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Abounia Omran, BehzadApplication of Data Mining and Big Data Analytics in the Construction Industry
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering
In recent years, the digital world has experienced an explosion in the magnitude of data being captured and recorded in various industry fields. Accordingly, big data management has emerged to analyze and extract value out of the collected data. The traditional construction industry is also experiencing an increase in data generation and storage. However, its potential and ability for adopting big data techniques have not been adequately studied. This research investigates the trends of utilizing big data techniques in the construction research community, which eventually will impact construction practice. For this purpose, the application of 26 popular big data analysis techniques in six different construction research areas (represented by 30 prestigious construction journals) was reviewed. Trends, applications, and their associations in each of the six research areas were analyzed. Then, a more in-depth analysis was performed for two of the research areas including construction project management and computation and analytics in construction to map the associations and trends between different construction research subjects and selected analytical techniques. In the next step, the results from trend and subject analysis were used to identify a promising technique, Artificial Neural Network (ANN), for studying two construction-related subjects, including prediction of concrete properties and prediction of soil erosion quantity in highway slopes. This research also compared the performance and applicability of ANN against eight predictive modeling techniques commonly used by other industries in predicting the compressive strength of environmentally friendly concrete. The results of this research provide a comprehensive analysis of the current status of applying big data analytics techniques in construction research, including trends, frequencies, and usage distribution in six different construction-related research areas, and demonstrate the applicability and performance level of selected data analytics techniques with an emphasis on ANN in construction-related studies. The main purpose of this dissertation was to help practitioners and researchers identify a suitable and applicable data analytics technique for their specific construction/research issue(s) or to provide insights into potential research directions.

Committee:

Qian Chen, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Civil Engineering; Comparative Literature; Computer Science

Keywords:

Construction Industry; Big Data; Data Analytics; Data mining; Artificial Neural Network; ANN; Compressive Strength; Environmentally Friendly Concrete; Soil Erosion; Highway Slope; Predictive Modeling; Comparative Analysis

Hersh, Samuel JosephManhood and War Making: The Literary Response to the Radicalization of Masculinity for the Purposes of WWI Propaganda
BA, Kent State University, 2018, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English
Through a combination of queer and feminist criticism, masculinity has been proven to have an ever-changing definition, one based on historical time and sociocultural influences. Throughout the Victorian era, only a certain form of manhood had social hegemony; this sense of masculinity stressed delicacy and a stately manner of sophistication that exceeded the ability of the lower classes to attain. Unfortunately for the Victorians, their definition of masculinity would soon be linked with effeminacy and the controversy surrounding the Oscar Wilde trials of the 1890s. Therefore, by the turn of the new century, masculinity was in a crisis. What ensued from this uncertainty was a radical redefinition of manhood. As the Victorians’ hold on hegemonic masculinity faltered, the middle class began to cast off what they saw as a restrictive and effeminate manhood. Public institutions to the populace itself all began promoting heartiness of character and virility as proper characteristics of a man. With the outbreak of World War One, this new definition of manhood was only cemented further by its appropriation into war propaganda. Britain, German, and American propaganda all used their countries’ new robust forms of manhood, radicalizing it in order to lure young men into enlisting. But the realities of the war broke this illusion of masculinity, leaving a generation of men destroyed; subsequently, a distinct sect of anti-war literature developed in in all three countries that sought to expose the destruction caused by this hypermasculine war lie. Through the use of historicism, critical theory, and literary analysis, I argue that America’s Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo, Germany’s All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Remarque, and the war poetry of Britain’s Wilfred Own are all literary pieces of social dissent. Each author writes about the war, or war experience, that destabilizes the hegemonic form of masculinity used before and during the war, producing works of counter-propaganda aimed at the state and society as a whole. In doing so, they help dismantle larger systems of oppression and disseminate counter-cultural sentiments.

Committee:

Kevin Floyd, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Suzanne Holt, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kimberly Winebrenner, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Charlene Schauffler, M.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature; Gender Studies; History; Literature; World History

Keywords:

literature; world war one; critical theory; cultural studies; masculinity; johnny got his gun; all quiet on the western front; wilfred owen

Palmore, Aaron GDesire Interrupted: Erotics, Politics, and Poetics in Horace, Odes 4
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Greek and Latin
This project offers a re-examination of the relationship between love and politics in Odes 4, Horace’s final lyric collection. The fifteen poems that make up the collection are on a diverse set of topics, with love, politics, and poetics among them. I claim that the concept of desire is a thread that unifies the work. Combining the resources of psychoanalytic literary criticism and more traditional philological scholarship, I demonstrate how desire—for stability, for love, for the future—emerges systematically from slips in phonemes, thematically ambiguous language, and the consonance of love and politics. In doing so, I advocate a style of philology that is on the border of language and the unconscious. My primary method is to focus on sounds, patterns, and rhythms as material traces of desire and as significant conveyors of meaning. These material traces of desire constitute a discourse about the contingency of subjectivity in a changing socio-political landscape. Desire is predicated upon lack or absence, which conceptually links Cinara, Ligurinus, and Augustus. Horace’s poetic practice in Odes 4 attempts to overcome the insurmountable distance between himself and these targets of his desire. The collection also reenacts the Augustan achievement through its trajectory of confusion to order. Ultimately, Augustus is set up as the guarantor of this order not only in the world, but also in poetry. Throughout most of the collection, this order is imperfect: a threatening darkness lingers throughout the poems and suggests that everything is not as it seems. In the final poem, the perfect order that is proposed emerges through the systematic reorganization of desire itself, as the desire of the poetic and erotic subject is enveloped by the totalizing desire of Augustus. Among many smaller observations that emerge from reading the collection through desire, two conclusions seem most significant. First, Horace’s final collection is not a scatter-shot collection of late poems, but presents a coherent trajectory under the rubric of desire. Second, despite masquerading as an idiosyncratic lyric project, Odes 4 is informed by many of the same sort of the socio-political developments that signal the rise and fall of elegy. The collection is not about an abstract experience or poetry for the sake of poetry, but about Horace’s experience in this changing world. In this world, erotic targets of desire are analogized to Augustus and his political power until, in the final poem, the diversity and energy of desire are flattened out by Augustus himself.

