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Scroggins, Marissa JoySurvey of Compassion Fatigue Education in APA-Accredited Clinical and Counseling Psychology Programs
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2015, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
The purpose of this study was to examine the present state of compassion fatigue (CF) education in APA-accredited clinical and counseling doctoral level training programs. It also sought to identify the number of training programs that require CF training or offer it as optional, attempted to discern the type of setting in which it is taught (class, supervision, etc.), as well as identified some of the reasons why it may not have been included (cost, time, interest, etc.) in programs without CF training. A researcher-developed survey was designed and consisted of a mixture of yes/no and multiple choice questions. Program chairs in 287 programs served as representatives of their programs and were invited to participate in this study. Participants included 69 program chairs from APA-accredited clinical and counseling programs that met study criteria. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. In response to the first question of “Does your program offer any form of compassion fatigue prevention training,” the majority of participants (75.4%) indicated that they did not have any formal CF prevention training though several indicated that CF training likely occurs in spontaneous class and supervision discussions. In response to the question “if no CF training exists, why not,” the majority of participants sited “other” (58.5%) or “lack of time” (34%). The results and interpretations are explained; contributions to the current literature, implications, and limitations are discussed; and recommendations for future research are provided. The electronic version of this dissertation is at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu.

Committee:

Suzanne Engelberg, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Colin Ward, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kelly Brown, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Clinical Psychology; Continuing Education; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Ethics; Psychology

Keywords:

quantitative; descriptive; exploratory; APA-Accredited; clinical psychology; counseling psychology; doctorate programs; program chairs; compassion fatigue; vicarious trauma; secondary trauma; preventative training

Patton, Roxanna Jessica-DyanThe College Experiences of Transgender Students: Creating a Welcoming Environment on Campus
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2012, Educational Leadership
The number of transgender students on college campuses has been increasing throughout the United States (Schneider,2010). Transgender students face unique concerns in nearly every aspect of campus life. The purpose of this research was to examine the college experiences of transgender students and recommend best practices for making college campuses more welcoming for transgender students. This phenomenological study was conducted using open ended interview questions to collect qualitative data from three transgender students at a large four year public institution in the Midwest. Respondents identified unwelcoming messages in the following areas of campus life: student activities, health services, and through the dichotomization of gender on university forms. Nine recommendations for best practices in creating a welcoming campus environment for transgender students are included in the discussion section of this thesis.

Committee:

Suzanne Franco, EdD (Committee Chair); McGinley Sarah, MA (Committee Member); DuVivier Roxanne, PhD (Committee Member); Jill Lindsey, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Gender; Gender Studies; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; School Administration; Secondary Education

Keywords:

trans; transgender; lgbt; glbt; student affairs; student services; gender; gender neutral; university; college; students; gender binary; gender fluid; gender nonconforming; transexual; higher education; student personnel; student activities; health care

Moffatt, DeborahAdult Undergraduates: Exploring Factors Essential to Success and Persistence toward Educational Goals
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Education : Curriculum and Instruction
This qualitative study explored the lives and experiences of 45 adult undergraduates and the factors they identify as essential for success and persistence toward educational goals. What we learn from the adult students, roughly 26–60 years of age, is why they chose to add college to their already full lives, what they have experienced in college, and most importantly, why and how they succeed and persist. Among the factors identified as important or essential are support, personal motivation and determination, paying for college, and success in learning. The study was purposefully designed for maximum variation in adult learners, institutional types and geographic locations. Study participants are diverse in age and generation, cultural and ethnic backgrounds, family and household composition, employment, and community commitments. Two-year and four-year public and private colleges and universities in urban, suburban and rural settings in two mid-western states served as study sites. Information was gathered using a survey instrument, individual interviews, focus groups and follow-up activities. New questions specifically developed for this study investigate life commitments in the areas of family/household composition and community involvement. The family/household composition questions included extended family as well as family members with health, mental health concerns, or disabilities. The process of identifying and documenting individual characteristics, life experiences, classroom interactions and encounters with campus and academic services was guided using a systems theory framework. Inductive and narrative analysis methodologies were used to identify and present the stories and experiences of adult students. Inductive analysis identified relevant themes among the participants. Narrative analysis used the words, emotions, and tonal inflections of adults to ensure that participant voices were evident in the written narrative (Denzin, 1989; Patton, 2002). The results of this study will be of interest to colleges and universities currently serving or choosing to plan for adult undergraduate populations. College personnel may include faculty, advisors, support staff, faculty and staff development educators, program planners or administrators. These results may also be of interest to adult educators and practitioners working with adult learners in community programs and college readiness seminars.

Committee:

Glenn Markle, EdD (Committee Chair); James Koschoreck, PhD (Committee Member); Kenneth Martin, PhD (Committee Member); Joe Donaldson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Continuing Education

Keywords:

adult learner;success;undergraduate education;motivation;support;persistence

Ogletree, Ann LavedaServant Leadership: The Urban Principal’s Role in Facilitating Inclusion
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Education : Urban Educational Leadership

This study intends to examine the specific relationships between general education and special education teachers and the role of the principal in facilitating their shared success relative to inclusion of students with special needs in the general education classroom and curriculum. The information gathered may help inform the practice of principals leading teams in the process of creating inclusive settings. Providing support to collaborating teachers improves the services delivered to students. Discovering patterns and behaviors that sustain successful teams may aid in the overall achievement of schools.

The application of servant leadership principles assists principals in facilitating inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classrooms. These ten themes discovered across sites indicate that commonalities exist: shared philosophy; concerns about teacher/pupil ratio; time; planning; communication; professional development; flexibility; principal’s visibility; team stability; and high expectations for student achievement. All participants shared the daily focus of meeting the needs of students.

