’s persistence in Africa well into the twentieth century, as well as the respective imperial and national myths that persist to this day as a result. More generally, refocusing the discussion of nineteenth-century imperial Iberia and widening the scope of its literatures reflects the goals of the emerging field of Iberian Studies, which aims to transcend the national boundaries imposed by the separation of academic disciplines to instead move towards inter- and transdisciplinary scholarship reflective of Iberia’s diverse cultural legacies.

Committee:

Pedro Schacht Pereira (Advisor); Salvador García (Committee Member); Rebecca Haidt (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Literature; Caribbean Literature; Comparative Literature; European Studies; Modern History; Modern Language; Modern Literature; Romance Literature

Keywords:

Iberian Atlantic; Spanish Antilles; Portuguese Africa; nineteenth century; coloniality; modern empire; Iberian studies; transatlantic studies; Cuba; Puerto Rico; Angola; Mozambique; Cape Verde; Guinea

Ghimire, BishnuImagining India from the Margins: Libearlism and Hybridity in Late Colonial India
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2012, English (Arts and Sciences)
This dissertation offers a comparative study of E. M. Forster's A Passage to India (1924), Mulk Raj Anand's Untouchable (1935), and Attia Hosain's Sunlight on a Broken Column (1961) as cases of cultural and political border-crossing in British India and proposes a philosophical affinity between Forster's liberal humanism and the colonial hybridity of Anand and Hosain: It argues that the liberal humanism of Forster's Indian writings prefigures the colonial hybridity of the two Indian writers from the next generation. The study also highlights the various forms of marginality that Forster, Anand, and Hosain occupy in connection with the British Empire and analyzes how the three critique colonialist discourse by systematically undoing its various tenets, including essentialist notions of difference and of cultural and racial identity.

Committee:

Carey Snyder, PhD (Committee Chair); Joseph McLaughlin, PhD (Committee Member); Ghirmai Negash, PhD (Committee Member); Haley Duschinski, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Asian Literature; Asian Studies; British and Irish Literature; Comparative Literature; Literature; Modern Literature; South Asian Studies

Keywords:

Post (colonial); late colonial India; the Raj; liberal humanism; hybridity; irony; Forster; Anand; Hosain; Rorty; Bhabha; representation; culture; nationalism; identity politics; critique of essentialism; cosmopolitanism; metropolitan; margin

Howat, Tyler PaulScott Pilgrim's Gaming Reality: An Introduction to Gamer Realism
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2012, English
With the rise of the gaming culture comes a similar increase in literature which addresses this lifestyle and those who live it. Without identification, this genre has gone without notice and relatively little scholarly discussion, largely due to a lack of familiarity with the subject due to prevalent misleading stereotypes. This thesis names that burgeoning genre: gamer realism. The first part of this thesis identifies its characteristics and general goals, along with some small examples of texts which exhibit some aspects of those characteristics. The second part examines the Scott Pilgrim graphic novel series by Bryan Lee O'Malley as a case study, in order to demonstrate how it exemplifies this new genre.

Committee:

James Boehnlein, PhD (Advisor); Thomas Morgan, PhD (Committee Member); Patrick Thomas, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Asian Literature; Canadian Literature; Canadian Studies; Comparative Literature; Language Arts; Literature

Keywords:

Scott Pilgrim; graphic novels; Bryan Lee O'Malley; gaming; gamer; magical realism

Grgorinic, NatalijaRecounting the Author
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2012, English
In this dissertation it is argued that all literary authorship is to a greater or lesser degree a product of labor of more than one person and that, as such, all literary authorship is collaborative. For the purpose of examining this collaborative aspect of authorship this dissertation deals exclusively with the examples of unconcealed literary collaboration. Among these, the examples of conjugal collaborations of Michael Dorris and Louise Erdrich, Peter Redgrove and Penelope Shuttle, and Julio Cortázar and Carol Dunlop are used to investigate the usefulness of marriage as a metaphor most frequently employed in the descriptions of overt collaboration. The tentative conclusion reached is that collaboration in terms of literary authorship requires a more suitable terminology, one that would go beyond the romantic or romanticized language of shared intimacy. Another key premise is that the idea of authorship as an exclusive solitary activity leaves a particular mark on the process of literary creation itself, as well as on the very activity of writing. Here novels written by collaborative couples (The Crown of Columbus), but also novels written by smaller (The Caverns) or larger (Invisible Seattle) groups were used to explain how that which is considered to be a ‘proper’ way of writing influences both the character and the reception of a particular text. The name of the author (whether singular or plural), as well as the pseudonym, are described as indicators of relative authorial plurality and shared authorial responsibility, with any name provided as the name of the author symbolizing the necessity of human involvement with the text as well as the other participants in the literary exchange. The model of a particular dyadic relationship established between the text and any person who interacts with it (in any capacity) is offered to account for the notion of literary authorship as a process rather than an act. In this process numerous individuals through the interaction with each other as well as with the text assume responsibility for that text. In the end, the peculiar circumstances of this dissertation’s authorship itself are examined in the context of the key ideas presented. The main conclusion of this dissertation is that examples of open literary collaboration broaden the understanding of literary authorship as a whole, pointing to the fact that all authorship relies at least to some small degree on sharing the creative labor as well as the responsibility for the product of that labor.

