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Briney, Carol EMy Journey with Prisoners: Perceptions, Observations and Opinions
MLS, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Liberal Studies Program
Carol E. Briney is the founding executive director of Reentry Bridge Network, Inc. and Reentry Solutions, Inc. Briney believes that a systematic approach is required to reduce the likelihood of recidivisim. For nearly a decade, she has written and facilitated holistic pro-social programs inside prisons and in community forums. Her programs support bridging the gap between prison and community by focusing on human value, grief-impairment, daily literacy, reentry and job readiness, trauma-informed care, the healing arts, and understanding poverty. Briney's work is founded on her strong belief - If we can’t help people to realize their own universal value, how can we expect them to see the value in their victims or their environment? This is gained through asset building, not punitive action. It takes community to reduce recidivism.

Committee:

Richard Berrong, PhD (Advisor); Clare Stacey, PhD (Committee Member); Manacy Pai, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Studies; Aging; Art Criticism; Art Education; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Black History; Black Studies; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Communication; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Criminology; Cultural Anthropology; Cultural Resources Management; Curriculum Development; Developmental Psychology; Divinity; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Tests and Measurements; Elementary Education; Evolution and Development; Experimental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Fine Arts; Forensic Anthropology; Gender Studies; Gerontology; Individual and Family Studies; Inservice Training; Instructional Design; Journalism; Kinesiology; Language; Linguistics; Literacy; Logic; Mental Health; Metaphysics; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern History; Modern Literature; Occupational Psychology; Organizational Behavior; Pastoral Counseling; Peace Studies; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Personality Psychology; Philosophy; Political Science; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Administration; Public Policy; Religion; Religious Education; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Social Research; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociolinguistics; Sociology; Spirituality; Teacher Education; Theology; Urban Planning; Vocational Education; Welfare; Womens Studies

Keywords:

prison; reentry; trauma; poverty; grounded theory; universal value; punitive; recidivism; corrections; Retablo; play therapy; male prisoners; female prisoners; socio-metaphysics; grief-impairment; grief and loss; truth-telling; poverty; hood; prison art

McKim, AlisonThe Missing Piece: Enactment in Revealing and Redirecting Student Prior Knowledge Can Enactment Expose Affect, Illuminate Mental Models, and Improve Assessment and Learning?
Master of Arts, Case Western Reserve University, 2015, Cognitive Linguistics
Research in cognitive science demonstrates that enactment is beneficial for encoding new information and retrieving prior knowledge. This study highlights the reciprocal relationship between enactment and prior knowledge as it benefits both teachers and learners. This thesis argues that enactment can be used to gain insight into students’ prior knowledge in a way that verbal assessment may not. This thesis also argues that an enacted lesson informed by student prior knowledge will lead to greater learning than an enacted lesson not informed by prior knowledge. Sample lessons of both conditions are included. Results of this study have implications in the fields of education and educational research. This introductory study provides a basis for future studies involving but not limited to the topics of enactment and affect, enactment in learning and enactment in assessing prior knowledge.

Committee:

Fey Parrill (Committee Chair); Vera Tobin (Committee Member); Mark Turner (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Communication; Curriculum Development; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Tests and Measurements; Educational Theory; Mathematics Education; Middle School Education; Plant Biology; Science Education; Social Studies Education; Sociolinguistics; Special Education; Teacher Education; Teaching; Vocational Education

Keywords:

enactment;encoding;embodied cognition;mental simulation;gesture;education;experiential learning;mental models;student conception;assessment;emotional reinstatement;affect;cognitively compatible;body-based learning;curriculum development;transpiration

Crum, Melissa RCreating Inviting and Self-Affirming Learning Spaces: African American Women's Narratives of School and Lessons Learned from Homeschooling
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Arts Administration, Education and Policy
There is considerable research on the challenges of public education for African American youth. Such research often paints a dismal picture of African American academic achievement. As a result, it is necessary to take a close look at the innovative education strategies within African American communities that offer a contrasting perspective. Specifically, this research uses Invitational Education Theory (IET), critical participatory action research, Black Feminist Epistemology, and critical multiculturalism to investigate the narratives of African American mothers who homeschool their children and analyze the purpose and outcomes of an African American homeschool cooperative. Families in this study offer insight into how African Americans are instituting change in their homes and communities and bring to light the over-arching challenges many African American families face in traditional education. Their work can inform creative ways to incorporate parents, community, and funds of knowledge into traditional education.

Committee:

Vesta Daniel (Advisor); Karen Hutzel (Advisor); Maurice Stevens (Committee Member); Patty Bode (Committee Member); James Moore, III (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; Art Education; Black History; Black Studies; Continuing Education; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Cultural Anthropology; Cultural Resources Management; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Early Childhood Education; Education; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Theory; Elementary Education; Ethnic Studies; Families and Family Life; Gender; Gender Studies; Multicultural Education; Personal Relationships; Personality Psychology; School Administration; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Research; Social Work; Sociology; Teacher Education; Teaching; Therapy; Urban Planning; Womens Studies

Keywords:

African American; homeschool; Invitational Education Theory; Multicultural Critical Reflective Practice; multicultural education; Black Feminist Epistemology; Critical participatory action research; PAR; community-based art education

Makonnen, KarynThe Interdisciplinary Approach: A Music Education Methods Course Component For Preservice Education and Music Education Majors
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2000, Music Education/Comprehensive Music Education
The purpose of this study was to develop a music education methods course component which could serve as an introduction to collaborative and integrative procedures for preservice education and music education majors. The design for the course component was two-fold: to provide preservice teachers with strategies for (a) the development of collaborative partnerships to facilitate the integration process, and (b) the development of interdisciplinary units. Four categories of teacher participants were designated: (a) the methods course instructor, (b) the preservice elementary education major, (c) the preservice music education major, and (d) the inservice elementary general music teacher. Preservice education and music education majors participate in heterogeneous teams. Each team includes one music education major and three elementary education majors from a variety of disciplines. methods course. Visual models and guidelines to facilitate collaboration and critical thinking are included. Implications and suggestions for implementation of this action thesis are discussed in Chapter Four.