Principals who support inclusion: are visible during the school day; provide stability in team membership; are flexible in organizing schedules; provide professional development that teachers find applicable to their daily work; and join teachers with similar philosophical beliefs when organizing inclusion teams. The most important finding is that all principals examined held high expectations for student achievement and expected teachers to provide students with instruction reflecting those elevated expectations.

Implications for practice are that principals who wish to support teachers working collaboratively in inclusive settings should nurture a school culture that supports teachers meeting the needs of all students. Implications for principal and teacher preparation programs and staff development planners are addressed. Implications for research indicate that the ten themes identified should be more deeply examined, prioritized, and used to increase the body of educational leadership knowledge. Other implications for research involve investigating the relationship between school culture and the success of inclusion in schools.

Committee:

Nancy A. Evers, PhD (Committee Chair); Ted A. Zigler, EdD (Advisor); James W. Koschoreck, PhD (Committee Member); Roger L. Collins, PhD (Committee Member); Glenda Myree-Brown, EdD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Education; Educational Psychology; Elementary Education; Organizational Behavior; School Administration; Special Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

educational leadership; inclusion; collaboration; principal; special education; servant leadership; student achievement; school culture

White, Marisa LynnThe Process of Becoming an Advocate for the Counseling Profession: A Qualitative Analysis of Counselors’ Development toward Advocacy
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2009, Counselor Education and Supervision
This study investigated how counselors develop into advocates for the counseling profession. Qualitative case study design was used when interviewing eight counselor advocates. Participants were chosen randomly from a list of attendees who were present at the 2008 state legislative advocacy training. Qualitative analysis was used to explore the data. Inductive and deductive reasoning was used to assist in coding data. As patterns emerged the data was clumped into four major themes. The four elements that effected the counselors’ journey toward becoming an advocate included education, mentorship, professional aspects, and personal aspects. The findings of this research indicated the positive impact that education and mentorship had on counselors becoming an advocate for the profession. Participants also discussed the positive influence that professional membership and professional identity has on advocacy endeavors. Moreover, participants gave details about the effects of personal aspects such as personal characteristics and personal experiences. This research supported findings in previous research and added information that has not yet been studied. It showed results that have implications on the counseling profession, counselor training programs, mentors, supervisors, students, and individual counselors. Additionally, this research gives a foundation for future researchers to build upon.

Committee:

John E. Queener, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; Adult Education; Behaviorial Sciences; Continuing Education; Developmental Psychology; Education; Educational Psychology; Families and Family Life; Higher Education; Mental Health; Psychology; Social Research; Social Work; Teacher educati

Keywords:

counselor; advocacy; qualitative; social justice; profession advocacy; education; mentorship; personal characteristics; professional membership; professional identity; passion; responsibility; fear; confidence; training

Musick, Chloe JaeRedefining the Effectiveness of Upward Bound: An Analysis of its Measuring Standards and a Proposition for the Future
Bachelor of Arts, Ohio University, 2017, Political Science
Through the use of OHIO Upward Bound as a case study, the purpose of this research is to show how Upward Bound impacts low-income and first generation college students enrolled in the program. This data was collected by interviewing five recent alumni of OHIO Upward Bound, who concluded that Upward Bound helped them develop skills typically used to succeed in college. Upward Bound is a federally-funded program that is dependent upon grant-based funding from the Department of Education. The funding is given to Upward Bound programs based on the percent of students who earn a Bachelor’s degree within six years of their high school graduation. The interviews showed the value of participating in Upward Bound beyond learning the skills to earn a Bachelor’s degree. This research is used to highlight the value of participating in Upward Bound and to propose an alternate way of measurement for the program to earn funding from the Department of Education.

Committee:

Barry Tadlock (Advisor)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Political Science

Keywords:

Upward Bound; TRIO; college access; educational attainment; college prep; first generation college student; low income student

Lewis, James R.SPIRITUAL FITNESS AND RESILIENCE FORMATION THROUGH ARMY CHAPLAINS AND RELIGIOUS SUPPORT
PHD, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
LEWIS, JAMES R., Ph.D., December, 2015 Cultural Foundations in Education SPIRITUAL FITNESS AND RESILIENCE FORMATION THROUGH ARMY CHAPLAINS AND RELIGIOUS SUPPORT (237 pp.) Dissertation Advisor: Natasha Levinson, Ph.D. Catalyzed by my observations as a U.S. Army Chaplain dealing suicide in the military across the past decade, in this study, I explore and more clearly conceptualize social processes of spiritual fitness and resilience formation in a context of plurality. Guiding questions include: Why do some become suicidal through suffering, while others experience “post-traumatic growth” instead? And if this capacity is a product of resilience, how is such a resilience formed? My research through this interdisciplinary study of literatures of spiritual and social formation through education, has identified three facets of this formation process, entailing 1) socially formed 2) frameworks of meaning 3) that become resilient habitus and habits of mind only through habitual practice, often requiring broad social support, as opposed to being the individual processes often thought. I argue that the integrated components of religious and civic formation, once central to resilience formation through American public education, are now largely ineffective, and have yet to be effectively replaced. It is that process of formation, cultivation and reinforcement of a core of spiritual fitness in resilience which the research of this dissertation is intended to explore and develop. Potential legal ramifications when the language of spiritual fitness is used by public institutions such as the U.S. Army, are also addressed. Army Chaplains have effectively fostered pluralistic models of resilience formation and reinforcement through religious support since before the birth of the United States, uniquely equipping Chaplains as resources for intentional spiritual fitness and resilience formation in the pluralistic context.