Committee:

Gary Stonum, PhD (Advisor); Thrity Umrigar, PhD (Committee Member); Christopher Flint, PhD (Committee Member); Laura Hengehold, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; British and Irish Literature; Comparative Literature; Gender; Literature; Modern Literature

Keywords:

collaborative authorship; literary authorship; genius; co-authorship; authors' rights; marriage; penname; pseudonym; anonymity, literary text

Elizondo Luna, Roberto CarlosMedusa House
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Creative Writing/Poetry
“Medusa House” is a collection of poems that deals with the paradoxes found in life, the questioning of language; and the definition of sexual, spiritual, and national identity. The main theme of the collection is transformation through creation and destruction, which I explored with the use of surrealist and religious imagery. Paradox colors the poems in the thesis, celebrating both the chaos and the order of life contained in death and vice versa. The character of the grandmother appears throughout the poems or “rooms.” Although one may feel trapped in a labyrinth of emotion and discord, I desired to bring truth for the writings as a whole: that we are being who suffer but who can also escape from that suffering. Mexico and the United States are merged without making the poet a “Chicano,” but someone who transcends labels for the sake of art and song.

Committee:

Larissa Szporluk (Advisor); Sharona Muir, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Fine Arts; Gender; Hispanic Americans; Language Arts; Latin American Literature; Literature; Modern Literature

Keywords:

Poetry; English; Spanish; Nomad; Grandmother; Identity; Apocalypse; Transformation

Hoffman, Dustin M.Living Impaired and Other Stories of the Underemployed
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Bowling Green State University, 2009, Creative Writing/Fiction
This collection of stories explores the contemporary American work place. Many of the stories take place at work, within the crucible of the eight-hour shift, where characters struggle to understand their worth beyond their hourly wage. During my time at BGSU, I've sought to investigate where one's occupation can take a character, whether it be chasing the ever-elusive American Dream or confronting an inner conflict. The styles of the stories range from traditional realism to the magically absurd, because the complex story of the American worker will never be able to be told in only one way.

Committee:

Dr. Wendell Mayo, PhD (Advisor); Theresa Williams, MFA (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

American Literature; Comparative Literature; English literature; Fine Arts; Language Arts; Literature

Keywords:

Occupational; Work; American Dream; Absurd; Traditional; Zombies; Pushing the Knives; Silverback; House Painter; Michigan; Kalamazoo; Magical Realism; Surreal

Minonne, Francesca“Yo Soy Joaquín Murrieta”: Los múltiples rostros de Joaquín a través del espacio y el tiempo
BA, Oberlin College, 2008, Hispanic Studies

En esta tesis me prepongo a estudiar el desarrollo de la leyenda de Joaquín Murrieta, un bandido hispano quien ganó fama durante la fiebre del oro en California. Sigo las transformaciones de esta leyenda cronológicamente, desde la muerte del Joaquín en 1853 hasta el presente. En cada período en que surge la leyenda, la relaciono con las condiciones sociales, políticas, y económicas de la época. De este modo, puedo examinar cómo la historia y las tensiones raciales entre angloamericanos e hispanos han influido la manera en que autores y artistas han representado a Joaquín.

In this dissertation, I propose to study the development of the legend of Joaquin Murrieta, a Hispanic bandit who became famous during the Gold Rush in California. I follow the transformations of this legend chronologically, from Joaquin’s death in 1853 to the present. In each time period in which the legend appears, I relate it to social, political, and economic conditions of that period. In this way, I can examine how history and racial tensions between Anglo-Americans and Hispanics have influenced the way in which authors and artists have represented Joaquin.

Committee:

Ana Cara, Ph.D. (Advisor); Patrick O'Connor, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Edward Melillo, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; American Literature; Comparative Literature; Folklore; Hispanic Americans; Latin American Literature; Literature

Keywords:

Joaquin; Murrieta; Murieta; Murietta; Zorro; legend; folk hero; bandit

Lloyd, AmandaReverse Orientalism: Laila Halaby's Once in a Promised Land
Master of Arts in English, Cleveland State University, 2012, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

Laila Halaby’s Once in a Promised Land (2007) offers instructive insight into the struggles facing Arab Americans in post 9/11 America. Specifically, Halaby inverts the Western gaze upon the Arab world; in doing so, she represents an America that is conspiratorial and inundated with religious zealotry. After 9/11, Halaby’s American characters become increasingly intolerant and distrustful of Arabs and Islamic cultures. Halaby, then, portrays intolerant and xenophobic American characters overwrought with suspicion and paranoia and reveals a post 9/11 America that is rife with anti-Arab racism.

Halaby also suggests that the pervasive American perception of a world distinctly divided between East and West only exacerbates global crises such as drought, poverty, and war. She also intimates that the events that occurred on September 11, 2001, were a direct result of these epidemics. Moreover, Halaby proffers a perspective of Americans as ignorantly perceiving the United States as isolated from crises threatening all nations. For this reason, her novel functions as a cautionary tale—instructing Americans to transcend a binary frame of reference in order to avoid further crises from escalating either within or beyond American borders.

There is also a direct correlation between Halaby’s novel and Leslie Marmon Silko’s 1977 work, Ceremony. Both Halaby and Silko weave traditional folktales with their own narratives. In addition, Halaby’s implication that the potential for global disasters unites all global citizens in a common fate is reminiscent of Silko’s warning that the possibility of nuclear annihilation affects all cultures, regardless of location. Accordingly, both authors encourage cooperation between Eastern and Western nations and put forward that it is essential for all civilizations to transcend national borders and cultural partitions in order to solve global crises.

