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Venezia, Shannon M.The Relationship Between Financial Aid and Graduation Rates for Rural Community College Students
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Higher Education (Education)
This study was designed to examine the relationship between financial aid and graduation rates for rural community college students. The main purpose of this study is to help fill the large gap in research that currently exists about rural community college students, and, more specifically, financial aid and rural community college students. This study uses data collected for the 2004/2009 Beginning Postsecondary Student Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/09), as well as data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). Two research questions focused on the descriptive statistics. Four additional questions used logistic regression for the findings. Two of these questions focused on all community college students, and two questions focused solely on rural community college students. All of the data for the six research questions were analyzed using STATA. The findings from this study are that there is a relationship between financial aid and graduation rates for both all community college students and rural community college students separately. Rural community college students showed the highest graduation rates through six-years for associate degree graduates, and rural community college students had the highest graduation rates through three- and six-years for associate degree and certificate graduates. In terms of financial aid, the Federal Unsubsidized Loan was found to be negatively related to graduation rates for both groups of students. The Pell Grant was found to have a positive association with graduation rates for rural community college students through three-years for associate degree and certificate graduates.

Committee:

Lijing Yang (Committee Chair); Michael Williford (Committee Member); David Horton (Committee Member); Hyun-Ju Oh (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Rural community colleges; financial aid; graduation rates

Wernert, Sean PatrickThe Socio-ecological Influences of College Bullying Behavior: A Phenomenological Study of Student Perceptions
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2017, Educational Psychology
Using Urie Bronfenbrenner’s socio-ecological model of development as a theoretical framework, the purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to examine how college students perceive and understand the bullying phenomenon— as well as the influences and consequences— on campus at University X; a private, religiously affiliated, large, research university. A total of fifteen students representing each undergraduate academic class and college at University X were interviewed using a single interview protocol. The semi-structured interview consisted of open-ended questions allowing the participants to describe their own understanding and perceptions of what constitutes bullying as well as what they perceive to be its influences and consequences. Using a constant comparative analysis of transcribing, coding and analyzing the interviews, the researcher found that college students at University X closely define bullying in the same way research has but exclude the concept of repetition from their understanding. In addition, the participants understand all four forms of bullying— physical, verbal, relational, and cyber— as bullying behavior, but see only verbal and relational forms as the primary types on campus. Participants also primarily understand immediate micro-system and cultural macro-system influences—including the 2016 U.S. election of President Donald Trump—as impacting bullying behavior. Recommendations for prevention and intervention methods are also discussed.

Committee:

Lisa Pescara-Kovach, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Gregory Stone, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Robert Salem, J.D. (Committee Member); Florian Feucht, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Education; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

bullying; college student behavior; ecological development

Dodd, David W.The Role of Information in the Decision-Making Processes of Chief Academic Officers and Chief Financial Officers at Liberal Arts Colleges
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2017, Higher Education (Education)
Private liberal arts colleges are struggling and the number of these institutions is declining dramatically. Significant changes are underway that threaten these institutions and the form of education they provide. The more that can be known about the challenges confronting these institutions, as well as strategies effective in addressing them successfully, the greater the prospects are for sustaining liberal arts education. In this qualitative multi-case study, I investigated decision-making by chief academic officers and chief financial officers at four private liberal arts colleges. Findings revealed tensions dealing with mission, financial health, changes in the external environment, and other areas. Response mechanisms by the institutions to address these challenges were identified, as were characteristics of effective senior leaders. Ultimately, the morphing of liberal arts colleges into other types of institutions does not necessarily equate to the end of liberal arts education, nor the ability of these institutions to provide that education.

Committee:

Peter Mather, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Information Science

Keywords:

decision-making; case study; qualitative; higher education; liberal arts colleges; structured information; unstructured information; chief academic officer; chief financial officer

Klima, Kerry Lee BelvillHidden, Supported, and Stressful: A Phenomenological Study of Midlevel Student Affairs Professionals' Entry-Level Experiences with a Mental Health Condition
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2018, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the experiences of midlevel student affairs professionals who navigated a mental health condition as a new professional and remained in the field. New professionals’ attrition and retention concerns continue to warrant further exploration through research. Research is lacking on new professionals group was those with a mental health condition. Mental illness is prevalent in our society, and as evident in this study, professionals do negotiate their mental illness as professionals in the field. I interviewed nine midlevel student affairs professionals from across the United States. Each of the professionals worked at a variety of institutions and within many functional areas in student affairs during their first five years in the field. I lead eighteen interviews with nine participants. In addition to the interviews, all of the participants responded to one journal prompt. To mask the identities of my participants, the professionals selected pseudonyms and I used these names throughout my manuscript. The participants shared their experiences comprising five main themes: (1) coping with mental health conditions, (2) student affairs competence and mental health, (3) influential relationships, (4) disclosure, and (5) organizational influences. Three primary findings emerged following the analysis of the experiences and the review of the literature. Participants experienced fear of discrimination. They shared about negotiating the personal nature of the experiences and their own self-advocacy. Lastly, the professionals’ community was instrumental in connecting to their retention. With these themes and findings, I developed implications for practice and future research. Implications for practice include a proposed paradigm shift in our organizations; the important role of supervisors, administrators, and colleagues; the use of a universal design model; and the value of structures to support those with mental health conditions. Future research could explore the identities of people with a mental health condition, the various community structures, and the role of the influential relationships in coping with a mental health condition.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson (Advisor); Michael Coomes (Committee Member); Neal Jesse (Committee Member); Hyun Kyoung Ro (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Education; Educational Psychology; Health; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Mental Health; Occupational Health; Psychology