Committee:

I. Barbara O'Hagin (Advisor); Ed Duling (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Elementary Education; Gifted Education; Higher Education; Middle School Education; Multicultural Education; Music; Music Education; Special Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

interdisciplinary, music education, methods course, teacher education, music education course component, integrate music, music education major, education major, integrate curriculum, Music Teachers, Music Projects

Leary, Judith A.Funding Faithful Felons: A Phenomenological Analysis of the Higher Education Transitions of Ex-Offender Scholarship Recipients
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of this study was to address gaps in post-secondary education research regarding ex-felons’ higher education experiences in order to help student affairs practitioners make campus environments and services more accessible to and welcoming for these populations. This study centers on the experiences ex-felons have had as they have transitioned into, through, and out of higher education. The Charles W. Colson Scholarship program, a need-based full-tuition and housing scholarship program at Wheaton College, provided the setting for this research. Six ex-felon men who earned bachelor’s degrees through the program participated in one face-to-face semi-structured individual interview of approximately three hours. The interviews elicited findings in five broad areas: (1) personal assets and liabilities, (2) coping strategies, (3) factors influencing disclosure of criminal pasts, (4) educational outcomes, and (5) supports and opportunities for greater support. Participants’ shared essential experience consisted of three distinct phases centering on their expectations. The Scholars interviewed entered Wheaton College with high expectations regarding their future college experiences. Moving through Wheaton, their expectations increased but shifted to post-graduate aspirations regarding future employment or ministry positions. As they moved out of their higher education experience, they found that their vaunted expectations had become unrealistic given their limitations and liabilities exacerbated by the real world conflicts they faced. As a result of these conflicts with their lofty aspirations, each participant began to question the pragmatism of his initial expectations, and to deconstruct them in order to reconstruct new expectations. However, this process caused recurring struggles within the participants as some battled with guilt for reconstructing their expectations while others struggled with patience regarding delays in their perceived timelines. No matter the struggles nor how often they recurred, each participant concluded that even if he had not accomplished all, or any, of the lofty goals to which he had once aspired, as long as he invested significantly in the life of one other person, he had accomplished something worthy of the investment that had been made in him.

Committee:

Ellen Broido, Ed.D. (Advisor); Michael Coomes, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Melissa Burek, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; Adult Education; Bible; Biblical Studies; Clerical Studies; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Criminology; Education; Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Ethics; Families and Family Life; Finance; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Individual and Family Studies; Law; Legal Studies; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Pastoral Counseling; Peace Studies; Personal Relationships; Philosophy; Political Science; Rehabilitation; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; School Finance; Social Research; Social Work; Spirituality; Teaching; Theology; Vocational Education

Keywords:

Reentry; Higher Education; Faith; Felons; Ex-offenders; Christian Liberal Arts; Schlossberg; Transition; Stigma; Labeling; Invisible Stripes; Phenomenology; Colson; Scholarship; Prison Ministry; Wheaton; Prisoner; Crime; Correctional Education; PSCE

Hickey, Chris L.The Phenomenal Characteristics of the Son-Father Relationship Experience
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2013, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine what the son-father relationship experience feels like (the phenomenology of the son-father relationship), and how the relationship experience affects leadership development, specifically in the son. I chose to reverse the order of the typical reference on this topic (father-son) in order to emphasize the significance of the son (role) being the central character or object of interest, even in instances where the character is a father in addition to being a son. Additionally, it should be noted that all fathers are sons, but not all sons are fathers (biologically, and/or socially, and/or conceptually). My central research question is: How is leadership development influenced by the phenomenological characteristics of the son-father relationship experience? I address this question through a series of interviews with adolescent boys age 17 and men between 18 and 45 years of age. The foundation of my interview protocol is built on a series of theory-based questions (Wengraf, 2001) that are outlined below. Analysis of these interviews is presented along with a comparative review of the scholarly literature on leadership development in adolescents. The primary value of this research is its applicability to youth leadership development programs with respect to the potential to add an emphasis on values and practices that cultivate healthy sustainable relationships that are consistent with responsible and effective parent involvement and planning, family leadership, and community support. While there is considerable consideration being acknowledged to an anecdotal connection between how boys are, or should be, affected by the leadership qualities of their fathers, very little was articulated about how the participants felt their own leadership development was influenced by the relationship experience, particularly juxtaposed to the amount of attention the participants spent on describing their feelings and emotions about their son-father relationship experience. In this respect, what is particularly noteworthy is the richness of the interviews with respect to the participant’s accounts of the phenomenal characteristics of the son-father relationship experience, including how sons articulate their feelings about the relationship, at and over time. This dissertation is accompanied by an Author’s Introduction supplemental file [mp4]. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Philomena Essed, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Holloway, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Michael J. Diamond, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Toby Miller, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; Asian American Studies; Behavioral Psychology; Black Studies; Cognitive Psychology; Communication; Counseling Education; Developmental Psychology; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Elementary Education; Ethnic Studies; Experimental Psychology; Families and Family Life; Gender Studies; Hispanic American Studies; Individual and Family Studies; Literacy; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Personality; Personality Psychology; Philosophy; Preschool Education; Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Research; Social Structure; Social Studies Education; Social Work; Sociology; Special Education

Keywords:

Phenomenal Characteristics; Phenomenology; Father-son relationship; Leadership Development; Adolescents; Family leadership; Leadership Qualities; Fathers; Feelings; Emotions; Male Development; Attachment Theory; Father Hunger

Johnson, Benjamin A.Fundraising and Endowment Building at a Land Grant University During the Critical Period, 1910-1940: The Failure of Ohio State
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, EDU Policy and Leadership
The purpose of this research is to provide an understanding of the financial strategy and shortcomings of The Ohio State University (OSU) in the early 1900s. It focuses on key moments in educational philanthropy, particularly endowment building, at OSU, with comparisons to the University of Michigan (U-M), and occasionally Harvard University. Located in the center of the midwestern state of Ohio, OSU might be considered a quintessential public university, facing challenges comparable to other colleges and universities. This dissertation draws on extensive original source material from OSU’s archives to show the dynamic interplay of university leaders in making key financial decisions. A variety of other primary and secondary sources from both OSU and U-M are also used. The chronological narrative presents the slow and halting journey of OSU toward private fundraising, endowment building, and the creation of the OSU Development Fund. To provide background, discussions on the land grant movement and the founding of OSU are included, as well as a description of the Ohio economy in the early 1900s. Key findings in this research are as follows. In the 1920s, Ohio State University was in a prime position to make great strides in fundraising and in building its endowment. Ohio was a relatively wealthy state, and several other universities had previously and prominently demonstrated how to begin and conduct fundraising campaigns, including annual alumni campaigns at Harvard and Yale. OSU had merely to keep pace with its contemporaries, such as the University of Michigan, to reach prosperity. But despite the factors working in its favor, OSU actually fell rapidly behind in fundraising and endowment building during the period from 1920 to 1940. Notwithstanding the difficult economic climate of the Great Depression, other universities forged ahead in fundraising through this period. OSU’s alumni leaders pushed heavily for progress in fundraising for over a decade before significant changes were made. It took the devastating state appropriations cuts by Governor Martin L. Davey (Gov. 1935-1939) before OSU adopted fundraising as an important source of university income. Indeed, the most influential factor in the university’s lack of fundraising and endowment building during the period from 1920 to 1940 was undoubtedly the unprogressive presidential leadership of both William Oxley Thompson (Pres. 1899-1925) and George W. Rightmire (Acting Pres. 1925-1926; Pres. 1926-1938). Both of these presidents, while they had some positive influences on the university, did not embrace private fundraising until the end of their presidencies, which was far too late. A critical period for growing the endowment had passed, and OSU had lost its lead among its peers, never to regain first place.