Committee:

Jeff Karem, PhD (Committee Chair); Jennifer Jeffers, PhD (Committee Member); Adam Sonstegard, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Islamic Studies; Literature; Middle Eastern Literature; Middle Eastern Studies; Modern Literature

Istomina, JuliaProperty, Mobility, and Epistemology in U.S. Women of Color Detective Fiction
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, English
This project explores how U.S. women of color detective fiction novels interpret and revise methods for obtaining and transmitting knowledge while operating within political and economic climates that discipline and occlude oppositional narratives, historiographies, and identifications. U.S. women of color detective fiction emerged in the early 1990s during a time when institutions began to incorporate historically marginalized perspectives, but also when American and transnational corporate initiatives sought to stigmatize and profit from poor women of color. The novels featured in this project make use of a genre that is invested in creating exceptionally intelligent and capable detectives who seek to identify and correct social injustice. In the process, these novels employ historiographic epistemologies that are typically elided in Anglo-European philosophical and narrative productions. Historiographic epistemologies are theories concerning the encoding and transmission of knowledge that also serve as mediations regarding the composition of history, testimony, and narrative. Through the use of historiographic epistemologies, U.S. women of color detective fiction novels reveal the creative and narrative-building aspects of logical reasoning employed by detective fiction and rationalist discourse more broadly. Moving from the local with Barbara Neely's Blanche on the Lam, to the transnational with Lucha Corpi's Black Widow's Wardrobe and Alicia Gaspar de Alba's Desert Blood: The Juarez Murders, to the global with Charlotte Carter's Coq au Vin and Lupe Solano's Havana Nights, this project identifies connections and distinctions among these texts that in turn enable a more nuanced understanding of how precarity is constituted through the pervasive, implicit division between domestic (white) space and public (surveillanced) space. In their use of a genre that reflects institutional and social structural alignments and in their employment of non-European epistemologies such as second sight, jazz, conocimiento, spiritual mestizaje, and public motherhood, the novels featured in this project also emphasize the fact that categories of difference are dynamic and that the uniqueness of each individual experience within the U.S. matrix of institutional and social power creates unique modes of resistance. As a result, the larger critical contribution of this project is its identification of connections between place-based, decolonial, and global womanist theories of subjecthood and space that test the predictability of the gender-race-class intersectional lens of analysis.

Committee:

Linda Mizejewski (Committee Chair); Lynn Itagaki (Advisor); Theresa Delgadillo (Advisor)

Subjects:

African American Studies; American History; American Literature; American Studies; Asian American Studies; Black Studies; Caribbean Literature; Caribbean Studies; Comparative Literature; Epistemology; Ethnic Studies; Gender Studies; Glbt Studies; Hispanic American Studies; Latin American History; Latin American Literature; Latin American Studies; Native American Studies; Performing Arts; Womens Studies

Keywords:

US women of color literature; US multiethnic detective fiction; US feminist detective fiction; feminist epistemology; hardboiled character; testimony; border studies; diaspora; domestic mystery

Linares, TrinidadDis-Orienting Interactions: Agatha Christie, Imperial Tourists, and the Other
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2018, Popular Culture
This postcolonial feminist analysis of Agatha Christie novels uses the activity of tourism. In order to narrow the study of Christie's work, I concentrated on Western tourists (mainly English and American) in non-Western locations such as the Middle East, the Caribbean, and South Africa. The tourists are of different social classes, but by narrowing these white Westerners by activity and behaviors performed according to that activity my research provides a more targeted approach. Focusing on The Man in the Brown Suit, Appointment with Death, Death on the Nile, Caribbean Mystery, and They Came to Baghdad, which have specifically tourist interactions with locals and tour workers, my research shows not only Orientalist attitudes presented by the protagonists and narrators, but also how such perspectives are questioned by those they other in the stories. Examining the behaviors of tourists through a postcolonial feminist lens illuminates the subject of gendered orientalism and imperial feminism¿Western women are championed, often at the expense of people of color. Christie's life experiences, especially those related to her second husband's archaeological work in the Middle East, challenged some of her views on the superiority of the British empire and that played out in her books. Therefore, while her older protagonists like Miss Marple remained conservative and hierarchical, Victoria Jones from They Came to Baghdad could see a commonality with the people of Iraq beyond race and culture. Although they never took center stage, the people of color spoke back to the Westerners in a number of her novels, thus rupturing their perceived lack of agency. Christie's work may romanticize the bygone days of British power, but there are enough cracks of modernity to allow the Other to shine through.

Committee:

Kristen Rudisill, Ph.D. (Advisor); Becca Cragin, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Stephannie Gearhart, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

British and Irish Literature; Comparative Literature; Ethnic Studies; Gender; Gender Studies; Literature; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern Literature

Keywords:

Orientalism; Agatha Christie; cultural and literary tourism; The Man in the Brown Suit; Caribbean Mystery; They Came to Baghdad; Death on the Nile; Appointment with Death; imperial feminism; postcolonial feminism; race; gender; mystery; popular culture