Committee:

Natasha Levinson (Advisor); McClelland Averil (Committee Member); Jeffrey Wattles (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; American Studies; Armed Forces; Behavioral Sciences; Clergy; Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Therapy; Comparative; Continuing Education; Counseling Education; Curriculum Development; Education History; Education Philosophy; Educational Leadership; Educational Sociology; Ethics; Individual and Family Studies; Mental Health; Military Studies; Rehabilitation; Religion; Religious Education; Social Research; Spirituality

Keywords:

spiritual fitness, formation, Army suicide, secular age, social formation, spiritual formation, personal formation, socio-cultural change, Constantinian Christian culture, habits of mind, habitus, Chaplaincy, Army Chaplains, Army Chaplain histor

Garner, Seander CCLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY (CSU) EMPLOYEE’S PERCEPTIONS OF WELLNESS AT THE WORKPLACE
Master of Education, Cleveland State University, 2014, College of Education and Human Services
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess office workers perceptions of workplace wellness programs (WWP). Significant: The significance of this study is to determine the relationship between workplace wellness and the influence it has on employees. Methods: An email was sent to 365 employees that participated in the Workplace Wellness Program at Cleveland State University (CSU). Flyers were posted on campus and participants were solicited by word-of-mouth. The fifteen (N=15) respondents were interviewed to assess their attitudes and perceptions regarding a workplace wellness program. Findings: Two –thirds (66%) of the participants interviewed described their overall health as good but needs improvement. Over half (60%) of the participants described wellness as being physically active or fit with three participants indicating that wellness is a holistic concept. Nearly all (87%) of the participants believe that employers should provide health and wellness programs. Over half (53%) of the respondents stated that they believe that a culture of wellness exists at CSU. Conclusions: The majority of the respondents believe that a workplace wellness program has an impact on the perceptions of employees at Cleveland State University.

Committee:

Sheila Patterson, PhD (Committee Member); Sparks Kenneth, PhD (Committee Chair); Toukonen Margaret , PhD (Committee Member); Little Kathleen, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clerical Studies; Continuing Education; Education; Health; Health Education; Physical Education; Public Health Education

Ongito, Ongoro J.Transformative Learning within the Online Learning Environment: The Impact of Learners' Gender, Epistemological and Self-Efficacy Beliefs on Generation of Knowledge in Online Discussion Forums
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2012, Curriculum and Instruction (Education)

Previous studies indicate that in comparison to face-to-face learning environment, online discussion requires students to engage each other at higher levels of thinking and not restrict themselves to recalling facts (Bell, 2006). A higher level of thinking in the learning process is observed when learners take responsibility of their learning process and exercise self-regulation. Although instructors usually use educational technology, such as online discussion forums, to encourage learners' interaction, at times the technology seems not to be fully integrated in instruction. (Scardamalia, (&) Bereiter, 2008). Scardamalia and Bereiter (2008) stated that educational technologies should not be regarded as mere technological innovations, but as a part of instructional design. Treating online discussion boards, chat rooms or wikis as part of instructional design encourages higher level learning practices (Nussbaum et al., 2002(;) Scardamalia, (&) Bereiter, 2008).

This study explored the potential of online discussion board forums to support thoughtful dialogue that contributes to higher levels of thinking. Previous studies have indicated that although online discussion forums have the potential to enhance student engagement in reflective learning, the quality of this reflection is often shallow (Marttunen and Laurinen (2001(;) Nussbaum et al., 2002(;) Scardamalia, (&) Bereiter, 2008).

Transformative learning theory enabled this study evaluate participants' perception of their learning experiences and progress in online discussion forums. The finding of this study was that participants of online discussion forum perceive transformative learning as a two-dimensional construct. This is inconsistent to previous studies proposing a four-dimensional construct (Mezirow, 2003). Further analysis of the collected data suggested that within the online discussion forums gender has no significant impact on learners' engagement in reflective learning practices. Neither do class-level play any role on the female and male students learning experience within online discussion forums. Significant contributors to learners' engagement in reflective learning practices include self-efficacy and sophisticated epistemological beliefs including certain knowledge, simple knowledge and innate-abilities.

Committee:

Dr. David R. Moore, PhD (Advisor); Dr. Teresa T. Franklin, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. George A. Johanson, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Greg K. Kessler, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Continuing Education; Curriculum Development; Education; Educational Technology; Information Technology; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Transformative learning; rational discourse; disorienting dilemma; knowledge building; Online learning environment; Epistemological beliefs; Online discussion, Communication pattern; Reflective thinking

Locklear, Brittany ReneeContinuing Competency: An Evaluation for Retention 180 Days After the Annual Competency Assurance Program
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2011, Allied Medical Professions
Background: Respiratory therapists at a large metropolitan academic medical center completed an Annual Competency Assurance Program (ACAP) to assess competency through performing procedures and cognitive assessments. Objective: The purpose of this study is to: 1) determine if there is a statistically significant difference in retention of performance procedure scores and cognitive assessment scores 180 days after ACAP, 2) with and without the use of electronic educational intervention. Methods: Eighteen therapists who attended 2010 ACAP were recruited to participate in the study. Participants were randomly divided into two groups receiving either electronic educational intervention (experimental group) or no electronic educational intervention (control group). Each volunteer in the study participated in a short recreation of ACAP, completing two performance procedures: tracheostomy tube change (infrequently performed procedure) and a bronchoalveolar lavage (frequently performed procedure). Both performance procedures were conducted, evaluated, and graded using the original criteria from ACAP. The volunteers also completed a multiple choice cognitive assessment, with questions pertaining to the performance procedures. The cognitive assessment was conducted and graded using the original criteria from ACAP. Results: Compared to the ACAP scores both groups showed a decline on all four measures on the 180 day posttest scores. The BAL performance score fell below the minimum competency level. The tracheostomy tube change performance had a statically significant change, p = 0.04, although the scores declined. Conclusion: Three of the four measures remained above the minimum competency level, although all scores declined, suggesting some retention.