Committee:

Bruce Kimball, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Bryan Warnick, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ann Allen, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Robert Lawson, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Comparative; Economic History; Economics; Education; Education Finance; Education History; Education Philosophy; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; History

Keywords:

Higher Education; History of Education; Philosophy of Education; Public Universities; American History; American Studies; Leadership; Policy Studies; Economics; Fundraising; Endowments; Private Giving

Russell, Jan WareCharacteristics of Contemporary U.S. Progressive Middle Schools
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2013, Leadership and Change
Progressive education has a long history within the American K-12 education system dating back to the late 1800s. During this period, two very distinct ideologies represented progressive education: 1) administrative progressives supporting standardization as a means of efficiency and 2) pedagogical progressives supporting child-centered learning based upon a well-rounded education. This study looks at 82 contemporary pedagogical progressive schools to identify common characteristics. Child-centered learning, community integration, and democratic decision-making were the three overarching philosophies covered in this study. Data was collected through an online survey of school leaders. The majority of research surrounding progressive education is qualitative and focuses on the experience of teachers, students, parents, or administrators, and not the characteristics of the school. This study is a mixed methods study that uses quantitative and qualitative methods to identify qualities found in contemporary progressive schools. Findings are intended to help school leaders plan for growth and sustainability. A 6-point scale was used to gather school leaders’ level of disagreement or agreement about whether particular educational practices associated with each philosophy occur within their school. Mean scores for the educational practice items for each philosophy were the independent variables in the regression analyses. A 10-point semantic differential rating scale was used to identify the school leaders’ perceptions of whether their school was adhering to each philosophy. These ratings were used as the dependent variable in the regression analyses. Significant educational practice items for each philosophy include: Child-Centered Learning Practices—Student learning is assessed through formative assessments (progress with feedback) versus summative assessments (grade or percentage scores), Student learning is based upon discovery through an independent learning process, Small group student interaction creates learning opportunities; Community Integration Practices—Student community service is used as a learning experience, Education occurs within the local community at various businesses and/or organizations; Democratic Decision-Making Practices—Stakeholders have equal voting power in decisions, Decisions are made based upon the greatest good for the greatest number, Consensus is preferred to majority rule, Decisions are made that create inclusion versus exclusion of stakeholders. This dissertation is accompanied by an MP4 video of the author’s introduction. The electronic version of this Dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Chair); Elizaberth Holloway, PhD (Committee Member); Charis Sharp, PhD (Committee Member); Jane Miller, EdD (Other)

Subjects:

Curricula; Education; Education History; Education Philosophy; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Tests and Measurements; Elementary Education; Middle School Education; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Organizational Behavior; Pedagogy; Secondary Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

mixed method; qualitative; quantitative; progressive education; middle schools; test bias; small schools; alternative eduction; 21st century curriculum; assessment; testing; innovative education; educational leadership; teaching, curriculum

Bruno, Amy JDo Mathematics and Test Anxiety Influence the Decision to Drop Out?
Specialist in Education, Miami University, 2015, School Psychology
GED students and non-traditional adult learners are a vastly understudied population within the field of school psychology. However, we do know that individuals who do not have a high school diploma or GED have poorer life outcomes than their counterparts with high school diplomas and degrees from universities. This study examined the levels of mathematics and test anxiety in a sample of students enrolled in GED courses in order to see if a relationship existed between high academic anxiety levels and the decision to “drop out” of high school. Additionally, this study provides qualitative insight to the rationale adult learners had for leaving high school and returning to get their GED, as well as aspirations they have for their futures and how earning their GED will help them attain those goals. Significant findings, future directions for study of this population of learners, and implications for practitioners are addressed.

Committee:

Susan Mosley-Howard (Advisor); Amity Noltemeyer (Committee Member); Paul Flaspohler (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Continuing Education; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Mathematics Education; School Administration; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Teacher Education; Teaching; Vocational Education

Keywords:

dropout, drop out, adult learner, GED students, GED, school climate, anxiety, mathematics anxiety, test anxiety, high school dropout

Faulkner, JamiePre-teenage Transgender Children: Their Families and Education
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, EDU Teaching and Learning
This qualitative study focuses upon the experiences of pre-teenage transgender (PTT) children as they negotiate their identities with their families and educational institutions. PTT children are an at risk population in U.S. public schools and frequently experience a lack of support and understanding from their families. Transgender identities are often subsumed into the broader discourse of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) identities. The lack of awareness of and support for PTT children is a substantial problem within education and leads to problems such as verbal and physical harassment. This qualitative study has two principle foci. The first is to determine how an analysis of historical discourses of transgender informs our current understanding of this concept. Using a Foucauldian discourse analytical style it examines and questions the basis for transgender being categorized as a psychiatric condition. The second is to understand how PTT children negotiate their identities with their families and schools, and to see how their unique identities highlight gender inequities. These questions were addressed by analyzing the data in the interviews conducted with the study participants using Ahmed’s cultural politics of fear, Goffman’s stigma, and Connell’s doing transgender. The first foci area of this study found that transgender as a concept has been shaped more by normalizing heteronormative and cisnormative discourses than scientific facts, and that researchers should reflect the negative impact of discourses on transgender identities when conducting research. It found the contention that transgender was a disordered form of gender identity development, when no ordered or normal form exists to be highly problematic, along with the fact that transgender still remains a psychiatric condition. It found the argument that the treatment of PTT children is unethical to be largely unsubstantiated and that in fact treatment constitutes a firmer ethical standpoint than non-treatment. The second foci area of this study found that PTT children had an early awareness of how their identities are stigmatized, but were nonetheless reported as being happier since their gender transition. PTT children became aware of their gender identity from as young as 2 and often felt pressured by society to conform to stereotypical gender norms. Finally, PTT children experienced harassment in schools, faced gender segregated schools that were hard to fit into, and families faced schools that in general were uninformed and unprepared to handle a PTT child. It recommends that educators minimize gender segregation in schools, implement school policies that offer specific protections for gender identity and gender expression, actively incorporate anti-bullying training into school culture, and finally develop guidelines for introducing transgender students to schools. Finally it suggests families incorporate a child-led form of parenting, develop community networks of support, and become aware of the current medical implications and realities for PTT children.