Estes, Sharon LynnInverted Audiences: Transatlantic Readers and International Bestsellers, 1851-1891
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, English
This dissertation challenges traditional author-based chronologies of British and American literatures by examining the international readerships for nineteenth-century bestsellers. The project spans the decades between 1851, when a series of legal cases undermined the copyrights of American books in Britain, and 1891, when the Chace Act in the United States provided full international copyright protection. In this period, international copyright laws (or lack thereof), publishing practices, and circulation patterns allowed bestsellers to circulate even more widely outside their countries of national origin, a pattern I call an inverted audience. Situated at the intersection of current work in book history and transatlantic studies, this dissertation constructs a phenomenology of the bestseller that accounts for these trends in publishing and reading within an international context. I argue that tracing and analyzing the international circulation of bestsellers not only re-nationalizes particular books by focusing on readers, but also creates a newly global map of the book trade that emphasizes reciprocal influences among nations. Constructed as a series of case studies, the dissertation brings together nineteenth-century publishers’ records, book trade periodicals, reviews, and international reprint editions to form a comprehensive view of how international audiences responded to particular books’ content, context, and circumstances of publication. In Chapter 1, I examine how widespread British reprints of Susan Warner’s The Wide, Wide World (1851) and Queechy (1852) variously reshaped these sentimental novels and connected them with a religious readership in England. Chapter 2 compares the international circulation and reception of “The American Tennyson” and “The British Longfellow”; and shows how the popular reprint market on both sides of the Atlantic enabled readers at all levels to imagine close relationships between themselves and their favorite poets. The third chapter discusses how American reprints of East Lynne and Lady Audley’s Secret crossed lines drawn in Civil War publishing and copyright law, inflected localized marriage laws, and sparked theatrical adaptations that would come to define the succeeding decades in American repertory theater. The final chapter of this dissertation extends the map of reciprocal relationships and inverted audiences to the colonial market and book trade, examining how the Australian bestseller The Mystery of a Hansom Cab became a London sensation in 1886, subsequently dominating American reprint markets as well. This triangulated geographical reading pattern revises accounts of imperial literary identities and the emerging detective genre. In proposing the categories of readerships and bestsellers to bring attention to new ways of mapping literary chronology and national relations, this dissertation contributes to literary recovery efforts while suggesting new strategies for literary interpretation suggested by new local reading contexts. Bestsellers tell stories of a book’s transnational circulation that are simultaneously material and intellectual, and looking at the period’s most popular books provides a unique opportunity to trace currents in transatlantic reading

Committee:

Clare Simmons, Ph.D. (Advisor); Susan Williams, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Steven Fink, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Amanpal Garcha, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Australian Literature; British and Irish Literature; Literature

Keywords:

transatlantic literature; history of reading; history of publishing; nineteenth-century literature

Escondo, Kristina AAnti-Colonial Archipelagos: Expressions of Agency and Modernity in the Caribbean and the Philippines, 1880-1910
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Spanish and Portuguese
In the past decade, an impetus towards a more globalized field of Hispanic studies has emerged, critiquing the Peninsular/Latin America binary in academic departments and highlighting the need for significant studies of Hispanic Asian and African literatures. Various scholars have been contributing to this call, both in the study of Africa and in Asia, in order to move away from the centrality of the Spanish presence. My research is located in this emerging trend. This project highlights Filipino texts in order to continue building a transoceanic bridge to the Pacific by comparatively placing it alongside Cuban and Puerto Rican texts. This project carries out a transoceanic comparative study of Cuban, Puerto Rican and Filipino nationalist and revolution literatures written during the late nineteenth century, leading up to Spain’s loss of its final colonies in the Spanish-American War in 1898 and the first few years of U.S. neo-colonization. Using South Asian and Latin American Subaltern Studies as a point of departure, it addresses the gap in Iberian and Latin American studies that ignores the former Spanish colonies in the Pacific Ocean with a decolonial objective in mind. The works studied show the development of a new, regional and national consciousness and reveal the authors’ responses to modernization, highlighting the political, cultural, and social tensions of that time period aesthetically and socio-culturally. By employing a transoceanic approach of the Filipino propagandista movement and the Latin American modernista movement, I aim to disrupt coloniality’s focus on the Atlantic and allow for the emergence of decolonial thought that considers the inclusion of the formerly marginalized Pacific. Through an analysis of these parallel movements, my overall claim is that, by reading these texts through a transoceanic lens, we see not a mimicry of a European style, but rather an educated, elaborate response to the collapsing empire and to the international community. In the struggle for the active participation in the production of knowledge and power, justice, and the creation of a national identity, both Latin American and Filipino cultural and ideological production were carried out by autonomous agents that confronted, negotiated, and initiated their own responses to the colonizing and modernizing projects.

Committee:

Ileana Rodríguez (Advisor)

Subjects:

Asian Literature; Asian Studies; Caribbean Literature; Caribbean Studies; Language; Latin American History; Latin American Literature; Latin American Studies; Literature; Modern Language

Keywords:

Cuba; Puerto Rico; Philippines; Latin America; Caribbean; Transoceanic; Nationalism; Anti-Colonialism; Subaltern; Latin America and Asia

Nir, OdedNutshells and Infinite Space: Totality and Global Culture
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Comparative Studies
In my dissertation, “Nutshells and Infinite Space: Totality and Global Culture,” I reformulate the Marxist concept of totality in response to the economic and cultural transformations brought about by globalization. The dissertation is divided into three parts. In the first part, I trace the lineage of Marxist thinking about totality through the writing of Marx, Lukacs, Adorno, and Jameson. Through addressing critiques of totality, I develop a conception of immanent totality that reconciles Hegelian Marxist thinking on totality with the critiques of the concept elaborated by Spinozist Marxism, Lyotard, and others. In the second part of the dissertation, I argue that attempts to theorize globalization from the late 1980s until the early 2000s (in the work of Ronald Robertson, Arjun Appadurai, Leslie Sklair, Kenichi Ohmae, Ulrich Beck and others) constitute an unconscious search for a subject of history, or for a universal agent that can exert control over globalization. This unconscious search is conducted in globalization theory’s attempt to relate systematic changes brought about by globalization to the subjective experience conditioned by such changes. I argue that in a first moment, globalization theories attempt to construct new discursive contradictions in order to describe their new phenomena. In a second moment, these contradictions tend to collapse, marking the failure of the search for a subject of history. I conclude by arguing that the nation-state remains a suppressed object of desire for globalization theory, one that marks the possibility of future collective projects. In the final part of my dissertation, I present a typology of World Literature theories. I argue that early World Literature theories include an unintended rejection of totalizing aesthetics. In contrast, I argue, more contemporary discussions of World Literature look for ways in which totalizing aesthetics are reinvented to take into account cultural transformations that result from processes of globalization. I then introduce a case study of Israeli literature. I present a short history of totalization in Israeli literature, showing how contemporary attempts to reinvent totalizing aesthetic strategies modify older totalizing imaginaries in order to address the specific effects of globalization in the Israeli context. I argue that these attempts to reinvent totalizing representational strategies point to possible directions for reconstituting radically transformative collective political imaginaries in the Israeli-Palestinian context.