Committee:

William Batstone (Advisor)

Subjects:

Classical Studies; Comparative Literature; Literature

Keywords:

Horace; Odes 4; Ligurinus; Cinara; Augustus; Lacan; psychoanalytic literary criticism; psychoanalysis

Varadi, Hannah LynnReconstructing Seville: Translating Eduardo del Campo’s Capital Sur
BA, Oberlin College, 2015, Comparative Literature
In the semi-biographical Capital Sur (2011), Spanish journalist Eduardo del Campo draws on experimental narrative techniques to portray his home city of Seville as he saw it in the 1990’s: a barometer of Spain’s social and economic crises. Here I compare modern translation theories to my own partial translation of this novel into English, which I place in the context of the U.S. translation publishing industry. I also show how the historical and cultural context of Seville influence the text’s themes—including del Campo’s critique of the hegemonic ways that countries such as the United States tend to exoticize Spain’s culture.

Committee:

Sebastiaan Faber (Advisor); Azita Osanloo (Advisor)

Subjects:

Communication; Comparative Literature; Composition; History; Intellectual Property; Journalism; Language; Literature; Mass Communications; Modern Literature

Keywords:

comparative literature; hispanic studies; new journalism; modular narrative; Eduardo del Campo; history of Spain; translation studies

Markodimitrakis, Michail-ChrysovalantisGothic Agents Of Revolt: The Female Rebel In Pan's Labyrinth, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland And Through The Looking Glass
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2016, English/Literature
The Gothic has become a mode of transforming reality according to the writers' and the audiences' imagination through the reproduction of hellish landscapes and nightmarish characters and occurrences. It has also been used though to address concerns and criticize authoritarian and power relations between citizens and the State. Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking Glass are stories written during the second part of the 19th century and use distinct Gothic elements to comment on the political situation in England as well as the power of language from a child's perspective. Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth on the other hand uses Gothic horror and escapism to demonstrate the monstrosities of fascism and underline the importance of revolt and resistance against State oppression. This thesis will be primarily concerned with Alice and Ofelia as Gothic protagonists that become agents of revolt against their respective states of oppression through the lens of Giorgio Agamben and Hannah Arendt. I will examine how language and escapism are used as tools by the literary creators to depict resistance against the Law and societal pressure; I also aim to demonstrate how the young protagonists themselves refuse to comply with the authoritarian methods used against them by the adult representatives of Power.

Committee:

Piya Pal-Lapinski (Committee Chair); Kimberly Coates (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Cinematography; Comparative Literature; Film Studies; Gender Studies; Literature; Philosophy; Political Science

Keywords:

Gothic; gothic literature; horror film; fascism; theory; violence; cinema; victorian literature; nonsense; children; state of exception; fairies; Nazism; Guillermo Del Toro; Lewis Carroll; Wonderland; Pan; Labyrinth; ideology; homo sacer; gender; death

Schaefer, Rachel R. RodeConsciousness-Raising: A New Direction for Chick Lit
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2015, English
Focusing on novels published outside of the popular market, this thesis seeks to draw attention to work being published under the label of chick lit that subverts standard chick lit genre conventions. While much work has been and is being done that concentrates on popular market chick lit, such as Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones’s Diary (1996) and Candace Bushnell’s Sex and the City (1996), only cursory attention is being given to transnational, minority, and religious chick lit. This thesis considers chick lit within the larger history of women’s writing in order to contextualize the genre. Since chick lit has been connected to both feminism and post-feminism in its origins, consideration of this genre as a feminist genre focuses attention on how chick lit functions as a consciousness-raising genre.

Committee:

Madelyn Detloff (Committee Chair); Mary Jean Corbett (Committee Member); Theresa Kulbaga (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature; Womens Studies

Keywords:

chick lit; feminism; consciousness raising; post feminism; Pointing with Lips; All Fall Down; Girls of Riyadh; No Sex in the City; Christian; Jewish; Muslim;

Wangpaiboonkit, Parkorn“La storia mia è breve” : Reading Puccini’s La Bohème beyond the obvious
BA, Oberlin College, 2015, Comparative Literature
A comparative close reading of Puccini's La Bohème, creating alternative readings through exploring the opera's hidden meanings, resistance to genre conventions, and innovations.

