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Gatlin, DeAngelo CRelations Between Family Cohesion and Social Competence Among Youth Living in Poverty
Specialist in Education, Miami University, 2017, School Psychology
Research abounds that explores the impact of economic disadvantage on youth and their families. An increased likelihood of the development of assorted negative outcomes has been revealed, yet researchers have also presented various protective factors for these families. The current study employs a correlational research design to investigate (a) the relationship between family cohesion and social competence among a large and ethnoracially diverse sample of U.S. families living in poverty, and (b) the potential moderating role of grade level on that relationship. The Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales (FACES IV; Olson 2011) and Harter’s Perceived Competence Scale (Harter, 1985) were adapted to measure family cohesion and social competence. Results revealed that family cohesion was significantly and positively related to social competence among the sample. A regression analysis demonstrated that grade level did not significantly moderate the relationship between family cohesion and social competence. Practical implications and future research directions are provided.

Committee:

Amity Noltemeyer, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Anthony James, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kevin Bush, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Psychology; Families and Family Life

Keywords:

family cohesion; social competence; poverty; economic disadvantage

Wingate, Tiah JAn Examination of Instrumental Support Received by Parents of Children with Special Health Care Needs Throughout the Life Course
MA, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences
The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the instrumental support received by parents of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) throughout the life course. The study sample included 489 parents of CSHCN obtained from the Wave III sample and the Refresher sample of the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) survey. The study provided a description of the sources of unpaid assistance for the parents of CSHCN and yielded significant findings regarding variations in support receipt associated with life course variables. Parents receive significantly more instrumental support from informal sources than from formal sources at each stage of the family life cycle. Additionally, a significant positive relationship exists between the amount of support received from formal sources and the amount of support received from informal sources. The receipt of support from various specific sources also demonstrates a relationship with the receipt of support from other specific sources. Finally, life course variables including religious participation and gender were associated with the receipt of support from formal sources, whereas family life cycle stage was associated with the receipt of support from informal sources. Parents from families with young children reported receiving significantly more unpaid assistance from informal sources than parents from families at all other life cycle stages. These findings help inform service providers as to parents who may potentially need assistance securing instrumental support as well as point to potential areas for future research.

Committee:

Kelly Cichy, PhD (Advisor); Maureen Blankemeyer, PhD (Committee Member); Rhonda Richardson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Families and Family Life; Health Care; Social Research; Social Work

Keywords:

children with special health care needs; parents of CSHCN; social support; instrumental support, parents of children with illness or disability; instrumental support for parents of children with special needs

Wright, Matthew RCohabitation among Older Adults: Well-Being, Relationships with Adult Children, and Perceptions of Care Availability
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Sociology
Cohabitation has been increasing among older adults over the past decade. Despite the growth in cohabitation, research on this population remains limited. It is well established that the married enjoy better health than the unmarried, and while previous research has considered the psychological well-being of older cohabitors, it is less clear whether cohabitation provides physical health benefits. It is also unclear how cohabitors compare with the married and unpartnered on parent-child relationships. These omissions are notable because families play a key role in the lives of older adults. Using 2008 and 2010 Health and Retirement Study data, I assess psychological well-being and physical health differences between continuously married, remarried, cohabiting, divorced, widowed, and never married older adults. Second, I examine how cohabitors compare to the continuously married, remarried, divorced, and widowed on relationships with adult children. Finally, I explore marital status differences in parent’s beliefs that their children would help in the future with basic personal care. Throughout the project, gender differences are considered. I find that older cohabitors have poorer self-rated health than the continuously married and remarried, but the disadvantaged profile of cohabitors explains the differences. Cohabitors and unpartnereds have similar physical health. Cohabitors do not differ from the continuously married and remarried on psychological well-being, but enjoy better well-being than unpartnereds. There is little variation by gender. On parent-child relationships, cohabitors have less frequent contact and lower positive relationship quality than the continuously married and widowed, but are similar to the remarried and divorced. Mothers reported more frequent contact and higher positive and negative relationship quality with children than fathers. Moreover, positive quality differs by marital status for fathers but not mothers, whereas negative quality differs for mothers but not fathers. Finally, cohabitors are the least likely to list a child as someone they believe is willing to provide future help with basic personal care. Parent-child relationship characteristics explained the differences in care perceptions. Overall, my study extends prior research on the well-being of older cohabitors, and sheds new light on how cohabitation is linked to parent-child relationships and perceptions of future care receipt from adult children.