Committee:

Philip Armstrong (Advisor)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature; Film Studies; Literature; Middle Eastern Literature; Middle Eastern Studies; Modern Literature; Philosophy; Political Science; Sociology

Hilgert, Bradley RobertBeyond Martyrdom: The Testimonial Voice of Ignacio Ellacuría and the Convergence of His Critical Thinking From Central America in Salvadoran Literature.
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Spanish and Portuguese
This dissertation analyzes the philosophical, theological, and political thinking of Ignacio Ellacuría, SJ. In it, I read Ellacuría’s work as a cultural text, or more specifically, as testimonio. In that light, Ellacuría’s work can be seen as resulting from and responding to the historical reality within which he was situated. In reading his work as cultural text, I place it in dialogue with a form of writing that is more widely considered to be a cultural text: literature. Doing this creates a dialogical relationship between Ellacuría’s writing and Salvadoran literature that allows the different texts to inform each other and us in a horizontal manner. I begin by comparatively reading Roque Dalton’s Clandestine Poems and Ellacuría’s philosophy of historical realism. The combination of these revolutionary and utopian projects move us toward a historical praxis that positions itself with those oppressed by the dynamic system of reality and attempts to go against the grain of history. I then move from Ellacuría’s philosophy to his theology in conjunction with Manlio Argueta’s One Day of Life. When read with his articulation of liberation theology, the subversive potential of the Christian-Jesuit spirituality that Ellacuría embodied emerges as both a basis for an alternative intersubjectivity and as an existential threat to the established order. In exploring Ellacuría’s philosophy and theology, the first half of the dissertation signals the potential contributions of a thinking geographically/epistemologically located with and from Central America. The second half of the dissertation centers on the years leading up to the Salvadoran civil war and the public debate around agrarian transformation. Two post-war novels, Horacio Castellanos Moya’s El arma en el hombre and Lucía Cerna’s La verdad register the need to historicize the concept of private property. Ellacuría’s political writings pose a methodology that responds to that need and reveals a necropolitical and parasitic system that produces violence and has its foundations in the colonial period. Finally, Claribel Alegría’s They Won’t Take Me Alive suggests that this ideologized notion of property was an active agent in the civil war and the text’s collective voices converge with Ellacuría’s to imagine alternatives to the unjust system structuring their reality. The primary objective of this work is to argue for the inclusion of Ellacuría’s intellectual production into the field of Latin American cultural studies.

Committee:

Ileana Rodríguez, Ph. D. (Advisor); Ulises Juan Zevallos Aguilar, Ph. D. (Committee Chair); Laura Podalsky, Ph. D. (Committee Co-Chair)

Subjects:

Comparative; Comparative Literature; Ethics; History; Language Arts; Latin American Literature; Latin American Studies; Literature; Modern Literature; Peace Studies; Philosophy; Religion; Spirituality; Theology

Keywords:

Salvadoran literature; Latin America; philosophy; theology; Central America; liberation philosophy; liberation theology

Cyzewski, Julie Hamilton LudlamBroadcasting Friendship: Decolonization, Literature, and the BBC
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, English
Broadcasting Friendship: Decolonization, Literature, and the BBC analyzes the politics and form of literary radio broadcasts produced in London and broadcast to the West Indies, South Asia, and Africa during the decolonization era. This dissertation focus on the relationship between individual agency and institutional power in the BBC’s Overseas Service and the U.S. grant funded Transcription Centre. I argue that writers working within metropolitan broadcasting institutions found friendship to be a productive political and aesthetic concept even as liberal models of friendship were being used as tools of British soft power. By showing how literary radio broadcasts were used for both cultural imperialism and anti-colonialism, we can better understand the interrelated developments of late modernism and postcolonial literature across multiple media. While my dissertation joins recent debates on mid-century literature and radio and transnational modernism, it is the first comparative study of the intersections of radio, literature, and cultural politics in the decolonization era. Each chapter focuses on a different concept of friendship and brings together a range of media with original archival research conducted at the BBC Written Archives Center, the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, and other collections. In Una Marson’s Jamaican literary magazine, The Cosmopolitan, and “Calling the West Indies” programs for the BBC, for example, we find the idea of cosmopolitanism being nurtured through poetry, while the Indian novelist Mulk Raj Anand portrays interpersonal friendship between English citizens and Indian subjects as an incentive to political action in his novel, Across the Black Waters and his World War II BBC propaganda talks. In the BBC’s Caribbean Voices and the Transcription Centre’s Africa Abroad radio programs, we see writers like George Lamming and Lewis Nkosi examining the development of international communities of writers of African descent in the 1950s and 60s. This research brings forward new material and bring to current scholarship a focus on the West Indian, South Asian, and West African writers within the BBC and other radio organizations. Ultimately, I argue that assertions of friendship between broadcast institutions and audience were used to mask British and American political interests while writers also used radio to transcend geographic and ideological distances for shared anti-imperial projects.