Keywords:

mental health; student affairs; student affairs professionals; mental health condition;

Mitova, Mariana A.Relationship Between Investments in Self and Post-Graduation Career Satisfaction Among Apparel and Textiles Majors
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
Rachel Vannatta Reinhart, Advisor The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to explore the relationship between investments that students make in themselves while enrolled in a higher education program and their post-graduation career satisfaction, and (2) to gather information about the importance apparel and textile professionals place on selected competencies identified by the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA). Graduates (n=123) of an apparel and textiles (A&T) program at a four-year, public research institution were surveyed to examine which investments in self best predict post-graduation career satisfaction. The Survey of A&T Graduates’ Career Satisfaction consisted of 86 items measuring perceived importance and preparation of the ITAA meta-goals and competencies, career satisfaction, co-curricular activity involvement, on-the-job training, health and well-being, career competencies, and willingness to relocate. Multiple regression showed that Career Competencies and Health and Well-being best predicted participants’ post-graduation career satisfaction. Participants rated the Professional Development meta-goal; the Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal; and Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goal of highest importance. These same meta-goals received highest perceived preparation ratings. Lastly, ANOVA findings revealed that buyers, retail managers, marketing professionals and others indicated differences in perceptions of competencies and meta-goals. The buyers/merchandisers rated the Industry Processes and the Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goals of higher importance than retail managers. Retail managers perceived the Global Interdependence meta-goal as less important than marketing professionals did. The Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal was perceived more important by retail managers than “others” category did. Graduates’ career satisfaction differed mostly by Income levels. Those who reported earning lower salaries were overall less satisfied with their careers. Results suggest that current leaders of apparel and textile programs should enhance their curricula with pedagogy methods that facilitate learning of teamwork, leadership, clear communication, ethics, and social responsibilities. Internships and experiential learning are recommended to enhance the on-the-job training of students in A&T programs. In addition, all investments in self, with exception of Willingness to Relocate, are related to Career Satisfaction. Lastly, Post-graduation career satisfaction is best predicted by graduates’ Career Competencies and Health and Well-being.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta Reinhart (Advisor); Gregory Rich (Other); Barbara Frazier (Committee Member); Joyce Litten (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Economic Theory; Economics; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Health; Health Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Home Economics; Home Economics Education; Mental Health

Keywords:

Higher Education; College; Well-being; Health; Students; Career Satisfaction; Apparel; Textiles; Internships; ITAA; Graduates; Professionals; On-the-job Training; Internships; Curriculum; HCT; Human Capital Theory; economic theory; assessment

McPherson, Gary RynellFactors Affecting Student Retention At a Midsized Private University
Doctor of Education, Ashland University, 2016, College of Education
In this study, I identified institutional actions that reduce student attrition using a mixed-methods research design. The research question asked, “What multitheoretical retention levers can be identified to reduce student attrition at CVU?” A theoretical framework influenced by Braxton’s (2000) research on the complex problem of student departure guided the study. Quantitative data from a student satisfaction survey were used to develop and implement a qualitative protocol. A thematic analysis of phone interviews resulted in the generation of a number of institutional actions that are known to improve student retention. These included providing students with clear lines of communication about campus goals, values, policies, and procedures; communicating expectations related to academic policies and course requirements; and optimizing the advisor–student dynamic. The research findings demonstrated that multitheoretical retention levers can be identified using a mixed-methods design.

Committee:

Harold Wilson, PhD (Committee Chair); James Olive, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Linda Billman, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

mixed methods; student attrition; student departure; student retention

Hoag, Beth AOpposites or Perfect Partners: Student Affairs and Libraries in Collaboration to Advance Student Learning
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Higher Education Administration
As institutions become more learning-centered, there will be an increased need to collaborate across organizational boundaries. Partnerships between student affairs professionals and academic librarians are one such method to encourage and demonstrate a seamless learning environment on campus. This study utilized a case study methodology to explore how student affairs professionals and academic librarians collaborate to advance student learning. Augustana College, a small private, Midwestern institution was chosen as the site for this study, and 18 participants (8 librarians, 5 student affairs professionals, 4 members of senior administration, 1 other) comprised the participants. The Stage Model for Collaboration in Higher Education (Kezar & Lester, 2009) was used as the theoretical framework. The findings indicated that although student affairs professionals and academic librarians shared a common definition of student learning, the professions were operationally invisible to each other prior to the opening of a shared library/student union facility. This hybrid facility acted as a catalyst for collaboration between the two units, but was not a panacea. The lack of knowledge of each other’s profession was a barrier to increased collaboration and formal information-sharing initiatives and relationship-building measures were needed to increase collaboration. Evidence suggests that that by working together, academic librarians and student affairs professionals are better able to support students, while advancing departmental goals through programming, employment, and outreach initiatives. Librarians provide a bridge to faculty that may validate the student affairs mission on campus and pave the way for increased learning partnerships campus-wide. Similarly, student affairs professionals act as a bridge to the student body, which may enforce and enhance the relevance of libraries for today’s student. Additional implications for practice and research are included.

