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Porter, John MartinNavigating Uncertainty in Automotive Technology Instruction: The Subjective Experiences of Automotive Instructors During Laboratory Activities
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
Educational researchers have conducted very few studies on the subjective experiences of both trained and self-taught auto mechanics (Barber, 2003, 2004; Nelsen, 1997, 2010). Further, no present studies explore the subjective experience of the automotive instructor as he or she experiences uncertainty in the automotive lab. This study addresses a gap in the current literature on career/technical instructor development. For this study, data were gathered by video recording automotive laboratory activities at three Midwestern automotive programs. Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR) interviews were conducted with automotive instructors as they observed themselves navigating the lab environment. Data from the IPR interviews were analyzed using emergent thematic analysis. The research revealed that most instructors in this study were aware, after reflection, of the reasoning behind many of the intuitive and improvisational behaviors, and had an awareness of the nuances of skill assessment the importance of modeling behavior. This study also identified transfer of artistry as a concept of advanced skill attainment in automotive subjects. Transfer of artistry is the result of an instructor’s ability to manage several paradigms of the laboratory experience at once, to create the appropriate conditions for a student to develop the cognitive, spatial, and tactile skills necessary for performing advanced automotive diagnostics and repair. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Holloway, PhD (Committee Member); Stephanie Davis, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Education; Vocational Education

Keywords:

Post Secondary; Career Technical; Automotive; Technology; Laboratory; Improvisation; Instructor; Mechanic; Technician; Reflection; Artistry; IPR; Interpersonal Process Recall; Thematic Analysis; Schon

Grugan, Cecilia SpencerDisability Resource Specialists’ Capacity to Adopt Principles and Implement Practices that Qualify as Universal Design at a 4-Year Public Institution
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2018, Educational Leadership
Due to the continuous growth of diverse student bodies on college campuses, creating accessibility for each unique student needs to be considered. Students who have a disability or disabilities are a substantial part of this growing diverse student body. Since disability resource specialists play a significant role in creating accessibility for such students, they can consider implementing practices that qualify as Universal Design. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore where disability resource specialists fall on Lewin’s (1951) continuum of change and Reynold’s (2009) levels of expertise in regards to implementing practices that qualify as Universal Design. Six participants were included in this study out of eight who were invited to participate. Out of those six participants, the study showed that all participants demonstrated a strong presence in the Unfreezing stage of Lewin’s (1951) continuum of change. Also, the study showed that all participants showed a level of knowledge as the second tier to Reynold’s (2009) levels of expertise. Limitations as well as recommendations for future research included recruiting a larger sample of participants to provide greater analysis of the study.

Committee:

Carol Patitu, Ph.D. (Advisor); Suzanne Franco, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Stephanie Krah, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Design; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Theory; Engineering; English As A Second Language; Experiments; Instructional Design; Intellectual Property; Labor Relations; Management; Mass Communications; Mental Health; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education; Occupational Health; Occupational Therapy; Personal Relationships; Public Administration; Public Health; Public Health Education; Public Policy; Reading Instruction; Recreation; Rehabilitation; Robotics; Robots; School Administration; Secondary Education; Special Education; Speech Therapy; Systems Design; Teacher Education; Transportation

Keywords:

Universal Design; Accommodations; Accessibility; Organizational Change; Proactive Practices; Disability; Disability Resource Specialists; Disability Services; Higher Education; Student Affairs

Remark, Linda NPortraits of Developmental Reading Students: A Case Study Exploration
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
The purpose of this study was to explore developmental reading students’ abilities and attitudes in reading, as well as the role literacy played in their lives. As higher education is funded based on student performance, it is in all college stakeholders’ interest to help all students, including developmental learners, succeed. Learning from developmental reading students has been proven to be advantageous in understanding their experiences and assisting with their academic success. Using a descriptive multiple case-study design, data were collected from 16 developmental reading students through two questionnaires, two reading assessments, literacy tracking, and two semi-structured interviews. Five participants’ data were further explored through a case and cross-case analysis. The study found developmental reading students were open to improving their reading abilities and viewed the developmental course as a medium through which to do this. They also appreciated and valued reading, though not always in ways academia would require. Finally, developmental readers were not always able to accurately identify their reading needs and did not view literacy as a social or cultural experience. The results of this study have important curricular implications for developmental students, educators, and their institutions. Instructors should provide meaningful opportunities for reflection on reading abilities and attitudes. Additionally, institutions should incorporate placement measures which place and diagnose specific literacy needs. Finally, classroom experiences need to incorporate and expand on the different types of literacy students are using outside of the classroom as well as support literacy use with others.

Committee:

Denise N. Morgan, PHD (Committee Co-Chair); Kristine E. Pytash, PHD (Committee Co-Chair); Tracy Lara Hilton, PHD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Community College Education; Education

Keywords:

Developmental Reading;Developmental Students;Community College;Case Study

Ryder, Robert MonierCan Instructional Videos Influence Perception of Plagiarism Among First Year Composition (FYC) Students?
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Findlay, 2016, Rhetoric and Writing
The purpose of this study is to examine whether video intervention influences student perception about plagiarism and to test whether students rank different forms of plagiarism and originality infraction by degree of severity. Plagiarism is often unintentional. Honor codes do not do much, but intervention might. Similarly, studies have suggested that the term plagiarism is outdated, and that the term incorrectly encompasses a wide range of writing practices, some major and others far less severe. The study’s scope was limited to first year composition (FYC) students at The University of Findlay (UF), a small Midwestern comprehensive university in Findlay, Ohio. The study utilized survey research of a control group and two experimental groups. Classes were administered a pre- and post-survey in the Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 semesters, and different video interventions were shown each semester. In addition to survey data, two study participants were also interviewed about their perception of different forms of plagiarism. While results did not lead to conclusive determination of whether videos result in a perceptual change about plagiarism, they did show that students do rank different forms of plagiarism and originality infraction by degree of severity. Study results led to two conclusions. First, videos that provide students with instructional variety and engaging content can be an excellent supplement to in-class writing exercises and face-to-face instruction. Second, students do not consider all types of plagiarism and originality infraction to be equally problematic. This necessitates use of a more extensive meta-language about plagiarism and originality infractions rather than categorizing all infractions as plagiarism.

Committee:

Elkie Burnside (Committee Chair); Sarah Fedirka (Committee Member); Nicole Williams (Committee Member); Christine Tulley (Advisor)

Subjects:

Communication; Community College Education; Composition; Education; English As A Second Language; Ethics; Language; Rhetoric; Teaching

Keywords:

plagiarism; originality infraction; rhetoric and composition; scale; hierarchy; first year composition; freshman composition; Ryder Scale of Originality Infraction; pedagogy; survey; originality; infraction; severity; plagiarism scale; original authorship

Cleland, Nicole RaeDifferentiation of Self and Effortful Control: Predictors of Non-Traditional Students' Adjustment to Community College
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2017, Counselor Education and Supervision-Marriage and Family Therapy
The community college (CCcc) setting has become increasingly important in education; yet, graduation rates are low (20%) compared 4-year colleges (69%). Researchers have focused on factors that predict college students’ retention and graduation. Measures of students’ academic, social, and personal-emotional adjustment to colleges have been found to better predictors of college success than entrance characteristics (Crede & Niehorster, 2012). This study builds on previous research by Skowron and Dendy (2004) that focused on relations between Bowen’s concept of differentiation-of-self, and effortful control, in a sample of adults; and by Skowron, Wester, and Azen (2004) that investigated relations between stress, differentiation-of-self, and personal adjustment to college. This study tested whether differentiation-of-self added incremental variance above the variance explained by effortful control to the prediction of students’ academic, social, and personal-emotional adjustment to CC in a sample of 119 non-traditional students at a CC in the Midwest section of the United States. The sample was 17.6% male, 79% female, and ages ranged from 18 to 63 years. Most participants were White (75.6%), with 15.1% identifying as Black or African American. Participants completed the Differentiation-of-Self-Short Form (DIS-SF; Drake, 2011), the Effortful Control Scale (ATQ-S-EC; Rothbart, Evans, & Ahadi, 2000), and the Student Adjustment to College Questionnaire (SACQ; Baker & Siryk, 1989). Participants’ ATQ-S-EC scores significantly predicted SACQ social adjustment. Students’ DSI-SF (IP) scores significantly predicted SACQ personal-emotional adjustment scores. Suggestions for future research are given and implications for interventions by Marriage and Family Therapists (MFT’s) are also provided.

Committee:

Linda Perosa, PhD (Committee Chair); Rikki Patton, PhD (Committee Member); Ingrid Weigold, PhD (Committee Member); Heather Katafiasz, PhD (Committee Member); Rene Mudrey-Camino , PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; Adult Education; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Counseling Education; Developmental Psychology; Education; Educational Psychology; Families and Family Life; Mental Health; Psychology; Therapy

Keywords:

differentiation; effortful control; college adjustment; non-traditional students; Bowens Family Systems Theory

Joslin, Kelly L.Art Appreciation in Face-to-Face and Online Settings: An Analysis of Course Effectiveness
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2016, Educational Leadership
The purpose of this quantitative quasi-experimental study was to determine if students enrolled in an online introductory art appreciation course learned the same content as their fact-to-face counterparts. To achieve this goal, the researcher compared the level of knowledge attainment of course outcomes in four different content areas: the themes and purposes of art, the organizing principles of art, interpreting iconography, and differentiating between various art media (drawing, painting, sculpture). The following research questions guided the study: 1. How does the overall profile (gender, major, number of terms completed) of students enrolled in a face-to-face art appreciation course differ from that of students enrolled in an online art appreciation course?; 2. How does the gender profile of students enrolled in both the face-to-face and the online sections of an art appreciation course compare to that of students enrolled in courses in the greater academic division and the college?; 3. What impact does course format (face-to-face vs. online) of an introductory art appreciation course have on student achievement of course outcomes: familiarity with the themes and purposes of art, recognition of the organizing principles of art, ability to interpret iconography, and familiarity with various art media? The study’s findings serve as an excellent point of departure for future research focusing on gender distribution in face-to-face art appreciation course sections, undeclared majors enrolled in online art appreciation course sections, and the impact that a variety of teaching styles and approaches to interaction may have on students’ knowledge achievement of the art appreciation course outcomes.