Committee:

Herb Douce (Advisor); Sarah Varekojis (Committee Member); Jill Clutter (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Continuing Education; Educational Evaluation; Health Care; Health Education; Medicine

Keywords:

continuing competency; competency assurance; competency; virtual simulation and cognitive assessment; respiratory therapy

Villone, Edward J.Officers Armed With Degrees: Does Education Shield Law Enforcement Officers From Complaints?
Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Youngstown State University, 2010, Department of Criminal Justice
This research explores how higher education among law enforcement officers may influence liability. Research in the area of police officer educational level and liability is sparse, with most comparing education with performance or other levels of measure. More specifically this thesis investigates complaints among police officers by level of education. In particular, the focus is on law enforcement officers with baccalaureate and more advanced degrees and their liability rates when compared to those with high school diplomas or GEDs. This study will examine criminal, civil, and administrative complaints that were filed against degreed and non-degreed law enforcement officers from a police department in Mahoning County, Ohio. These proceedings will then be analyzed to determine whether the degreed officers have a reduced risk of criminal, civil, and administrative liability. The central hypothesis is that degreed officers will have a lower rate of complaints sustained (in other words found guilty) when officially complained of wrongdoing in 1) criminal, 2) civil, and 3) administrative proceedings. The primary variables will be complaint type, education level, and complaint outcome. The importance of this research will assist law enforcement administrators address departmental liability risks and provide potential options to reducing liability.

Committee:

Patricia Wagner, J.D. (Committee Chair); John Hazy, PhD (Committee Member); C. Allen Pierce, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Community Colleges; Continuing Education; Criminology; Education; Higher Education; Inservice Training; Management

Keywords:

Law enforcement; Police officers; Higher education; Criminal liability; Civil liability; Administrative liability; Degreed officers; Police officer education; Police officer liability

Williams, Anne-Evan KaleThe Impact of Formative Assessment Program Implementation on Reading Achievement
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, EDU Policy and Leadership
In a climate of assessment and accountability, school districts are constantly on the search for product solutions to the pressing issue of student reading performance, as assessed by annual state standardized accountability testing. In an attempt to increase student reading growth rates, some districts are turning to formative assessment systems, such as the formative online reading assessment Diagnostic Online Reading Assessment, or DORA (commercially available from Let’s Go Learn, Inc.), in order to encourage more differentiated classroom instruction and as a growth monitoring tool for instruction. The implementation of DORA, while top-down in nature, is being done in collaboration with the product developers, whose professional development model utilizes a Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) framework, providing for extensive administrator support, modeling of usage, using a teacher cohort model, and allowing for teacher concerns to be address during the professional development cycle. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects in student reading growth of the teacher-level implementation decisions and in the top-down, district wide implementation of a formative online reading assessment, as part of district-wide measures to improve student reading performance, and subsequently, student reading test scores. Data was collected from a large, urban school district in Southern California, with a large minority population, many of whom speak English as a second language. Existing student DORA data was collected, while a survey was administered to teachers to collect teacher-level professional development implementation data. Student data and teacher data were analyzed using regression analysis and Hierarchical Linear Modeling to determine 1) the relationship between teacher-level professional development implementation decisions and the overall teacher use of DORA, and 2) the relationship between teacher-level professional development implementation decisions and student DORA growth over time. For the first research question, it was determined that none of the study variables pertaining to teacher professional development and implementation decisions were statistically significant predictors of overall teacher usage of the DORA formative assessment program. For the second and third research questions, while it was found that student DORA growth curves did vary by teacher in grades two, three, and five. Few of the study variables pertaining to teacher professional development and program implementation accounted for variance in student growth curves at the teacher level, and none consistently across grade level. Although many of the study variables pertaining to professional development were not found to be significant in this study, future study regarding the implementation of large-scale formative assessment programs should examine how the effects of this professional development vary as the time of the implementation vary. Further research should also examine the effects of a Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) on the implementation of district-wide formative assessment programs. Within a climate of assessment and accountability, more emphasis is being placed on formative assessment use in the classroom, and further study of these formative assessments is warranted.

Committee:

Jerome D'Agostino (Advisor)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Software; Educational Tests and Measurements; Reading Instruction

Keywords:

formative assessment; professional development; reading assessment; program implementation

Gangal, NehaIdentifying Pharmacist´s Perception, Knowledge and Perceived Barriers towards providing care to Patients taking Anti-psychotics.
Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Science (MSP), University of Toledo, 2013, College of Pharmacy
The role of community pharmacists has expanded from the traditional tasks of dispensing medications to working with other health professionals and the public in a patient-centered model of practice. However, in relation to mental health, the pharmacists´ role is still evolving. Pharmacists have the potential to improve the quality of mental health care, and outcomes by enhancing adherence, adjustment of medications and monitoring and managing adverse effects. The World Health Organization (WHO) acknowledged pharmacists as dynamic members of mental health care teams. Despite having a great potential to provide appropriate care to the patients, concerns are raised that the medication-related needs of people with mental illness are not adequately met in pharmacies. People with mental illness may receive less attention from pharmacists than others. To motivate pharmacists to provide additional care to mental health patients, it is important to know the perceptions of pharmacists towards mental health patients and towards providing counseling to them. In this study the modified Theory of Planned Behavior was used to assess knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, subjective norm and intention of Ohio pharmacist regarding the provision of care to patients taking anti-psychotics. The study involved developing a valid and reliable survey, which was sent to 2500 pharmacists licensed and working in Ohio using the online software `SurveyMonkey´. A total of 240 surveys were included in the analysis. It was found that the modified model of Theory of Planned Behavior was useful in predicting intention of pharmacists to provide counseling services but may require some modifications for future studies Our results show that around 95% of the respondents had positive attitudes towards providing additional care to mental health patients. Approximately 89% had positive subjective norms. Pharmacists felt motivated to provide counseling depending on physicians´ desire and patients´ needs. Almost 68% had high perceived self-efficacy in providing care to patients taking anti-psychotics. Around 90% of pharmacists intended to provide additional care to patients taking anti-psychotics. Descriptive statistics showed that only 20% of pharmacists had high scores on the knowledge section (40% or higher points). Regression showed that the factors which significantly predicted intention to counsel were attitude (β = 0.188; p<0.05) and subjective norm (β = 0.144; p<0.05). Logistic regression showed that none of the demographic variables predicted attitude of pharmacist towards providing counseling to mental health patients. Lack of time to offer individual attention and lack of knowledge were the top two barriers perceived by 90% and 80% of the pharmacists respectively. Overall results showed that pharmacists had a positive attitude and strong intention towards providing additional care to mental health patients. A majority of pharmacists surveyed showed limited knowledge on seven questions related to the proper use of anti-psychotics. Therefore, it is important to enhance knowledge among pharmacists on appropriate use of anti-psychotics. Continuing education programs could be helpful to pharmacists in this process.