Committee:

Kenneth Borland, D.Ed. (Advisor); Maureen Wilson, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Michael Coomes, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Sara Bushong, MLS (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Library Science

Keywords:

Student Affairs; Academic Libraries; Collaboration; Partnerships, Higher Education; Mental Models; College; University

Raveendran, Reetha PerananamgamLife of Purpose: Exploring the Role an Athletic Code of Conduct Plays in Shaping the Moral Courage of Student Athletes
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Leadership Studies
This qualitative study explores how an athletic code of conduct shaped the moral courage of student athletes in a Midwestern University. This study examined how eight student athletes, in a Division III institution, were motivated to engage in positive behaviors. It sought to understand how this selective group of student athletes perceived the three key concepts spelled out in the athletic code of conduct – sportsmanship, respect for others, and integrity – and how they were empowered to engage in acts of moral courage when on the field. Case study research design was used in general while giving special focus to portraiture. The concept of voice in portraiture was emphasized by preserving and listening to the student athletes’ responses while simultaneously listening for stories. The present study also focused on highlighting the positive aspects of a social system, i.e., athletics, and extracting the element of goodness unlike current research in the field. The conceptual framework of the two constructs – understanding the importance of the athletic code of conduct and how this code shapes the student athletes’ moral courage – is examined here by analyzing verbal and non-verbal interview responses of the participants and observations while being on-site. Participants’ reflective journals were used implicitly to understand the lives of these student athletes. Data revealed emergent themes which responded to the five research questions. Findings indicated that one of the most important factors that enabled and empowered them to act with moral courage was their personal values. When personal values aligned with those of an athletic code of conduct, it was only natural to stand up and do the right thing. Student athletes in this present study unanimously believed that the values of such athletic codes of conduct should be integrated into their lives through intentional education, application and reflection throughout their careers as student athletes. Senior student athletes had a more sophisticated sense of moral reasoning when compared to younger student athletes. This finding supports Kohlberg’s (1969) Theory of Moral Development where the level of moral reasoning becomes more complex and complicated with age and lived experiences. Coaches were credited for being both disseminators and advocates of the values of the athletic code of conduct. However, results also revealed that it was difficult to establish if the athletic code of conduct as a document had a direct influence on the moral courage of the participants. Themes generated from these data resulted in a number of recommendations for policy and practice in the realm of college athletics, as well as suggestions for future research. One such policy change was to investigate alternative models, both curricular and co-curricular, so that incoming freshmen are intentionally taught the values of the athletic code of conduct. Future research is needed to understand the influences of such codes of conduct on the moral courage of student athletes from different demographics such as first-generation college students, full scholarship athletes or those from varying socio-economic statuses.

Committee:

Patrick Pauken (Advisor); Khani Begum (Committee Member); Christopher Frey (Committee Member); Sharon Showman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Ethics; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Sports Management

Keywords:

student athletes; code of conduct; moral development; moral courage; higher education administrators; ethical infrastructures; athletic environment

Lindsay, Kristen ReneeSenior Student Affairs Officers' Perceptions Of Critical Professional Competencies
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Higher Education Administration
Literature describing the role of the senior student affairs officer (SSAO) is plentiful, but research studies describing the specific skills needed to successfully fulfill the role are fewer in quantity. Therefore, in order to better understand the skills needed to be a senior-level student affairs administrator, and how to acquire them, this study examined SSAOs' perceptions of the ACPA and NASPA joint competencies. The sample, comprised of SSAOs who hold ACPA membership, shared their perceptions, which were examined according to several variables including gender, ethnicity, professional experience, and institution characteristics. Findings indicated that a doctoral degree was particularly significant for developing the skills necessary to be a successful SSAO. Additionally, there were differences according to several of the variables, indicating the importance of different competencies at different types of institutions, although no clear-cut picture of specific competency importance emerged. The additional competencies suggested by the SSAOs who participated in the survey, although nearly all of them overlapped with the ACPA and NASPA joint competencies, provide reinforcement of skills important to SSAOs in today's higher education landscape. The findings provide a snapshot of the skills necessary for successful SSAOs, as well as implications for graduate preparation programs and future revisions of the ACPA and NASPA join competencies.

Committee:

Maureen Wilson, Dr. (Advisor); Steven Cady, Dr. (Committee Member); Michael Coomes, Dr. (Committee Member); Robert DeBard, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

ACPA and NASPA competencies; senior student affairs officers; student affairs competencies; SSAO; student affairs professionals; higher education competencies; senior-level student affairs administrator; student affairs skills; professional competencies

Rellinger, Brian AThe Diffusion of Smartphones and Tablets in Higher Education: A Comparison of Faculty and Student Perceptions and Uses.
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Leadership Studies
Individual access to mobile devices has increased dramatically in recent years, and faculty and students are beginning to use smartphones and tablets to support teaching and learning. This correlational study surveys faculty and students at a private, liberal arts university to better understand perceptions about the devices for use in an academic setting. Student and faculty responses are compared using adopter categories and innovation attributes developed by Rogers’ (2003) diffusion of innovations. Two survey instruments were developed for this study. The Faculty Smartphone and Tablet Diffusion of Innovations (FSTDIS) and Student Smartphone and Tablet Diffusion of Innovations (SSTDIS) were created based on a previous survey aimed at faculty adoption of a course management system. The surveys were sent to approximately 250 faculty members and between 1,700 and 1,900 students. Results from the surveys were used to address four research questions comparing faculty and students, as well as perceptions of the value of smartphones and tablets in higher education. Findings from this study can be used by university administrators to increase the adoption of mobile devices for academic purposes. Rogers’ (2003) diffusion of theory provides a framework for technology adoption in organizations.