Committee:

Susan Brown, Ph.D (Advisor); I-Fen Lin, Ph.D (Committee Member); Karen Guzzo, Ph.D (Committee Member); Kei Nomaguchi, Ph.D (Committee Member); Susan Peet, Ph.D (Other)

Subjects:

Aging; Demography; Families and Family Life; Sociology

Keywords:

cohabitation; aging; marriage; older adults; health; parent-child relationships

Shahrani, ShahreenaIn Pursuit of `Good Society’: Navigating Politics, Marriage, and Adulthood in Contemporary Jordan
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
This dissertation studies the role that marriage plays in contemporary Jordanian youths’ collective action and social imaginaries. I argue that marriage should be studied as part of politics as it is linked to popular perceptions regarding the state’s function (or dysfunction) in Jordan. In addition, I argue that marriage needs to be considered as a potential site for youths’ socio-political agency, as marriage involves not only practical considerations about money and employment but also strategies, practices, and efforts to realize their imagination of what state-society relationship should be (social imaginaries). I study marriage through a variety of ethnographic and expressive cultural forms (through field interviews, popular literature, music, cartoons, graffiti, and films) in order to better understand what Ammani youth have to say about marriage and society. Popular culture appeals to young people in Amman because it often resembles their own lived experiences and depicts how individuals can overcome hardship. Field experiences and conversations reveal how marriage concerns are linked to national and everyday politics. The strategies youths actively pursue—from individual and familial networking to saving cooperatives and employment abroad—can be seen as expressions of agency in pursuit of their social imaginaries. Their search for educated, pious, and employed partner with similar views about marriage, society, and piety further emphasizes the link between the public and the private sphere, and the personal and the political. Despite young people’s efforts to pursue individual and societal goals, generational fears allude to older generations pushing back against societal change. Since decisions and actions regarding marriage are tightly connected to political, economic, and social institutions, marriage serves as a lens to understand popular debates and sentiments among Ammani youths. Thus, it offers insights into why Jordan has avoided the systemic change of recent “people’s revolutions” in the region.

Committee:

Sabra Webber (Advisor); Ila Nagar (Committee Member); Morgan Liu (Committee Member); Johanna Sellman (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Cultural Anthropology; Families and Family Life; Gender Studies; Mass Media; Middle Eastern Studies; Near Eastern Studies

Keywords:

social imaginaries, good society, Jordan, Arab youths, marriage crisis, youth crisis, Arab Spring, marginality, agency

Amos, Nancy A.What is the Lived Experience of First-Time Adolescent Mothers?
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, Social Welfare
In 2014 approximately 249,000 babies were born in the United States to young women between the ages of 15 and 19. There are medical and psychological complications associated with adolescent pregnancy. One problem is the presence of maternal depression which is a serious condition with implications for both the mother and the child. Depression is experienced differently in adolescents than in adults, making it difficult to accurately assess and plan for services. Guided by Relational-Cultural Theory, this qualitative study described the lived experience of adolescent mothers in the early postpartum period. The study also examined adolescent mothers classified as depressed compared to those as nondepressed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Eight adolescent mothers between the ages of 15 and 19 were interviewed using a semi-structured interview grounded in the theoretical and empirical literature. Questions were asked about risk factors for depression and to elicit the experiences of the participants as mothers. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Atlas.ti software was used to code and merge data. Two coders were used to increase reliability of the themes observed. At the micro level, participants talked about their change of perception of themselves, change in school plans, lack of knowledge about pregnancy and delivery, and feeling the pressure of time and role conflict. At the mezzo level, participants described the loss of friends when they became mothers and about changing connections and disconnections with family members and with the father of their baby. At the macro level, participants talked about negotiating medical, daycare, and educational systems and about their perceptions of being treated differently as a reaction to their status as an adolescent mother. Participants described both connections and disconnections that improved their experience of being an adolescent mother. The participants described ways in which their connections with adults could be improved by listing ideas about what they wanted adults to know about their experience. The findings are discussed in relation to implications for social work practice, policy, and future research.

Committee:

Elizabeth Tracy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Early Childhood Education; Families and Family Life; Health Care; Psychology; Social Work

Keywords:

qualitative research; social work; adolescent mothers; lived experience

Gerhardt, MicahPaternal Emotion Socialization: A Naturalistic Study
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2016, Human Development and Family Science
Children’s higher levels of emotion regulation and socioemotional development have been related to positive outcomes in school, work, peer relations, and general mental and physical health. This study examines emotion expression and emotion coaching practices by fathers and mothers of young children and the role they play in children’s development of emotion related skills. The study used two time points of longitudinal data, collected annually, to examine children’s development of emotion regulation skills. At each time point, children and their mothers came for a lab visit and completed an audio recording at home on a typical weekend day. Lab data were later micro-coded for affect expression; audio recordings were coded for emotion expression and emotion socialization practices. The relations of father’s and mother’s emotion expression and emotion coaching behaviors with child emotion regulation were examined. In addition, moderation of maternal depression’s deleterious relation with children’s emotion regulation ability by fathers’ emotion related parenting practices was examined. It was found that father positive mood was positively associated with child positive mood, and mother positive mood was negatively associated with child negative mood at home. Father emotion coaching at time 1 was able to predict child positive expression in response to a clean-up task at time 2. This research has far reaching implications as depression, particularly among females, has a relatively high incidence rate (about 1 in 5). Poor child emotion regulation has been implicated in lifelong deficits in socioemotional functioning and better understanding the acquisition of these skills will enhance our ability to teach children these necessary skills.