Committee:

Jed Deppman (Advisor); James O'Leary (Advisor); William Day (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature; Music

Keywords:

Puccini;La Boheme;opera;

Roane, Nancy LeeMisreading the River: Heraclitean Hope in Postmodern Texts
BA, Oberlin College, 2015, Comparative Literature
Ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus, known for his theory of "constant flux," may be one of the most misunderstood and misquoted thinkers of Western philosophy. The way that the protagonist of Julio Cortazar’s Rayuela misreads Heraclitus serves as one example of this phenomenon wherein poorly-conceived postmodern inquiries that seek to weaken the idea of a Truth lead to a nihilistic apathy. Horacio Oliveira misunderstands Heraclitus’ doctrine of constant flux and uses this misreading to “logically” justify his sexist and elitist behavior towards others. This phenomenon crops up again in Samuel Beckett’s absurdist play Fin de Partie through Hamm, a patriarch that no longer sees any point in trying because the world as he knows it is disintegrating. We can use Heraclitus as a central theoretical point for parsing through what exactly goes wrong with the ethical decisions of these characters. Carole Maso’s AVA serves as a counterexample to Rayuela and Fin de Partie, for the novel revolves around similar theoretical questions but provides us with a more properly “Heraclitean” approach for how to confront a world without fixed meaning. Studying these failures and successes supply us with examples of how Postmodern thought can be used for harm or for good. A Heraclitean reading of these texts shows us how, properly understood, Postmodernism moves not only towards deconstructing structuralized systems of violence and marginalization, but also towards building something out of the rubble.

Committee:

Claire Solomon (Advisor); Jed Deppman (Committee Chair); Benjamin Lee (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Ancient Languages; Classical Studies; Comparative; Comparative Literature; Epistemology; Ethics; European Studies; Gender Studies; Latin American Literature; Latin American Studies; Literature; Metaphysics; Modern Literature; Philosophy; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Heraclitus;Julio Cortazar;Cortazar;Rayuela;Hopscotch;Samuel Beckett;Beckett;Fin de Partie;Endgame;Carole Maso;Maso;AVA;Postmodernism;Ancient Greek philosophy;Poststructuralism; Deconstruction; Cixous;Derrida;Deleuze;Kahn; TM Robinson

Celik, Ipek AzimeSpectacular Regimes and Political Drama: A Comparative Study of Greek and Turkish Theatre in the 1960s and 1970s
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2002, Comparative Studies
Greek playwright George Skourtis’s play The Nannies (1970) and Turkish playwright Vasif Ongoren’s Rich Man’s Kitchen (1977) dramatize a new era in the relationship between drama and politics in Greece and Turkey in the 1960s and 1970s. These playwrights, drawing upon the potentials of texts, genre, and contexts, questioned the legitimacy of the regimes of the period. This thesis investigates why and how theatre in Greece and Turkey departed from the official model, which constructed a modern, western and national Greek and Turkish identity. Instead, it became a resistant alternative enterprise. The crisis of representation in the politics of identity intensifies especially during times when the regimes are totalitarian (in the case of Greece between 1967-1974) or polarized (in the case of Turkey during the 1970s). These contexts offered an abundant resource for drama as a result of the visualization of power and conflict and thus the theatricality of the regimes. Artistic productivity flourished during these periods in spite of the constraints imposed by the context. Theatrical genres led the communication between the texts and the contexts. Through the genres of protest (Theatre of the Absurd in Greece and Epic Theatre in Turkey) the theatres of these two countries defined alternative identities that are not, in most cases, compatible with the official construction of a national identity. I am exploring this dynamic narrativity in the contexts of increased tensions. This thesis brings together theories of theatrical performance, dramatic literature, identity and politics in the cases of Greece and Turkey. As countries that had (or have) been on the fringes of the west, latecomers in the nationalization and modernization projects, they have similar acculturation processes. Thus they offer a rich database for the study of formation and development of cultural identity under modem nation states. An artful dialogue between these theatres overturns the rival nationalist identities and promotes more compatible local and cosmopolitan narratives.

Committee:

Dorothy Noyes (Advisor); Stratos Constantinidis (Advisor); Sabra J. Webber (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature

Stypinski, Megan Michele“'Reinventing the Gods': Bloomian Misprision in the Nietzschean Influence of Jim Morrison.”
M.A. (Master of Arts in Liberal Studies), Ohio Dominican University, 2008, Liberal Studies

Stypinski, Megan M. “'Reinventing the Gods': Bloomian Misprision in the Nietzschean Influence of Jim Morrison.” M.A. Ohio Dominican University, 2008.

“Nietzsche killed Jim Morrison...Morrison the Superman, the Dionysian madman, the Birth of Tragedy himself. But who knows who or what killed him?...” John Densmore, drummer for the Doors, wrote these words in his autobiography Riders on the Storm: My Life with Jim Morrison and the Doors published almost twenty years after Morrison’s mysterious death (Densmore 3). More than thirty years later, new theories continue to surface; myriad tales of drug overdose, murder, suicide and a plot to fake his death. The following essay will not focus on his passing or argue whether or not the Doors made a positive contribution to society. In contrast, this essay will explore the connection between Morrison and Friedrich Nietzsche alluded to in Densmore’s quote above. The purpose of this venture is to uncover the role Nietzschean philosophy played in the work of Jim Morrison and to honor the intellectual creativity and power of the band, an area often ignored. Using Harold Bloom’s theory of “misprision” as a guide, this essay will examine a selection of Morrison’s poems and lyrics, as well as his actions on stage, through the lens of several of Nietzsche’s concepts. In order to delve into this topic, it was necessary to trace the evolution of the artist and those who inspired his creative process. Ultimately, the work of Morrison and the Doors demonstrates a clear break from Bloom's “anxiety of influence” and successfully completes the poetic process of misprision thereby proving that Morrison created a place for himself as a writer and poet—his life's dream.