Committee:

Neha Holiday-Goodman (Committee Chair); Varun Vaidya (Committee Member); Robert Bechtol (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Counseling Psychology; Health Care; Health Care Management; Mental Health; Pharmacy Sciences

Keywords:

Pharmacists;mental health disorders;anti psychotics;attitude;knowledge;barriers, perceptions

Goddard, Connor S. R.Exploring the Efficacy of Consumer Education with Regard to Consumption of Branded and Luxury Counterfeit Merchandise
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2014, Apparel, Textiles, and Merchandising (Education)
Counterfeiting in general has become a worldwide phenomenon, and the production of fashion merchandise is at the forefront of this economic predicament. As severity of the issue rises, businesses and scholars suggest that consumer education and awareness could be the tool to lessening the impact of counterfeit manufacturing (Berman, 2008; Cheek & Easterling, 2008; Juggessur, 2011; Marcketti & Shelley, 2009; Phillips, 2005). This study presents the topic of counterfeiting, its negative consequences and the fight against this illegal business. The study uses consumer education as a method of creative vigilance toward the public in an effort to find out whether this alters future purchase intentions of counterfeit merchandise. Results indicate strong support for the efficacy of a consumer education seminar with regard to knowledge, attitudes, and planned behavior toward the consumption of counterfeit merchandise. Additionally, three variables, parents' annual income, sex, and country of citizenship, introduced some variation among participants that suggest there are differences based on demographic factors. After the educational seminar, students had a greater understanding of counterfeiting, felt more knowledgeable about the topic, acknowledged that it is illegal, realized how it affects the global economy and retailers, and linked it to social issues such as organized crime, terrorism, child labor, and sweatshops. In congruence with scholars who suggest consumer education as a vehicle to decrease counterfeit consumption, participants agreed that this seminar was educational and informative, and an effective means towards minimalizing the consumption patterns of counterfeit merchandise. Because participants gained a significant amount of knowledge in the educational seminar, this could affect preferences for authentic and counterfeit merchandise, and reduce intent to purchase counterfeits. An educational session would be expected to have relatively immediate change in knowledge and attitude, but not in behavior, because it takes time for consumers to take action. This exploratory study substantiates the notion that consumer education is effective in influencing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors about counterfeit merchandise consumption.

Committee:

V. Ann Paulins (Committee Chair); Lisa Williams (Committee Member); RayeCarol Cavender (Committee Member); Eugene Geist (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Continuing Education; Curriculum Development; Education; Educational Evaluation; Gender

Keywords:

Counterfeit; Counterfeit Consumption; Luxury Goods; Branded Goods; Consumption; Consumer Education; Theory of Planned Behavior; Knowledge; Attitudes; Behavior; Efficacy of Consumer Education; Educational Seminar; Gender and Country of Origin Differences

Graham, Tracy AnnA Preventive Conservation Guidebook
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2009, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
The discussion contained within “A Preventive Conservation Guidebook” outlines the basic philosophy of collections management, or rather what I refer to as the philosophy of “being a registrar.” We serve as collections managers because we believe in the benefit of cultural heritage and stewardship, and we follow through on this belief by respecting our collections and placing their needs as priorities. One of the most important ways in which we carry this out is by subscribing to the theories and practices of Preventive Conservation. This text serves as a guidebook for museum collection managers and registrars to begin subscribing to and integrating Preventive Conservation practices into their personal belief system and daily operations. In attempt of this, I discuss the term, present information pertaining to its practices and introduce a model for providing quality collections care through a combination of Preventive Conservation theory and continuing education. Additionally, this text introduces the results of a Ohio-wide survey of collection holding institutions and their collections care practices and current preservation and educational or professional training needs.

Committee:

Durand Pope (Advisor); Rod Bengston (Advisor)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Fine Arts; Library Science; Museums

Keywords:

Preventive Conservation; Museology; Museum Studies; Museum; Collection Management; Registrar; Preservation; Conservation; Survey; Continuing Education; Inventorying; Long-Range Planning; Emergency/Disaster Planning; Integrated Pest Management Program

HALL, BETTIE C.Investigating the Relationships Among Computer Self-Efficacy, Professional Development, Teaching Experience, and Technology Integration of Teachers
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Education : Curriculum and Instruction
Research suggests that computer self-efficacy, professional development, and years of teaching experience are critical factors that influence teachers' integration of educational technology in their classrooms. Results of a pilot study conducted by the researcher suggested a strong relationship between the degree of self-confidence teachers demonstrated toward technology and its use in their classrooms. This study builds upon previous research to focus on the relationships among computer self-efficacy and the technology integration perceptions of high school mathematics and science teachers in a Midwestern metropolitan area. This exploratory study selected this particular population to examine factors that may inhibit or encourage technology integration among secondary teachers. These factors were self-efficacy beliefs, professional development, and teaching experience. Data were collected from teachers who volunteered to participate in the study through surveys, semi-structured interviews, classroom observations, and teaching materials. The data were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively to determine whether relationships existed among the factors under consideration, as well as to detect other patterns that emerged. A moderate, statistically significant correlation was found to exist between perceptions of computer self-efficacy and technology integration among the participants, a finding that was supported by qualitative analysis. The results can inform future research, as well as professional development, continuing education, technology training, and teacher education programs.