Committee:

Xin Feng, PhD (Advisor); Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Families and Family Life

Keywords:

Fathers, Emotion Socialization, Emotion Expression, Naturalistic Observation

Gonsalves, Crystal RThe Remembered Experience of Adoption: Factors Supporting Healthy Adjustment
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch Santa Barbara: Clinical Psychology
This qualitative research study is designed to explore ideas, customs, and practices related to adoption from the perspective of adult adoptees. While many studies seek to explain the negative impact of adoption, minimal literature exists with regard to a phenomenological exploration of adoption practices that successfully promote healthy adjustment and a sense of resilience and well-being in adopted children. Existing research on adoption has largely been conducted quantitatively, which can fail to capture the personal, lived experience of a positive adoption experience that leads to healthy adjustment. Specifically, little is known about which factors of the adoption experience adoptees perceive as contributing to healthy adjustment and a sense of well-being. The proposed study located themes and patterns that became apparent through narrative inquiry concerning factors in the adoption experience that contributed to adjustment. Narrative research honors the knowledge held in stories that are retrieved from memory (Fry, 2002). By interviewing adults who were adopted as children, it is hoped that their personal stories can augment clinical conceptualizations of adoption and shed light on positive meaning-making experiences in the context of adoption. These conceptualizations will be of use to persons and professionals who work closely with those involved in adoption, including mental health professionals and paraprofessionals working closely with adoptees and their families. This information is of value for those involved in family dependency treatment courts, child welfare services, and other agencies who wish to promote positive experiences for children and families who become involved in the adoption process. The electronic version of the dissertation is accessible at the Ohiolink ETD center http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Steve Kadin, PhD (Committee Chair); Bella DePaulo, PhD (Committee Member); Violet Oaklander, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Social Psychology

Keywords:

adoption; adopted; attachment; adjustment; resilience; phenomenological; qualitative; biological; adoptive parents; adoption registry; adoption stereotypes; adaptability; age of adoption; disclosure; racial identity; ethnic identity; closed; open adoption

Brind'Amour, KatherineMaternal and Child Health Home Visiting Evaluations Using Large, Pre-Existing Data Sets
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Health Services Management and Policy
Introduction: Although popular and prevalent nationwide, maternal and early childhood home visiting interventions are, in many cases, of uncertain effectiveness. Methods: For Studies 1 and 2, the Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) Columbus, Ohio location was evaluated via propensity score matching with non-participants for its impact on a range of health outcomes. For Study 3, the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) was used to create a nationally representative profile of the home visiting population using descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis. Results: In Studies 1 and 2, matching revealed greater likelihood to have a C-section, low birth weight, and to be enrolled in WIC for women and infants participating in the Columbus NFP compared to non-participating matches. In Study 3, descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis indicated substantial differences between participants and non-participants. Conclusions: There is no conclusive evidence that the Columbus NFP program is effective at achieving its stated goals; however, the studies’ limitations were considerable. The national profile created using the NSCH supports that there are substantial differences between participants and non-participants, with home visiting participants reflecting greater health and environmental risks and lower socioeconomic status, but perhaps better parental engagement. Improved data collection and evaluation methods, as well as confirmatory factor analysis and changes in questions for the NSCH data, may help improve opportunities for home visiting evaluation in the future.

Committee:

Thomas Wickizer (Committee Chair); Phyllis Pirie (Committee Member); Sharon Schweikhart (Committee Member); Sarah Keim (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Evaluation; Families and Family Life; Health; Health Care Management; Health Education; Nursing; Public Administration; Public Health; Public Health Education; Womens Studies

Keywords:

home visiting; prenatal intervention; home health; program evaluation; public health; maternal and infant health; MIECHV; Nurse Family Partnership; National Survey of Childrens Health; propensity score; factor analysis

Brooks-Turner, Brenda ElaineExploring the Coping Strategies of Female Urban High School Seniors on Academic Successes as it Relates to Bullying
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2016, College of Education and Human Services
Bullying has become a worldwide problem of pandemic proportion and degree. (Thomas, Bolen, Heister & Hyde, 2010). In the United States over thirty-five percent of school-aged students were directly involved in bullying incidents. Tragic news stories about suicides and school violence raised awareness about the importance of addressing this global issue (Van Der Zande, 2010). To date reports further indicate that more females are involved in indirect relational bullying than males. Unfortunately, as technology becomes more and more accessible, relational bullying has become one of the fastest growing epidemics (Brinson, 2005; Rigby & Smith, 2011). Current research explanations were limited as to how female seniors who are victims of bullying showed resilience to academically succeed despite incidences of bullying throughout their high school experiences. Therefore, the purpose of this mixed method study was to explore the coping strategies utilized by12th grade female urban high school seniors who have experienced school success despite their involvement as victims of bullying. In this study, 32 high school female seniors completed the online Olweus’ Bullying Questionnaire which included self-reported attendance, discipline referrals, grade point average, and participation in extracurricular activities as it related to their bullying experiences. Additionally, the researcher randomly selected eight focus group participants were involved in two focus group sessions to provide rich descriptions of their experiences as victims of bullying. These victims expressed the coping strategies used to successfully defeat the negative connotations associated with bullying, and specifically acknowledged their personal triumphs. When students understood the intricacies of bullying, and were empowered to use effective coping strategies, their experience of school success should increase as the prevalence of bullying decreases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to decrease the number of bullying incidences in schools by providing students with effective resources or coping strategies that enabled them to no longer be victims of bullying, but to have opportunities to experience success as they develop, and learn in a safe and hostile-free environment.