Committee:

Barbara M. De Luca, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); C. Daniel Raisch, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Peter J. Titlebaum, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Mary A. Zahner, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Art History; Community College Education; Education; Educational Leadership

Keywords:

face-to-face; online; teaching; learning; effectiveness; pre-test; post-test; art appreciation; visual literacy

Bolanos, NormaImplications of the Community School Idea for Education in Costa Rica
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1947, EDU Teaching and Learning
none

Committee:

Laura Zirbes (Advisor)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Teacher Education

Giordano, Christopher MConstructing Pedagogical Approaches Among Part-Time Community College Faculty Members: A Grounded Theory Research Study
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2014, Higher Education
Although community colleges serve close to half of the undergraduate students in the United States, there is a lack of empirical literature about teaching in community college settings (Grubb, 1999; Moriarity 2007). More specifically, existing research is lacking on what is known about part-time instructors at community colleges, who teach millions of students each year and represent 70% of the instructional workforce (American Federation of Teachers, 2010). Although community colleges rely heavily on this contingent workforce to teach our most diverse and at-risk populations of students, very little is known about how they teach, how they arrive at their approaches to teaching, and the potential impact of these teaching methodologies and practices (Sperling, 2003). Through a grounded theory methodology, this study examined a small group of part-time community college faculty members to discover how they arrive at the pedagogical approaches that guide their classroom instruction. A series of semi-structured interviews generated data that were analyzed using open, intermediate, and advanced coding methods. Data analysis resulted in the development of a theory explaining the pedagogical decision-making process of part-time community college faculty members. The study produced two major conclusions: (a) the lived experiences of (part-time community college) instructors and existing environmental factors are not just static elements in the teaching process but are integrated through a central concept - connections in the teaching process; and (b) instructors are learners who make connections between new and old information to construct new knowledge and create meaning as they encounter people, things, and events in the teaching process.

Committee:

Penny Poplin Gosetti, Dr. (Committee Chair); Deb Gentry, Dr. (Committee Member); Charlene Gilbert, Prof. (Committee Member); Ron Opp, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Community Colleges; Education; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

pedagogy; teaching; part-time faculty; adjunct faculty; community colleges; grounded theory; qualitative study

Harmon, MartinoThe Impact of Institutional Support Services, Policies, and Programs on the Completion and Graduation of African American Students Enrolled at Select Two-Year Colleges in Ohio
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2013, Judith Herb College of Education
Two-year colleges are grappling with need to focus on student success outcomes driven by increasingly strict accountability standards implemented by state and federal government, while at the same time facing declining resources and increasing enrollments of diverse, underprepared students. According to the American Association of Community Colleges (2010), more than 40% of all African American students enrolled in postsecondary education are enrolled in two-year colleges. A review of the literature indicated that improving persistence and completion rates for African American students is a challenge that two-year colleges face. This study examined whether institutional support services, policies, and programs influenced the completion and graduation of African American students at select Ohio’s two-year colleges. The study examined (a) general institutional interventions, such as advising, mentoring, orientation programs and courses, tutoring, and departments or programs that specifically target African American or other underrepresented students, as well as (b) special programs or staffing configurations dedicated to supporting the needs of African American students. Two major gaps in the literature were addressed in this study: 1) the impact of interventions on African American completion and graduation enrolled at two-year colleges; and 2) the impact of interventions which specifically focus on the completion and graduation of African American students, e.g. Culture centers, Office of Minority Affairs, or Multicultural Centers. The researcher’s interest in this study is due to his work in the field of college student retention and student success as well as the desire to gain and share knowledge about the impact of specific interventions in promoting the success of African American college students enrolled at two-year colleges. The researcher’s working knowledge of the subject matter and familiarity with many of the two-year colleges in the population aided in completion of this study; however, to prevent bias, the researcher used the literature and the findings to guide his conclusions The research included an observational study in which institutional intervention data were collected using a questionnaire sent to chief student affairs officers (CSAOs) at 14 (61%) of Ohio’s 23 of two-year colleges with an enrollment consisting of a minimum of 5% African American students. The CSAOs were asked whether particular interventions were used at their institutions; if so, these CSAOs were also asked to rate the impact of the intervention on completion and graduation rates for African American students. The respondents were given the choice of rating the intervention as having “no impact,” “some impact,” or “high impact.” In addition to the survey, institutional data were collected from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) and analyzed to determine whether the predictor variables influenced the outcome variable, three-year completion and graduation rates of first-time, full-time African American students. A total of 52 variables, including institutional characteristics, student enrollment, and institutional interventions, were included in this study. The 13 institutional and student enrollment variables were determined based on the IPEDS website, and 39 institutional intervention variables were determined using the questionnaire. Two of the 13 institutional characteristics and student enrollment variables—(a) the percentage of African American students enrolled and (b) the percentage of African American students enrolled in remedial math and English classes—were found to be significant predictors of African American completion and graduation rates. A total of 16 of the 39 institutional intervention variables from the survey were rated by the CSAOs as having a high impact on completion and graduation rates. Although the results were not statistically significant, they do reflect relationships that may be of practical significance. The 16 intervention variables were grouped into the following categories for analysis: - Developmental education/at-risk student interventions - Early alert/warning systems - New-student orientation programs or courses for credit - Advising for first-year students (mandatory) - Mentorship programs - Special office or department which targets the needs of African American or underrepresented students Based on the findings of this study, it can be concluded that the following variables were correlated with African American completion and graduation rates : (1) use of the early alert/warning system; (2) use of supplemental orientation program or course for African American, at-risk, or underrepresented students; (3) implementation of mentorship program for students in select academic programs; (4) implementation of mentorship program for at-risk, African American, or underrepresented students; and (5) use of peer mentors. A sixth institutional intervention (i.e., special office or department that provides programs or services targeting African American students) was included in the analysis due to the importance of that intervention to this study. Jenkins (2006) has emphasized the importance of interventions that target African American students by stating that “the clearest difference in high and low impact colleges is targeted support and specialized services for minority students” (p. 40). Although it was difficult to draw a meaningful quantitative conclusion from the findings related to the institutional interventions due to the small size of the sample in the study, the CSAO impact ratings provided information that supports the literature describing the importance of effective interventions in increasing completion and graduation rates for African American students enrolled at Ohio’s two-year colleges. The findings of this study provided opportunities for further research using a national population of two-year colleges that have a special office or department dedicated to serving the needs of African American students. This approach would ensure a sufficient sample size to make meaningful quantitative conclusions. Further research may also incorporate follow-up case studies focused on groups of CSAOs and administrators as well as student focus groups. This research provided a foundation for developing an understanding of specific institutional characteristics that serve as predictors of African American student completion and graduation rates and how impact ratings by key administrators can be used to guide research on the impact of those interventions on African American student completion and graduation rates. This study added to the scarce body of research that has examined the impact of institutional support services, policies, and programs on the completion and graduation rates of African American students enrolled at two-year colleges