Committee:

Kenneth Martin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Glenn Markle, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Janet Bohren, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Rebecca Scheckler, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Curricula; Education; Secondary Education; Social Research; Teacher Education; Teaching; Technology

Keywords:

technology integration; computer self-efficacy; teacher professional development; teaching experience; mixed-methods study

Lokon, Elizabeth J.OPENING MINDS THROUGH ART (OMA): AN ART PROGRAM FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA
Master of Gerontological Studies, Miami University, 2008, Gerontology
Art programming for people with dementia in long-term care facilities tends to fall short when it comes to providing opportunities for creative self-expression. The Opening Minds through Art (OMA) program is designed to fill this unmet need. It is a program led by artist facilitators with the assistance of staff/volunteers. The program has four major goals: (1) to promote the social engagement, autonomy, and dignity of people with dementia by providing creative self-expression opportunities; (2) to show the public the creative self-expression capacities of people with dementia through exhibitions of their artwork; (3) to provide staff and volunteers with opportunities to build intimate relationships with people who have dementia; and (4) to provide volunteers with community service opportunities. This report presents the conceptual foundation and methodology of the OMA program. It includes an overview of person-centered care philosophy, the rationale for doing the OMA program, and research evidence on the use of the arts in dementia care.

Committee:

Suzanne Kunkel, PhD (Committee Chair); William Ciferri, MBA (Committee Member); Jennifer Kinney, PhD (Committee Member); Jane Straker, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Continuing Education; Fine Arts; Gerontology; Health; Inservice Training

Keywords:

art; dementia; person-centered care; long-term care; activity; creativity; program design; art education; life-long learning

Smith, Catherine E.Glass Cockpit Transition Training in Collegiate Aviation: Analog to Digital
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2008, Career and Technology Education/Technology

The purpose of this study was to analyze, develop, and validate a training protocol for digital cockpit transition training in collegiate aviation, due to recent changes in aircraft cockpit instrumentation from analog to digital. The objectives of the study were to determine an effective teaching method for glass technology training for collegiate aviation pilots transitioning from analog to digital, to determine how human factors affected the training required to successfully transition a collegiate aviation pilot to glass cockpit technology, and to develop a protocol or training process for collegiate aviation pilots for use in transitioning from analog to digital cockpit instrumentation.

The research design used for this study was a qualitative comparative analysis; which was well-suited to the comparison of data from Avidyne, Bowling Green State University, Cirrus, and Cessna. Through the use of a matrix, comparison of each company's training process and tasks were cross referenced with the others, resulting in discovery of integration and how each of the parts related to each other. A recommendation matrix resulted from the best practices that were revealed through the comparative data matrix of Avidyne, Bowling Green State University, Cessna, and Cirrus for three common criteria; (a) Course Structure, (b) Training Requirements/Training Course Outline, and (c) Evaluation. The researcher highlighted the training strengths represented by each institution in order to develop a digital cockpit instrumentation transition training protocol for use in collegiate flight training. A survey was used as validation of the training protocol recommendations. The panel of experts represented six collegiate aviation institutions. Overall, the panel agreed with the survey and protocol and validated that the training protocol was appropriate. The few exceptions were the concern for the sufficient training for IFR pilot qualification levels through ground training and course depth. This was consistent with the comments of three of the panel members in their suggestion to increase the ground training content for Instrument Flight Rules pilot competency and digital instrumentation systems. The researcher concluded, based on the recommendations from the expert panel, that the protocol was logical, efficient, and well-suited to a collegiate aviation flight school for IFR digital instrumentation transition and that there are numerous areas for future study.

Committee:

Dr. Terry Herman, PhD (Committee Chair); Dr. Gary Benjamin, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Jon McDermott, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Ernest Savage, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Comparative Literature; Continuing Education; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Teaching; Technology; Transportation

Keywords:

analog aircraft instrumentation; digitial aircraft instrumentation; glass cockpit transition training; collegiate flight training; university flight training; transition training; glass cockpit

Lamont, SarahDeconstructing the Dichotomy: Muslim American University Students' Perceptions of Islam and Democracy
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Cross-Cultural, International Education
Much of the research on Islam and democracy has focused on the macro-level, and fails to detail a qualitative account of the experience of Muslim citizens of democracies (Cesari, 2004; Said, 1978; Said, 1981; Al-Azmeh, 1993; Esposito, 1995; Khan, 2006; Huntington, 1996; Adib-Moghaddem, 2008; Barber, 1996; Fukuyama, 1992). The neglect of the Muslim individual experience in the dominant discourse on Islam and democracy has stifled the voices of members of this marginalized population, thereby limiting their self-representation. This is especially true for Muslim Americans, who, in the aftermath of 9/11 and current surge of revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East, are either demonized or forgotten altogether, despite the significance of their every day navigation of both Islamic and democratic values and unique efforts toward identity construction. The purpose of this study was to address these gaps in the literature and, through the use of a phenomenological framework and Shi-xu¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿s (2005) cultural approach to Critical Discourse Analysis, complicate the dominant discourse on Islam and democracy by providing insight into the lived experience of seven Muslim American university students as well as supplemental perspectives from their university professors and local Imams. The findings of this study encapsulate the lived experience of the seven Muslim American student participants. These participants, along with professors and local Imams, constructed an alternative discourse that positioned the Islamic and democratic values of equality, respect, freedom, and education as compatible, with the exception of some complications such as Eurocentrism and a heavy reliance on unbridled capitalism. The study concludes with suggestions for all participants to better their understanding and/or enactment of Islamic and democratic values, including attaining education, engaging in civic participation, and developing empathy.