Committee:

Jeremy Glazier, Program Director (Advisor)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature; Literature; Music; Philosophy

Keywords:

The Doors; Jim Morrison; Nietzsche; Harold Bloom; theory of misprision; poetry

Gonzalez, Christopher ThomasHospitable Imaginations: Contemporary Latino/a Literature and the Pursuit of a Readership
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2012, English

The rise of Latino/a literature in the US has been fraught with difficulties that stem from matters of publication and audience. These difficulties, such as the often limited expectations publishers have for the forms Latino/a literature may take, have resulted in significant constraints on the development of this literary tradition. Despite these constraints, Latino/a authors have steadily worked to expand audience expectations by attending to narrative design and creating challenging reading situations—moments in which audiences are not only presented with a cognitively-challenging reading experience, but are also challenged to broaden its understanding of the forms Latino/a literature may take. Rather than compose their narratives with an actual audience in mind, many Latino/a authors sought to write for an ideal audience capable of engaging with even the most complex storyworlds. In essence, Latino/a authors, through their writings, invited actual audiences to break from their narrow expectations. My selected Latino/a texts reveal the narrative strategies used to challenge audiences, and also demonstrate how these challenges were received by actual audiences.

"Hospitable Imaginations: Contemporary Latino/a Literature and the Pursuit of a Readership" explores how challenging reading situations have shaped Latino/a literature over the course of its development. I contend that early in the publication history of Latino fiction, publishers insisted on Latino/a writers foregrounding what were thought to be narrative modes and thematics endemic to Latinos themselves, while in more recent years publishers have placed more of a premium on immersive storytelling—on the telling of stories that have the power to capture, and retain, the imaginations of the broadest possible readership. Focusing on Latino/a texts written from the late 1960s to the present, I show how authors such as Oscar “Zeta” Acosta, Gloria Anzaldúa, Piri Thomas, Giannina Braschi, Sandra Cisneros, Junot Díaz, and Gilbert Hernandez have worked to create a sophisticated readership through narrative features such as consciousness representation, bilingualism, code-switching, serialization, and intertextual/paratextual play.

Committee:

Frederick L. Aldama, PhD (Committee Chair); David Herman, PhD (Committee Member); Brian McHale, PhD (Committee Member); Manuel L. Martinez, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Caribbean Literature; Comparative Literature; Ethnic Studies; Hispanic American Studies; Hispanic Americans; Literature; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern Literature

Keywords:

Latino; Latina; Literature; narrative; storyworld; ideal audience; publishing; Oscar Acosta; Gloria Anzaldua; Giannina Braschi; Gilbert Hernandez; Junot Diaz; Sandra Cisneros; Piri Thomas;

Young, Richlynn C.Prison Privatization: A Multi-State Comparison Content Analysis
Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Youngstown State University, 2011, Department of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science

This thesis project measured the effectiveness of prison privatization at a multi-state level. A content analysis of existing data on a convenience sample of seven states that have a large percentage of their prisons privatized: Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Ohio, Texas, and Oklahoma was compared to seven non-or-low privatized states that do not have a large percentage of their prisons privatized: Louisiana, New York, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Alabama, Maryland, and Illinois. A convenience sample was taken of public and private states on available data supplied by the Bureau of Justice Statistics which was used to ascertain differentiating factors on both the public and private levels.

There are three factors that led states in this project to privatize its prison system. Results indicate that most states have made the decision to privatize for three reasons: lower cost; to reduce over-crowdedness, and consent decree. Several states have enacted laws that mandate either some sort of cost savings through privatization or simply an increase in quality standards by the private vendor operating the institution. In examining the cost per inmate among all fourteen states, it appears that the low-to-non privatized states spend the least amount of money per inmate to house its prisoners.

In addition, many states have specific positions within their departments that monitor and maintain privatization standards. Monitoring privatization consisted of on-site monitoring, facility inspections and the oversight and monitoring of contracts. As private prisons are studied in the future, researchers should take a regional look at other aspects affecting privatization such as recidivism, turnover, and number of escapes.

Committee:

John Hazy, PhD (Advisor); Christopher M. Bellas, PhD (Committee Member); Christian Onwudiwe, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative; Comparative Literature; Criminology

Keywords:

prisons; private prisons; privatization; public prisons

Lammendola, Daniel JulianHybridization and Enunciation in Arab-Italian Migrant Literature
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
This thesis explores two memoirs and two poems written by three migrant Arab writers, Nassera Chohra, Mohamed Bouchane, and Aziz Bouzidy, in the emerging genre of Italian literature of migration. Issues of identity formation are paramount to these works as these migrants seek to define themselves and assert their individuality in the face of dominant cultural norms. The work draws especially from the critical theory of Homi Bhabha's The Location of Cultures (1996) and his definitions of hybridity and enunciation and their role in identity formation. However, shortcomings in the notion of hybridity, as demonstrated in these works, are discussed and analyzed. The term hybridization is proposed, and supported with textual examples, in order to better contextualize the migrant experiences narrated in these writings.