Committee:

William Ingle (Advisor); Rachel Reinhart (Committee Member); Allison Goedde (Committee Member); Chris Wolverton (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Educational Technology; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Technology

Keywords:

mobile technology; smartphones; tablets; liberal arts; higher education; diffusion of innovations; diffusion theory; digital divide; technology adoption;

Patton, Roxanna Jessica-DyanThe College Experiences of Transgender Students: Creating a Welcoming Environment on Campus
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2012, Educational Leadership
The number of transgender students on college campuses has been increasing throughout the United States (Schneider,2010). Transgender students face unique concerns in nearly every aspect of campus life. The purpose of this research was to examine the college experiences of transgender students and recommend best practices for making college campuses more welcoming for transgender students. This phenomenological study was conducted using open ended interview questions to collect qualitative data from three transgender students at a large four year public institution in the Midwest. Respondents identified unwelcoming messages in the following areas of campus life: student activities, health services, and through the dichotomization of gender on university forms. Nine recommendations for best practices in creating a welcoming campus environment for transgender students are included in the discussion section of this thesis.

Committee:

Suzanne Franco, EdD (Committee Chair); McGinley Sarah, MA (Committee Member); DuVivier Roxanne, PhD (Committee Member); Jill Lindsey, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Gender; Gender Studies; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; School Administration; Secondary Education

Keywords:

trans; transgender; lgbt; glbt; student affairs; student services; gender; gender neutral; university; college; students; gender binary; gender fluid; gender nonconforming; transexual; higher education; student personnel; student activities; health care

O'Brien, Katherine FSuccess of Developmental Readers: An Examination of Factors Affecting Attrition and Institutional Practices Which Support Retention
PHD, Kent State University, 2013, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
Students who enter higher education requiring reading remediation have poor institutional persistence. This study examined the course success and first-year institutional persistence of six women enrolled in a developmental reading course at a regional campus of a state university. Data sets were comprised of classroom observation, review of academic records, and interviews with students and their instructor. Three of the women were successful in the course while three were not. The cross-participant analysis revealed five factors associated with student success and institutional persistence. Successful students had more frequent attendance and were more engaged with their professors outside of class than unsuccessful students. Those who were recent high school graduates were less likely to succeed than students who had a gap between high school and college. While adult responsibilities such as raising children impacted students’ progress, these factors did not affect success in developmental reading. Most notably, students who were successful in the course and persisted through the first year had support systems both off-campus and on-campus including a college employee.

Committee:

Alexa Sandmann (Advisor); William Bintz (Committee Member); Tricia Niesz (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Literacy; Reading Instruction

Keywords:

persistence; attrition; student success; developmental education; remediation; developmental readers

Weinblatt, BrianAn Examination of Academic Decision-Making During Two University Mergers
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2012, Higher Education

This study examined decision-making processes during two university mergers, instances of major organizational change. Processes were evaluated in the context of traditional and modern academic decision-making models. A qualitative method of inquiry, designed as a multiple instrumental case study, entailed interviews with 6 participants at a pilot site, followed by 37 interviews and document analysis at two case study sites. Interview transcripts and documents were coded and analyzed, yielding a thematic evaluation.

Four major themes were found pertaining to the two mergers: avoidance of conflict, need for validation, momentum, and disconnect among views. The study found that more traditional models of decision-making were employed at one institution, while more modern models were used at the other. Both institutions exhibited administrative leadership utilizing tools to exert influence to effect the mergers. Conclusions included a highlight on American higher education institutions in transition from traditional to more modern approaches of decision-making, described as a “grey zone” between the models. Implications of the study included the necessity for modern higher education administrators to maintain a delicate balance between traditional and evolving modern approaches of higher education decision-making.

Committee:

Penny Poplin Gosetti, PhD (Committee Chair); David Meabon, PhD (Committee Member); Ronald McGinnis, MD (Committee Member); Robert Yonker, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

university decision-making; higher education decision-making; university mergers; higher education mergers; university consolidation; higher education consolidation

McLaughlin, Sean M.The Effects of Community Building Programs on Student Neighborhoods Adjoining the Urban University Campus
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, EDU Policy and Leadership
Student neighborhoods near urban university campuses are unique neighborhood settings. Social problems resulting from thousands of college aged students living in dense enclaves in neighborhoods near university campuses are numerous. Rioting, high crime, negative neighbor relations and poor living conditions are examples of the many problems of the student neighborhood. As universities develop and implement strategies to address the challenges of the campus proximal student neighborhood, research must guide those practices. This study examines the effects of a specific community building program sponsored by a large mid-western research university located in a large metropolitan setting on social outcomes in the densely populated student neighborhood adjacent to its campus. The community building program is designed by Student Life staff to strengthen social ties and community in the student neighborhood. Social disorganization theory and sociological approaches to the study of neighborhoods are used to theorize important exogenous and intervening independent variables relevant to the student neighborhood context. These independent variables include demographic structures such as race, gender, age and socioeconomic status along with intervening structures such as friendship density, network associations (university versus neighborhood) and participation in university sponsored programs to build community. Dependent variables include social ties, sense of community, perceptions of informal social control and neighborhood satisfaction. Regression analysis is used to determine the extent to which participation in university community building programs predicts the outcome variables. The study concludes that participation in university sponsored programs has effects on social ties and perception of informal social control in the student neighborhood. Gender and race were found to negatively predict social ties formation. The study also concludes that living in neighborhoods where community building programs take place, regardless of the amount of an individual’s participation, predicts sense of community. Neighborhood satisfaction is not predicted by demographic variables or participation in the university sponsored community building program. Results also indicate that when a student identifies as a resident of specific street, or as a member of the community at-large, they tend to have greater sense of community. The discussion offers propositions for higher education administrators who are tasked with creating policy and practical interventions aimed at addressing the unique challenges with which these neighborhoods confront the institution.