Committee:

Frederick Hampton, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Brian Harper, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ralph Mawdsley, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Paul Williams, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mittie Davis Jones, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Elementary Education; Families and Family Life; Gender; Gender Studies; Health Education; Individual and Family Studies; Law; Legal Studies; Multicultural Education; Personal Relationships; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Policy; School Administration; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociology; Teacher Education; Urban Planning

Keywords:

bullying;coping strategies;academic success;academic achievement;female;urban high school;graduating seniors

George, Christopher EricCan I Get a Witness?: Reclaiming the Baptist Testimony Tradition to Enhance Sense of Community in a Church Congregation
Doctor of Ministry, Methodist Theological School in Ohio, 2015, Practical Studies
This Doctor of Ministry research project was motivated by a pastoral concern about loss of community in a specific congregation. Inspired by conversations with members of the congregation, the project sought to address people’s need for a community characterized by freedom and love. In the process, the project discovered a larger issue present in American society, namely the loss of community and sense of connectedness which permeates our culture. The Christian church, following the Biblical mandate to seek reconciliation, advances God’s mission by fostering unity and strengthening community. Recognizing the value of storytelling in the creation and strengthening of community, this research project reclaimed the Baptist testimony tradition and encouraged Christian storytelling in the context of a local church, namely First Baptist Church of Mobile. The project sought to empower a community of believers to discover and share stories with one another in an effort to foster friendship and mutual understanding. In the process, the project not only strengthened community in the context of this congregation, but provided a model for other congregations and church leaders who are committed to meeting a growing need for community in the Christian church specifically and American society generally.

Committee:

Diane Lobody, Ph.D. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Clergy; Families and Family Life; Personal Relationships; Religious Congregations; Religious History

Keywords:

community, church, congregation, testimonials, storytelling,

Surrarrer, Caroline ABEHIND THE LABELS: LIBBY PAYNE, FASHION DESIGNER FOR "MRS. MAIN STREET AMERICA"
MA, Kent State University, 2016, College of the Arts / School of Art
BEHIND THE LABELS: LIBBY PAYNE, FASHION DESIGNER FOR “MRS. MAIN STREET AMERICA” Abstract This research sought to explore the life and career of Elizabeth “Libby” Miller Payne (1917-1997). The history of American ready-to-wear (RTW) is filled with unknown fashion designers who worked “behind the scenes” for manufacturers. This was especially true in the mid-20th century between the advent of manufactured women’s clothing and the rise of the celebrity fashion designer. In downtown department stores and boutiques all over the country, consumers purchased moderately-price styles created by names that never appeared on a label. One of these was Elizabeth “Libby” Miller Payne (1917-1987), a prolific designer whose career spanned fifty years in the New York ready-to-wear industry. Libby Payne designed hundreds of garments for “Mrs. Main Street America” under well-recognized moderate price-point labels such as Bobbie Brooks, Jonathan Logan, Beau Baker, David Warren, and John Henry. Libby’s designs “sold like hotcakes.” One of Libby’s most successful, Bobbie Brooks Style #862, sold 100,000 in its first two months on the market. The purpose of this research study was to investigate the life and work of creative talent, Libby Payne, situating her in the context of the mid-20th century American fashion industry, and utilizing her history as a vehicle for understanding the evolution of moderate price-point labels, designers, suppliers, manufacturers, retailers, and consumers during this critical time. Although the name, Libby Payne was previously unknown, her creations filled the retail selling floors and closets of “Mrs. Main Street America” from the 1930’s through the 1980’s. Throughout her long career, Libby experienced the evolution of the fashion industry first-hand, from her first position in a New York manufacturer’s workroom to retirement as a sometime freelance designer with a showroom and offsite production. Her story can provide insights to the business behind accessible ready-to-wear clothing, the evolution of the fashion designer, and secrets to success in this role. Libby Payne worked in fashion for more than half of her life, and her experiences can be viewed as a lens that reflects the American industry’s growth and change. Her legacy can inform us of the way the ready-to-wear industry has evolved into what it is today.