Committee:

Youssef Yacoubi (Advisor); Charles Klopp (Committee Member); Naomi Brenner (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature

Keywords:

Migrant Literature; Italian Literature; Arab Italian Migrant Literature; Italian; hybridization; hybridity; literature; structuralism; migrant

Smith, Spencer JMale Narrative Identity in Young Adult Literature: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Narrative Psychology and Literary Analysis
Bachelor of Arts (BA), Ohio University, 2013, English
Literary scholars often delve into psychology to interpret works of fiction, but rarely has fiction been used to inform psychological theory. The primary aim of this thesis is to understand what one might be able to learn about adolescent development and narrative formation from young adult literature. Largely by applying Dan P. McAdams “life-story” framework for narrative development--especially his ideas of communion, agency, and imagoes--to young adult novels, I intend to show how narrative psychology is extremely important to existing notions of adolescent development. I will explore these ideas in three novels: The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger, The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton, and Life of Pi by Yann Martel.

Committee:

Joseph Bianco (Advisor)

Subjects:

American Literature; Canadian Literature; Comparative Literature; Literature; Psychology

Keywords:

narrative psychology; adolescence; young adult literature; Life of Pi; The Catcher in the Rye; The Outsiders

Laffey, Seth EdwardThe Letters of Edwin Arlington Robinson: A Digital Edition (1889-1895)
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English
This project comprises a digital edition of a selection of letters by American poet Edwin Arlington Robinson (1869-1935), including all known letters written by the poet between 1889 and 1895, and hosted online by Colby College Libraries' Digital Collections. The edition is based on work started last century by Professor Wallace L. Anderson of Bridgewater State University, and left unfinished by him at his death in 1984. Professor Anderson collected a vast quantity of Robinson's letters from various repositories and private parties around the country. He transcribed them and provided annotations and textual notes for about three-quarters of them. For my project, I have edited, updated and corrected a substantial portion of Anderson's transcriptions, as well as completed fresh transcriptions of my own, checking them for accuracy against Robinson's holographs held at Harvard and the University of Virginia. I have formatted the new edition so as to more accurately represent the holographs, and have added my own textual notes and annotations to those of Anderson, along with an introductory critical essay detailing my methods and principles. It is of primary importance to me that these letters be accessible to both the scholarly community and the general public, with a view to maximizing their usefulness for literary and historical research. I have settled on digital publication as the best means to achieve this end because it will render the letters accessible to anyone with a computer and internet connection, free of charge. The project of publishing the remainder of Robinson's letters in this format is expected to continue beyond the dissertation.

Committee:

Paul Gaston (Advisor)

Subjects:

American History; American Literature; American Studies; Comparative Literature; Literature

Keywords:

Edwin Arlington Robinson; letters; Gardiner; Maine; 19th-century American literature; nineteenth-century American literature; American poetry; modern poetry; Wallace Ludwig Anderson; Colby College; literary history; realist fiction; poetry; American poets

Thorsteinsson, VidarDiachronic Binding: The Novel Form and the Gendered Temporalities of Debt and Credit
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Comparative Studies
Contributing to Victorian novel studies, literary theory, and gender studies, this dissertation studies individual indebtedness and speculation as testing-grounds of the management of the self, highlighting the role of novelistic narrative in the attendant subjective experiences and practices. Its central conclusion is that self-government in the credit economy takes the form of a uniquely temporal sensibility or form which is here named “diachronic binding.” Diachronic binding, as is shown, consists of a continuous motion between speculation and austerity, where the violence and disciplining of the latter often takes on particularly gendered expressions. In the Introduction, the historical-comparative dimensions of the project are discussed and its contours charted through a reading of Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s painting Found. Following Chapter 1, which is devoted to outlining the theoretical basis of the argument concerning time, gender, and the credit economy, Chapter 2 opens on to an engagement with the Victorian novel, starting with an analysis of the figure of what is here called the “rootless woman.” Living in a state of constant suspense and flight, is is considered how Becky Sharp of Vanity Fair personifies the haunting presence of an irreducibly unpaid quantitative gap at the heart of capitalist value production. The rootless woman, it is concluded, simultaneously stages the general fear of failing to profitably engage temporal market forms and the desire to exclusively associate women with these failures so as to rhetorically legitimate their exclusion from the market and subjection to domestic patriarchy. The analysis of George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda, in Chapter 3, continues to consider the unevenly gendered enactments of value. In contrast to Daniel’s successful engagement of the binding dynamic between future speculation and past validation, it is considered how Gwendolen is set up to fail in her motion from speculation to austerity. The `Hermione’ episode where Klesmer ambiguously complements Gwendolen’s “plastik” as she freezes in horror at the sight of the painting that forebodes her future tragedy is read closely, and interpreted as exposing the desperation of Gwendolen’s self-preservation in the face of economic instability, a brittle and fragile protective armor that stands in opposition to Daniel’s suppleness of form. Building on the engagement with Thackeray and Eliot, the fourth and final chapter moves on to consider the afterlives of Victorian forms, tropes, and narrative patterns in contemporary Icelandic fiction set during the country’s recent period of hyper-financialization. The presence of a marketable yet abject feminine subjectivity which is simultaneously plastic and fragile is identified in Icelandic novelist Steinar Bragi’s 2008 financial horror thriller, Women. The novel’s protagonist, Eva, undergoes a violent and literal process of bodily forming that invokes the performative techniques of modern finance while harkening back to the speculative core of capitalist value-production. The dissertation ends with a short conclusion which discusses the historical and cultural counterpoints between the Victorian period and the contemporary trans-Atlantic world.

