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Krueger, Margaret ChristineReligion on Many Platforms: Approaching Religion Reporting in an Era of Multimedia
Bachelor of Science (BS), Ohio University, 2014, Journalism
The news industry is changing to meet market demands, just as religion is growing in importance in the public sphere. As a result, religion journalism -- the secular coverage of religion, faith and values topics -- is an evolving field. This scholarly essay overviews the history of religion journalism since the 1700s, explores how religion coverage is constructed and provides original qualitative analysis on the current state of religion reporting and multimedia. With the support of the Religion Newswriters Association, the author has conducted 14 in-depth interviews with religion reporters from prominent national and international news outlets. Ultimately, the scholarship's goal is to answer the questions : How do you tell an important story about a phenomenon whose tenants are personal and unverifiable? How are reporters using technological advances in audio, video and visualization to tell an archaic story of things unseen, laden with ritual and intimacy? Upon exploring these concerns, this scholarly essay will depict the process of creating and publishing a professional project -- a hyperlocal, nonsectarian news site for students and community members of Athens, OH entitled Athens Beyond Belief.

Committee:

Michael Sweeney, Dr. (Advisor); Cary Frith, Assistant Dean (Advisor)

Subjects:

Journalism; Religion

Keywords:

religion, reporting, religion journalism, athens beyond belief, multimedia, OU RNA, Religion Newswriters Association, religion beat, hyperlocal, professional project,

Haluszka, Adria R.THE SACRED DOMAIN: A SEMIOTIC AND COGNITIVE ANALYSIS OF RELIGION AND MAGIC IN THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2010, Greek and Latin

Throughout the corpus of texts scholars have decided to call the Greek Magical Papyri (PGM), most simply defined as a “recipe-book” for ancient magicians, there are many spells describing the manufacture and use of sacred images that, by the end of the ritual actions incorporated throughout the spell, become invested with essences and traits that are not necessarily ontologically apparent or natural. For example, there are statues invested with social agency that can perform all manner of fantastical feats. There are engraved rings that are ritually invested with great powers and come to be specifically described in terms of adjectives such as “beneficent,” “ merciful,” “sexually pleasing,” and so forth. This dissertation takes a close look at the specific ritual actions that allow for objects in the profane world – such as clay or stone, for example – being ascribed these kinds of powers and abilities.

For this purpose, I use cognitive and semiotic frameworks to draw out deeper meanings, analyses, and typologies of ritual action. I use the PGM as my primary source, although part of the semiotic theory that I incorporate also involves looking at how these images fit into a wider conception of the portrayal of divine interaction in literature and iconography in the ancient world. A second important aspect of this dissertation is a closer look at the practitioner of magic himself as a figure who also has (or comes to have, through the course of the ritual action) an inner essence that bestows upon him special and divine powers. An essential contribution of semiotic domain theory to this topic is the manner in which it allows us to analyze the practitioner of magic as a “specialist” thinker within the domain of religion. In this way the practitioner of magic can be compared to other “specialists” who also create new content within the semiotic domain of religion, such as the figure of the poet. Both of these figures create new content, however one happens to create very marginalized content, in the form of magic, while the other creates what is commonly interpreted as more normal “religious” content, in the form of epic and hymns about the gods. I use semiotic domain theory to offer an explanation as to why this is the case. How is it that the way magic “works,” on semiotic and cognitive levels, especially, results in it being something specifically marginalized in terms of what defines religious action? The theories I present and the topics under discussion help to explain this, thus fitting my dissertation into the ever-present debate about the definitions of magic and religion.

