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West, Sarah M."Serviam": A Historical Case Study of Leadership in Transition in Urban Catholic Schools in Northeast Ohio
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2017, College of Education and Human Services
The purpose of this historical case study was to explore, through the lens of knowledge transfer, answers to the following two questions: how did the Sister-educators from one community in Northeast Ohio prepare themselves for leadership, and when it became clear that the future of their urban school depended on transitioning to lay leadership, how did Sister-principals prepare their religious communities and their school communities for that change. This qualitative study focuses on six members of one active, engaged, service-based community which has supported schools Northeast Ohio for over a century. The research revealed that a successful Sister-to-laity leadership transition will have its foundation in charismatic love, encourage faith-filled mentoring of faculty and students, honor the mission of the founding community, and support an overarching leadership culture of magnanimity to all stakeholders. This model can be employed in other educational and nonprofit settings where non-hierarchical servant leadership would be an effective approach.

Committee:

Marius Boboc, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Catherine Hansman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Elizabeth Lehfeldt, Ph.D (Committee Member); Adam Voight, Ph.D (Committee Member); Matt Jackson-McCabe, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education History; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; School Administration; Teaching

Keywords:

qualitative research, case study, religious education, Catholic school culture, urban school leadership, religious congregations, Catholic school leadership, leadership models, education policy, Northeast Ohio Catholic education, education history

Jacomet, Gregory A.The Use of Unschooling as a Potential Solution to the Complex and Chronic Problem of Educating Foster Children
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2018, Educational Administration (Education)
Pedagogical and existential problems of the foster child population were examined including the history of orphan management and current methods for care. Also examined was the increasingly popular practice of homeschooling as well as its most autonomous variant, unschooling. Utilizing the methodology of bricolage, I leveraged the literature spanning both foster care and homeschooling juxtaposed against my own unschooling practice (with my own children) and interviews with other unschoolers to suggest a potential avenue for improvement to the education and subsequent life outcomes of the fostered population.

Committee:

Charles Lowery (Committee Chair); Krisanna Machtmes (Committee Member); Karl Wheatley (Committee Member); Laura Harrison (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Pedagogy; Social Work

Keywords:

foster care;foster children;aging out;emancipation;homeschooling;unschooling

Grugan, Cecilia SpencerDisability Resource Specialists’ Capacity to Adopt Principles and Implement Practices that Qualify as Universal Design at a 4-Year Public Institution
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2018, Educational Leadership
Due to the continuous growth of diverse student bodies on college campuses, creating accessibility for each unique student needs to be considered. Students who have a disability or disabilities are a substantial part of this growing diverse student body. Since disability resource specialists play a significant role in creating accessibility for such students, they can consider implementing practices that qualify as Universal Design. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore where disability resource specialists fall on Lewin’s (1951) continuum of change and Reynold’s (2009) levels of expertise in regards to implementing practices that qualify as Universal Design. Six participants were included in this study out of eight who were invited to participate. Out of those six participants, the study showed that all participants demonstrated a strong presence in the Unfreezing stage of Lewin’s (1951) continuum of change. Also, the study showed that all participants showed a level of knowledge as the second tier to Reynold’s (2009) levels of expertise. Limitations as well as recommendations for future research included recruiting a larger sample of participants to provide greater analysis of the study.

Committee:

Carol Patitu, Ph.D. (Advisor); Suzanne Franco, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Stephanie Krah, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory; Engineering; English As A Second Language; Experiments; Instructional Design; Intellectual Property; Labor Relations; Management; Mass Communications; Mental Health; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Occupational Health; Occupational Therapy; Personal Relationships; Public Administration; Public Health; Public Health Education; Public Policy; Reading Instruction; Recreation; Rehabilitation; Robotics; Robots; School Administration; Secondary Education; Special Education; Speech Therapy; Systems Design; Teacher Education; Transportation

Keywords:

Universal Design; Accommodations; Accessibility; Organizational Change; Proactive Practices; Disability; Disability Resource Specialists; Disability Services; Higher Education; Student Affairs

Dunn, Jeffery WNeoliberalism and the `Religious' Work of Schools: The Teacher as Prophet in Dewey's Democratic Society
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, EDU Policy and Leadership
This study explores the deleterious and often dehumanizing effects of neoliberal conceptions of schooling on broader democratic forms of education as John Dewey conceived them. I reveal how Dewey’s notion of the religious and his enigmatic claim that the teacher is a “prophet of the true God” provides a way to think differently about the aims and purposes of education situated now within the riverbeds of twenty-first century neoliberalism. With a renewed vision of education, I position teachers as the prophets of democracy who work to subvert the culture of neoliberal schooling.