Committee:

Catherine Leslie, Dr. (Advisor); Jean Druesedow (Committee Member); Pamela Grimm, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Families and Family Life; Fine Arts; Home Economics; Marketing; Modern History

Keywords:

ready-to-wear industry; mid-twentieth century fashion designer; unknown fashion designer; moderate price point labels

Perry, Steven WayneRace, class, and achievement: the influence of family contextual and household processes on minority student high school success
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1998, Sociology
none

Committee:

Vincent Roscigno (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education; Families and Family Life; Sociology

Ruhl, Stephanie M."Stories Do the Work" ... Pursuing an Embodied and Aesthetic Orientation for Hospice Care
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2014, Communication Studies (Communication)
This dissertation explores the storytelling capacities of aesthetic, embodied approaches to hospice care. The action-based nature of this research enabled me to design and implement art-based storytelling programs, called Enrichment Programs, at Allegiance Hospice in Jackson, Michigan. Through engagement in these aesthetic and embodied experiences (i.e., music, art, photography, life review), as well as the use of multisensory forms of narrative development and representation, patients, families, volunteers, and care providers discovered new ways of embracing the creative and charismatic spirit upon which the hospice movement was founded. As a result and in line with the hospice mission, the quality of participants' lives were enhanced and compassionate, edifying relationships were cultivated. Guided by narrative and aesthetic theoretical sensibilities, I volunteered for one year as the director of the Enrichment Programs which included designing and implementing art-based storytelling experiences grounded in theory and answerable to lived experience, conducting training seminars for new and existing volunteers, and making patient and family visits as assigned. During these activities, I collected discourse through participant observation, in-depth interviews, and review of artistic artifacts. Initially, two research questions guided my efforts: How do the enrichment programs provided by Allegiance Hospice foster storytelling in families during end-of-life care? How do participants narrate life experiences during Enrichment Programs provided by Allegiance Hospice? After spending several months at Allegiance Hospice, my fieldwork led me to explore an additional question: What is the role of storytelling and creative activities in helping participants negotiate lived contradictions and challenges of Hospice work? My results are organized into four motifs, woven together by the narrative thread of creativity and charisma: Hospice ... A Movement with Momentum, Enrichment Programs ... Meaningful Moments and Lasting Legacies, Creative Pursuit of Possibilities in Interdisciplinary Team Meetings, Discovering a Shared Language ... Emplotment of Life, Loss, and Hope. Ultimately, I argue that (1) an aesthetic, embodied approach to hospice care fosters meaningful storytelling occasions, (2) the arts transcend constraining text-based conceptions of what counts as narrative, and (3) aesthetic engagement in the lifeworlds of patients creates space for hospice volunteers and care providers to manage the inherent contradictions in their work.

Committee:

Lynn Harter (Committee Chair); Joseph Bianco (Committee Member); Raymie McKerrow (Committee Member); William Rawlins (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Communication; Families and Family Life; Health Care

Keywords:

health communication; hospice; bereavement; narrative; art-based storytelling; multisensory narrative practice; family legacy; enrichment programs

Shang, BotongThe Role of Information in College Saving Decisions: A Principal-Agent Approach
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2015, Human Ecology
In this study, I investigate whether and how much parents save for their children’s college when they have more information about the costs and benefits of college. I combine data from Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2004 – 2012, Simmons National Consumer Survey, and a self-collected dataset of magazine articles. Using principal-agent model, the paper first lays out the theoretical framework and predicts that parents with different amount of information about the costs of college or about the available scholarship will have different saving behaviors. Further, these saving behaviors will also vary with the demographic characteristics of households holding the same amount of information. Results show that there is indeed heterogeneity among different groups of parents. The marginal effect of information affects the amount of and share of resource allocate to the annual principal payments for their home mortgage. Specifically, there is a sharp contrast between families with lower income and families in the highest income group in the sample. Parents with some college education or college degree are more sensitive to information about the costs of college, while parents with no college education at all are more sensitive to information about available scholarships. Comparing parents with different race/ethnicity, information about the available scholarships have the largest marginal effect on Hispanic parents, then on the non-Hispanic, non-Black parents, and least on black parents with children younger than 16. With the only consideration of the number of children are about to go to college, there are not many significant marginal effects of information among parents with more children who are 16 or 17 years old. However, information shows consistent marginal effects on the non-Black, non-Hispanic parents who have at least one child is ready to go to college.

Committee:

Dean Lillard (Committee Chair); Sherman Hanna (Committee Member); Andrew Hanks (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Economics; Education; Families and Family Life; Home Economics

Hwang, SeunghyunRemaking the American Family: Asian Americans on Broadway during the Cold War Era
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Theatre
Remaking the American Family: Asian Americans on Broadway during the Cold War Era adds to the extant literature of theatre history by showing how an examination of Broadway productions can serve as a portal to understanding the historical emergence of Asians in their journey to become full American citizens. Based on three criteria: financial success, artistic success, and Asian content, I chose the following: South Pacific (1949), The King and I (1951), The Teahouse of the August Moon (1953), Flower Drum Song (1958), and A Majority of One (1959). Through closely reading these Cold War Broadway productions, I discuss the ways in which the productions suggest a revision of the way the Asian family was co-opted into American family ideology after World War II. I investigate how concepts of ethnic groups, gender, education and American democracy are reinforced, revised, reshaped, and articulated by what I define as a Cold War traditional family structure and travel literature. I analyze aspects of the transforming family structure in three central chapters. In Chapter 2, The American Family Portrait: Asians Move into the Frame I delineate a new definition of American that includes Asians as evidenced in the staging of these mainstream Broadway productions. In Chapter 3, "Interracial Romances and Parental Responsibilities, the productions demonstrate Asians as responsible men and women who have the ability and desire to become good American parents and citizens. Chapter 4, Educating the Children, focuses on characters learning English intertwined with the tenets of American democracy. Such education was crucial to Asians to justify the possibility of their process of Americanization. The concluding chapters summarizes my analysis and suggests future research possibilities.