Committee:

Ada Demb, EdD (Advisor); Helen Marks, PhD (Committee Member); Lenard Baird, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

student neighborhood; higher education; town-gown; neighborhood; co-resident neighborhood; sense of community; neighborhood intervention; community building program; community building

Jordan, Tricia K.Sophomore Programs: Theory, Research, and Efficacy
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, EDU Policy and Leadership
The purpose of this study was to explore how students perceive the efficacy of a program designed for second-year students. The study population consisted of 222 juniors at a medium-sized, public, Research I, Midwestern institution; the group was comprised of both program participants and non-participants. The survey instrument, the Sophomore Program Efficacy Questionnaire (SPEQ), was designed expressly for this study, and was administered in a web-based format to the population. SPEQ items were created using existing literature and theories related to the sophomore experience. The 70-item SPEQ has distinct sections that parallel to expected sophomore outcomes: 1) program awareness, 2) pre-success indicators, 3) program participation, 4) post-success indicators (motivation level, decision-making ability, identity development, academic success, and retention rate), and 5) program efficacy indicators. Demographic qualifiers were also analyzed and summarized to determine if any distinctions exist based on individual characteristics. Specifically, race/ethnicity, gender, residence, residency status, major status, and age were all collected from survey respondents. Aggregate results showed that there were few demographic distinctions to make, however, between the sub-groups (participants and non-participants), more interesting results were discovered. Quantitative data revealed that the SPEQ instrument fit the hypothesized theoretical framework underlying the design fairly well. Additionally, in almost every case related to post-success indicators, participants and non-participants reported gains in each category; they noted positive growth from the beginning of the sophomore year to the end. Also, non-participants reported higher gains in these same variables than their participant counterparts. Participants believed the sophomore programs were generally worthwhile and they would recommend them to their peers. Qualitative data showed that even those who did not interact with the programs believed them to be a worthwhile initiative. This study supports the notion that students can recognize personal growth in the second college year, regardless of participation in sophomore-specific programming. Therefore, continued research on the second-year experience should focus on helping all sophomores get the resources they need in a way that makes sense for them and for their institution.

Committee:

Ada Demb, PhD (Committee Chair); Leonard Baird, PhD (Committee Member); Dorinda Gallant, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

sophomores; second-year students; sophomore programs; program efficacy; students in transition; second-year programming; second-year programs

Russell, Elizabeth (Annie)Voices Unheard: Using Intersectionality to Understand Identity Among Sexually Marginalized Undergraduate Students of Color
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Higher Education Administration

This study used intersectionality as a framework and methodology to understand identity among sexually marginalized undergraduate college students of color. The research questions were as follows:

1. What are the experiences of QLGBTSGL (Queer, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Same Gender Loving) undergraduate students of color on a college campus? How do QLGBTSGL undergraduate students of color perceive their college experiences to be different from and similar to other students in college?

2. How do environmental factors (e.g., spiritual community, society, family, student organizations, and support groups) affect identity development for QLGBTSGL undergraduate students of color in college?

3. How do interpersonal relationships, such as those with friends, family, and romantic partners, influence identity development for QLGBTSGL undergraduate students of color in college?

4. How do QLGBTSGL undergraduate students of color make meaning of their identities? In what ways do identity consistency and coherence characterize their identity meaning-making?

The literature implied that while substantial research has been done in identity and identity development in student affairs, including in race, gender, sexuality, and environment, the intersections and interactions of those identities had been less explored in research, if at all. The findings produced three emerging themes related to the unheard voices of the population at hand: defining self; intersections and interactions of identities and social group memberships; and defining ethics, morals, and values. The conclusions and implications both confirm previous findings on identity and identity development, while also acknowledging new areas of knowledge, implications for practice, and suggestions for future research.

Committee:

Dafina Stewart, PhD (Committee Chair); Kimberly Coates (Committee Member); Ellen Broido (Committee Member); Patricia Kubow (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Hispanic Americans

Keywords:

Intersectionality; Queer; Lesbian; Gay; Bisexual; Transgender; Same Gender Loving; Students of Color; LGBT; GLBT; African Americans; Latino Americans

Fischer-Kinney, Julie A.Biracial/Multiracial Student Perceptions of Student Academic Support Services at a Predominantly White Public Institution
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2012, Higher Education

This study attempted to contribute to national research on biracial/multiracial students, a growing diverse population in higher education. A lack of literature exists on biracial/multiracial college students, particularly as it pertains to student academic success at predominantly white institutions (PWI). The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of biracial/multiracial college students regarding student academic support services at one PWI. In order to address barriers to student success, the voices of biracial/multiracial students are greatly needed by institutions to enhance and develop services, programs, policies, and procedures.

This phenomenological study used Padilla‘s Theoretical Framework for Modeling Student Success to understand the barriers to student success perceived by biracial/multiracial students at one PWI. The qualitative study employed triangulation through three phases of research. In phase one, a demographic study was used to identify students at the PWI who self-identify as biracial/multiracial. The demographic study responses also guided conversations in the second phase of research, focus group meetings. Phase two consisted of three focus groups comprised of 11 biracial/multiracial students. Phase three consisted of member checking within and between focus groups, and during data analysis, for clarification and agreement of findings. The culmination of the study was the creation of a Local Student Success Model (LSSM) for the PWI, a blueprint for biracial/multiracial student success consisting of recommended student and institutional actions.