Committee:

Mollie Blackburn, PhD (Advisor); Cynthia Tyson, PhD (Committee Member); Antoinette Errante, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Policy; Elementary Education; Endocrinology; Gender; Gender Studies; Glbt Studies; Health; Higher Education; Individual and Family Studies; Middle School Education; Multicultural Education; Pedagogy; Teacher Education

Keywords:

Pre-teenage transgender children; transgender; MtoF; FtoM; Hormone blockers; medical intervention; Gender identity; Education; Pedagogy; School policies; harassment; bullying; gender segregation;

Dixon, KerryThe Contested Space of STEM-Art Integration: Cultural Humility and Collaborative Interdisciplinarity
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, EDU Teaching and Learning
Abstract This dissertation study is part of Project ASPIRE (Apprenticeships Supported by Partnerships for Innovation and Reform in Education) (U.S. Department of Education Award Number U336S090049), which created a new model for urban teacher education based on principles of equity, diversity, and social justice. That model was focused on preparing highly qualified teachers in hard-to-staff content areas to teach in high-need public middle and high schools. This dissertation focuses on one component of the overarching ASPIRE project: a teacher inquiry group comprised of veteran secondary science, mathematics and world language teachers charged with determining how arts-integrated teaching and learning could inform the preparation of pre-service urban teachers in their content areas. Specifically, the study explores how four of the inquiry group members—one mathematics teacher and three science teachers—engaged with and enacted arts integration in their own classrooms. While many arts supporters have advocated for the inclusion of the arts within STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education policy, funding and practice, there is currently little research-based consensus on what exactly constitutes high quality STEM-Art integration. Furthermore, there is scant research-based guidance on how such integration can be systematically enacted to meet the needs of all students. Drawing on theories of interdisciplinarity (Boix Mansilla, 2006; Becher, 1989; Klein, 1990), Communities of Practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991) and teacher inquiry (Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 2009), this dissertation study examines how the four study participants negotiated the interdisciplinary co-construction of knowledge about visual art with the inquiry group and within their own classrooms. In addition, it explores how they conceptualized the purpose of visual art integration within the teaching and learning of science and mathematics. Findings indicate that the four study participants explored STEM-Art integration with a notable lack of paradigmatic defensiveness as it related to the culturally-bound knowledges and practices of their (science and mathematics) disciplines. This disciplinary (cultural) humility allowed them to view visual art as well as their own subject areas with high levels of reflexivity. This, in turn, led them to enact authentic, collaborative, and enduring STEM-Art integration. The concept of cultural humility in the context of STEM-Art integration extends interdisciplinarity as a theory of action and locates it within a critical paradigm. As such, these findings have implications not only for the development of more consistent and rigorous STEM-Art integration methodologies, but also for the enactment of equity-oriented, asset pedagogies, particularly by teachers belonging to dominant groups and whose cultural identities do not match those of their students, as is often the case in urban school settings.

Committee:

Valerie Kinloch (Advisor); Patricia Brosnan (Committee Member); Candace Jesse Stout (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Curriculum Development; Education; Educational Theory; Mathematics Education; Multicultural Education; Science Education; Secondary Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

STEM; art; interdisiciplinary; urban education; teacher preparation; cultural humility; secondary STEM education; equity; multicultural; arts integration; education reform

Huff-Franklin, Clairie LouisaAN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF VALUE-ADDED AND ACADEMIC OPTIMISM OF URBAN READING TEACHERS
Doctor of Education, Miami University, 2017, Educational Leadership
AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF VALUE- ADDED AND ACADEMIC OPTIMISM OF URBAN READING TEACHERS The purpose of this study is to explore the correlation between state-recorded value- added (VA) scores and academic optimism (AO) scores, which measure teacher self-efficacy, trust, and academic emphasis. The sample for this study is 87 third through eighth grade Reading teachers, from fifty-five schools, in an urban school district in Ohio who have VA scores. Teachers were given an AO survey to find out through quantitative methods what relationship exists, if any, between value-added and academic optimism scores. The findings of this study is that no correlation was found between AO and VA. However, by exploring other confounding variables, other concepts were confirmed. The question driving this research may promote discussion about what teacher characteristics are actually effective and desirable and whether a district would like their teachers to duplicate them or not.

Committee:

Kate Rousmaniere (Committee Chair); Molly Morehead (Committee Member); Andrew Saultz (Committee Member); William Boone (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; Education; Education History; Education Philosophy; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Tests and Measurements; Educational Theory; Elementary Education; Hispanic Americans; Middle School Education; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Special Education

Keywords:

Value Added; Academic Optimism; Positive Psychology; urban youth; minority students; achievement gaps; student engagement; SES; teacher effectiveness; teacher impact; education legislation; ESEA;A Nation At Risk;NCLB; Race to the Top; ESSA

Gilis, Jeffrey T.Nutrition Knowledge and Interest of Collegiate Athletes at a Division I University
Master of Family and Consumer Sciences (MFCS), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Family and Consumer Sciences/food and Nutrition

Statement of Problem: The major objectives of this study were to determine the difference in nutrition-related knowledge between sport, gender, and academic year; how nutrition interest varied between sport and gender; and how perceived nutrition-related knowledge correlated with actual nutrition-related knowledge in a collegiate athlete population.

Methods and Procedures: Data was collected using a survey, which was created new for the purposes of this study and was administered to student-athletes in a face-to-face setting. The survey instrument covered a variety of topic areas, including nutrition-related knowledge, perceived nutrition-related knowledge, and nutrition topics of interest. Data was analyzed after all 17 intercollegiate athletic teams, 319 subjects (approximately 75% of the student-athlete population), were surveyed. Descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, Pearson correlation, two-sample t-tests, and ANOVA tests were conducted.

Results: The women's gymnastics team scored significantly higher with regard to nutrition-related knowledge than any other team surveyed, scoring an average of 9.9 out of 14 (p = 0.000). The men's football and men's basketball teams scored significantly lower with regard to nutrition-related knowledge than all other teams, scoring, on average, 7.5 and 6.6 out of 14, respectively (p = 0.000). Female athletes, scoring an 8.8 out of 14, scored significantly higher on average than male athletes, scoring a 7.8 out of 14 (p = 0.000). There was no significant difference in nutrition-related knowledge between academic years. Nutrition topics of interest varied between sport, with pre- and post-workout meals, healthier fast food alternatives, and energy requirements being the topics of highest interest. Females, overall, were most interested in the topics of cheap, healthy meals and safe, healthy weight loss, while males were found to be most interested in the topics of sports drinks and muscle building. Lastly, there was no significant correlation found between perceived and actual nutrition-related knowledge (r = 0.093).