Committee:

Lesley Ferris (Advisor); Beth Kattelman (Committee Member); Jennifer Schlueter (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; American Literature; American Studies; Asian American Studies; Ethnic Studies; Families and Family Life; Gender; History; Theater; Theater History; Theater Studies; Womens Studies

Atala, Sarah R.How Hospice Nurses' Beliefs About Death and Dying Frame Their Caregiving
Master of Gerontological Studies, Miami University, 2014, Gerontology
In 2010, almost half (42%) of all deaths in the United States were under the care of a hospice program; 82.7% of those were patients 65 or older (Cirillo, 2012). Hospice care is implemented by an interdisciplinary team of care providers and poses biological, moral, spiritual, and religious considerations for both patients and care providers. Since nurses are the primary providers of hands-on hospice care, understanding their beliefs is important to understanding and improving hospice care. The purpose of this paper is to explore nurses' beliefs about end of life issues and the way beliefs affect a nurse's attitudes towards their care as well as their caregiving style. This study has three objectives: 1. Understand how hospice nurses describe their own beliefs about end of life. 2. Describe the relationship between a nurse's beliefs and the daily tasks of caregiving for patients and their families. 3. Determine whether there is a difference in the attitudes of nurses between a for-profit and a not-for-profit hospice. This information will be valuable in improving hospice care by establishing a deeper understanding of nonphysical aspects of holistic care.

Committee:

Kate DeMedeiros, Dr. (Committee Chair); Jennifer Kinney, Dr. (Committee Member); Heidi Ewen, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Families and Family Life; Health Care; Nursing; Religion; Spirituality

Keywords:

Hospice, nurses, grief, bereavement, spirituality, religion, beliefs

Douglass, D'Wanna M.Lost Youth: The Forgotten Ones. A Personal Journey of Awareness & the Need to Advocate
MLS, Kent State University, 2014, College of Arts and Sciences / Liberal Studies Program
This essay recounts the story of one woman’s efforts to overcome adversity through a combination of life experiences and education in the context of and sometimes even in opposition to recent Sociological studies of the underprivileged; It also examines how such individuals can use the knowledge they acquire in this way to pay it forward; and advocate for youth.

Committee:

Manacy Pai (Advisor); John S. Rainey (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art Education; Counseling Education; Education; Educational Sociology; Families and Family Life; School Counseling; Sociology

Keywords:

youth at risk; sociology; education; counseling; advocate; abuse

Ferguson, Kelly K.What Are You Going to Do with the Rest of Your Life?
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2014, English (Arts and Sciences)
This dissertation is comprised of two sections: a critical essay entitled "Postmodern Persona Creative Nonfiction" and an essay collection, "What Are You Going to Do With the Rest of Your Life?" "Postmodern Persona in Creative Nonfiction" examines the use of multiple personas within nonfiction. For writers working within the era of Postmodernism, the self-identified fractured self often requires a multi-voiced persona to best explore complicated issues. The critical essay then examines these personas as they manifest in Truman Capote, Alison Bechdel, Janet Malcolm, and D.J. Waldie, as well as in the author's own work. "What Are You Going to Do With the Rest of Your Life?" contains essays that examine notions of identity and self as affected by sense of place, race, education, job status, and external appearances. The essays juxtapose personal experiences and external events in the goal of creating narrative.

Committee:

Dinty Moore (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Families and Family Life; History; Literature; Modern Literature; Teaching

Keywords:

Alabama history; Alison Bechdel; Janet Malcolm; DJ Waldie; Truman Capote; chick drummers; humor; essay; persona; nonfiction; narrative; Southern; Lynyrd Skynyrd; Yankee; Generation X; Kurt Cobain; drunk

Jones, Christina G.The Things We Keep
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2014, English (Arts and Sciences)
This thesis is a collection of nine short stories reflecting upon Appalachia from a contemporary feminist Appalachian writer. While the setting of the collection is Southern Ohio, the characters are not limited to an ultimate place of being and neither are the characters. Told through the eyes of a young woman searching for her biological mother, the stories are written with Appalachian story-telling heritage, parable qualities, unexpected endings, and genuine dialect. Many of the characters are faced with moral dilemmas that cause them to think about what family, love, abandonment, oppression, joy, and identity are truly about. A central theme making the stories cohesive is a set of storage units and the contents each unit holds, much like our minds and the memories we choose to discard or keep.