Committee:

Bryan Warnick, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education; Education Philosophy; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory

Keywords:

Neoliberalism; Dewey; Democratic Schools; Prophetic Teachers

Banks, Laurie AUnderstanding implementation, student outcomes, and educational leadership related to Ohio's Third Grade Reading Guarantee
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2018, Educational Leadership
This study explores the outcomes of policy implementation from the perspective of the policy makers and the educators who are charged with implementation, specifically examining the decision-making process for district leaders during implementation. The study identifies the outcomes from the perspective of the policy-maker utilizing accountability measures, while examining the decision-making process by district leaders during implementation particularly focusing on doing what is “right” and what is “good” as defined by Strike (2008). The author provides an overview of Ohio’s Third Grade Reading Guarantee (TGRG). Ohio’s TGRG is one of many literacy policy’s in America that include retention as a consequence for students not able to demonstrate proficiency by the end of third grade. Quantitative and qualitative data provide a robust data set to inform the scholarship around policy and implementation from a dual perspective. The study reveals the statewide trends in reading proficiency in third grade did not change after implementation, only after a new type of assessment was administered during SY 15-16, resulting in a drastic decline in proficiency as assessed through high-stakes assessment. The K3 literacy measure, an accountability measure for schools and districts tied to Ohio’s Third Grade Reading Guarantee, had a significant negative correlation to student demographics across all three years of initial implementation. This study found one cohort of students placed on Reading Improvement and Monitoring Plans (RIMPs) in a local education agency (LEA), after being found not on track in third grade, and then promoted to fourth grade, were assessed as fourth graders and found still to be off track as assessed by the fall diagnostic. Interviews were conducted with six educational leaders from an LEA. Those interviewed were asked to reflect on the implementation of Ohio’s Third Grade Reading Guarantee and the decisions they tackled during implementation to ensure they acted as functionaries, focusing on what is “right” and “good” (Strike, 2008). The data set was evaluated utilizing Strike’s (2008) work on ethical leadership and decision making. The author concludes the study with policy recommendations and considerations for those in K-12 Leadership.

Committee:

Andrew Saultz (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Literacy

Keywords:

Education Policy; Educational Leadership, Literacy, Retention; Literacy Policy; Reading Instruction, Intervention

Varrasso, ThereseaHope Springs Eternal: Private Colleges, the State, and the Common Good
Honors Theses, Ohio Dominican University, 2018, Honors Theses
Ohio has a major issue to combat: an under-prepared workforce. Future jobs coming to the Buckeye State will require post-secondary education, yet most working age Ohioans lack this prerequisite. To combat this problem, the state government has developed higher education policies to ensure Ohio’s students receive timely, cost-effective educational opportunities. Ohio’s private higher education institutions have already consistently provided such opportunities. Through their histories of excellence and adaptability as well as their current work, Ohio’s private colleges and universities demonstrate that they provide for the common good by educating tomorrow’s leaders and citizens. Therefore, private higher education institutions in Ohio must promote themselves and specific policies—such as student aid funding—that will support them in continuing their mission.

Committee:

Kathleen Riley, Ph.D. (Advisor); R. W. Carstens, Ph.D. (Other); John Marazita, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Education Policy; History; Political Science

Keywords:

Private colleges; state; higher education; Ohio politics; common good; public policy

Horton, MichaelHow Texas Discovered Columbus
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2017, History
This project examines the Columbus legacy in U.S. history textbooks used in Texas from 1919 to 2017. This study argues that the traditional and glorified interpretation of the life of Columbus dominated his coverage in U.S. history textbooks adopted for use in junior high and high school classes in Texas during the twentieth century. The wave of scholarly criticisms of Columbus at the end of the twentieth century had only sporadic effects on textbooks published at the turn of the century. Inconsistent representations of the new debate over Columbus’ legacy in these textbooks show at best a delayed response and at worst a reluctance to change the traditional story of Columbus as an American hero.