Committee:

Sarah Iles Johnston, PhD (Advisor); Fritz Graf, PhD (Committee Member); Carolina Lopez-Ruiz, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Classical Studies

Keywords:

Ancient magic; ancient religion; semiotics and religion;cognitive theory of religion

Uszynski, Edward T.Implicit Religion and the Highly-Identified Sports Fan: An Ethnography of Cleveland Sports Fandom
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2013, American Culture Studies
Scholarly writing on the conflation of sport as a religion regularly concentrates on the historical and institutional parallels with the religious dimensions of sport, focusing on ritual, community, sacred space, and other categories more traditionally associated with religious life. Instead, this study redirects focus toward the neo-religious nature of modern spirituality; that is, the fulfillment of Thomas Luckmanns prediction that a significant aspect of modern spirituality would concern the need to construct a self, the constantly shifting work of forming personal identity and enhancing self understanding. As such, internal commitments and intense devotion may perform as a de facto invisible religion in the lives of people. As popular culture provides useful texts toward satisfying this ongoing work, professional sports can act as a conduit of both personal and collective self understanding for highly identified fans, subsequently operating as an invisible religion within their lives. This study investigates the nature of fandom among a sample of Cleveland professional sports fans. Using a semi-structured interview format, it explores the lived world of patrons of the Parkview NiteClub, a long standing Cleveland sports bar/blues club, asking, How might the experience of this group of highly identified fans in Cleveland constitute a kind of invisible religious experience that both shapes their view of themselves and influences how they journey in this life? Using Edward Baileys tripartite implicit religion rubric to assess commitment, integrating foci, and intensive concerns with extensive effects, formal interviews with fifteen Parkview patrons took place over six months, using a semi-structured questionnaire to explore the contours of their devotion to the Cleveland teams. The interviews reveal that the co-mingling of civic history, existence of the teams, and personal life narrative of the fans themselves are intimately interwoven, producing a relationship between the three that moves the teams from mere entertainment outlet to a chief component of the fans self-understanding. They testify that much of their past history and current reality is affected by their relationship to the teams in Cleveland, and that both personal and collective identity gets continually influenced by the existence and performance of the teams themselves. Thus, this study concludes that the activity of sports fandom can be considered both invisibly and implicitly religious, and that sport fandom as a site may provide a venue for future scholarly work concerning neo-religious behavior within modern society.

Committee:

Michael Butterworth, PhD (Committee Chair); Vikki Krane, PhD (Committee Member); Bruce Edwards, PhD (Committee Member); Kara Joyner, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Religion; Spirituality

Keywords:

Cleveland, Ohio; professional sports; sport and religion; fandom; implicit religion; invisible religion; ethnography; Parkview NiteClub; Cleveland Browns; Cleveland Indians; Cleveland Cavaliers

Greenberg, David BrettHighway Religion: Truckstop Chapels, Evangelism, and Lived Religion on the Road
BA, Oberlin College, 2011, Religion

This study examines manifestations of Christian faith found along the highways of the United States, particularly in the form of truckstop chapels. Through ethnographic research and social-historical/theoretical analysis, this study seeks to explore the ways in which Evangelical Christianity, when combined with certain cultural and social particulars of the trucking profession, may be markedly re-contextualized, giving rise to distinctive approaches to ministry, worship, and religious life.

By identifying widespread and often codified specializations among trucking ministries and examining the ways in which the trucking-specific evangelism of such ministries may be applied and lived out by individual drivers of faith, this study asserts that trucking ministry is a concrete and unique social, cultural, and religious formation, the existence and properties of which allow many drivers to pursue and understand faith and profession in a seamless and unified manner.

Committee:

James Swan Tuite (Advisor); David Kamitsuka (Committee Chair); Albert G. Miller (Committee Member); Paula Richman (Committee Member); Corey Barnes (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Religion; Religious History; Transportation

Keywords:

Truck driving;Trucking;American Religion;Christianity;Evangelicalism;Truckstop chapels;Lived religion;Religion

Dippel, Stewart ArthurA study of religious thought at Oxford and Cambridge from 1560 to 1640 /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1983, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

University of Oxford--Religion;University of Cambridge--Religion;Religious thought--England--Modern period;Theology

SWINFORD, KATHERINE M.THE SEMI-FIXED NATURE OF GREEK DOMESTIC RELIGION
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2006, Arts and Sciences : Classics
The present thesis is concerned with household religion practiced during the Classical period in ancient Greece. In the past, the study of domestic cult was overlooked, and instead scholars focused on the public religion of the Greeks. These studies used literary evidence in order to describe civic religion. However, ancient texts also provide evidence for rituals practiced and gods revered in the Greek household. Literary sources indicate that domestic rituals did not require specialized equipment, and therefore, such equipment is difficult to identify in the archaeological record. This study attempts to identify such implements and examines material excavated from domestic contexts in three cities: Olynthus, Halieis, and Athens. The integration of literary sources and archaeological evidence demonstrates that common household items were used as the implements of domestic ritual. Thus, it seems that everyday, household objects assumed religious significance in certain contexts.