Committee:

Connor Joan (Advisor); O'Keeffe Patrick (Committee Member); LeMay Eric (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; American Studies; Ethics; Families and Family Life; Fine Arts; Folklore; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Appalachia; story-telling, tradition; contemporary; feminist; storage units; family; short story collection

Lackovich-Van Gorp, Ashley N.Positive Deviance and Child Marriage by Abduction in the Sidama Zone of Ethiopia
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2014, Leadership and Change
This dissertation uses Positive Deviance (PD) to understand child marriage by abduction in a community in the Sidama Zone of Ethiopia. Marriage by abduction occurs among the poorest 10% of the Sidama population and entails the kidnapping of girls between the ages of 10 and 14 for forced genital circumcision, rape and marriage. PD is a problem solving approach that mobilizes a community to uncover existing yet unrecognized solutions to solve the specific problem. This study, which entailed an examination of the evolution of marriage norms among the Sidama as well as an analysis of the underpinnings of marriage by abduction, discovered that some community members practice behaviors and strategies that can prevent child marriage by abduction. The results support PD application to this specific form of child marriage as well as the practice as a whole, offering an alternative to traditional behavior change methodology. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Alan Guskin, PhD (Committee Chair); Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Member); Lize Booysen, DBL (Committee Member); Monique Sternin, MA (Committee Member); Sandra Cheldelin, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

African Studies; Behavioral Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Gender Studies; Social Psychology

Keywords:

positive deviance; child marriage; Ethiopia; Sidama; action research; mothers; daughters; abduction; harmful traditional practice; adaptive behavior change; adolescents; adolescent development; international development

Vincent, Pamela EvelynBirth Order and Family Size Effects on Time to Treatment as well as Presenting Social and Communicative Symptoms of Autism
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2009, Human Development and Family Science
Although there is growing concern regarding the etiology and effects of autism spectrum disorders, there is still much that is not known about these developmental conditions. In examining the causes or factors influencing autism and other related disorders, it is necessary to look not only at what is held as common belief, but to expand upon those theories and provide a more thorough analysis of specific facets of autism; in this case, the role of specific environmental factors. This study provides another look into the familial factors that may play a role in the development of a condition which has its roots in genetic etiology. While the idea of a gene-environment effect has become a more commonly held theory regarding autism, there is very little evidence examining specific environmental risk factors, such as vaccinations, restrictive diets, toxins, or family-related factors. The goal of this study was to correlate birth order and family size variables with diagnosis and presenting symptoms of autism in children from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) database. A small, but significant, relationship was found between some of the variables used to measure autism-related symptoms and the child’s birth order or family size. Specifically, measures from the ADI-R regarding age (in months) of speech and communicative markers as well as social play and interaction were found to be significantly predicted by both birth order and number of siblings in the family. Additionally, a measure on the Vineland Scales of Adaptive Behavior regarding overall communicative level was found to be significantly predicted by birth order and number of siblings. In further support of these findings, a significant correlation was found between many of the same ADI-R and Vineland Scales measures and birth order and number of siblings. The common non-significant findings related to birth order and sibling number were measures of a loss of language or skill after having that particular skill for 3 or more months. The results of this small study provide evidence for the necessity of future research on these or other environmental factors present in the lives of typically and atypically developing children.

Committee:

Steven A. Petrill (Advisor); Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Families and Family Life; Psychology

Keywords:

autism; family effects; birth order; family size

Followell, Timothy B.Effect of Dental Treatment on Parental Stress as Measured by the Parenting Stress Index
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2010, Dentistry
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether full-mouth rehabilitation of children with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC) had any impact on parental stress as measured by the Parenting Stress Index (PSI). Methods: This IRB-approved longitudinal case control study consisted of a cohort examined at the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Dental Surgery Center (DSC). Children were required to have a minimum of 6 carious teeth for inclusion. Patients were treated under general anesthesia for S-ECC. The primary caregiver completed the PSI and demographic information. Patients were scheduled for a recall visit 1-3 months later with standardized study personnel. Caregivers re-accomplished the PSI. Continuous variables were analyzed using the Student’s t-test. Results: Forty parent-child dyads completed the initial and 3 month recall visits for pilot data. Mean age of children was 43 months (±12.5). Mean caregiver age was 27.4 years (±8.3). Children presented with a mean of 9.6 carious teeth ((±3.4). Treatment of S-ECC did not significantly impact parental stress (p=0.426) or total family stress (p=.237). There were small but significant changes in three subscales within the Child Domain: Adaptability (p=0.034), Reinforces Parent (p=0.039), and Mood (p=0.038). Conclusions: Parental stress levels, as measured by the PSI, are not significantly altered by treatment of S-ECC under general anesthesia.

Committee:

Sarat Thikkurissy, DDS, MS (Advisor); Henry Fields, DDS, MS (Committee Member); Dennis McTigue, DDS, MS, MSD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Dental Care; Families and Family Life; Health; Health Care; Psychological Tests

Keywords:

pediatric dentistry; dentistry; parenting stress; parental stress; caries; early childhood caries; severe early childhood caries; decay; tooth decay; teeth; baby bottle tooth decay; general anesthesia; dental surgery

Engelhardt, Bryan EldonMarital happiness and family economics
BA, Oberlin College, 2002, Economics

Economics has long been the study of maximizing production, minimizing cost, and analyzing distributions, but it was not until recently that the field of economics added the social institution of the family and subjective well being to its list. What is being expounded upon within this discussion is how marital happiness affects family economics. The question begins with how marriage affects the basic micro model of economics: utility, and in turn how marital happiness affects economic decisions made by the family, such as the amount of leisure and goods to consume.