Committee:

Bruce Collet, PhD (Advisor); Margaret Booth, PhD (Committee Member); Stefan Fritsch, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; American Studies; Banking; Behavioral Sciences; Cognitive Psychology; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Continuing Education; Cultural Anthropology; Curriculum Development; Economic History; Economic Theory; Economics; Educat; Education

Keywords:

Islam; democracy; phenomenology; critical discourse analysis; Muslim American; national identity; capitalism; participation; education; civic engagement; religious identity; clash of civilizations; Imams; professors; university students

Bruno, Amy JDo Mathematics and Test Anxiety Influence the Decision to Drop Out?
Specialist in Education, Miami University, 2015, School Psychology
GED students and non-traditional adult learners are a vastly understudied population within the field of school psychology. However, we do know that individuals who do not have a high school diploma or GED have poorer life outcomes than their counterparts with high school diplomas and degrees from universities. This study examined the levels of mathematics and test anxiety in a sample of students enrolled in GED courses in order to see if a relationship existed between high academic anxiety levels and the decision to “drop out” of high school. Additionally, this study provides qualitative insight to the rationale adult learners had for leaving high school and returning to get their GED, as well as aspirations they have for their futures and how earning their GED will help them attain those goals. Significant findings, future directions for study of this population of learners, and implications for practitioners are addressed.

Committee:

Susan Mosley-Howard (Advisor); Amity Noltemeyer (Committee Member); Paul Flaspohler (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Continuing Education; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Mathematics Education; School Administration; School Counseling; Secondary Education; Social Psychology; Teacher Education; Teaching; Vocational Education

Keywords:

dropout, drop out, adult learner, GED students, GED, school climate, anxiety, mathematics anxiety, test anxiety, high school dropout

Cron, Amanda J. WrightThe Statement of Purpose in Applications to PhD Programs in Rhetoric and Composition: An Activity Theory Analysis
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2010, English
The applications process to PhD programs is complex, as signified by the number and variety of application requirements, including written texts. Of these texts, the statement of purpose in particular is regarded by recent scholarship as an occluded genre, one for which rhetorical purposes and resulting formal and content-related maneuvers are not apparent to applicants. This genre is a high-stakes genre in admissions to many PhD programs, acting as writing sample, evidence of disciplinary knowledge, and tentative proposal of future research. This thesis employs activity theory to investigate and analyze representative graduate programs’ admissions processes as activity systems and the role the statement of purpose plays in these systems. This role includes the ways the statement of purpose generates new texts and actions. The author makes both a nonspecific activity system model of admissions to PhD programs in rhetoric and composition and their use of the statement of purpose, and a contrastive model of one program and its use of the statement. The study’s findings demonstrate one potential cause of the occluded nature of the statement of purpose as a genre; that is, the expectations for and use of the genre in admissions practices vary from program to program, even within one discipline. Ultimately, this thesis examines the critical role student writing plays in the transition to a PhD program, concluding that the specific nature of this role is context-driven.

Committee:

Margaret Strain, PhD (Advisor); Susan Trollinger, PhD (Committee Member); Betty Youngkin, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Composition; Continuing Education; Rhetoric

Keywords:

statement of purpose; personal statement; activity theory; graduate students; writing; rhetoric and composition; occluded genre

Powell, Scott M.Perceptions of Appalachian Students about Post-Secondary Education
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2008, Curriculum and Instruction (Education)

This research is an exploratory inquest that seeks to examine the perceptions of Appalachian students about post-secondary education. The purpose of this research is to holistically study how Appalachian students view postsecondary institutions in order to understand the factors that promote academic achievement and the factors that contribute to the gender gap that exists in postsecondary education in Appalachia. The significance of this research is its ability to contribute to the knowledge base on Appalachian students and be useful to a variety of institutions and individuals helping historically underachieving students, including state and federal policymakers, federal and state agencies, educational institutions within Appalachia and other impoverished regions, and to academics and instructors.

This study employed an exploratory, qualitative, and face to face methodology to examine the perceptions of 17 male and 17 female 18 to 25 year old Appalachian students from two different universities, Ohio University in Athens and Shawnee State in Portsmouth. The sample from this research was obtained by purposeful sampling in order to gain an in-depth understanding about the issue under investigation. The instrument used in this analysis was a semi-structured in-depth interview guide, which allowed for the exploration of the student's own critical analytic insights into their perceptions about the phenomenon under investigation. This methodology enabled the researcher to gain a more complete understanding of the social phenomena associated with the perceptions of Appalachian students about post-secondary education.

This research reveals that the issues related to the postsecondary educational achievement of Appalachian students require a holistic view incorporating economic, social, educational components. The findings specifically reveal, among others, that Appalachian students highly value education, suffer socio-cultural barriers to educational access, are very dependent on actors outside the family structure for motivation to pursue higher education, often lacked financial resources for college, often feel unmotivated in high school and college and suggest a multidimensional plan for Appalachian educational realization. Therefore, this research adds to the growing body of literature that seeks to eliminate racial, gender, social class, religious and ethnic discriminatory barriers to educational access and achievement.

Committee:

Francis E. Godwyll, PhD (Committee Chair); Diane Ciekawy, PhD (Other); Rosalie Romano, PhD (Other); Sandra Turner, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Cultural Anthropology; Education; Education History; Educational Evaluation; Educational Sociology; Higher Education; History

Keywords:

Appalachia; education; post-secondary; higher education; inequality; cultural studies; qualitative

Gilis, Jeffrey T.Nutrition Knowledge and Interest of Collegiate Athletes at a Division I University
Master of Family and Consumer Sciences (MFCS), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Family and Consumer Sciences/food and Nutrition

Statement of Problem: The major objectives of this study were to determine the difference in nutrition-related knowledge between sport, gender, and academic year; how nutrition interest varied between sport and gender; and how perceived nutrition-related knowledge correlated with actual nutrition-related knowledge in a collegiate athlete population.