Committee:

Eugene Holland (Committee Chair); Philip Armstrong (Committee Member); Jill Galvan (Committee Member); Ethan Knapp (Committee Member); Katherine Hayles (Committee Member); Gudni Elisson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

British and Irish Literature; Comparative Literature; Gender Studies; Icelandic and Scandinavian Literature; Literature; Modern Literature; Social Research

Keywords:

Victorian novel; William M Thackeray; George Eliot; Narrative theory; Marxism; Temporality; Capitalism; Debt; Financialization; Icelandic literature; 2008 financial crisis; Gender studies;

Piser, Gabriel AAppalachian Anthropocene: Conflict and Subject Formation in a Sacrifice Zone
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Comparative Studies
My dissertation, "Appalachian Anthropocene: Conflict and Subject Formation in a Sacrifice Zone" diagrams the dominant forces of historical subject formation to see how they shape contemporary responses to extraction-based development and environmental crises. My first chapter examines the new challenges posed by the Anthropocene and neoliberalism in Appalachia, and outlines the general analytical framework of material, conceptual, and affective systems used throughout the dissertation. In Chapter Two I show the violent rearrangement of these three systems as integral to dominant forms of subjectivity and resistance. I then present an overview of these forms of subjectivity before assembling a theory of oppositional subjectivity drawing from Marxism, decolonial, continental, and black philosophy, and queer theory. Chapter Three traces the boundary-making practices of settler colonialism as they shaped the settler-subject in Appalachia. I examine how dominant forces of subjectification emerged under colonialism, the harmful effects that persist, and their impact on contemporary responses to the land-use conflicts surrounding resource extraction and to environmental disasters like the 2014 Charleston Water Crisis. I conclude this chapter by arguing for a renewed attention to residues of settler colonialism in collective political responses to the context of the neoliberal Anthropocene. Chapter Four examines the unifying forces of white supremacy, nationalism, and capitalism as they shaped the citizen-subject over the two centuries following the War of Independence. In this chapter I examine the geopolitical production of the national territory of the United States and socio-political production of the national subject of the American Citizen. I then present oppositional responses to dominant American subjectivity in the writing of the militant Appalachian preacher and poet Don West. I show how he helps us to understand these discourses and more importantly, helps us to become subjects differently. In my conclusion I reflect on the era of Anthropocene neoliberalism and the new problems and opportunities it poses. Since the end of World War II, more than sixty years of rapid political, technological, social, and ecological changes have dramatically reshaped the context facing environmental scholars and Appalachian activists. Among other trends, the region faces the decline of the region's primary industrial sectors, population loss to coastal and urban regions, new resource extraction opportunities, accelerating inequality and absentee landownership, and changing racial and ethnic demographics. I show how these unique economic, environmental, and socio-political challenges provide rich opportunities for further scholarship on regional development, environmental justice, and related social movements.

Committee:

Eugene Holland (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

American History; American Studies; Comparative Literature; Economic History; Environmental Health; Environmental Justice; Environmental Law; Environmental Science; Environmental Studies; Native American Studies; Philosophy; Regional Studies

Keywords:

political ecology; subject formation; subjectivity; Appalachia; affect; environmental studies; environmental history; development; resource extraction; water; energy; poetry; race; class; gender; Anthropocene; media studies

Herdman, Kristen Effugatis Daemonibus: Possession and the Body in Gregory of Tours' Vita patrum
Master of Arts, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, World Literature
This study examines anxieties about bodily and spiritual contamination expressed via exorcism and possession in Gregory of Tours’ hagiographical work Vita patrum . There are no less than thirteen references to possession in this text, ranging from descriptions of specific incidents to more general comments on saints and exorcism. In many of the episodes, the mouth plays a prominent role in both the diagnosis of possession and the subsequent exorcism. Being an inherently liminal space, the mouth is an excellent site at which to observe and interrogate the boundary phenomena connected with the condition of possession. A focus on this particular aperture, which serves as a passage between seen and unseen, interior and exterior, brings concerns about bodily integrity and purity to the fore. Although studies of possession in the New Testament and the high and later Middle Ages abound, comparatively limited attention has been paid to the phenomena in the early Middle Ages. By closely examining the role that the mouth plays in these descriptions of possession in Gregory's account, this paper hopes to add to a recent bloom of interest in early medieval topics and to underscore the role of the body in religious practices in sixth-century Gaul.

Committee:

Florin Berindeanu, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature

Keywords:

Gregory of Tours, early Middle Ages

De La Cruz-Guzman, MarleneOf Masquerading and Weaving Tales of Empowerment: Gender, Composite Consciousness, and Culture-Specificity in the Early Novels of Sefi Atta and Laila Lalami
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2014, English (Arts and Sciences)
This dissertation explores the development of a risky but empowering culture-specific women's consciousness by the protagonists of Sefi Atta and Laila Lalami's early novels. My insertion of Jameson's primacy of the national situation in the development of a woman's composite consciousness allows the reader to gain an understanding of women's marginalization and subsequent empowerment in a specific setting such as Casablanca, Morocco or Lagos, Nigeria. The composite factor is essential to understand the lived experiences of people in specific cultures within the postcolonial nation, for it acknowledges the importance of traditional resources but also the modern liberation tools available to the women. This study places Atta and Lalami's characters squarely in their cultural milieu so that they are read in their social, economic, political, racial, ethnic, and religious contexts. Just as Abouzeid argued that progress in studying women must be centered on women's social and political milieu because it is there that women's agency and oppression can be localized and contextualized, this study argues that women's empowerment is, in fact, grounded on what it means to be a woman in her particular society with its cultural expressions and norms. This approach focuses on a very practical and empowering experience for women as it ties them even more closely to their communities, even as they advocate for more options than were previously available to them. This culture-specificity empowers these characters to function even more efficiently as women who continually change and improve their communities in Nigeria and Morocco. Atta and Lalami's use of the concept of the composite consciousness in the frame of the local tradition serves as a unifying metaphor for each novel. This composite consciousness approach has the potential to answer Chandra Talpade Mohanty's call for a paradigm that is culture-specific yet creates solidarity across subjectivities and across the globe without erasing difference.