Conclusions: Future nutrition education interventions at the university under review should be tailored to fit the interests and education levels of the sport or gender being educated. This will assist in the optimization of retained information, providing a greater opportunity for improvements in athletic performance and overall quality of life.

Committee:

Dawn L. Anderson, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Amy L. Morgan, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Carrie M. Hamady, MS, RD, LD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Continuing Education; Counseling Education; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Theory; Health; Health Education; Health Sciences; Higher Education; Nutrition; Recreation; Science Education; Teaching

Keywords:

sports nutrition; collegiate education; college athlete nutrition

Smith-Justice, Ella M.Foreign language teacher self-efficacy: A descriptive study of high school foreign language teachers in central Appalachia
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, EDU Teaching and Learning
This mixed-methods study explores the self-efficacy beliefs of foreign language teachers in central Appalachia, which encompasses eastern Kentucky, north-central Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, and southwestern West Virginia. The participants in this study are high school foreign language teachers in the region; 81 participants completed an anonymous online survey comprised of a demographics and background questionnaire and slightly modified versions of the Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy Scale (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001) and the Second/Foreign Language Teacher Efficacy Scale (Swanson, 2010a), while 11 of those participants went on to volunteer participation in semi-structured interviews with me about their language teaching experiences in central Appalachia. The questionnaire data revealed that the teachers in this sample are mostly female and primarily teach Spanish, with smaller percentages of French and German teachers. Most of the teachers in the sample are considered veteran teachers, with slightly fewer than half of the veteran respondents having taught between 10 and 19 years. The majority of the survey respondents teach in the state of Kentucky. The analysis of the collected quantitative and qualitative data produced five primary findings: 1) despite the many challenges that they face in their teaching contexts, this sample of central Appalachian foreign language teachers has a high level of self-efficacy for foreign language teaching, and they feel most confident about their efficacy for classroom management (TSES) and content knowledge (FLTES); 2) this sample of language teachers is positively impacted by membership in professional language teaching associations, receiving funding for participation in professional development activities, teaching a high number of students per day, being older in age, and perceiving that foreign language education is valued in their respective schools and states of employment; 3) the sample is negatively impacted by not participating in professional language teaching associations, not receiving funding for professional activities, teaching classes in content areas other than their target languages, and feeling as though foreign language education is not valued in their schools, local communities, and states of employment; 4) despite veteran teachers in the sample producing higher efficacy scores across the board than novice and intermediate language teachers for classroom management (TSES), instructional strategies (TSES), student engagement (TSES), facilitating language instruction (FLTES), and cultural instruction (FLTES), language teaching experience does not have a statistically significant effect on language teacher self-efficacy for this sample; and 5) language speaker status is statistically significant for this group of language teachers for teaching self-efficacy related to content knowledge and cultural instruction. In addition to these findings, I suggest that the unique geographic context of central Appalachia is impactful for language teacher self-efficacy in the region because its topography shapes the population that resides there as well as local attitudes toward global education, while the regional economy simultaneously emphasizes the need for foreign language education for economic diversification, as well as restricts the funds and resources that are available to bolster language instruction. Finally, recommendations for future scholarship are offered, as well as implications for initial language teacher preparation and continued education and learning.

Committee:

Alan Hirvela (Advisor); Terrell Morgan (Committee Member); Francis Troyan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Bilingual Education; Curriculum Development; Education; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Foreign Language; Higher Education; Language; Modern Language; Multicultural Education; Multilingual Education; Secondary Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

language teaching; language teacher self-efficacy; rural; Appalachia

Brooks-Turner, Brenda ElaineExploring the Coping Strategies of Female Urban High School Seniors on Academic Successes as it Relates to Bullying
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2016, College of Education and Human Services
Bullying has become a worldwide problem of pandemic proportion and degree. (Thomas, Bolen, Heister & Hyde, 2010). In the United States over thirty-five percent of school-aged students were directly involved in bullying incidents. Tragic news stories about suicides and school violence raised awareness about the importance of addressing this global issue (Van Der Zande, 2010). To date reports further indicate that more females are involved in indirect relational bullying than males. Unfortunately, as technology becomes more and more accessible, relational bullying has become one of the fastest growing epidemics (Brinson, 2005; Rigby & Smith, 2011). Current research explanations were limited as to how female seniors who are victims of bullying showed resilience to academically succeed despite incidences of bullying throughout their high school experiences. Therefore, the purpose of this mixed method study was to explore the coping strategies utilized by12th grade female urban high school seniors who have experienced school success despite their involvement as victims of bullying. In this study, 32 high school female seniors completed the online Olweus’ Bullying Questionnaire which included self-reported attendance, discipline referrals, grade point average, and participation in extracurricular activities as it related to their bullying experiences. Additionally, the researcher randomly selected eight focus group participants were involved in two focus group sessions to provide rich descriptions of their experiences as victims of bullying. These victims expressed the coping strategies used to successfully defeat the negative connotations associated with bullying, and specifically acknowledged their personal triumphs. When students understood the intricacies of bullying, and were empowered to use effective coping strategies, their experience of school success should increase as the prevalence of bullying decreases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to decrease the number of bullying incidences in schools by providing students with effective resources or coping strategies that enabled them to no longer be victims of bullying, but to have opportunities to experience success as they develop, and learn in a safe and hostile-free environment.

Committee:

Frederick Hampton, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Brian Harper, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ralph Mawdsley, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Paul Williams, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mittie Davis Jones, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Elementary Education; Families and Family Life; Gender; Gender Studies; Health Education; Individual and Family Studies; Law; Legal Studies; Multicultural Education; Personal Relationships; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Public Policy; School Administration; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Social Structure; Social Work; Sociology; Teacher Education; Urban Planning

Keywords:

bullying;coping strategies;academic success;academic achievement;female;urban high school;graduating seniors

Minkin, Sarah M.Starting from Here: An Exploration of the Space for Sustainability Education in Elementary Science and Social Studies
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2015, Environmental Studies (Voinovich)
Sustainability education (SE) is a pathway for creating a more socially, economically, and environmentally just and sustainable world. SE involves the incorporation of sustainability concepts into curricula using innovate teaching methods (i.e. place-based education, outdoor education, experiential education, nature-based education). This thesis explores the space for SE in Grade 5 science and social studies classrooms. Using the case study methodology, this study looked to practicing teachers for insights on how SE could be integrated into the public education system. This study investigated teachers’ understanding of sustainability and practice of SE by analyzing their perceptions of sustainability, examples of SE lessons, and their sources of knowledge about sustainability. The results indicated that teachers’ understanding of sustainability is largely focused on environmental aspects and that teachers’ practice of SE also has an environmental focus. This study evaluated the feasibility of teaching SE in the classroom by outlining the challenges and opportunities for SE presented by teachers. While there are some factors that limit teachers’ ability to teach SE (i.e. teachers’ limited knowledge about sustainability, lack of training in SE, and institutional demands), with guidance and support from education institutions and community partnerships current and future teachers can provide SE for their students.