Committee:

Kathleen Lynch (Advisor)

Keywords:

ancient Greece; domestic ritual; domestic religion; household ritual; household religion; hearth; altar; Olynthus; Athens; Halieis

Malo, RobertaSaints' relics in medieval English literature
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, English
This dissertation, “Saints’ Relics in Medieval English Literature,” examines how the occlusion, control of and access to saints’ relics became the source of significant tensions in late medieval culture and literature. I argue that in England, conflicting ideas about papal control, institutional power and the role of the laity directly influenced the literary presentation of relics and their cults. Because saints’ relics were thought to channel God’s healing power and to work miracles, clerics highly regulated access to these body parts and objects. Literary scholars have seldom recognized this highly politicized regulation of relics. Instead, the assumption has been that relics are, as medieval theology would have it, an uncontroversial bridge between heaven and earth. I show that in fact, when they discussed relics, medieval authors were frequently using relics to explore lay experiences of hierarchical power. Relics inspire interest and even repulsion in the contemporary scholar, but in the Middle Ages, they were a crucial focal point for lay devotion and, because of their miracle-working capabilities, institutional control. Situated as they were in the shrines and churches that became places of pilgrimage, relics inspired saints’ cults and pilgrim communities, but also enabled a parish’s or cathedral’s assertions of institutional dominance. By examining the cultural history of relics, I argue that these objects functioned to consolidate Church authority and hierarchy. In this historical context, control over relics tended to be material and tactile: pilgrims were often literally kept from seeing or touching relics. In literature, however, writers tended to explore relics’ management by presenting relics as rhetorically, as well as materially, occluded. This literary phenomenon is nevertheless based on the actual incorporation of the saint’s body into the Church (in the form of a relic) and draws from the historical exclusion of lay bodies from full participation in and access to the power that the relic was thought to mediate. I show that the strict regulation of relics directly influenced literary presentations of local churches as more powerful than secular authority, as well as presentations of conflict between pilgrims and shrine-keepers.

Committee:

Lisa Kiser (Advisor)

Subjects:

Literature, Medieval

Keywords:

medieval pilgrimage and relics; pilgrimage; relics; relic custodians; Cathedral shrines and architecture; medieval religion; medieval religious culture; medieval religious literature; religion in medieval literature; Malory; Chaucer; Swithun; Erkenwald

Guiler, Peter ScottQuaker Youth Incarcerated: Abandoned Pacifist Doctrines of the Ohio Valley Friends During World War II
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2011, History
Religious groups use strong doctrinal markers to ensure and maintain their integrity and more importantly, their identity. The Ohio Valley Friends counted themselves among the traditional pacifist denominations throughout the United States in the twentieth century. With the onset of World War II, they dutifully followed this doctrine of pacifism incarcerating their youth in their own sponsored conscientious objector camp in Coshocton, Ohio. Driven by this central tenet of pacifism, through an ageist struggle to maintain identity, the Friends lost both their identity and their youth. Within two years of the entrance of the United States into the war, a sudden shift in the Ohio Valley Friend’s collective affirmations caused them to try to abandon the camp’s sponsorship, and patriotically support the U.S. militarist goal of victory. Their monthly newsletters and actions showed no changes in their theology nor radical reordering of their allegiance to their supernatural God, but rather the embrace of this same God, co-opted into a newly founded nationalist civil religion.