Methods and Procedures: Data was collected using a survey, which was created new for the purposes of this study and was administered to student-athletes in a face-to-face setting. The survey instrument covered a variety of topic areas, including nutrition-related knowledge, perceived nutrition-related knowledge, and nutrition topics of interest. Data was analyzed after all 17 intercollegiate athletic teams, 319 subjects (approximately 75% of the student-athlete population), were surveyed. Descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, Pearson correlation, two-sample t-tests, and ANOVA tests were conducted.

Results: The women's gymnastics team scored significantly higher with regard to nutrition-related knowledge than any other team surveyed, scoring an average of 9.9 out of 14 (p = 0.000). The men's football and men's basketball teams scored significantly lower with regard to nutrition-related knowledge than all other teams, scoring, on average, 7.5 and 6.6 out of 14, respectively (p = 0.000). Female athletes, scoring an 8.8 out of 14, scored significantly higher on average than male athletes, scoring a 7.8 out of 14 (p = 0.000). There was no significant difference in nutrition-related knowledge between academic years. Nutrition topics of interest varied between sport, with pre- and post-workout meals, healthier fast food alternatives, and energy requirements being the topics of highest interest. Females, overall, were most interested in the topics of cheap, healthy meals and safe, healthy weight loss, while males were found to be most interested in the topics of sports drinks and muscle building. Lastly, there was no significant correlation found between perceived and actual nutrition-related knowledge (r = 0.093).

Conclusions: Future nutrition education interventions at the university under review should be tailored to fit the interests and education levels of the sport or gender being educated. This will assist in the optimization of retained information, providing a greater opportunity for improvements in athletic performance and overall quality of life.

Committee:

Dawn L. Anderson, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Amy L. Morgan, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Carrie M. Hamady, MS, RD, LD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Continuing Education; Counseling Education; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Theory; Health; Health Education; Health Sciences; Higher Education; Nutrition; Recreation; Science Education; Teaching

Keywords:

sports nutrition; collegiate education; college athlete nutrition

Newton, Claudia KRising Valor: A Research Study of Chinese Women Working in Factories, Educating Themselves and Redefining Women's Empowerment
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration
Few empirical studies directly address education among women factory workers in China, much less their sense of agency, power, character and awareness. This dissertation seeks to discover whether among women factory workers in the core manufacturing center, the Yangtze River Delta region of China, educational opportunities and other resources enable women workers to make their own choices, increase their independence, and build a greater awareness of themselves and their role in this world, to self-empower. It examines the gradual transformation of Chinese women factory workers and analyzes their patterns of interaction, attitudes, and perceptions regarding some traditional Chinese values. Results of the study showed that these women factory workers in China, regardless of education level, familial status, or position in the workplace, continuously sought improvement, and that this improvement is their path to empowerment. These women use formal, informal, and nonformal education to develop themselves, and many of the participants acknowledged that continuing their education would have the potential to significantly impact their sense of awareness, self-sufficiency, and decision-making. Although Chinese women factory workers face great challenges in their lives, their willingness to succeed through continuing their education demonstrates their will to persevere. I conclude that increased opportunities in education can be used to facilitate women’s empowerment for Chinese women factory workers and enhances the capability, agency and achievement of their aspirations by these women.

Committee:

Vilma Seeberg (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Asian Studies; Continuing Education; Cultural Anthropology; Education; Ethnic Studies; Gender Studies; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Womens Studies

Keywords:

women empowerment, agency, factory, resources, employment, education, culture

Hall, Jona S.Identifying the Variables that Impact the Nontraditional Career Choices of Women
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2016, Educational Administration (Education)
Women continue to be underrepresented in the nontraditional careers. With areas of cosmetology, health sciences, education and child care being the dominate female careers; there is limited female representation in welding, carpentry, plumbing/pipefitting, electrical and other traditional male careers. Due to facing social barriers and developing an understanding of skill measurement among peers by the age of adolescence, individuals will disregard career options that may be viable for the future based on limited exposure and inaccurate facts. In addition, as students become aware of their own interests and abilities career preferences begin to emerge. Choices tend to be toward jobs in which students find accessible and in which there is a familiarity. The process of self-selection and differentiated task-specific beliefs among students occurs as early as elementary school. Researchers have gathered data to bring awareness that gender stereotyping occurs within the elementary setting and students are already self-selecting careers based upon those stereotypes at young ages. By the age of adolescence, the experiences students have had within the school setting, within the home, and through experiences or lack thereof, can already determine the career path for an individual. Due to females being strongly influenced by their setting and the expected gender roles they are to play, understanding the research is critical for the recruitment and retention of women within a nontraditional work setting. Recruitment and early exposure can start at earlier ages by providing job shadowing and mentoring early in the educational life of a child. By researching ways to improve the recruitment and retention of females into nontraditional occupations, tremendous financial opportunities could be available to women who may never have considered the skill sets and talent they have as being viable. This qualitative study uses a series of three interviews with selected participants in order to help identify a shared phenomenon; a phenomenological study. Participants met on three separate occasions to participate in the interview process. All women interviewed live in the southeastern portion of Ohio, are currently working or have worked in a nontraditional career field, and have had to overcome adversity in order to maintain a successful career. Results from the study have identified the importance of mentorships at an early age that range beyond family background knowledge but depend more upon someone who provides opportunity for exposure to a profession in which the female may not have considered.

Committee:

Charles Lowery, Ed.D (Committee Co-Chair); Krisanna Machtmes, Ph.D (Committee Co-Chair); Emmanuel Jean Francois, Ph.D (Committee Member); Dwan Robinson, Ph.D (Committee Member); Jason Stoner, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Continuing Education; Counseling Education; Curriculum Development; Education; Education Policy; Educational Theory; Gender Studies; Labor Relations; School Counseling; Vocational Education; Womens Studies

Keywords:

career choice of women; nontraditional female careers; career counseling; middle skills gap; college and career; nontraditional careers; variables that impact career choice; women in the workplace; laborers

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