Committee:

Ruth Herndon (Advisor); Amilcar Challu (Committee Member); Kyle Ward (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education History; Education Policy; History; Teaching

Keywords:

Christopher Columbus; History Education; US History; Textbooks; Twentieth Century

Zhang, HanIndividual cognitive and contextual factors affecting Chinese students’ mathematical literacy: a hierarchical linear modeling approach using Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012
PHD, Kent State University, 2018, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of salient student-, school-, and region-level factors on Chinese students’ mathematical literacy. Secondary data from Shanghai, Hong Kong, Macao, and Chinese Taipei participants of PISA 2012 was utilized to examine (a) how problem solving skills and noncognitive learning characteristics are related to mathematical literacy, while taking into account the effect of covariates; (b) how school-level factors moderate the relationships between student level variables and mathematical literacy; and (c) how region level factors interact with the student and school level variables. Three level hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was selected as the analytic method due to its capability in exploring multilevel data. The results of this study indicated that, at student level, actual behavioral control (mathematics learning behavior and work ethic), perceived behavioral control (mathematics self-efficacy and self-concept), and problem solving skills showed positive impact on Chinese students’ mathematical literacy. At school level, providing students with cognitive activation in mathematics lessons, experience with pure mathematics tasks, and mathematics extracurricular activities helped to improve mathematical literacy; however, constructivist practice, in terms of teacher behaviors on student orientation and on formative assessment, showed negative impact on their mathematical literacy. Finally, three regional factors (regional infrastructure, educational resources, and teacher shortage) interacted with applied mathematics tasks at school and problem solving skills, respectively, to conjointly impact mathematical literacy. This study also offered implications for future policy and classroom practice, such as continue considering teaching general problem solving skills as a critical aspect in mathematics education.

Committee:

Jian Li (Committee Chair); Tricia Niesz (Committee Member); Christopher Was (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy

Keywords:

Problem solving skills; mathematical literacy; HLM; PISA 2012

VanHorn, Pamela MarieLinking Collaborative Leadership Practices to Increased Student Achievement
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Educational Studies
This study explored the relationship between the implementation of processes directed at improving school-level functions and student academic success. Specifically, the researcher used the Collaborative Leadership Organizational Practices Survey (CLOPS) to measure how fidelity of implementation of the Ohio Improvement Process (OIP) influenced sixth grade students’ reading and mathematics achievement. The CLOPS identified areas of strength and weakness in school level OIP implementation, thereby exposing gaps in the school improvement process. The study was conducted in 57 schools in four midwestern districts. Each school administered the Northwest Evaluation Association’s (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) formative assessment tool during fall and winter in two content areas, reading and mathematics. Those same schools adopted the OIP as the school improvement model. Research design employed the survey responses, publically available demographic data considered as control variables. The change from fall formative assessment scores to winter formative assessment scores for reading and mathematics in Grade 6 was identified as the dependent variable. Data included principal responses that reflected the principals’ perceptions of the degree of OIP implementation at the school-level, demographic data retrieved from the state education agency website, and school aggregated formative assessment data from fall and winter assessments. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine if the degree of fidelity of OIP implementation in a school influenced student achievement from fall to winter assessment administrations. Results identified three OIP practices at the teacher-based team level positively impacted the change in student achievement from fall to winter: (a) teachers on a team, which is described as membership on the teacher-based teams; (b) common post-assessment results, which are described as teams working together to review student progress after the completion of a common post-assessment and, (c) implementation of inclusive instructional practices, which are described as agreed upon instructional strategies that are research based with data that can be effective with all students. Practical implications for collaborative leadership practices within the context of a structured improvement process provide a model for districts to enhance achievement for all students. Future research should address ways to increase the impact of collaborative leadership practices in a structured improvement process. This research could include the impact of levels of trust, academic emphasis and collective efficacy of a staff within the structured improvement process on increased student achievement.

Committee:

Belinda Gimbert, Ph.D. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

collaborative leadership, school improvement process, student achievement

Moran, James PThe Impact of Extracurricular Activity on Teacher Job Satisfaction
Doctor of Education (Educational Leadership), Youngstown State University, 2017, Department of Counseling, School Psychology and Educational Leadership
Student involvement in extracurricular activities (ECA) has been studied in the field of educational research in regard to its impact on academic achievement. This research reviewed the extant research regarding student achievement. In addition, it expands upon the limited research on the relationship these activities may have in regard to the teachers and staff who oversee them, and how this supervision and involvement of ECA impacted those teachers’ job satisfaction. The findings of the current investigation indicate that supervision of ECA can have a positive impact on educational professionals. Additionally, the research has shown to substantiate positive impacts on teacher longevity, organizational commitment, job performance, and job satisfaction for those individuals who coach and/or advise these activities. Coupled with the research indicating a positive impact on academic achievement from participation in ECA for students, these findings support the prioritization of ECA by school districts and states, so that creative fiscal ways can be found to sustain such programs that have, in recent times, been eliminated due to budget cuts.