Committee:

Walter Hixson, Dr. (Advisor); Elizabeth Mancke, Dr. (Committee Member); Kathy Feltey, Dr. (Committee Member); Kevin Kern, Dr. (Committee Member); Kenneth Bindas, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Religion; Religious History

Keywords:

Pacifism; Quakers; Friends; Ohio Valley Friends; Ageism; World War II Conscientious Objector Camps; Religion, Civil Religion; Biblical Pacifism; Biblical Doctrines;

Spatz, Garrett M.Born (Again) This Way: Popular Music, GLBTQ Identity, and Religion
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Music Ethnomusicology

This thesis is an exploration of the relationship between religion and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (GLBTQ) identity in the United States as revealed and complicated through popular music. It is based upon three case studies consisting of the 2011 Chicago Gay Pride Parade, the musical voice of the GLBTQ community as portrayed through gay anthems and historical gay icons, and pop star Lady Gaga’s music and concert “The Monster Ball.” These three case studies build upon one another in order to further contextualize each other: the Chicago Gay Pride Parade uses music in order to redefine spaces in Chicago, the musical voice builds upon the concept of “gay” anthems by female singers, and Lady Gaga is one of the most popular contemporary gay icons. I completed much of the research for this project through ethnographic methods of participant observation and several interviews with community insiders.

I examine the 2011 Chicago Gay Pride Parade as a ritualesque event that allows for personal and societal transformations needed in order to promote acceptance of GLBTQ individuals within the United States and as a celebration of a range of identities. By reflecting on my own and others’ experiences as parade attendees and participants, I analyze music’s role in the creation of a safe space that is necessary for these transformations. This study also reveals how the GLBTQ rights movement’s aims and goals draw extensively on narratives of the American Dream, with its focus on narratives of transformation, since the movement’s aims are on transforming the GLBTQ community’s role in the United States.

Next, to show certain strategic, political aims of the GLBTQ community, I explore the musical voices with which it has identified. More often than not, GLBTQ individuals do not turn to their own voices in choosing their musical anthems but rather the voices of non-GLBTQ individuals, in a manner that I understand as strategic identification. I detail how examining the chosen voices can provide insights into the GLBTQ community. I reveal the way that black musical practices influence popular music now and historically, influencing the current gay anthems. I suggest that gay men identify with voices influenced by these black musical practices in to strategically connect the GLBTQ rights movement with the African American civil rights movement.

Finally, I explore Lady Gaga’s use of Christian-inspired language in her support of her GLBTQ fans and detail the political implications of this language. Her language reveals the importance of religious rhetoric in the United States and connects her to a larger history where religion becomes a key component of American identity and reinserts GLBTQ individuals into this discursive framework.

Committee:

Katherine Meizel, PhD (Advisor); Jeremy Wallach, PhD (Committee Member); Mary Natvig, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Popular Music; Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Identity; Religion; Politics; Civil Religion; American Exceptionalism; American Dream; Divas; Lady Gaga; "Firework" by Katy Perry; Gay Men

Zietsma, DavidIMAGINING HEAVEN AND HELL: RELIGION, NATIONAL IDENTITY, AND U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1930-1953
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2007, History
This dissertation argues that religiously framed narratives of national identity conditioned the United States approach to the world from 1930 to 1953. When the Great Depression called into question U.S. manifest destiny, Americans reified their divine chosenness first through a “good neighbor” national image and later through a narrative imagining the United States as a righteous nation battling evil enemies. During the Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman administrations, competing religious groups/organizations provided the language and images through which national these identity narratives attained their form. The destabilizing impact of the Depression allowed the temporary ascendance of Protestant liberal modernist discourse and an attendant surge in popularity for cooperative internationalism. When the good neighbor narrative failed to reconcile Americans’ experience in the world with their neighborly picture of the world, a gradual shift toward the language/imagery of neo-orthodox realism occurred as Americans began imagining the United States as a righteous defender against the evil Axis powers. World War II empowered fundamentalist Christianity, enabling a postwar transition that gradually marginalized the vestiges of pre-war religious modernism and again depicted the United States as a righteous nation, this time battling the godless Soviet Union on behalf of God-ordained free market economics and political democracy.