Committee:

Joseph McLaughlin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Mara Holt, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Nicole Reynolds, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Julie White, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Literature; African Studies; Comparative Literature; Folklore; Gender; Islamic Studies; Literature; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Sefi Atta; Laila Lalami; African literature; Nigerian novel; African novel; composite consciousness; Chandra Talpade Mohanty; feminism; womens studies; Moroccan literature; Nigerian literature; Morocco; Nigeria; storytelling; masquerade; gender studies

Kurzen, Crystal MarieCollaboration, Collectivity, and Trans/Nationality: Intersectional Affiliation in Child of the Dark by Carolina Maria De Jesus, Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina Garcia, and Imaginary Parents by Sheila Ortiz Taylor and Sandra Ortiz
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2004, Comparative Studies
This project analyzes how three women's narratives from the second half of the twentieth century represent identity production as inescapably intersectional and affiliated. In Child of the Dark, the diary entries of Carolina Maria de Jesus negotiate her subject position as an Afro-Brazilian single mother struggling to get through everyday in the poverty-stricken favela where she lives outside of São Paulo, Brazil. The collaboration of a journalist in heavily editing her diary entries, however, altered the subject she constructs in the text. Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina Garcia engages questions of exile and trans/national identity construction. Garcia's four female protagonists represent multiple generations of Cuban women with different affiliations to both Cuba and the United States. These characters negotiate a fractured history and, at times, even a separation from their places of origin, searching for home spaces that ultimately only exist "in-between." In Imaginary Parents by Sheila Ortiz Taylor and Sandra Ortiz Taylor, the authors work collectively to create a visual-verbal family autobiography, tackling issues of co-production and auto/biography within their text. All three cases provide models that challenge traditional definitions of autobiography through their qualities of collaboration, collectivity, and trans/nationality to create spaces of empowerment and affiliation for validating women's identities—and the identities of other immigrant or marginal peoples.

Committee:

Julia Watson (Advisor); Lucia Costigan (Committee Member); Ruby Tapia (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature

Cook, Brittany A.Presence, Process, Product: The Significance of the Womb in Writing Woman
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2015, English
In this paper, I propose a way to interpret Trinh T. Minh-ha’s theory of writing woman. Minh-ha claims that writing woman must come through the body; therefore, I argue that this movement is situated within the womb. To navigate my argument, I investigate three texts as they represent the womb in different stages. First, I use two short stories from Chinelo Okparanta’s collection Happiness, Like Water to articulate the presence of the womb. Then, I explore the television miniseries Top of the Lake to demonstrate the process of the womb. Finally, I employ Karen Russell’s short story “Reeling for the Empire” to evince the product of the womb. These texts present the womb in atypical ways, which allows me to conclude that writing woman is a comprehensive endeavor that works to recognize the embodied experiences of women.

Committee:

Margaret Strain (Advisor); Patrick Thomas (Committee Member); Rebecca Potter (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature

Keywords:

Trinh T Minh-ha; Body theory; Feminist theory; Writing Woman; Chinelo Okparanta; Jane Campion; Karen Russell; Happiness, Like Water; Top of the Lake; Vampires in the Lemon Grove

Yanick, Anthony JosephProlegomena to a Theory of Cinematic Bodies: What Can an Image Do?
Master of Arts, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, World Literature
What can and image do? My claim is that this question reveals a refrain common to a distinct group of individuals in the field of film-philosophy. I propose to contribute a stance towards understanding how images disclose novel aspects of experience and challenge traditional ways of seeing. This opens us to a new way of thinking-with film. I find that a Deleuzean film philosophical approach is most always grounded in an extended theory of the body that develops through Gilles Deleuze’s particular reading of Baruch Spinoza. I trace the logic of the body through this early monograph to the cinema books in order to reveal it to be the underlying conditions for the cinematic body. I then conclude to introduce a technique of seeing becoming-image that can uncover the experience of film not through theoretical argument that pre-comprehends its meaning, but affirms the image in discovering the conditions for the cinematic experience that is as much thinking-feeling as it is perceptual.

Committee:

Florin Berindeanu (Committee Chair); Laura Hengehold (Committee Member); Joe Hughes (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Comparative Literature; Film Studies; Philosophy

Keywords:

Deleuze, Film-Philosophy, Spinoza, Aesthetics, The Body, Cognitivism, Film Studies