The study found that focus group participants at the PWI were unaware of the location and function of some student academic support services. Participants believed that new student academic support services are needed, such as peer mentoring in the major, in addition to the evaluation and modification of existing student academic support services, such as faculty mentoring, to aid in biracial/multiracial student success.

Study participants (including demographic and focus group participants) at the PWI perceived there to be a total of over 15 barriers to student success. Financial and personal barriers were perceived to be the greatest barriers to biracial/multiracial student success. Focus group participants perceived 10 key barriers to success that fit into two major categories of barriers— institutional barriers and individual barriers. In order to overcome barriers to student success, focus group participants perceived that students must have knowledge in five key categories; must take action in two key categories; and recommended institutional actions in five key categories to ensure the student success of biracial/multiracial students.

Committee:

Penny Poplin Gosetti, PhD (Committee Chair); Jamie Barlowe, PhD (Committee Member); Shanda Gore, EdD (Committee Member); Debra Gentry, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; African American Studies; Asian American Studies; Black Studies; Educational Leadership; Ethnic Studies; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Hispanic American Studies; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Native American Studies

Keywords:

biracial; multiracial; support services; predominantly white institution; student academic support services; student perceptions; student success; local student success model; triangulation; focus groups

Graham, KarenDevelopment and Validation of a Measure of Intention to Stay in Academia for Physician Assistant Faculty
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2012, Higher Education

This study attempted development and validation of a measure of “intention to stay in academia” for physician assistant (PA) faculty in order to determine if the construct could be measured in way that had both quantitative and qualitative meaning. Adopting both the methodologic framework of the Rasch model and the theoretical framework that “intention to stay in academia” is a complex psychological construct influenced by a wide range of individual and environmental variables, this investigation identified potential observable indicators of the construct and used them to develop a survey instrument. Evidence of multiple aspects of validity was sought throughout the investigation in order to make an evaluative judgment regarding the validity of the measure at the conclusion of the research.

The investigation was conducted in four phases. In Phase I, the construct of “intention to stay in academia” was conceptualized by means of a literature review and interviews of 15 experienced PA faculty. This phase resulted in a list of 79 potential observable indicators of the construct which were transformed into survey items in Phase II. In Phase III of the study, an instrument of 70 items was piloted to a convenience sample of 53 PA faculty. Following the pilot data analysis, a revised instrument was administered to all 1002 PA faculty in the U.S. in Phase IV, with a 49.3% response rate.

The measure of “intention to stay in academia” for PA faculty developed in this study demonstrated multiple types of validity evidence but was limited by the lack of an overall meaning to the item hierarchy and failure to meet the strict expectations of the Rasch model for unidimensionality. However, a subset of 19 items relating to a supportive academic environment produced a meaningful progression of types of indicators of “intention to stay in academia” and demonstrated characteristics of a linear measure. This subset included items dealing with relationships, autonomy, institutional support, and workload; inferences that higher education administrators and other stakeholders in PA education could make from the analysis of this subset of items were discussed. Although the cumulative evidence from this study allowed for concluding that measuring PA faculty “intention to stay in academia” was a realizable goal, the theoretical framework for the measure needs to be strengthened in order to guide future iterations of the instrument and validate a more meaningful and useful measure.

Committee:

Svetlana Beltyukova (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

physician assistant faculty; faculty retention; intention to stay; Rasch model

Christman, Heather ShookConnections between Leadership and Developmental Capacities in College Students
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2013, Educational Leadership
Colleges and universities have a unique opportunity to develop leaders capable of addressing the challenges of tomorrow. Critical components of such leadership include understanding oneself, being able to navigate challenges, work across difference, and understand and adopt multiple perspectives. The ability of higher education to support the development of leaders who can address challenges can have a major effect on the future of our country and our world. This longitudinal study explored connections between college student leadership and the developmental capacities necessary to engage in effective leadership. The study used the Social Change Model of Leadership (SCM) (Higher Education Research Institute, 1996) and Self-Authorship Theory (Baxter Magolda, 2001) as frameworks to explore connections between leadership and developmental capacities. I used data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education collected between 2006 and 2009 in this dissertation study. I analyzed four years of transcripts for 22 students who had high quantitative gains on the Socially Responsible Leadership Scale over a four-year period. The sample was diverse with just under half of the students identifying as students of color. I conducted the data analysis for each of the participants by: 1) coding for SCM leadership values; 2) analyzing development toward self authorship across four years; 3) and coding for patterns in development and SCM leadership value shifts across four-years. The results of this study demonstrated two major findings furthering our understanding of leadership using the SCM. The first finding highlighted the various stages students go through as they move toward effectively demonstrating SCM leadership. The second major finding was that development was connected to all of the SCM leadership values and increasing student developmental capacities is a necessary component of leadership development. This study produced major implications for those interested in promoting leadership development that guides the content and pedagogy of leadership development.