Committee:

Walter Hixson (Advisor)

Keywords:

United States foreign relations; U.S. religion and culture; religion and American foreign policy

Niblick, AlisonThe Impact of Minority Faith on the Experience of Mental Health Services: The Perspectives of Devotees of Earth Religions
Doctor of Psychology (PsyD), Wright State University, 2013, School of Professional Psychology
In response to an identified need in the psychological literature for research on minority religion, especially earth-centered religion, this dissertation was developed to 1) present an overview of the three main branches of contemporary earth religion, 2) illuminate the realities of minority religious identity in the United States of America, 3) collect data regarding the demographic and identity variables of devotees of earth centered religion, and 4) solicit feedback from the earth religious community regarding its understanding of psychological distress, preferred ways of coping with distress, and perceptions and experiences of professional mental health services. A total of 64 self-identified devotees of earth-centered faith completed an online questionnaire about their identity variables, experiences of psychological distress, ways of understanding distress, and experiences, perceptions, and fears pertaining to mental health services. The questionnaire was developed by the researcher based upon a literature review and consultation of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology's developmental achievement levels in diversity. Descriptive and statistical findings pertaining to this religious population are detailed. Additionally, clinical and research implications of the results, as well as limitations and strengths of the current study are identified and discussed.

Committee:

Julie Williams, PsyD, ABPP (Committee Chair); James Dobbins, PhD, ABPP (Committee Member); Eve Wolf, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Clinical Psychology; Counseling Psychology; Psychology; Psychotherapy; Religion; Spirituality; Therapy

Keywords:

mental health; spirituality; religion; psychology; therapy; cultural competence; earth religion; earth centered faith; african diaspora; lucumi; santeria; candomble; vodou; native american spirituality; american indian spirituality; paganism; witchcraft

Eberly, GraceNew Vrindaban: Pilgrimage, Patronage, and Demographic Change
Bachelor of Arts, Ohio University, 2016, Classics and World Religions
If you were to visit New Vrindaban, West Virginia (or any number of ISKCON centers in the United States) in the late 1960s or early 1970s, you would have primarily encountered young, white, counter-culturists. These Americans, with their Sanskrit spiritual names and Indian garments, moved to the commune to live off of the land in exchange for their service to the community and to the growing movement. These devotees would have been intimately familiar with the teachings of their guru and ISKCON’s founder, Prabhupada, and many would have denied a Hindu identity. If you visit the community today, you will discover a radically different scene. Driving up the long, winding road, you will pass a number of abandoned dormitories that are the only remaining vestiges of New Vrindaban’s communal past. Devotees now own their own homes and generate their own incomes. If you enter the temple on a weekend or during a holiday, you will find that roughly ninety percent of those in attendance are Hindus of South Asian descent. This thesis explores the historical and social processes which have allowed for and informed such a profound demographic transformation. It argues that New Vrindaban’s devotee and Hindu populations are strange bedfellows and, consequently, New Vrindaban’s temple is a coterminous social space in which religious and ethnic identities are reinforced, resisted, and renegotiated.

Committee:

Brian Collins (Advisor)

Subjects:

American Studies; Asian American Studies; Demographics; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Religion; Religious Congregations; South Asian Studies; Spirituality

Keywords:

New Vrindaban; ISKCON; International Society of Krishna Consciousness; Hinduism; American Religion; American Hinduism; Pilgrimage; Diasporic Religion; Diaspora

Yarrison, Fritz WilliamNormative Vs. Counter-Normative Identities: The Structural Identity Model
MA, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Sociology
Research in identity theory has previously explored a number of identities. A majority of these, however, have been identities that are socially desired and expected. This research seeks to explore a different type of identity, those that are counter-normative. The aim of this thesis is to begin the exploration of how individuals with counter-normative identities fit into the identity processes posited by identity theory. Using a nationally representative web-based survey, three groups of identities are explored. Within each group are three specific identities with varying amounts of normalcy. In order to examine the identity process across the three identities and the three sets, group structural equation modeling is used. The results examine the similarities and differences between each of the three identities with regard to the model of identity processes proposed by the structural identity theory research program. In addition, a relatively understudied component of self-esteem, authenticity, is included as an outcome of the identity model. The findings show that those individuals who claim counter-normative identities do, in fact, differ from those who claim normative identities in their experience of the identity process. These results suggest that the structural identity theory model may not carry over from normative to counter-normative identities. Future work should examine counter-normative identities more closely to determine whether a separate model is required for counter-normative identities.