Committee:

Karen Larwin, PhD (Advisor); Charles Vergon, JD (Committee Member); Sara Michaliszyn, PhD (Committee Member); Matthew Paylo, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; School Administration

Keywords:

extracurricular activity, job satisfaction, coach, club adviser

Moulthrop, Dorothy RussoRetaining and Sustaining Mid-Career Teachers: The Middle Years Matter
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2018, Educational Studies
Teacher turnover is widely understood to be one of the most pressing challenges facing the American elementary and secondary education system. Studies indicate mid-career teacher attrition is a growing phenomenon in the United States. The purpose of this study is to explore the experiences of mid-career teachers with an aim toward understanding the factors that encourage them to stay in the profession and those that repel them from it. Using a qualitative research design, I employed a life history approach from a naturalistic inquiry and constructivist paradigm. I interviewed eight mid-career teachers, four who currently teach and four who left teaching at mid-career. Findings indicate there is a range of factors that influence teacher's career decisions. Some of these factors are particular to the individual and some are particular to the profession. While experience mitigates some of the challenges of being a beginning teacher, adverse working conditions present ongoing barriers to satisfaction. The mid-career teachers in this study who continued in the profession developed strategies to confront these barriers. Relationships are the key sustaining force for the participants in this study. For some, a sustaining force is their faith. Policies could better support teachers, so they could rely less on themselves, their families, their colleagues and their faith, and more on institutional and organizational structures. Further, education policy to stem mid-career teacher attrition needs to respond to the objective professional aspects of the job and not the personal ones. We will never be able to eliminate an individual's preference to stay or leave teaching, nor would we want to, but we can make schools and the profession more desirable places to work for teachers in the system and those considering becoming a part of it.

Committee:

Belinda Gimbert (Advisor); Antoinette Errante (Advisor); Ann Allen (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

teacher retention; teacher attrition; mid-career teachers; mid-career teacher retention; teacher job satisfaction; life history research; qualitative study; education policy; career stages; working conditions; performativity

Eicher, Michael D.The Influence of Leadership Style on Philanthropy and Fundraising in Three Independent Appalachian Schools
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2017, Educational Administration (Education)
This multiple-methods study explored the influence that leadership style has on philanthropy and fundraising, and investigated how behaviors and characteristics associated with leadership style promote successful fundraising in three P-12 independent schools. Research was conducted via a multiple-methods design in which qualitative and quantitative approaches were used. Initially, qualitative interviews were conducted with the head of school, the director of development, and a major donor to the respective school. Subsequently, quantitative data were collected using the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire for a more complete understanding of each head of schools’ unique leadership style. Findings revealed that heads of school utilize both transformational and transactional leadership behaviors and characteristics. Additionally, results indicated that the ability of independent heads of schools to delegate leadership tasks, thereby utilizing a distributive leadership approach in addition to transactional and transformational leadership achieved maximum success in their fundraising efforts.

Committee:

Charles Lowery (Committee Chair); Krisanna Machtmes (Committee Member); Leonard Allen (Committee Member); Renee Middleton (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

Annual fund; Capital campaign; Charter School; Director of development; Distributive leadership; Fundraising; Transactional Leadership; Transformational Leadership; Philanthropy; Successful Campaign Funding; Independent School

Jabbari , Fatma The Discursive Production of Citizenship, Social Identity, and Religious Discrimination: The Case of Tunisia
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2018, Political Science (Arts and Sciences)
Post-conflict state building projects aim to reform the conceptualization and implementation of citizenship mostly through education. The socialization of identity through schools tend to define social cohesion by promoting narratives based on nationalist rhetoric and national identity. This is especially true for countries with centralized authority such as Tunisia, where the educational institutions and curricula are sanctioned and monitored by the state. This thesis examines the discursive production of identity and citizenship boundaries in state narratives as embedded in Social Science textbooks through three time periods: The Bourguiba era 1956-1987, Ben Ali administration, 1987-201, and contemporary dynamics; 2011-Present.The thesis also analyzes the effects of identity production processes on social discrimination against religious minorities (Christians and Jews) in Tunisia. This study does so by means of mixed methods. First, it examines thirty-one (36) Social Sciences textbooks (History, Civics, and Islamic Education) circulated nationwide in Tunisia as well as interviews, political declarations, and official documents. Second, it analyzes data from round 3 of The Religion and State (RAS3) dataset (between 2009-2014) to examine the impact of state nationalist narratives on societal discrimination against religious minorities in Tunisia and the MENA region. Understanding the impact of identity polarization on religious discrimination is a critical step towards understanding the complex mechanisms of democratization, citizenship, and peacebuilding in diverse war-torn regions swayed by revolutions and uprisings.