Committee:

David Meabon, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Mary Ellen Edwards, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Donald White, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Bettina Shuford, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African Americans; Black Studies; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Higher Education Administration; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Multicultural Education

Keywords:

African American completion and graduation; Black student; multicultural; diversity; two-year community college completion and graduation; impact of at-risk student institutional interventions; CSAOs; mentorship programs; Culture centers; student success

Das, Dilip A.Four-Year College Choice Considerations Among High-Achieving Lower-Income Community College Students in Michigan
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2013, Higher Education
The college choice considerations and decisions of high school seniors matriculating full-time to four-year colleges is well-documented. However, a growing majority of students do not fit within the high school to four-year college group, leaving gaps in the college choice research literature. This qualitative study addresses the college choice research gap though semi-structured interviews of 17 academically talented – 3.5 or higher grade point average with over 25 college credits completed – Pell Grant-eligible community college students seeking transfer to a four-year college. All participants demonstrated high levels of motivation to complete a baccalaureate. Twelve of participants applied to only one transfer college and five applied to two. Constraints on college choice included a variety of financial considerations, strategic recruiting strategies by four-year colleges, and a lack of detailed guidance and college knowledge. Utilizing a cultural capital framework for analysis, marked differences between the college experiences of traditional four-year students and high-achieving, low-income non-traditional community college students were found including differences based on class, race and cultural traditions.

Committee:

David Meabon, PhD (Committee Chair); Mary Ellen Edwards, PhD (Committee Member); Larry G. McDougle, PhD (Committee Member); Penny Poplin Gosetti, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; Adult Education; African American Studies; Community College Education; Economics; Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Middle Eastern Studies; Sociology

Keywords:

Transfer college choice; college choice; lower-income; Pell-eligible; high-achieving; first generation; class reproduction; undermatching; cultural capital; stratification; workforce experience; motivation; choice constraints; race and class constraints

Shepherd, Kathleen KayThe Influence of the College Environment on Community College Remedial Mathematics Instructors' Use of Best Practices in Remedial Mathematics
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2016, Higher Education
An estimated 41% of the more than 11 million students who attend a community college need remediation, with remedial mathematics the most common course students need. The literature pertaining to best practices for student success in remedial mathematics abounds, yet, there is little evidence of the factors that influence instructor use of these best practices in the classroom. This study evaluated results of a 29-item survey of American Mathematical Association of Two Year Colleges’ members on the influence of instructor demographics, faculty development, institutional policies and procedures, and student support services on instructor use of best practices in teaching remedial mathematics. Developmental Theory served as the study’s theoretical framework, while the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education and the Input-Environment-Output Model served as conceptual frameworks. Analysis revealed nine significant predictors of overall use of best practices, four of which were influenced by instructor demographics, three by institutional policies and procedures, and two by professional development. This study may inform policymakers and administrators alike as they scrutinize the delivery of remedial mathematics courses.

Committee:

Ronald Opp, PhD (Committee Chair); Debra Harmening, PhD (Committee Member); William Weber, EdD (Committee Member); Grace Yackee, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Mathematics Education

Keywords:

community college remedial mathematics; community college developmental mathematics; best practices community college teaching; developmental theory

Gadson, Bryan CAmerican Elite: The Use of Education for Social Stratification
MLS, Kent State University, 2016, College of Arts and Sciences / Liberal Studies Program
The following essay will investigate the United States educational system and how it has been used to increase social stratification and limit the mobility of social class. This essay will define social stratification and give examples of how it limits social mobility based on various determinants such as race, class, and socioeconomic status. Understanding the use of education and the role it plays in moving social class, we learn how education has now been commoditized and its use for social stratification has been exploited. The essay will contend that the proliferation of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) were created to assist students of color in their educational opportunities and ability to move social strata. In doing so, predominantly white institutions began to focus their attention on underrepresented populations and their ability to compete in the educational marketplace, as well as HBCUs’ ability to move social class by instituting summer transition programs assisted with the federal government implementation of TRiO to assist universities in their efforts. With this focus, this essay will discuss the impact of college transition programs and their impact on retention and graduation rates for underrepresented student populations and how they are influencing the ability to move social class and the overall achievement gap that still exists in today’s society.