Committee:

Pranav Jani, Dr. (Advisor); Thomas Davis, Dr. (Advisor); Adeleke Adeeko, Dr. (Committee Member); Peter Kalliney, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Literature; Asian Literature; British and Irish Literature; Caribbean Literature; Mass Media

Keywords:

postcolonial literature, modernism, transnational literature, radio studies, media studies, West Indies, South Asia, India, West Africa, Una Marson, George Lamming, Mulk Raj Anand, Attia Hosain, Sam Selvon, Henry Swanzy, Dennis Duerden, Lewis Nkosi

Zgodinski, Brianna RI Hate It, But I Can't Stop: The Romanticization of Intimate Partner Abuse in Young Adult Retellings of Wuthering Heights
Master of Arts in English, Cleveland State University, 2017, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
In recent years, there has been a trend in young adult adaptations of Wuthering Heights to amend the plot so that Catherine Earnshaw chooses to have a romantic relationship with Heathcliff, when in Bronte’s novel she decides against it. In the following study, I trace the factors that contribute to Catherine’s rejection of Heathcliff as a romantic partner in the original text. Many critics have argued that her motives are primarily Machiavellian since she chooses a suitor with more wealth and familial connections than Heathcliff. These are indeed factors; however, by engaging with contemporary research on adolescent development, I show that the primary reason she rejects Heathcliff is because he has exhibited a propensity for violence and other abusive behaviors. I also analyze the consequences of reversing her decision in the updated young adult versions, which include the made-for-television film MTV’s Wuthering Heights (2003), the Lifetime original film Wuthering High School (2012), and the novel Catherine (2013). The most significant consequence of this change is that in order to make Heathcliff a “chooseable,” twenty-first century hero, the writers of these works have to romanticize his violent tendencies through the perspectives of their female protagonists. When the young women begin to question how secure they are around their partners, they ultimately decide that fidelity to their “soulmate” relationship is more important than safety or autonomy, with the writers using Catherine Earnshaw’s famous “I am Heathcliff” speech to support their protagonists’ conclusions. I argue, though, that while Catherine does allude to the type of otherworldly love these young women are venerating, Bronte uses her speech to confront the limitations of that love, not to hold it up as an ideal.

Committee:

Rachel Carnell (Committee Chair); Gary Dyer (Committee Member); Frederick Karem (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Behavioral Psychology; British and Irish Literature; Gender; Literature; Modern Literature; Motion Pictures; Personal Relationships

Keywords:

Wuthering Heights; Emily Bronte; Victorian literature; Wuthering Heights adaptations; young adult literature; young adult adaptations; teen violence; intimate partner abuse

Montanes-Lleras, Andres Alberto“Second to the Right, and Straight on Till Morning”: Audiences, Progression and the Rhetoric of the Portal-Quest Fantasy in J. M. Barrie’s Peter and Wendy
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2018, EDU Teaching and Learning
Despite the long standing association between children’s literature and fantasy, most critical discussions on the genre have focused—especially from an educational perspective—on whether or not fantasy is attractive, engaging, and, most important of all, appropriate for young readers. Though recent years have seen an increased interest on the genre from a more text- or content-oriented perspective, there are still relatively few studies focused on the narrative and rhetorical strategies of fantasy, how the fantastic elements of the story are presented, and the way the reader is invited to negotiate and ultimately reflect on the relation between reality and fantasy. The main purpose of this dissertation is to explore how the protagonists’ transit between worlds, characteristic of what Farah Mendlesohn calls the portal-quest fantasy, and featured in many children’s books, defines both the overall design of the text and the reader’s experience with the fantastic. Contrary to Mendlesohn herself, who finds the rhetoric of the form inherently problematic, emphasizing the way the fantasy world is presented, for both the characters and, on a different level, the reader, imposes an authoritative interpretation of the world, reducing the possibility of alternate or contradictory interpretations; I specifically seek to show how the transit between worlds itself serves as an effective rhetorical strategy to invite the reader into the world of the story, and increase our sense of estrangement and wonder, while proposing a serious ethical and metafictional reflection on the fantastic. In order to accomplish this, my study proposes an alternative approach to the form, using some of the key concepts or principles of rhetorical narrative theory developed in various works by James Phelan and Peter J. Rabinowitz, in particular the notion of narrative progression. As I argue in the first part of my study, by expanding the traditional notion of plot to include the interaction between author, narrator and the different audiences involved, as well as the ongoing and cumulative responses of the reader, it becomes easier to see how the distinctive plot dynamics characteristic of the portal-quest fantasy in general respond to a clear authorial intention and affect the way we approach, experience, and ultimately interpret the fantastic, suggesting a more complex reading and evaluation of the form. While I use several examples to illustrate my ideas, the second part of my study focuses exclusively on the case of Peter and Wendy—a novel that despite being widely considered a classic of children's literature, has rarely been studied as a fantastic text proper. As my analysis seeks to show, while Neverland is presented early on as this ambiguous imaginary space, and we are constantly reminded that what we are reading is just a story, the island becomes increasingly real as the story progresses, leading to the climactic moment where the characters have to decide between staying in Neverland for good or going back home to the real world—a decision that, as the novel makes abundantly clear, is far from simple, emphasizing how Barrie’s book resists fixed interpretations.