Committee:

Richard Serpe, Dr. (Committee Chair); William Kalkhoff, Dr. (Committee Member); Kristen Marcussen, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Social Psychology; Sociology

Keywords:

Self, Identity, Identity Theory, Religion, Non-religion, Relationship Status, Parental Status, Counter-Normative, Salience, Prominence

Hardiman, Craig I.The nature of Hellenistic domestic sculpture in its cultural and spatial contexts
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2005, History of Art

This dissertation marks the first synthetic and contextual analysis of domestic sculpture for the whole of the Hellenistic period (323 BCE – 31 BCE). Prior to this study, Hellenistic domestic sculpture had been examined from a broadly literary perspective or had been the focus of smaller regional or site-specific studies. Rather than taking any one approach, this dissertation examines both the literary testimonia and the material record in order to develop as full a picture as possible for the location, function and meaning(s) of these pieces.

The study begins with a reconsideration of the literary evidence. The testimonia deal chiefly with the residences of the Hellenistic kings and their conspicuous displays of wealth in the most public rooms in the home, namely courtyards and dining rooms. Following this, the material evidence from the Greek mainland and Asia Minor is considered. The general evidence supports the literary testimonia’s location for these sculptures. In addition, several individual examples offer insights into the sophistication of domestic decorative programs among the Greeks, something usually associated with the Romans. Next, several distinctly Italian elements are identified, such as the prevalence of garden sculpture and domestic sculpture used in religious context. This material has tended to be studied as separate from the Greek, in spite of the view that it was largely inspired by earlier Greek examples. The multicultural island of Delos is then analyzed. It has produced the largest corpus of domestic statues and is illustrative of both Greek and Roman architectural and decorative traditions. Following this, the final chapter tackles the thorny issue of these statues’ “meaning” in light of domestic religion, suggesting that their primary purpose was as display, announcing the wealth, taste and prestige of the homeowner.

This dissertation will fill an important gap in the scholarship on Hellenistic domestic decoration. This study will offer useful insights into how private sculpture was used for and viewed by the whole of the Hellenistic landscape and how, contrary to popular belief, the material functioned in much the same manner as public sculpture.

Committee:

Mark Fullerton (Advisor)

Keywords:

Sculpture, Greek; Sculpture, Roman; Architecture, Greek; Architecture, Roman; Domestic; Hellenistic; Display; Olynthos; Priene; Eretria; Pergamon; Pompeii; Campania; Delos; Religion, Greek; Religion, Roman.

Goings, Carolyn SmithRacial Integration in One Cumberland Presbyterian Congregation: Intentionality and Reflection in Small Group
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2016, Leadership and Change
Negative attitudes toward racial minorities and consequent maltreatment of non-Whites continue to be a crisis in America. The crisis of racism is still realized in phenomena such as residential segregation (Bonilla-Silva, 2014), health disparities (Chae, Nuru-Jeter, & Adler, 2012; Chae, Nuru-Jeter, Francis, & Lincoln, 2011), and in the not-so-uncommon unjust arrests and imprisonment of persons of color (Alexander, 2012). Improvement in race relations through the development of meaningful cross racial relationships in racially integrated settings is one avenue that may lead to reduction of racism (E. Anderson, 2010; Fischer, 2011; Massey & Denton, 1993). Christian congregations are common settings in America, and Christian teachings are primary sources of Western ethics and moral values. Historically, Christian practices have affected American attitudes such as with regard to elder care, have influenced legislation such as child labor laws, and have even swayed the contents of the United States constitution. Yet, racial segregation has been the norm in Christian congregations from the end of American slavery until today. Since there may be a relationship between the persistence of segregation in Christian congregations and the persistence of racism in America, racial integration in Christian congregations may impact racial attitudes and relationships. Using Participatory Action Research, this study explored ways to improve racial integration and race relations in Christian congregations. This study utilized volunteers in a 30-day exploration of racial integration in a congregation, a small church in one of the two Cumberland Presbyterian denominations. Data from observations, interviews, racially integrated events, reflection sessions, and participant journaling were collected and analyzed. Intentionality in racial integration in one congregation resulted in cumulative positive change, at times difficult and incremental. Findings revealed that adaptive, proactive leadership enabled cross racial dialogue leading to increases in transformative relations and learning. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/, and OhioLINK ETD Center, http://etd.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Laura Morgan Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Daniel J. Earheart-Brown, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Craig Keener, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; American History; American Studies; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Bible; Biblical Studies; Black History; Black Studies; Clergy; Divinity; Ethics; Ethnic Studies; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Religion; Religious Congregations; Religious Education; Religious History; Social Research; Sociology; Spirituality; Theology