Economic issues already analyzed within the family include joint and independent utility functions, the joint production function, distribution of economic resources, exiting constraints and more. The addition to the economic community that this discussion will be making hinges on a closer look at marriages shared goods; a good that can only be consumed within marriage, either produced by one spouse and consumed by the other or shared by both. From the shared good, we can analyze if happiness within marriage changes choices between shared goods, leisure, and private consumption, which in turn affects the personal or joint utility function when married.

The purpose of studying happiness within marriage for an economist when looking at it from the bigger picture is that it adds insights into the complex economic institution that would not otherwise be observable. The insights include how the complicated interplay of the resources allocated to shared goods and the leisure to consume them, is exchanged between private consumption. So, marital happiness, as it affects utility produced within marriage, can influence a variety of decisions. These broad definitions of goods once analyzed generically can define more specific issues such as economies of scale, income transfers, labor force participation decisions, human capital investments, and large ticket items such as a house or arguably children. In effect a happy marriage is not just interesting to sociologists and those who are married but gives insights into economic issues as well.

The layout of this paper will be as follows. In the second section there will be a literature review to highlight important points from which to construct the model and add to the discussion. In the third section the model will be developed and used to express how marital happiness changes family economics. In section four I will look at the data and its econometric results to support the model and then conclude. Appendix B will outline the idea of happiness as an endogenous decision.

Committee:

(Advisor)

Subjects:

Economic Theory; Economics; Families and Family Life

Keywords:

family; economics;marital;

Pillainayagam, Priyanthan A.The After Effects of Colonialism in the Postmodern Era: Competing Narratives and Celebrating the Local in Michael Ondaatje’s Anil’s Ghost
Master of Arts in English, Cleveland State University, 2012, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Through the utilization of Jean-Francois Lyotard’s views on the Postmodern Condition, this paper highlights the failure of metanarratives to accurately convince, as well as convey information and understanding in a postmodern society. This is due in part to what Lyotard believes is an increasing skepticism towards the grand totalizing nature of metanarratives and their reliance on some form of universal truth. In order to reverse the overarching effect of the metanarrative, its all-encompassing nature, and its power to legitimize illegitimate versions of institutionalized truths; one must focus on what Lyotard describes as “petit recits” or “little stories”. This theoretical framework will serve as the foundation for understanding the interrelated functions of truth and identity within Michael Ondaatje’s Anil’s Ghost. Set in the midst of the Sri Lankan civil war, Ondaatje uses his protagonist, Anil Tissera, to highlight not only the failure of the West to understand the decades long conflict, but also to indict the Sri Lankan government’s complicity in the extrajudicial murders of its own civilians; as well as showcasing the relationship between testifying and witnessing unspeakable acts of violence. Because colonialism sought to bring the colonized other under a single law of imperial imposition, it is in a way a type of metanarrative; whose aftereffects continue to linger in post-independence era nations. These aftereffects have caused the traditionally fragmented South-Asian society to fragment even further when the unifying feature of colonialism dissolved. The personal stories of the characters within Ondaatje’s novel serve to not only showcase their understanding of the conflict, but also as an allegorical allusion to the island and its conflicts as well. Anil’s identity creation; the conflict between brothers; the failure to prove hidden truths; and giving a voice to those who cannot or will not speak, are all attempts by Ondaatje and his characters, to shed new light on the personal stories and experiences of those whom traditional historical narratives fail to acknowledge.

Committee:

Jennifer M. Jeffers, PhD (Committee Chair); Fredrick J. Karem, PhD (Committee Member); Adrienne Gosselin, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Asian American Studies; Asian Studies; Canadian Literature; Comparative; Ethnic Studies; Families and Family Life; Forensic Anthropology; Gender Studies; History; Holocaust Studies; Human Remains; International Relations; Language Arts; Literature; Minority and Ethnic

Keywords:

colonialism; postmodernism; Jean Francois Lyotard; (meta)narratives; local; Michael Ondaatje; Anil's Ghost; South Asian; Sri Lanka; independence; civil war; NGO&8217;s; identity; truth; mystery/detective fiction; personal stories; buddhist; genocide

Fortkamp, Aaron M.The Little Death Artist
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2011, English
This work of fiction depicts two families in sub/rural America, largely focusing on the teenage lifestyle and the problems faced by the modern-age single-parent family unit. The plot reveals the disparity between young love and the post-love state ushered in by divorce. Third-, first-, and second-person perspective are used, as well as the past, present, and future tenses, to the effect of providing a unique outlook and narrative voice for eight distinct characters.

Committee:

Eric K. Goodman (Committee Chair); Margaret Luongo (Committee Member); Kay Sloan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Families and Family Life; Fine Arts; Literature; Womens Studies

Keywords:

fire; teenagers; sex; alcohol; cigarettes; smoking; underage; football; tense; perspective; death; sadness; funereal; family dynamics

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