Committee:

Marcia Baxter Magolda, Dr. (Committee Chair); Kathleen Goodman, Dr. (Committee Member); Judith Rogers, Dr. (Committee Member); David Cowan, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Developmental Psychology; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

self authorship; self evolution; Social Change Model of Leadership Development; leadership development; adult development; college students; development; learning outcomes

Robinson, Kirk S.How Graduate Teaching Assistants Experience Teaching Preparation for Higher Education: A Symbolic Interactionist Study
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2017, Educational Leadership
Literature suggests many graduate students receive inadequate, little, or no formal preparation for teaching in higher education. Most extant research on this topic shows preparation has positive outcomes for graduate students, yet few studies examine the process of graduate students’ teaching preparation, which could lend important insights that yield better preparation. This study addresses this process, inquiring into how graduate students experience teaching preparation, and how interactions with peers and an instructor shape preparation, in a one-credit hour graduate pedagogy seminar. Situating graduate students taking the seminar as a collegiate subculture called prospective college teachers (PCTs), this 15-month study employed an ethnographic methodology grounded in an interpretivist paradigm. A symbolic interactionist theoretical perspective and framework guided approaches to both data collection and analysis. Data collection yielded fieldnotes from 21 seminar sessions, 18 interviews between seven graduate students (and the seminar instructor) hailing from various academic disciplines, and documents for review. Results showed the 60-minute seminar contained three sections: part one, transitional periods, and part two. Through interactions with peers and the instructor, PCTs generally experienced part one as stable, predictable, and transactional, as it primarily featured instructor lectures and notetaking by PCTs. Transitional periods, short periods of time bridging the gap between parts one and two, were less predictable and varied in terms of eventfulness. Regardless, PCTs’ peer interactions in transitional periods were usually brief or planned by the instructor, making interactions somewhat rigid and scripted. PCTs’ interactions with the instructor mostly related to adhering to the instructor’s requests, creating a general PCT experience of compliance. In part two, PCTs had more opportunities for in-depth interactions with peers and the instructor around activities applying teaching knowledge. Thus, PCTs in part two experienced more opportunities to learn from peers and their instructor. Studying interactions between PCTs and the instructor yielded three general themes lending insight into PCTs’ seminar experiences: the instructor’s management of the seminar shaped PCTs’ behavior in it, there were tensions between the instructor and PCTs due to the instructor’s management style, and there were specific conditions in the seminar that could foster learning in PCTs. From the general results, analysis, and themes, implications for practice included seminar outcomes devoted to deep learning about teaching in addition to skills-based training, expansion of the 60-minute seminar time frame to two hours to facilitate more opportunities for learning-rich dialogues, and co-creation of the seminar between PCTs and the instructor.

Committee:

Mahauganee Shaw (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Pedagogy

Keywords:

graduate teaching assistants; graduate student development; faculty development; college teaching preparation; ethnography; symbolic interactionism

Couch, Matthew MA Phenomenological Study of Over-Involvement in Undergraduate Students
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, EDU Policy and Leadership
Student involvement scholars have long posited that greater social and academic outcomes accrue for students as they become more involved in college (Astin, 1984, 1993; Wolf-Wendel, Ward, & Kinzie, 2009). Questions left underexplored in the extant literature about the possibility of an upper limit of beneficial involvement and an abiding concern about a growing number of Millennial students encumbered by the stress of their co-curricular commitments motivated this study. Four male and four female undergraduate students, all of whom were involved in co-curricular activities at an exceptionally high level and had experienced a variety of challenges as a direct result of so much engagement, were interviewed to explore the phenomenon of over-involvement. This phenomenological study sought to describe the essence of over-involvement experienced by traditional-aged undergraduates at a large research university. Areas of inquiry included details of the lived experience of over-involved students, the challenges they faced, and the students’ motivations for beginning and sustaining such overwhelming levels of activity. Major findings included a lifelong pattern of engagement and desire for achievement prior to college; intense intrinsic and extrinsic motivations to be involved; considerable difficulties faced by over-involved students, including insufficient sleep, poor diet, damaged relationships, and debilitating levels of stress; and cultural norms of students wearing a persona of composure, so as not to reveal their vulnerability to others.

Committee:

Susan Jones, Ph.D. (Advisor); Marc Johnston-Guerrero, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Terrell Strayhorn, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

over-involvement; overinvolvement; over-involved; overinvolved; student involvement; engagement; phenomenology; persona; vulnerability; undergraduate involvement; Millennial students; stress; anxiety; motivation; overwhelmed

Kus, Jacqueline MThe Influence of Sport on the Career Construction of Female Division III Student-Athletes
PHD, Kent State University, 2016, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
Student-athletes have been shown in the literature to have a defined experience that is different from non-athletes. The challenges student-athletes face at the Division III (DIII) level and a lack of research raises curiosity regarding their career development. The purpose of this qualitative narrative study was to investigate female DIII student-athletes meaning-making regarding major selection using the Career Construction Interview (CCI) and the ways major choices are confirmed or challenged by their own defined life story. The participants of this study included 7 Caucasian traditional-age female student-athletes who exhibited strong athletic identities (utilizing the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale) attending a DIII institution located in the Midwest. Data were collected through semi-structured, open-ended interviews and the CCI, and analyzed using processes of restorying, life design counseling, and holistic-content analysis. The findings of this study indicate that telling, hearing, and retelling their stories were individually impactful and transformative. This study identified three themes across the narratives, which documented the influence of sports, minimal career support, and affirmation of their major decisions as shared experiences among the participants. Implications of the findings point to the need for intentionality surrounding career interventions in DIII post-secondary institutions for athletes and non-athletes. Results of this study revealed that even students with a chosen major can benefit from reflecting on their career stories. These results point to the opportunity to meet the career needs of student-athletes and the general student body with curriculum such as a constructivist career course designed around the CCI.