Committee:

Nukhet Sandal , Dr. (Advisor); Myra Waterbury , Dr. (Committee Member); Sandal Kendhammer, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative; Education Policy; Middle Eastern Studies; Peace Studies; Political Science

Keywords:

Tunisia; Arab Uprisings; Citizenship Education; Religious Minorities; Religious discrimination; MENA; Textbooks; Social Sciences

Ressa, Virginia A.A Tale of Two Policies: The Role of a Teacher-Based Team in School Reform
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, EDU Policy and Leadership
In the school policy reform discourse and literature, “teacher teams” at the local school and building level have become a promising venue for implementing policy innovations and bringing them closer to the settings and practices they hope to reform. This study examined the implementation of two policies, one federal policy, Race to the Top (RttT), and one state policy, Midwestern State Improvement Process (pseudonym; MWIP), within a single teacher team. Both policies emphasized teacher collaboration and improved instruction, and converged on teachers at Cardinal High School at the same time. Utilizing naturalistic inquiry and ethnographic field work, the study documented the work of a teacher-based team working to make sense of and enact the requirements and expectations of mandated policies from within the practical and professional contingencies of their daily work. This intersection is the focus of the study and its findings. These implementations of policy encounter in this teacher team a world whose contingencies may be no less compelling than those of the proposed reforms. The study revealed social, organizational, and professional values in play at the teacher team level that policymakers may not have anticipated, as in how teachers rely on existing systems and professional relationships to make sense of their new implementation tasks at the teacher-team level.

Committee:

Douglas Macbeth (Advisor); Allen Ann (Committee Member); Gimbert Belinda (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education Policy; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

teacher-based team; federal education policy; state education policy; case study; policy implementation; education reform; teacher teams; improvement processes

Mitova, Mariana A.Relationship Between Investments in Self and Post-Graduation Career Satisfaction Among Apparel and Textiles Majors
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
Rachel Vannatta Reinhart, Advisor The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to explore the relationship between investments that students make in themselves while enrolled in a higher education program and their post-graduation career satisfaction, and (2) to gather information about the importance apparel and textile professionals place on selected competencies identified by the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA). Graduates (n=123) of an apparel and textiles (A&T) program at a four-year, public research institution were surveyed to examine which investments in self best predict post-graduation career satisfaction. The Survey of A&T Graduates’ Career Satisfaction consisted of 86 items measuring perceived importance and preparation of the ITAA meta-goals and competencies, career satisfaction, co-curricular activity involvement, on-the-job training, health and well-being, career competencies, and willingness to relocate. Multiple regression showed that Career Competencies and Health and Well-being best predicted participants’ post-graduation career satisfaction. Participants rated the Professional Development meta-goal; the Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal; and Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goal of highest importance. These same meta-goals received highest perceived preparation ratings. Lastly, ANOVA findings revealed that buyers, retail managers, marketing professionals and others indicated differences in perceptions of competencies and meta-goals. The buyers/merchandisers rated the Industry Processes and the Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goals of higher importance than retail managers. Retail managers perceived the Global Interdependence meta-goal as less important than marketing professionals did. The Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal was perceived more important by retail managers than “others” category did. Graduates’ career satisfaction differed mostly by Income levels. Those who reported earning lower salaries were overall less satisfied with their careers. Results suggest that current leaders of apparel and textile programs should enhance their curricula with pedagogy methods that facilitate learning of teamwork, leadership, clear communication, ethics, and social responsibilities. Internships and experiential learning are recommended to enhance the on-the-job training of students in A&T programs. In addition, all investments in self, with exception of Willingness to Relocate, are related to Career Satisfaction. Lastly, Post-graduation career satisfaction is best predicted by graduates’ Career Competencies and Health and Well-being.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta Reinhart (Advisor); Gregory Rich (Other); Barbara Frazier (Committee Member); Joyce Litten (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Economic Theory; Economics; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Health; Health Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Home Economics; Home Economics Education; Mental Health