Committee:

Nancy Manring, PhD (Advisor); Danielle Dani, PhD (Committee Member); Stephen Scanlan, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Sociology; Elementary Education; Environmental Education; Science Education; Social Studies Education; Sustainability; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

sustainability; sustainability education; place-based education; education for sustainable development; elementary education; science education; social studies education; teachers; teacher education; community partnerships

Groman, Jennifer LynnFrom Calling to Crisis: The Growth Process of Teachers Through Crisis-Like Incidents
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2015, Elementary Education
The phenomena of crisis in the formation and development of teacher identity is not unknown in the field of educational research, yet the study of these phenomena tends to focus on preservice and novice teachers. The purpose of this research is to discover through veteran teacher narratives, descriptions of crisis-like incidents, as well as any growth and transformation they may have experienced in the context of the profession. By studying teacher stories I hope to contribute to the understanding of how teachers navigate their teaching lives and shifting identities, especially in the face of difficulty, and gain insight into the value of collectively sharing and talking about the stories together. This Organic and Narrative based inquiry engaged three veteran teachers in conversations about the difficulties and challenges (crisis-like situations) of their teaching lives. The stories of crisis-like incidents (Veteran Stories) varied greatly, but themes emerged, such as: passion for the profession; varying needs for reflection; conflict of personal beliefs and institutional beliefs; conflict of belonging and not belonging; harmed and healed relationships; and the presence of a strongly held core belief. The process of sharing crisis stories in a safe and caring environment was quite transformative for participants. Their reflections indicated increased understanding of self and others, desire to be of service, a sense of wellbeing and personal implications, as well. They concluded that teachers often cause crisis-like incidents for other teachers, and that reflecting on incidents, while emotionally difficult, proved valuable to them. The researcher gained increased awareness of the vulnerabilities and risk in teaching, and now views herself as moving into teacher Elderhood. Early readers responded to the stories of crisis with stories of their own, demonstrating the truly widespread nature of crisis-like incidents in the lives of public school teachers. Recommendations for the profession include increased time and space for teachers to talk to one another about their philosophical beliefs and values and the value of a healthy, trusting school culture. Further research is needed to unearth aspects of critical incidents among teachers with varying philosophical viewpoints, as well as the phenomena of teachers causing critical incidents to other teachers.

Committee:

Gary Holliday, Dr. (Advisor); Renee Mudrey-Camino, Dr. (Committee Member); Alfred Daviso, Dr. (Committee Member); Sandra Spickard-Prettyman, Dr. (Committee Member); Rebecca McElfresh, Dr. (Committee Member); Diane Montgomery, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Early Childhood Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Educational Psychology; Elementary Education; Middle School Education; Pedagogy; Personal Relationships; Philosophy; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Spirituality; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Crisis, critical incidents, teaching, teacher training, organic inquiry, narrative inquiry, transpersonal psychology, stories, narratives, teacher stories, teacher identity, identity

Wallace, Kyle SAn Exploratory Study of Learning Journeys for Makers in the Fields of Art, Craft and Design: An Investigation of the Blurred Boundaries between Art, Craft, and Design
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2016, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design
In this exploratory study, research was conducted on the learning journeys of makers in the fields of art, craft and design. The investigation was conducted to explore new ways of informing hands-on learning for makers, as well as parents and educators of makers. The primary research revealed insights about the makers' positions within the blurred boundaries of art, craft and design, how these makers approach creativity and how their learning activities fit within informal, non-formal and formal learning approaches. This study does not attempt to reinforce or redefine the boundaries between art, craft and design. Rather, this study suggests that practitioners and students want to explore the space between art, craft and design even though many academic institutions often attempt to reinforce boundaries between the three fields. The findings in this study were rich in details and these were used to create a framework for makers to begin or continue advancing their skills and knowledge in hands-on learning. The information provided could be used to bridge formal learning activities with informal and non-formal learning activities. Bridging these types of learning activities could better position future makers to become the producers of innovative ideas for our future economy. It is important to note that the investigator is also a maker. His background includes vocational education in cabinetmaking and millwork, and university education at a one-year exchange program in Germany and a BFA with a concentration in Industrial Design. His professional career includes fabrication and managerial experiences from a variety of production workshops at multiple locations across the United States and abroad, in countries such as England and Australia.

Committee:

Elizabeth B.-N. Sanders, Ph.D., (Advisor); Peter Chan, Ph.D., (Committee Member); David Staley, Ph.D., (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Art Education; Curricula; Design; Education; Epistemology; Fine Arts; Higher Education; Industrial Arts Education; Pedagogy; Teacher Education; Teaching; Vocational Education

Keywords:

Exploratory Study; User-Centered; Maker; Blurred Boundaries; Art; Craft; Design; Learning Journey

Mitova, Mariana A.Relationship Between Investments in Self and Post-Graduation Career Satisfaction Among Apparel and Textiles Majors
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Leadership Studies
Rachel Vannatta Reinhart, Advisor The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to explore the relationship between investments that students make in themselves while enrolled in a higher education program and their post-graduation career satisfaction, and (2) to gather information about the importance apparel and textile professionals place on selected competencies identified by the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA). Graduates (n=123) of an apparel and textiles (A&T) program at a four-year, public research institution were surveyed to examine which investments in self best predict post-graduation career satisfaction. The Survey of A&T Graduates’ Career Satisfaction consisted of 86 items measuring perceived importance and preparation of the ITAA meta-goals and competencies, career satisfaction, co-curricular activity involvement, on-the-job training, health and well-being, career competencies, and willingness to relocate. Multiple regression showed that Career Competencies and Health and Well-being best predicted participants’ post-graduation career satisfaction. Participants rated the Professional Development meta-goal; the Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal; and Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goal of highest importance. These same meta-goals received highest perceived preparation ratings. Lastly, ANOVA findings revealed that buyers, retail managers, marketing professionals and others indicated differences in perceptions of competencies and meta-goals. The buyers/merchandisers rated the Industry Processes and the Critical and Creative Thinking meta-goals of higher importance than retail managers. Retail managers perceived the Global Interdependence meta-goal as less important than marketing professionals did. The Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Sustainability meta-goal was perceived more important by retail managers than “others” category did. Graduates’ career satisfaction differed mostly by Income levels. Those who reported earning lower salaries were overall less satisfied with their careers. Results suggest that current leaders of apparel and textile programs should enhance their curricula with pedagogy methods that facilitate learning of teamwork, leadership, clear communication, ethics, and social responsibilities. Internships and experiential learning are recommended to enhance the on-the-job training of students in A&T programs. In addition, all investments in self, with exception of Willingness to Relocate, are related to Career Satisfaction. Lastly, Post-graduation career satisfaction is best predicted by graduates’ Career Competencies and Health and Well-being.