Committee:

Richard Serpe, Dr. (Advisor); Amoaba Gooden, Dr. (Other)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Community Colleges; Economics; Education; Higher Education; Sociology

Keywords:

education, social, stratification, mobility, class, socioeconomic, achievement, TRiO, HBCU, graduation, rate, retention, college, transition

Dobransky, Kristine AnnTechnology Use and Integration by Ohio's Community College ESL Instructors
Doctor of Education, Ashland University, 2015, College of Education
Technology has become ubiquitous at all levels of education. The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine what technology is currently being used in Ohio’s community college ESL programs and at what level of the substitution, augmentation, modification, redefinition (SAMR) model the technology is being used or integrated. This study was conducted using mixed methods methodology and a cross-sectional survey design. Survey and interview data were collected and analyzed for common themes. Data suggest that Ohio’s community college ESL instructors are just beginning to realize the potential of using technology in their ESL courses. Although few community college ESL instructors are using technology in their ESL courses, those who are use a variety of educational technology mainly at the substitution and augmentation levels of the SAMR model.

Committee:

Harold E. Wilson, PhD (Committee Chair); Constance M. Savage, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Susan Lohwater, PhD (Committee Member); Deanna Romano, EdD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Educational Technology; English As A Second Language

Keywords:

ESL, technology, community colleges, Ohio, SAMR model

Stine, Cory M.Community College Trustee Orientation and Training Influence on Use of Best Practices
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2012, Higher Education
The orientation and training of public community college trustees is inconsistent. This empirical study investigated that training and its influence on board use of best practices. The study used adult learning theory and involvement theory. Astin’s input-environment-outcome model was used as a conceptual framework with a blocked form of stepwise regression. The criterion variable was board use of best practices, created from a scale score of board best practices. Trustees from 146 institutions in 16 states responded to the electronic survey (n=253). Six predictor variables were significant at the p<.05 level. Results provided a better understanding of board use of best practices, orientation and training, and suggested ways in which trustee orientation and training could be improved.

Committee:

Ronald D. Opp, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Larry G. McDougle, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Snejana I. Slantcheva-Durst, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jerome E. Webster, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Community College Education; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Community college; trustees; board; orientation; training; involvement theory; adult learning theory; survey; best practices; IEO; Astin; regression; stepwise

Lamont, SarahDeconstructing the Dichotomy: Muslim American University Students' Perceptions of Islam and Democracy
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Cross-Cultural, International Education
Much of the research on Islam and democracy has focused on the macro-level, and fails to detail a qualitative account of the experience of Muslim citizens of democracies (Cesari, 2004; Said, 1978; Said, 1981; Al-Azmeh, 1993; Esposito, 1995; Khan, 2006; Huntington, 1996; Adib-Moghaddem, 2008; Barber, 1996; Fukuyama, 1992). The neglect of the Muslim individual experience in the dominant discourse on Islam and democracy has stifled the voices of members of this marginalized population, thereby limiting their self-representation. This is especially true for Muslim Americans, who, in the aftermath of 9/11 and current surge of revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East, are either demonized or forgotten altogether, despite the significance of their every day navigation of both Islamic and democratic values and unique efforts toward identity construction. The purpose of this study was to address these gaps in the literature and, through the use of a phenomenological framework and Shi-xu¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿s (2005) cultural approach to Critical Discourse Analysis, complicate the dominant discourse on Islam and democracy by providing insight into the lived experience of seven Muslim American university students as well as supplemental perspectives from their university professors and local Imams. The findings of this study encapsulate the lived experience of the seven Muslim American student participants. These participants, along with professors and local Imams, constructed an alternative discourse that positioned the Islamic and democratic values of equality, respect, freedom, and education as compatible, with the exception of some complications such as Eurocentrism and a heavy reliance on unbridled capitalism. The study concludes with suggestions for all participants to better their understanding and/or enactment of Islamic and democratic values, including attaining education, engaging in civic participation, and developing empathy.

Committee:

Bruce Collet, PhD (Advisor); Margaret Booth, PhD (Committee Member); Stefan Fritsch, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; American Studies; Banking; Behavioral Sciences; Cognitive Psychology; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Continuing Education; Cultural Anthropology; Curriculum Development; Economic History; Economic Theory; Economics; Educat; Education

Keywords:

Islam; democracy; phenomenology; critical discourse analysis; Muslim American; national identity; capitalism; participation; education; civic engagement; religious identity; clash of civilizations; Imams; professors; university students

Cooney, Matthew AThe Demographics and Utilization of Transformational Leadership Practices by Potential Community College Presidents
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Higher Education Administration
Community colleges are facing a leadership crisis due to the mass retirements and turnover of community college presidents. Senior academic affairs officers, senior student affairs officers, senior academic and student affairs officers, and senior finance and administrative officers are considered potential community college presidents to fill the position as they are often one administrative position away from the president. Community college scholars and organizations recommended the utilization of transformational leadership by individuals in the community college presidency position. The purpose of this correlational descriptive study was to understand who are potential community college presidents, to what degree they utilized transformational leadership practices, and to determine whether potential community college presidents’ utilization of transformational leadership practices differed based upon personal and professional experiences. Potential community college presidents (N=656) completed a demographic questionnaire and the Leadership Practices Inventory-SELF (Kouzes & Posner, 2013) to understand their educational, personal, and professional backgrounds; and their utilization of transformational leadership practices. Potential community college presidents’ demographics and their utilization of transformational leadership practices are reported. Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance tests, and independent sample t tests were employed are presented to answer the research questions. There were statistically significant differences in the mean scores on the LPI-SELF based upon level of interest in a community college presidency, institutional location, current position, highest degree earned, and participation in leadership development programs. Conclusions and recommendations include continued exploration of potential community college presidents’ preparation and utilization of transformational leadership practices.