Committee:

Barbara Kiefer (Advisor); Linda Parsons (Committee Member); James Phelan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; British and Irish Literature; Education; Literature; Modern Literature

Keywords:

children literature; fantasy; portal-quest; Mendlesohn; rhetorical narrative theory; Phelan; Rabinowitz; audience; progression; plot; Peter and Wendy; Barrie; Narnia; Lewis; The Lord of the Rings; Tolkien; Prydain; Alexander; Harry Potter; Rowling

Ghosal, TorsaBooks with Bodies: Experientiality in post-1980s Multimodal Print Literature
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, English

In Books with Bodies: Experientiality in post-1980s Multimodal Print Literature , I examine contemporary British and North American authors’ use of books as platforms for multimodal narration. “Multimodality” refers to the concurrent use of several semiotic systems (such as writing, maps, charts) for communication. The pointed juxtaposition of different semiotic systems in a literary text requires a combination of perception processes on the reader’s part. My dissertation charts the ways in which multimodal literary books published in response to the proliferation of electronic reading and writing interfaces from the 1980s onward prompt metacognitive awareness about "reading" as an experience that is grounded in bodily interactions and sensory contact with the modes and the platforms that mediate literature. I term this metacognitive awareness about the readers’ embodied engagement with the text’s material form "presence," by revising Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht’s notion of "presence-effect."

The theoretical framework for this dissertation comes from three fields: I combine approaches to multimodality that originated in the study of social semiotics, insights from the cognitive sciences--the “second-generation” models of cognition--and twentieth century philosophies of experience, particularly those of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Michel Serres, and Gumbrecht. By analyzing multimodal fictions, poetry, and lyrical essays such as Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (2003), Salvador Plascencia’s The People of Paper (2005), Anne Carson’s Nox (2010), Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes (2010), and Doug Dorst and J.J. Abrams’s S. (2013), among other texts, Books with Bodies subverts the distinction between higher-order mental abilities (such as language processing) and lower-order perceptions (like touch) which underlies prior scholarship on the cognitive impact of literature. Indeed, I argue that the tendency to unpack the literary experience primarily in terms of how the mind processes language persists due to the equation of cognition with computation in first-generation artificial intelligence (AI) researches that influenced cognitive literary studies. Drawing on insights from queer and disability studies, I show that when we take cognition as analogous to information processing, we pathologize behavioral or cognitive differences. Thus, at a time when AI researches are finally moving beyond language processing to consider embodiment, my dissertation demonstrates the manner in which contemporary literature can contribute to the understanding of embodied, enactive intelligence.

Committee:

Brian McHale (Advisor); Frederick Luis Aldama (Committee Member); Jared Gardner (Committee Member); Jesse Schotter (Committee Member); Danuta Fjellestad (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; American Literature; British and Irish Literature; Canadian Literature; Comparative; Literature; Mass Media; Modern Language; Philosophy of Science

Keywords:

cognition; narrative theory; multimodality; presence, consciousness; poetics; experience; experientiality; books; bookishness; print; digital; media; contemporary literature; Anglophone

Gibson, Alanna MarieSalome: Reviving the Dark Lady
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2014, English
Salome: Reviving the Dark Lady is a rationale for an impending interdisciplinary reimagining of the literary Dark Lady for the early twenty-first century. The work comprises of poetry, dance, and film. This thesis recounts the history of beauty in the Early Modern Period and discusses the historical context of the Dark Lady to provide a frame for the journey of marginalized archetype into the twenty-first century. The choreopoem itself is built upon Salome, the character from Elizabeth Cary's1613 closet drama "The Tragedy of Mariam Fair Queen of Jewry." The choreopoem contains transliterated soliloquies of the princess interspersed through original poems and prose inspired by works of spoken-word artist Andrea Gibson, twentieth-century Afro-Scandinavian author Nella Larsen, and various literary and cultural critics.

Committee:

Albino Carrillo (Advisor)

Subjects:

African American Studies; American Literature; Bible; British and Irish Literature; Comparative Literature; Cultural Anthropology; Dance; European Studies; Experiments; Folklore; Gender; Language Arts; Literature; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern History; Religion; Scandinavian Studies; Theater; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Beauty; Early Modern Period; religion; Dark Lady; Nella Larsen; Choreopoem; Salome; Elizabeth Cary; Women of Color; feminism; sexism; sexuality; revival; art; literature; poetry; racism; nontraditional beauty

Nader, Alexander C"Infinite Earths": Crossmedia Adaptation and the Development of Continuity in the DC Animated Universe
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Popular Culture
This thesis examines the process of adapting comic book properties into other visual media. I focus on the DC Animated Universe, the popular adaptation of DC Comics characters and concepts into all-ages programming. This adapted universe started with Batman: The Animated Series and comprised several shows on multiple networks, all of which fit into a shared universe based on their comic book counterparts. The adaptation of these properties is heavily reliant to intertextuality across DC Comics media. The shared universe developed within the television medium acted as an early example of comic book media adapting the idea of shared universes, a process that has been replicated with extreme financial success by DC and Marvel (in various stages of fruition). I address the process of adapting DC Comics properties in television, dividing it into “strict” or “loose” adaptations, as well as derivative adaptations that add new material to the comic book canon. This process was initially slow, exploding after the first series (Batman: The Animated Series) changed networks and Saturday morning cartoons flourished, allowing for more opportunities for producers to create content. References, crossover episodes, and the later series Justice League Unlimited allowed producers to utilize this shared universe to develop otherwise impossible adaptations that often became lasting additions to DC Comics publishing. Concepts developed in this paratextual universe became popular enough to see recursive adaptation in DC Comics ongoing comic book universe and other media, emphasizing the importance of cross-media connections. The continued popularity and success of comic book media is reliant on cross-media synergy and shared universes.