Keywords:

Higher Education; College; Well-being; Health; Students; Career Satisfaction; Apparel; Textiles; Internships; ITAA; Graduates; Professionals; On-the-job Training; Internships; Curriculum; HCT; Human Capital Theory; economic theory; assessment

Elam, Nicholas PTHE IMPACT OF THE OHIO TEACHER EVALUATION SYSTEM ON PRINCIPALS’ APPROACHES AND PERCEPTIONS TOWARD EVALUATION
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2017, Educational Leadership
In 2012-2013, Ohio introduced a teacher evaluation system that replaced many district-created systems. The Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) incorporates quantitative student achievement data to a greater extent, a greater number of ratings classifications, more tangible consequences for teachers, requires a more extensive time commitment for evaluators, and relies more heavily on widespread uniform interpretation and implementation than most of its predecessors. This mixed-methods study investigates the ways in which OTES has reshaped principals’ approaches and perceptions toward evaluation. Quantitative data, from three years of OTES evaluations, does not indicate that principals’ evaluation ratings are influenced significantly by either of two policies unique to OTES – one policy that allows principals access to some (and only some) teachers’ quantitative ratings well in advance of submitting a qualitative rating, and another policy that allows highly-rated teachers to be evaluated less frequently in subsequent years. Qualitative data, from interviews with principals, reveal mixed perceptions about OTES’ ability to improve teacher practice and accurately reflect individual teacher effectiveness.

Committee:

Andrew Saultz, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Thomas Poetter, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Michael Evans, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kate Rousmaniere, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Sheri Leafgren, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Tests and Measurements

Keywords:

Ohio Teacher Evaluation System

Hottenstein, Kristi NA Qualitative Case Study on Human Subject Research Public Policy Implementation at One Council on Undergraduate Research Institution.
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2016, Higher Education
Regulations for research involving human subjects in higher education have long been a critical issue. Federal public policy for research involving human subjects impacts institutions of higher education by requiring all federally funded research to be passed by an IRB. Undergraduate research is no exception. Given the literature on the benefits of undergraduate research to students, faculty, and institutions, how human subject research public policy is being implemented at the undergraduate level was a significant gap in the literature. This qualitative single case study examined the human subject research policies and practices of a selective, Mid-western, Council on Undergraduate Research institution. The purpose of the study was to determine how this institution implemented human subject research public policy to benefit its students. This institution used a hybrid approach of public policy implementation that met federal requirements while capitalizing on the role local actors can play in the implementation process. This model resulted in a student friendly implementation emphasizing various learning outcomes and student mentoring. Although there is considerable research and public discussion on the negative aspects of IRBs, if approached in a manner that embraces student learning, the IRB experience can be an extremely beneficial aspect of the institution’s learning environment.

Committee:

David Meabon (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Biomedical Research; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory; Higher Education Administration; Operations Research; Organization Theory; Social Research

Keywords:

IRB; institutional review board; CUR; council on undergraduate research; undergraduate research; UR; public policy; implementation; human subject research; implementation theory; hybrid theories; student mentoring; benefits of undergraduate research

Lawhead, Victor B.A Study of Youth Needs and Services in Kokomo, Indiana
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1947, EDU Policy and Leadership
none

Committee:

D. H. Eikenberry (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy

Wysocki, Carrie DThe Collaboration of General and Special Education in a Teacher Preparation Program Design: A Case Study
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, EDU Teaching and Learning
Based on a case study guided by grounded theory, this research sought to investigate and derive meaning from an exploration of the phenomenon of a program design process. The study was designed to address two primary research questions: first, how did faculty from both general and special education departments describe their experiences in a program merging design process; and secondly, what challenges did the faculty encounter during the program design process? Data collected included: program documents, meeting observations and in-depth interviews with the six faculty members of the case study. Three faculty members from a separate university were also interviewed to provide a contrast of the data to examine their experiences within a merged teacher education program, thus providing a comparison in the research. Five major findings emerged from this study, including the following: there was a collectively shared guiding vision for the team; collaboration as a key factor in the process; a sense of community and connectedness appeared to strengthen the process. Faculty buy-in and organizational structures of the program merger were recognized as challenges to the design process. Also, availability of time and resources were additional challenges the team faced. The study provides recommendations to college of education faculty and administration engaging in program merger design; to faculty engaged in leading the process as well as to faculty in general and special education interested in program reform.