Gegas, Christos IoannisC.P. Cavafy: (Homo)Erotics and (Re)Constructions
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, Comparative Studies
In this thesis, I will explore the relationship between C.P. Cavafy's (1863-1933) life and his erotic poetry. Specifically, I will consider how Cavafy's sexuality is (re)constructed by and through his poetry as well as criticism and the role that secondary sources and ancillary texts play in this construction. Why do some critics read Cavafy's erotic poetry as gay, while others resist such readings and admit to only a few poems being gay? What different reading strategies does either group employ to reach their conclusions? Is resistance to characterizing his poetry as homoerotic merely a sign of anxiety over the queering of Cavafy's oeuvre and is this a sign of masked homophobia? Or are there justifiable objections to such characterizations? Are ethical readings that read his erotic poetry as queer over-determined? What role do interpretive communities play in substantiating either side of this debate? Since Cavafy wrote in Modern Greek, what structural differences lay between the original language and works translated into English and how do those differences arise? To answer some of the questions, I will use close-reading techniques of Cavafy's erotic poetry, both in the original Modern Greek as well as English. I will attempt to resuscitate defunct or even unfashionable theories of literature in my assessment (especially Formalist ones), showing how some still prove useful and productive in reading and analyzing his poetry. I will also survey Cavafian criticism and try to unpack the assumptions that underlie either conclusion. To accomplish this, I will introduce the notions of feedback and estrangement to try to explain some of these complications. I will also consider the role that pleasure plays in his poems. Finally, I will suggest that Cavafy's ambiguous use of language, coding, and production methods surpassed mere self-censorship and at the same time served to secure his position in an emerging canon.

Committee:

Philip Armstrong (Advisor)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature

Keywords:

Cavafy; poetry; homoerotics; Formalism; Barthes; Sedgwick; Foucault; Fish; Hirsch; Richards; translation studies; limits; sexual idendity

Judkins, Ryan R.Noble Venery: Hunting and the Aristocratic Imagination in Late Medieval English Literature
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2012, English
As Johan Huizinga and, more recently, Pierre Bourdieu have argued, what we do and the games we play influence how we act and think. Similarly, as George Lakoff and Mark Johnson have concluded, the metaphors that we use display our conceptual structures. Taking these two points as a basis, this thesis examines hunting, the major leisure pursuit of the aristocracy, in medieval English literature. Many have concluded that hunting was just a general courtly pastime of no particular interest, especially for literary scholars, while others have struggled to analyze it because it was so prevalent and so wide-ranging, and thus presents an immense body of literature. In response, this dissertation defines the concept of "venery" and then argues that venery was, along with chivalry and love, one of the three major foci of aristocratic culture, and that medieval authors played extensively upon it rhetorically. Through an often dialectical consideration of a wide range of late medieval Anglo-French literature, this thesis first argues that venery both arose from and fundamentally influenced the aristocratic habitus and imagination, in large part because hunting was a central component of the aristocratic education. Then, it analyzes how the courtly par-force hunt particularly embodied this process and shifted over time to respond to various social changes. The dissertation then turns to a consideration of how Chaucer in Troilus and Criseyde and the anonymous author of the Alliterative Morte Arthure employ veneric themes rhetorically in attempts to influence their aristocratic audiences' perceptions of love and of chivalry. In the process, they reveal the fundamental importance of venery on the aristocratic comprehension of chivalry and love and more broadly on the aristocratic imagination. An understanding of venery is thus essential to an appreciation of medieval courtly literature and an understanding of the cultural assumptions of the medieval nobility.

Committee:

Richard Green, PhD (Advisor); Lisa Kiser, PhD (Committee Member); Ethan Knapp, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Animals; British and Irish Literature; Comparative Literature; Cultural Anthropology; European History; Literature; Medieval History; Medieval Literature; Middle Ages

Keywords:

hunting; medieval; hunt; venery; falconry; aristocracy; nobility; court; Chaucer; Troilus and Criseyde; Alliterative Morte Arthure; game; deer; hart; habitus; war; warfare; courtship; love; aristocratic education;

Boyle, KirkThe Catastrophic Real: Late Capitalism and Other Naturalized Disasters
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2009, Arts and Sciences : English and Comparative Literature

The 2005 landfall of Hurricane Katrina entrenched natural disaster studies within the disciplinary territory of the social sciences. For scholars of this specialized field of knowledge, examining the geological and hydrometerological aspects of the largest natural disaster in the history of the United States made little sense without also asserting its historical origins and societal impact. One goal of this dissertation is to secure the human concerns of natural disaster studies further by aligning them with a singular historical social science, a Marxist paradigm that reframes contemporary natural disasters as misfortunes inherent to the neoliberal form of late capitalism. Although Marxism provides the most expansive view of the unnatural forces of natural disasters, this approach itself must be philosophically generous and rigorous, not politically expedient, hence I clarify the ontological status of natural disasters by enlisting reinforcements from the humanities-existential philosophy and Lacanian psychoanalysis.

The second goal of this dissertation is to redress a deficiency in the social scientific approach to the cultural representation of natural disasters, which is undeveloped and still largely beholden to positivist methodologies. Drawing on the jointly Marxist and psychoanalytic approach developed by dialectical thinkers like Frederic Jameson and Slavoj Žižek, I show how literary and cultural imaginations of catastrophes shape their real formation within the capitalist world-economy. A comparative analysis of the recent Hollywood disaster films Children of Men (2006) and I Am Legend (2007) demonstrates the divergent response of progressives and conservatives to what Naomi Klein dubs “disaster capitalism.” While some works of mass culture disguise and expose the role of the political economy in exacerbating the disastrous effects of so-called natural disasters, others naturalize economic crises. Close readings of The Day the Earth Stood Still (2008) and Knowing (2009) unearth both ideological and utopian projections of the current “global financial crisis.”

Committee:

Beth Ash, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Stanley Corkin, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Jana Braziel, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Comparative Literature; Mass Media; Motion Pictures; Philosophy; Sociology

Keywords:

natural disasters; disaster capitalism; disaster films; late capitalism; global financial crisis; ontological difference; Slavoj Zizek; Naomi Klein

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