Committee:

Kenneth Borland (Advisor); Patrick Pauken (Committee Member); Maureen Wilson (Committee Member); Tim Brackenbury (Other)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Community Colleges; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Higher education; community colleges; leadership studies

Doehne, Bryce ASupporting Student Veterans Utilizing Participatory Curriculum Development
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2016, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
An organizational level program utilizing Participatory Curriculum Development (PCD) (Taylor, 2003) is presented to assist postsecondary institutions with development, implementation, and evaluation of programs to support student veterans. Postsecondary institutions are provided with a “how to” program manual that includes literature-based core and supplemental programs, trauma-informed theory, and a methodological framework to implement programs. Practical program evaluation measures are offered to assist postsecondary institutions with evaluating the outcomes of their efforts to support student veterans. The electronic version of this dissertation is at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu

Committee:

Bill Heusler, Psy.D. (Committee Chair); Shana Hormann, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Peter Schmidt, Psy.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Armed Forces; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Curricula; Curriculum Development; Education; Education Policy; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Mental Health; Military Studies; Organization Theory; Psychology

Keywords:

student veterans; support program; participatory curriculum development; military-connected students; program; military veterans; non-traditional students; program manual; innovative program; trauma-informed care; post-secondary institution

English, Lindsay SThe Influences of Community College Library Characteristics on Institutional Graduation Rates: A National Study
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2014, Higher Education
Given the national and growing attention on community college learning outcomes, this study examines the influences of libraries’ or learning commons’ characteristics on institutional graduation rates. The theoretical and conceptual frameworks used to support this study are Astin’s Theory of Involvement and his I-E-O Model respectfully; however, based on the results future researchers should consider exploring expenditure models. The data set used was created by using 5 different national sources including 4 IPEDs surveys and the Library Statistics Program, also conducted by the National Center of Educational Statistics. The significant predictors of institutional graduation rates were then used to create a blocked regression model to determine influence. The results indicated that three of the original 41 independent variables did have a significant predictive power over institutional graduation rates. The three variables included the percentage of students under the age of 25, total expenditures for other information resources (including fees for database searches such as DIALOG and Nexis-Lexis), and total expenditures for current serials (ongoing subscription commitments such as periodicals, newspapers, etc.).

Committee:

David Meabon (Committee Chair); Ronald Opp (Committee Member); Renay Scott (Committee Member); Barbara Floyd (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Community Colleges; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Community Colleges; graduation rates; Library; Learning Commons

Crenshaw, Michael RyanServices for College Students with Traumatic Brain Injuries
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.), University of Dayton, 2016, School Psychology
There are many students who have sustained a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) who are pursuing post-secondary education each year and many of these students will need accommodations to successfully graduate from college. Accommodations for students with TBI in primary and secondary education are well documented; however, accommodations that are provided for students in post-secondary education have not been studied to date. Further, there have not been studies examining what services may be helpful for students with TBI in post-secondary education. The present study examined the college disability services provided for students with TBI in post-secondary education and what accommodations may be beneficial, using a qualitative design. Respondents from twelve colleges were interviewed to gain insight about accommodations in their setting. The results provide a better understanding of what accommodations are provided and those that may be beneficial for students with TBI in college settings. Suggestions are made for staff at universities to help better serve students with TBI, improving their successful completion of post-secondary degrees.

Committee:

Susan Davies, Ed.D. (Committee Chair); Molly Schaller, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Elana Bernstein, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; Adult Education; Community College Education; Continuing Education; Counseling Education; Counseling Psychology; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Higher Education; Instructional Design; Psychology; School Administration; School Counseling

Keywords:

Services; College; TBI; Traumatic Brain Injury; Brain Injury; Post-secondary; Students; Higher Education

Leary, Judith A.Funding Faithful Felons: A Phenomenological Analysis of the Higher Education Transitions of Ex-Offender Scholarship Recipients
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2015, Higher Education Administration
The purpose of this study was to address gaps in post-secondary education research regarding ex-felons’ higher education experiences in order to help student affairs practitioners make campus environments and services more accessible to and welcoming for these populations. This study centers on the experiences ex-felons have had as they have transitioned into, through, and out of higher education. The Charles W. Colson Scholarship program, a need-based full-tuition and housing scholarship program at Wheaton College, provided the setting for this research. Six ex-felon men who earned bachelor’s degrees through the program participated in one face-to-face semi-structured individual interview of approximately three hours. The interviews elicited findings in five broad areas: (1) personal assets and liabilities, (2) coping strategies, (3) factors influencing disclosure of criminal pasts, (4) educational outcomes, and (5) supports and opportunities for greater support. Participants’ shared essential experience consisted of three distinct phases centering on their expectations. The Scholars interviewed entered Wheaton College with high expectations regarding their future college experiences. Moving through Wheaton, their expectations increased but shifted to post-graduate aspirations regarding future employment or ministry positions. As they moved out of their higher education experience, they found that their vaunted expectations had become unrealistic given their limitations and liabilities exacerbated by the real world conflicts they faced. As a result of these conflicts with their lofty aspirations, each participant began to question the pragmatism of his initial expectations, and to deconstruct them in order to reconstruct new expectations. However, this process caused recurring struggles within the participants as some battled with guilt for reconstructing their expectations while others struggled with patience regarding delays in their perceived timelines. No matter the struggles nor how often they recurred, each participant concluded that even if he had not accomplished all, or any, of the lofty goals to which he had once aspired, as long as he invested significantly in the life of one other person, he had accomplished something worthy of the investment that had been made in him.