Committee:

Jeffrey Brown, PhD (Advisor); Becca Cragin, PhD (Committee Co-Chair)

Subjects:

American Literature; American Studies; Comparative Literature; Fine Arts; Literature; Mass Media; Modern History; Modern Literature; Multimedia Communications

Keywords:

comics; comic books; DC; batman; superman; justice league; intertextuality; adaptation; adaptation studies; paratext; intertext; DC Animated Universe; DCAU; arkham; cross-media; shared universe; comics studies; marvel cinematic universe; harley quin

Salter, Tiffany M.Decolonizing Forms: Linguistic Practice, Experimentation, and U.S. Empire in Asian American and Pacific Islander Literature
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, English
In Decolonizing Forms: Linguistic Practice, Experimentation, and U.S. Empire in Contemporary Asian American and Pacific Islander Literature, I examine Asian American and Pacific Islander experimental writings that address the United States' histories of militarization and neo/colonialism in Asia and Oceania. I argue that the authors' deployment and representation of linguistic practices form the crux of their experimentations, enact specific critiques of the U.S. imperium in its many permutations, and attend to ongoing decolonial efforts. The experimentations in the texts combat what I term American solipsism, or the inability of the American public discourse to recognize any nations, occupied spaces, or U.S. actions that cannot be absorbed into American exceptionalist reasoning; the works I analyze demand readers to re/acknowledge or re-conceptualize the United States' relationships with the Philippines, Korea, Guam, and Hawai`i. I argue that these authors are attending to the structures of imperialism that have shaped life and history for Asian/American and Pacific Islander populations and further that the shape of their experimentations reflect the shape of empire and the texts' and characters' decolonial practices. Specifically, I argue that linguistic experimentation is the tool by which the authors deploy a decolonial aesthetics precisely because the authors are highlighting the linguistic practices and policies of imperialism. I contribute to scholarship by addressing experimentation in genres beyond poetry; each chapter focuses on one main text with a different experimental narrative form: novel, novel with narrative poetry, lyrical poetry, and multi-genre composition. In Chapter 2, I argue that the neocolonial martial law state in Jessica Hagedorn's Dogeaters (1990) uses gossip as a tool of terror, reflecting Governor-General William Howard Taft's (1901-1904) documented uses of gossip to govern the Philippines, influencing Philippines leadership through today. Counter to a critical tradition that claims gossip as a feminized discourse that provides women agency, I argue gossip serves a patriarchal-military government invested in subordinating citizens through fear via unofficial rumor and gossip. In Chapter 3, I argue Cathy Park Hong's Dance Dance Revolution (2007) presents a female tour guide's use of poetry in a fictional creole language to trouble official versions of history, bypassing mediation by western historians. I argue that the layers of mediation highlight U.S. mediation of successes and failures in the "Forgotten War" and its aftermath. In Chapter 4, I argue Lisa Linn Kanae's collaboration with graphic designer Kristin Lipman in Sista Tongue (2001) and their radical citational practice offer a critique of academic discourse. I argue that Kanae and Lipman call not only for a more inclusive, creative dialogue within scholarly inquiry especially as pertains to Pidgin (Hawaiian Creole English) language usage, but also a decolonization of scholarly publication. In Chapter 5, I argue Craig Santos Perez's poetry book series, from Unincorporated Territory (2008, 2010, 2014), integrates translation acts into his work as an aesthetics of interconnectedness in Oceania. I argue Perez's incorporation of translation into his poems enacts a form of situated waymaking, as his words replicate space not only semiotically, but also work together to resemble a sea of islands.

Committee:

Martin Ponce (Advisor)

Subjects:

American History; American Literature; American Studies; Asian American Studies; Bilingual Education; Comparative Literature; Ethnic Studies; History of Oceania; Literature; Literature of Oceania; Pacific Rim Studies

Keywords:

Asian American; Pacific Islander; Literary Studies; Experimental; Avant Garde; Literature; Poetry; Memoir; Imperialism; Hawaii; Guam; The Philippines; Korea; gossip; creole; citation; translation; Anglophone; literary form

Smith, Logan AMONUMENTS IN THE MAKING: CAPTURING TRAUMA(S) OF COMMUNAL ABSENCE IN THE POST-PLANTATION FICTION OF MARYSE CONDÉ AND WILLIAM FAULKNER
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2018, French
This thesis, written in English, offers a comparative analysis of communal trauma in the Post-Plantation fiction of Maryse Condé's Traversée de la Mangrove and William Faulkner's Light in August. More specifically, this piece of scholarship examines how traumas of absence, defined as those resulting from a missing experience rather than a lived one, construct communities through the acknowledgement of shared pain. By rejecting traditional narrative techniques, both authors tell the story of their fictional communities via what we call a communal recit, the totality of individual narratives collectively informing the reader's understanding of the particular community. In reading these individual recits alongside each other, the reader engages in a process we call Relational reading, which taking inspiration from Édouard Glissant's Poetics of Relation, is a method of identifying shared experiences within a literary work. This reading practice is made possible through Deleuze and Guattari's analysis of the rhizome and its advantages as a narrative device. For the reader, this style of narration yields topologies of the represented communities' thinking, thereby exposing how characters come to see themselves in relation to one another. Finally, this work considers literature's role as a functional monument to that which cannot be easily depicted.

Committee:

Jonathan Strauss, PhD (Advisor); Audrey Wasser, PhD (Committee Member); Erin Edwards, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Caribbean Literature; Caribbean Studies; Comparative Literature; Literature

Keywords:

trauma studies; literary trauma studies; communal trauma; absence; memory; Maryse Conde; William Faulkner; Deleuze and Guattari; Edouard Glissant; rhizome; phenomenal voice

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