Committee:

Laurie Katz, Professor (Advisor); Mary Bendixen-Noe, Professor (Committee Member); Antoinette Errante, Associate Professor (Committee Member); Amy Shuman, Professor (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

Teacher Preparation, Collaboration, Special Education, General Education, Case Study, Grounded Theory, Constructivism, Behaviorism, Dual License, Merged Programming

Carr, ThadA study of present practices in reporting to parents on pupil progress
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1947, EDU Policy and Leadership
N/A

Committee:

Arch Heck (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

Education; policy; leadership

Brooks-Turner, Brenda ElaineExploring the Coping Strategies of Female Urban High School Seniors on Academic Successes as it Relates to Bullying
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2016, College of Education and Human Services
Bullying has become a worldwide problem of pandemic proportion and degree. (Thomas, Bolen, Heister & Hyde, 2010). In the United States over thirty-five percent of school-aged students were directly involved in bullying incidents. Tragic news stories about suicides and school violence raised awareness about the importance of addressing this global issue (Van Der Zande, 2010). To date reports further indicate that more females are involved in indirect relational bullying than males. Unfortunately, as technology becomes more and more accessible, relational bullying has become one of the fastest growing epidemics (Brinson, 2005; Rigby & Smith, 2011). Current research explanations were limited as to how female seniors who are victims of bullying showed resilience to academically succeed despite incidences of bullying throughout their high school experiences. Therefore, the purpose of this mixed method study was to explore the coping strategies utilized by12th grade female urban high school seniors who have experienced school success despite their involvement as victims of bullying. In this study, 32 high school female seniors completed the online Olweus’ Bullying Questionnaire which included self-reported attendance, discipline referrals, grade point average, and participation in extracurricular activities as it related to their bullying experiences. Additionally, the researcher randomly selected eight focus group participants were involved in two focus group sessions to provide rich descriptions of their experiences as victims of bullying. These victims expressed the coping strategies used to successfully defeat the negative connotations associated with bullying, and specifically acknowledged their personal triumphs. When students understood the intricacies of bullying, and were empowered to use effective coping strategies, their experience of school success should increase as the prevalence of bullying decreases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to decrease the number of bullying incidences in schools by providing students with effective resources or coping strategies that enabled them to no longer be victims of bullying, but to have opportunities to experience success as they develop, and learn in a safe and hostile-free environment.

Committee:

Frederick Hampton, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Brian Harper, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ralph Mawdsley, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Paul Williams, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mittie Davis Jones, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Elementary Education; Families and Family Life; Gender; Gender Studies; Health Education; Individual and Family Studies; Law; Legal Studies; Multicultural Education; Personal Relationships; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Policy; School Administration; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociology; Teacher Education; Urban Planning

Keywords:

bullying;coping strategies;academic success;academic achievement;female;urban high school;graduating seniors

Nachlas, Morton deCorceyA Critical Study of Two Conflicting Proposals for Reorganizing Secondary Education
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1946, EDU Policy and Leadership
none

Committee:

Harold B. Alberty (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy

Owens, Lorie BethThe Role of Intermediaries in State Education Policy Implementation
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, EDU Policy and Leadership
Using grounded theory methodology, this dissertation reports on a study of 12 educators’ experiences as trainers in a state-level policy implementation. Interviews, policy and program documents provide evidence of the trainers enacting intermediary roles in the implementation process, standing as a primary information conduit between the state department of education, which developed the program, and the teachers, who would enact the program. Two main themes emerged from data analysis. First, the study shows how intermediaries engaging in ongoing knowledge building processes with the state department of education extended the department’s implementation capacity. They used their professional capital (Hargreaves & Fullan, 2012)— a combination of human, social and decisional capital utilizing group commitments and capabilities— and their local knowledge (Kalb, 2006) — insights gained from situated and practical insights into local social relations and institutions— to reach the policy enactors, the teachers. Second, the data indicated the presence of collective trust— the trust that groups have in individuals and other groups— among the trainer group, contributed to their initial successes, which Forsyth, Adams and Hoy (2012) suggest can positively influence school reform. The study confirms the findings of prior implementation research, that the implementation process is complex and convoluted, yet contributes to the evidence that intermediaries play increasingly more powerful (and possibly more effective) roles in policy implementation. It also extends collective trust research by its examination of the role of trust, both in relationships among the state trainers, and from the state trainers to other factions involved in the implementation process. The study suggests opportunities for subsequent research concerning intermediaries and expanding trust research to include studies of trust disintegration over time.