Committee:

Tracy Lara Hilton (Committee Chair); Jennifer Kulics (Committee Member); Mark Savickas (Committee Member); Kevin Glavin (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Career Construction; Narrative; Qualitative; Athletic Identity; Division III; Female Student athletes; Influence of Sport; Meaning Making; Career Interventions; Major Selection; Restorying

Castellani, JenniferDeconstructing Eve: A Critical Feminist Analysis of Mid-Level Female Administrators in Conservative Evangelical Universities
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2016, Educational Leadership
Research demonstrates that female staff in conservative, Christian colleges experience gender discrimination in a variety of forms, and this oppression is often because evangelical theology dictates women are ontologically second class citizens. This qualitative critical feminist dissertation specifically focuses on the gendered experiences of female mid-level administrators in evangelical academia. Interviews and participant reflective exercises were used to collect data, and findings demonstrate gender inequality exists within Christian academia. Female mid-level supervisors reported difficulty balancing home and work responsibilities, pay disparity, thwarted promotional opportunities, and covert and overt discrimination. Recommended strategies to address gender inequality include leadership development programs, mentoring, advocacy for balanced hiring and salaries, gender equity task forces, climate surveys, and internal and external coalitions.

Committee:

Molly Schaller, Dr (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory; Gender; Gender Studies; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Religion; Theology; Womens Studies

Keywords:

evangelical higher education; gender discrimination; female administrators; feminist theory in higher education; critical theory in higher education; theology; gender studies; religion

Columbaro, Norina LPaving the Way Toward Faculty Careers in Higher Education: Student Mentoring Relationship Experiences While Completing Online Doctoral Degrees
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2015, College of Education and Human Services
Research focusing on online doctoral programs in preparation for academic careers consistently reveals a perception that online doctoral degree programs lack opportunities for social learning, mentoring, and submersion in the academic culture (Adams & DeFleur, 2005; Flowers & Baltzer, 2006; Columbaro, 2007; Guendoo, 2007; Good & Peca, 2007; Columbaro & Monaghan, 2009; DePriest, 2009). In addition, the value of mentoring within doctoral programs has been addressed in several empirical studies (Green & Bauer, 1995, Golde & Dore, 2001; Paglis, Green, & Bauer, 2006; Creighton, Parks, & Creighton, 2007; Mullen, 2006; 2008; 2009). However, little research has specifically attended to the mentoring experiences of online doctoral students and their perceptions of how those experiences prepared them for tenure-track employment within four-year, land-based higher education institutions. The purpose of this study was to explore the existence and nature of mentoring relationships within online doctoral degree programs. Further, it explored how these relationships prepare online doctoral degree graduates for full-time, tenure-track employment in four-year, land-based higher education institutions. The following research questions guided this study: 1) How did graduates of online doctoral degree programs, currently employed as tenure-track faculty members at four-year land-based colleges or universities, experience mentoring while completing their online doctoral degree programs? 2) How did mentoring relationships prepare these graduates to become tenure-track faculty members in four-year, land-based colleges and universities? The study was informed by social learning theory in that it explores the role and purpose of interpersonal mentoring relationships in supporting doctoral students, as well as preparing them to serve as faculty in higher education environments. The research design employed basic interpretive qualitative research approach using semi-structured interviews focusing on participants' critical mentoring episodes to explore their experiences and perceptions. The lens through which findings were analyzed was social constructivism in that it accounted for the varied experiences and meaning making of individuals in their doctoral education mentoring relationships. Findings from this study may provide insight for academic institutions adopting online doctoral degrees as part of their strategic direction and for prospective online doctoral students.

Committee:

Catherine Hansman, Ed.D. (Committee Chair); Joanne Goodell, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jonathan Messemer, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Mittie Davis Jones, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mary Hrivnak, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Educational Technology; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

online doctoral degrees; mentoring; e-mentoring; mentoring in online doctoral degree programs; critical incident technique; tenure; faculty

Filipan, Rhonda S.Shouting from the Basement and Re-Conceptualizing Power: A Feminist Oral History of Contingent Women Faculty Activists in U.S. Higher Education
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
This dissertation study grew out of several interrelated issues in U.S. higher education: (1) the corporatization of higher education; (2) the steady growth in the numbers of part-time and full-time non-tenure track faculty, known collectively as contingent faculty, which has resulted in a two-tiered workforce in academe; (3) the disturbingly large numbers of women who often occupy these low-paying positions, especially in what have now become feminized disciplines; and (4) the rise in a hearty activist movement among contingent faculty, including union organizing and coalition building, that seeks to transform academic labor practices. The confluence of these factors has led some contingent women faculty members into activism, often at the national level, in hopes of reforming higher education teaching conditions and altering the narrative on contingent faculty. My study, a feminist oral history, seeks to understand their experiences. The epistemological and methodological stance for this study was qualitative and feminist; the study was shaped by emancipatory paradigms to raise awareness of the hierarchies that exist to marginalize contingent faculty, especially women in the humanities. Two research questions were explored: First, how do contingent women faculty members describe their process of becoming activists, especially the personal and contextual factors that impacted this process? Second, how do the situations described by contingent women faculty activists align with feminist conceptualizations of power? To address question #1, I turned to bricolage, using qualitative coding methods in conjunction with narrative analysis and feminist methodologies. Nine themes were identified in the findings which simultaneously point to the development of the interviewees as activists and to their marginalization in academia. To answer question #2, I examined how situations described by the contingent women faculty activists line up with feminist modalities of power. Findings uncovered the deep structures in higher education institutions that contribute to a gendered and powered workplace environment for these contingent women faculty activists.

Committee:

Susan Iverson, Ed.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Womens Studies

Keywords:

contingent faculty; adjunct faculty; part-time faculty; higher education; activism; feminist power; power; oral history; women in higher education; qualitative research; English composition instructors; feminization; grassroots leadership

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