Committee:

Rachel Vannatta Reinhart (Advisor); Gregory Rich (Other); Barbara Frazier (Committee Member); Joyce Litten (Committee Member); Patrick Pauken (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Economic Theory; Economics; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Health; Health Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Home Economics; Home Economics Education; Mental Health

Keywords:

Higher Education; College; Well-being; Health; Students; Career Satisfaction; Apparel; Textiles; Internships; ITAA; Graduates; Professionals; On-the-job Training; Internships; Curriculum; HCT; Human Capital Theory; economic theory; assessment

Johnson, William RaymondFour-Year Music Degree Program Perceptions of Value from Administrators and Students: A Mixed Methods Study
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Arts Administration, Education and Policy
The duties required of a musician earning a living wage are starkly different than the musicians twenty years ago. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, pure performance opportunities were often enough for music professionals to support themselves, but the musicians of today require a set of skills not explicitly instructed in a four-year degree, most prominently career management and rudimentary financial management proficiencies. Today, the vast majority musicians are now required to utilize skills tangentially related to the creation and performance of music, with various manifestations of a “portfolio” or “Protean” career becoming a preferred term of scholars and administrators alike. Considering a new performer/teacher/administrator paradigm, institutions of higher education training the musicians of the future have a responsibility to current and future students to maintain pace with current employment trends. For this dissertation, I investigated students and administrators at four-year degree granting institutions and found gaps between what students desire from their education, the goals of administrators in providing this degree, and what the workforce requires. Specific considerations for department policy are presented, and opportunities for future research in a variety of arts disciplines are highlighted.

Committee:

Wayne Lawson, Ph.D. (Advisor); Jan Edwards, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Tatiana Suspitsyna, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Margaret Wyszomirski, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Fine Arts; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Music; Music Education; Performing Arts; School Administration; Secondary Education; Teacher Education; Vocational Education

Keywords:

Music, Musician Employability, Creative Economy, Music Education, Portfolio Career, Music Policy,

Spoerndle, Regenia E.Critical Pedagogy in Action: A Case Study of Our Lady of the Elms
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2012, Communication
This case study of Our Lady of the Elms School in Akron, OH, examines the dialogic teaching practices of eight exemplar teachers representing instruction for students in grades Pre-K-12. Framed in Critical Pedagogy theory, four themes emerged related to the dialogic teaching practices used by the teachers. These themes included (1) building relationships within the classroom, (2) behavioral training for critical listening and critical thought, (3) Socratic questioning and student reflection, and (4) teacher awareness and sensitivity to the learning environment. Research included examination of the challenges faced by the teachers while engaging in dialogic instructional practices. Challenges emerged as three themes and included (1) resistant and overly enthusiastic students, (2) physical exhaustion and time constraints, and (3) a lack of support from the broader community for dialogic education. This study was designed to provide commentary and inspiration to parents, students, education and political leaders engaged in the great conversation of American educational reform.

Committee:

Kathleen Clark, Dr. (Advisor); Patricia Hill, Dr. (Committee Member); Yang Lin, Dr. (Committee Member); Mary Triece, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Communication; Early Childhood Education; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Theory; Gender; Higher Education; Language; Middle School Education; Preschool Education; Rhetoric; Secondary Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Critical Pedagogy; Communication; Education; Dialogic Teaching; Educational Reform

Bordo, Vanessa C.Making a Case for the Use of Foreign Language in the Educational Activities of Nonprofit Arts Organizations
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2011, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
The research hypothesis of this case study is that the natural marriage of language and arts can both strengthen foreign language learning and the vitality of arts organizations. The use of artistic and cultural examples greatly enhances foreign language learning on multiple levels. Furthermore, arts organizations can benefit from increased funding, positive community image and viability by incorporating foreign language into their educational outreach programming. The University of Akron, Emily Davis Gallery exhibition French Contemporary Art: The Work of Hervé Heuzé and related bilingual tour program tests this hypothesis. This paper describes the methodology for executing the bilingual exhibition and the findings of this central case study with support from the fields of arts administration and language acquisition. A small selection of other organizations' language-arts models is also presented. Through an examination of the reactions of attending French teachers, observations of the gallery staff, and a large amount of secondary research supporting these conclusions, it is evident that the arts and foreign language not only can, but also should be blended. As the U.S. faces an economy and cultural milieu in which arts stability and language learning struggle to flourish, this fusion of programming may be an important solution for the two arenas in the future.

Committee:

Durand Pope (Committee Chair); Maria Adamowicz-Hariasz, Dr. (Committee Member); Rod Bengston (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Arts Management; Bilingual Education; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Education; Education Policy; Fine Arts; Foreign Language; Language; Language Arts; Modern Language; Multicultural Education; Multilingual Education; Museum Studies; Museums; Performin

Keywords:

Arts Administration; Foreign Language; French; Art Gallery; Language Acquisition

Gordon, Seth EAttitudes and Perceptions of Independent Undergraduate Students Towards Student Debt
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, EDU Policy and Leadership
Two-thirds of college students will borrow money to attend college or university. Among them is a group categorized as `independent’ according to federal criteria, including age, income, familial status, veterans, and those for whom dependency is not possible, such as foster children. This qualitative study explores the meaning that independent undergraduate students ascribe to the debt they encumber while enrolled in college. What is their perception of their student debt? Do they believe their education is worth the debt? The researcher originally sought to ask twenty independent undergraduate students in their junior year or above about their experience of student debt while enrolled at a large regional public university in the Midwest. In addition to interviewing, twenty individuals who met the original criteria, an additional eight were interviewed who expanded the original definition of independence beyond the federal criteria and the need to focus on those close to graduation. Results suggest that student debt is considered a necessity by all of the participants as it relates to their college attendance and their lifestyle choices. College attendance was seen as a requirement to gain access to future employment. Student loans often were used to supplement or provide full support for external living expenses. Acceptance of this syllogism may explain expanded levels of debt tolerance, consistent with the application of prospect theory to the data. Their own needs and networks facilitated the participants’ understanding of their student debt. Some of the participants viewed the impact of debt on their academic and social experience as negative, while the majority recognized student debt as a “necessary evil” and a personal “investment” in their own human capital. Student debt was viewed as distinctly different from other kinds of debt. While all of the participants recognized the value of their education, some level of distrust of the current structure of higher education emerged related to the high cost of higher education. There are many implications for practice and policy. The current federal definitions of independence do not account for those who are technically classified as dependents but do not receive financial support from their parents. For them as well as those individuals who through circumstance or personal initiative become responsible for their own finances, difficult bureaucratic barriers remain to establish financial independence and gain the benefits of being labeled independent in terms of increased borrowing limits and Pell grant eligibility. Expanded and detailed financial aid literacy training may reduce stress caused from student debt, as many participants were unaware of the variety of options related to repayment. In addition, targeted proactive financial aid advising that addresses the needs of non-traditional and self-supporting dependent students would provide more value to students. Opportunities that utilize loan forgiveness, such as AmeriCorps, were popular with the participants and could be expanded. Future research on dependent students could illuminate how financial literacy is connected to student development. Exploration of the impact of student debt on specific demographic and social groups could positively impact advising of first generation, minorities, and uninformed independent students.

Committee:

Ada Demb, Ed.D. (Advisor); Scott Sweetland, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Chris Zirkle, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Education; Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Public Administration; Public Policy

Keywords:

Student Debt; Financial Aid; Independent Students; Adult Students; Financial Aid Policy; Prospect Theory; Emerging Adulthood; Higher Education Finance; Education Finance; Economics of Higher Education;

Cox, Lisa N.Learning Style Differences of Undergraduate Allied Health Students in the clinical and Classroom Setting
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2009, Allied Medicine
Student learning is an important consideration in the development of course designs. By recognizing and holding a better understanding of student learning styles, educators are able to build a better framework for more efficient and desirable teaching methods. This study aimed to find a relationship between allied health students’ classroom and clinical learning styles. Two Kolb Learning Style Inventories were administered to a total of 82 seniors in The School of Allied Health at The Ohio State University. This sample included students in the Athletic Training, Medical Dietetics, Radiological Sciences, and Respiratory Therapy programs. The students were asked to fill out the first questionnaire in regards to their didactic classroom learning. The second survey was administered at least one week after the first and the students were asked to fill out this questionnaire in regards to their current clinical experience. The data collected from the questionnaires was then entered into the Statistical Package of the Social Sciences for analyses. Overall, in the didactic classroom setting, 24.2% (n=16) of the students were Divergers, 28.8% (n=19) were Accommodators, 19.7% (n=13) were Convergers and 27.3% (n=18) were Assimilators. In the clinical settings 27.8% (n=20) of the students were Divergers, 36.1% (n=26) were Accommodators, 23.6% (n=9) were Convergers and only 12.5% (n=9) were Assimilators. Learning style did not change for 66.7% (n=10) of Athletic Training Majors. Over half of the Medical Dietetics (53.8%,n=7), Radiological Sciences (72.7%, n=8) and Respiratory Therapy (52.9%, n=9) students’ Learning Style did change with the switch of the setting from classroom to clinical. It was found in Cross tabulation that the Accommodating learner was least likely to change style with setting (75%, n=12) with the Diverger style next at 69.2%. The change of style that was least likely to occur was between the Converger and Diverger (n=2) and the Assimilator and Accommodator (n=4). These findings support the idea that learning styles are an effective and interesting way to learn about the dynamic of a specific program or class. Future research should be done to fully assess and grasp an understanding of the styles of those active in the field of Allied Health education.

Committee:

Jill Clutter, PhD (Advisor); Laura Harris, PhD (Committee Member); Georgianna Sergakis, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Behaviorial Sciences; Continuing Education; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Psychology; Educational Theory; Health; Health Care; Health Education; Higher Education; Sports Medicine; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Learning Styles; Allied Health; Atheltic Training, Medical Dietetics, Radiological Sciences, respiratory therapy; Kolb; Clinical Education; Classroom Education

Jackson, Patrick EEXAMINING CAMPUS AND STUDENT FACTORS THAT PREDICTED ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AND INTENTION TO PERSIST FOR SUCCESSFUL AFRICAN AMERICAN AND LATINO STUDENTS AT FOUR-YEAR COLLEGES.
PHD, Kent State University, 2014, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
This study examined the relationship of campus climate, institutional satisfaction, and academic adjustment in contributing to the academic performance and intentions to persist in college for successful African American and Latino students at traditional four-year colleges. Despite the dramatic increased enrollment of students of color in higher education, colleges’ strategies have failed to effectively and meaningfully increase the graduation rates for African American and Latino students (NCES, 2011). A national sample of responses on the Your First College Year survey (N = 5,559) was analyzed to describe the experiences and variables that contributed to perceptions of college campuses and academic outcomes for African American and Latino students. Methods included Exploratory Factor Analysis, Linear Regression Analysis, and Logistic Regression Analysis. Results identified the significance of: (a) Felt Discrimination on Campus; (b) Academic Self-Efficacy; (c) Sense of Belonging; and (d) Institutional Satisfaction on the academic performance and intentions to persist for respondents. This research is extremely timely because the outcry for more U.S. citizens with college credentials must include educational attainment for greater numbers of African American and Latino college students. Conclusions of this study suggest that colleges must understand and accept: (a) the needs of its changing demographics; (b) that African American and Latino students have unique needs; and (c) addressing those needs and expectations will increase student satisfaction, academic performance, and retention. Furthermore, discrimination continues to be pervasive on college campuses. Genuinely combating micro-aggressions on campus is essential to fostering a sense of belonging for students of color.

Committee:

Mark Kretovics (Committee Chair); Susan Iverson (Committee Member); Aryn Karpinski (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; African American Studies; Black Studies; Continuing Education; Counseling Education; Demographics; Demography; Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Hispanic American Studies; Hispanic Americans; Multicultural Education; Social Research

Keywords:

African American; Black; Hispanic; Latino; college student; persistence; retention; academic performance; factor analysis; regression analysis; campus climate; institutional satisfaction; academic self-efficacy; sense of belonging; discrimination

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