Committee:

Jan Nespor, PhD (Advisor); Antoinette Errante, PhD (Committee Member); Valerie Kinloch, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy

Keywords:

policy implementation; collective trust; trust; state education policy; intermediaries; professional capital; local knowledge

Miller, Emby McKinleyEDUCATION IN PERIL: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF BLACK MALE HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUTS AND GRADUATES
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Human Ecology
Education is seen as one of the several critical factors in promoting the healthy development of youth as they transition to adulthood. In the current era, a high school diploma is considered a minimum requirement for employment in most sectors of the economy (Barton, 2006). The job prospects for youth who have not completed high school often are bleak, unstable, and relatively undesirable. Among youth living in disadvantaged urban communities, the rates of high school drop-out are highest among African American and Latino males. Although considerable efforts and resources have been devoted to preventing vulnerable youth from dropping out of high school, it is a persistent problem in many of our large urban school districts around the country. Part of the reason for this impasse is the gap between what is known about why and how vulnerable youth leave school or what helps them to succeed. Recognizing the effects of dropping out of high school on society, the question is why do urban, African American male students drop out of high school? What makes these students more prone to dropping out than their counterparts who remain in school? In an effort to better understand the lives and circumstances of these student groups, this research investigation uses a comparative case method to examine similarities and differences in the life histories of a matched sample of high school graduates and dropouts. This study investigates how the developmental systems of family, neighborhood, peers and education shape the youth's perspective on school. Findings reveal that while both groups experience high levels of risk factors high school drop-outs had significantly more risk experiences in the family, community, and criminal justice domains. Dropouts also had fewer protective factors in the school, peers, community, and family domains. Individuals experience educational obstacles in multiple domains and as such schools are not likely to promote educational resiliency without additional supports operating in the community to assist disadvantaged families.

Committee:

Deanna Wilkinson, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

African Americans; Comparative; Counseling Education; Developmental Psychology; Ecology; Education Policy

Keywords:

African American males, High school, School dropout, Urban education, Comparative case method

Triplett-Stewart, Yolanda M.Intertextuality, Multiliteracies, and a Double-Edged Sword: Urban Adolescent African American Males’ Perceptions of Enabling Texts, Pedagogies, and Contexts
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, EDU Policy and Leadership
In this multi-case study, nine adolescent (high, medium, and lower academically performing) African American males at a single-gender urban middle school participated in semi-structured interviews using Photo Elicitation methods (Prosser, 2011) to reflect on their experiences with Enabling texts, activities, and contexts. Enabling Texts (Tatum, 2008) move beyond a solely cognitive focus—such as skill and strategy development—to include a social, cultural, political, spiritual, or economic focus. Considering a socio-cognitive perspective allowed for the exploration of both the cognitive and sociocultural dimensions of literacy, without limiting the analysis to one or the other. Data sources included: a) portfolio and school record artifacts, b) individual semi-structured interviews, and c) biographical survey data. Data collection and analysis were comprised of portfolio and school data completed during the 2010-2011 school year, as well as multiple and sequential interviews and survey data collected during the spring of 2013. Three African American males for each subgroup: high, medium and lower academically performing, were selected based on their availability to participate in the study, interest, and percentage point growth from previous year’s standardized testing data. Due to the study’s emphasis on gaining a deeper understanding of the student’s experience, this study integrates the theoretical perspectives of phenomenology with the more coherent and systematic, yet reflexive data analysis steps of Constructivist Grounded Theory (CGT): initial, focused, and axial coding (Charmaz, 2006). Overall, findings suggest urban adolescent African American males perceptions of contexts, texts, and pedagogies differed based on their achievement levels, however there were several similarities across all cases, which students found to be Enabling. By focusing on the students’ perception of their literacy experiences with various texts, pedagogies, and contexts, the author makes the similarities and differences between high, medium, and lower performing students more visible. Implications for key stakeholders (principals, teacher educators, educators, parents, and students) emphasize the importance of gaining a more nuanced understanding of the interplay between adolescents’ literacies and the experiences that shape them.

Committee:

Rick Voithofer (Advisor); Mollie Blackburn (Committee Member); James Moore (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; Education; Education Policy; Educational Technology; Gender; Gender Studies; Language Arts; Middle School Education; Science Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

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