Committee:

Ellen Broido, Ed.D. (Advisor); Michael Coomes, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Melissa Burek, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling; Adult Education; Bible; Biblical Studies; Clerical Studies; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Criminology; Education; Education Finance; Education Policy; Educational Sociology; Educational Theory; Ethics; Families and Family Life; Finance; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Individual and Family Studies; Law; Legal Studies; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Pastoral Counseling; Peace Studies; Personal Relationships; Philosophy; Political Science; Rehabilitation; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; School Finance; Social Research; Social Work; Spirituality; Teaching; Theology; Vocational Education

Keywords:

Reentry; Higher Education; Faith; Felons; Ex-offenders; Christian Liberal Arts; Schlossberg; Transition; Stigma; Labeling; Invisible Stripes; Phenomenology; Colson; Scholarship; Prison Ministry; Wheaton; Prisoner; Crime; Correctional Education; PSCE

Simpson, Darcia LeeA Qualitative Investigation of the Experience of African-American Adult Learners in the Third Age: Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Lifelong Learning
Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education, Cleveland State University, 2015, College of Education and Human Services
The aim of this qualitative study was to examine contextualized experiences of African-American Third Agers (AATA). Current literature conceptualizes Third Agers as individuals who are societally positioned to experience meaningful and purposeful periods of self-discovery and adult development later in life. However, among Third Age theorists, adult educators, educational gerontologists (a sub-field of adult education), psychologists, sociologists, and diversity theorists, there are comparatively few research studies of the experiences of AATA. As a result, we do not know much about AATA; this poses a significant problem. Therefore, this investigation of AATA’s experiences simultaneously reduced the related literature gap, added to the academic body of knowledge on older adults, and strengthened the emerging study of the third age. The goals of the study were to understand who these individuals are, what their experiences were as adult learners, and what learning meant to them at this stage in life. The overarching research question that guided this inquiry are the following: what does it mean to be an AATA adult learner? Within this question are two related questions: (1) What is the experience of lifelong learning as narrated by AATA, (2) What meaning do AATA give to this phase of life as it relates to lifelong learning? Narrative research was used to capture the stories of a small group of participants, with the intent of collecting rich, in-depth narratives on the topic. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was guided by the narrative inquiry approach. This study produced an understanding of how AATA perceive of themselves as learners and investigated their attitudes towards lifelong learning for assisting institutions in the delivery of quality educational experiences for an aging population.

Committee:

Elice Rogers, Ed.D. (Committee Chair); Anne Galletta, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Catherine Hansman, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Jonathan Messemer, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Regennia Williams, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ovella Roulette-McIntyre, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; African Americans; Aging; Community College Education; Continuing Education; Curriculum Development; Educational Leadership; Educational Sociology; Gerontology; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Spirituality

Keywords:

Lifelong learning; third age; adult learning; adult development; African-American older adults; older adults; aging; retirement; third agers; Baby Boomers; elderly; volunteerism; motivation; spirituality; African-American spirituality; adult education

Hurtado, DeAnn L.Effects of Performance-Based Funding on Ohio's Community Colleges and on Horizontal Fiscal Equity
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2015, Educational Leadership
This study analyzed changes in institutional effectiveness and state funding during the first three years of Performance Based funding (PBF) measures in Ohio. This study additionally examined changes to horizontal fiscal equity in the state of Ohio’s comprehensive community colleges for the first 3 years after the implementation of performance funding. Statistical measures recognized in public school finance were used to estimate changes in horizontal fiscal equity on Ohio’s funding distribution for the 15 public comprehensive community and state community colleges following the implementation of Performance-Based funding. The study population consisted of the 15 comprehensive community and state community colleges in Ohio. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the effect of performance funding on the effectiveness (measured by success points) and funding changes (measured by FTE funds) of Ohio’s comprehensive community colleges. Horizontal fiscal equity between the schools was assessed using range, coefficient of variation, and Gini coefficient statistics. During the period covered by this study, the PBF model appeared to have made the study institutions more effective, based on the number of institutions (13) that had an increase in success points per FTE over the study period. With the exception of 2 schools, all institutions showed a positive percentage increase in success points over the study period. Institutions were then ranked based on changes to State Subsidy funds allocated during the study period. Among the 15 institutions, 6 improved their ranking and 9 declined in ranking. With respect to actual dollar changes per FTE, 9 institutions increased in State Subsidies and 6 decreased. Based on both dollar changes and state rankings, the State Subsidies per FTE changed considerably since FY2010. Range-related statistics indicated an increasing trend toward inequity in the system, as did coefficient of variation and Gini coefficient analyses. The inequity was small but increasing as each year of the study progressed and more State Subsidy funds were allocated to schools based on success points. Implications of the findings and areas for further research were discussed.

Committee:

Theodore Kowalski, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carolyn Ridenour, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Joseph Schenk, D.B.A. (Committee Member); C. Daniel Raisch, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Community Colleges; Education Finance; Education Policy; Finance; Higher Education Administration

Keywords:

Higher Education Funding; Ohio Performance-Based Funding; Horizontal Fiscal Equity; Community College Funding

Hrubik-Vulanovic, TatjanaEFFECTS OF INTELLIGENT TUTORING SYSTEMS IN BASIC ALGEBRA COURSES ON SUBSEQUENT MATHEMATICS LECTURE COURSES
PHD, Kent State University, 2013, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences
The purpose of this study was to investigate how intelligent tutoring system ALEKS, which was implemented in remedial Basic Algebra courses, affected students’ success in subsequent lecture courses and how former ALEKS students and instructors in lecture courses perceived ALEKS learning environment. ALEKS courses were delivered in emporium style: instructors were available to answer students’ questions, while ALEKS guided students through online exercises individually based on their skills and knowledge. The participants were students from four mathematics lecture courses and their instructors. Some students took remedial courses in ALEKS prior to the lecture courses while some students did not. The quantitative part of the study compared ALEKS and non-ALEKS students on the final examination and students’ self-reported-preparedness. The qualitative part of the study discussed students’ and instructors’ perceptions of ALEKS based on student surveys and instructor interviews. No difference between ALEKS and non-ALEKS students was found in final examination scores and self-reported-preparedness. Students rated learning experience in ALEKS emporium on average at 2.74 on the scale of one to five, with five being the highest. One third of students liked studying at their own pace and ALEKS content (they rated ALEKS emporium at 3.29), while one fourth claimed that "nothing was good" in emporium courses (they rated ALEKS emporium at 1.55). Although ALEKS emporium was very different from lecture courses, only one fifth of students reported changes in their study habits. The instructors did not observe any difference between ALEKS and non-ALEKS students and mentioned benefits of ALEKS-like tool for drill-and-practice. One instructor observed positive shifts in student attitude towards mathematics but advised longer study to be conducted to confirm this observation. Providing a choice to students between online and lecture courses, while increasing the role of instructors in online courses, may result in better student satisfaction. Students could also be gradually trained to effectively use online resources. The design changes in ALEKS could include the replacement of the "pie" with the bar chart, different types of feedback, explanation of how assessments are done, and ability to revisit problems on assessments.

Committee:

Cindy Kovalik, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Albert Ingram, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Aryn Karpinski, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Education; Higher Education; Mathematics Education

Keywords:

intelligent tutors;ALEKS;online learning;adaptive tutors;remedial courses;developmental courses;college mathematics courses;intelligent tutoring systems;online courses;college; mathematics;

Schwartz, Carol A.An Analysis of Instructional Practices of Contingent Faculty in Community Colleges
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2012, Higher Education

The academy has long acknowledged teaching, service, and research as the threefold work of its members. Those members in community colleges primarily engage in teaching, as opposed to research and service, but historical trends show an increase in the percent of courses taught by contingent instructors as opposed to full-time faculty members. This trend, when considered with the fact that almost half of the students now pursuing postsecondary educational opportunities do so in community colleges, provides a rich landscape for investigation.

This dissertation examines, through description correlation methods, the existence of relationships between characteristics of community college contingent faculty and the planning, preparation, class environment, instruction, and professional development activities used by contingent faculty in community colleges, specifically those instructors in the Arts and Sciences or general education divisions.

Those varied teaching activities are the components of Danielson’s Framework for Teaching, a model developed to address wide-ranging aspects of instruction. That model serves as the conceptual framework for this study, which included participants from across the nation who work in community colleges differentiated by size and the populations they serve.

The analysis of the results of this correlational study leads to recommendations for more effective instructional practices in contingent faculty and improved integration of this group into the academic life of community colleges.

Committee:

David Meabon, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Mary Ellen Edwards, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Larry McDougle, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Bin Ning, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Renay Scott, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Community Colleges; Education; Pedagogy; Teaching

Keywords:

community college; contingent faculty; adjuncts; adjunct faculty; teaching practices; Framework for Teaching; instructional practices; pedagogy; instruction

McGrew, Heidi MuchAcademic Achievement of Dual Enrolled Students: Do Instructors and Venues Matter?
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2017, Educational Leadership
This study investigated the impact that instructor type (high school teacher or college faculty) and educational venue (high school or college campus) had on the academic achievement of dual enrollment students as measured by overall course grades in First-Year Composition and College Algebra courses. A pre-existing data set from a large Midwestern urban community college, spanning two academic years was used in the analysis. The researcher analyzed the data using descriptive methods, as well as two separate statistical analysis methods: an independent samples t-test and a one-way between groups ANOVA. The results revealed that, in general, dual enrollment students in First-Year Composition taking courses from a high school teacher scored higher and performed better in terms of overall course grades compared to dual enrollment students in First-Year Composition who were taking courses from college faculty. However, dual enrollment students in College Algebra taking courses from a high school teacher faired similarly to dual enrollment students in College Algebra taking courses from a college faculty member. The results also revealed that the Delivery Model (i.e., high school teacher on a high school campus, college faculty on a high school campus, or college faculty on a college campus) did impact the overall course grade of dually-enrolled students in First-Year Composition but not in College Algebra. The findings are discussed in terms of further research and practice.

Committee:

Thomas Lasley, II Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Joseph Valenzano, III Ph.D. (Committee Member); Michele Welkener, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mary Ziskin, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community College Education; Education; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Higher Education; Secondary Education; Teacher Education

Keywords:

Dual Enrollment, Academic Achievement, Instructor Type, Educational Venue

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