Keywords:

race relations; racial segregation; integration; churches; Christian congregations; participatory action research; Cumberland Presbyterian; leadership; Blacks; Whites; race in churches; segregated denominations; slavery and religion; race and religion;

Yarrison, Fritz WilliamA Theoretical and Methodological Advancement of Identity Theory: The Emergence of Context Specific Salience
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Sociology
Research on self and identity has a rich history in social psychology. A number of different conceptions exist that theorize the organization of the self. This dissertation focuses on the organization of self from the perspective of Identity theory. Identity theory can be broken down into three research programs; the structural, interactional, and perceptual control. Previous research in identity theory has focused heavily on the structural program's conception of identity salience as the main organization structure of the self-concept. In addition, research in identity theory has focused heavily on normative aspects of everyday life in terms of the identities explored. This dissertation discusses the challenge that counter-normative identities, or identities that individuals claim that are not what are expected in society, present for the structural research program of identity theory. The interactional research program within identity theory is discussed as one solution to the exploration of counter-normative identities. Using the identity set of religious and non-religious as an example, this dissertation examines the relationship between identity prominence and salience that has been empirically supported for normative identities. In addition, this dissertation incorporates context, a major focus of the interactional perspective of identity theory, in two ways. First, a new measure of context specific salience is developed and incorporated into analyses. Second, proximate social structure, or the structure within which individuals enact identities, is explored as a moderator of the effect between prominence and salience. The results begin to show how counter-normative identities differ from normative ones and highlight the importance of context and the interactional perspective of identity theory, especially when incorporating counter-normative identities.

Committee:

Richard Serpe, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Will Kalkhoff, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Susan Fisk, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Philip Brenner, Ph.D. (Committee Member); John Updegraff, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

Social Psychology; Self and Identity; Religion and Non-religion; Contextual Salience

Korb, Laurie LynnAn Investigation into the Relationship Between Aspects of Religiosity and Marital Functioning Among Evangelical Christians
Master of Science, Miami University, 2007, Family and Child Studies
The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between several dimensions of religiosity and marital functioning among married couples living in the Western New York area. Participants were 111 individuals from one Evangelical Christian church. A scale, Integration of Biblical Principles, was developed and tested for this study. Several aspects of religiosity were found to be correlated with marital functioning, but integration of Biblical principles had the strongest association. Regression analysis determined number of years married, belief construct, and integration of Biblical principles were the best predictors of marital functioning. As hypothesized, the integration dimension of religiosity, or application, is the best predictor of marital functioning compared with other religiosity variables tested. Implications for refinement of the Integration scale and for the usefulness of the study results are discussed.

Committee:

Charles Hennon (Advisor)

Keywords:

integration of Biblical principles; integration of beliefs; marital functioning; religion; religiosity; aspects of religion; evangelical Christians; born again Christians

Anderson, Paul D.Rural Urban Differences in Educational Outcomes: Does Religious Social Capital Matter?
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Arts and Sciences: Sociology
Even though sociologists have researched religion for many years, the exact mechanisms involved in religious effects on adolescent outcomes remains unclear. In recent years researchers have turned to social capital, and more specifically religious social capital, in an effort to more accurately predict life outcomes. However, despite findings indicating that religious social capital improves behavioral outcomes and educational achievement, contradictory results have emerged due to methodological and measurement limitations. Therefore, using data from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) survey I determined the factors associated with the accumulation of religious social capital and the effects of demographic and geographic factors on religious social capital. In addition, a new religious social capital measure was created and a more in-depth classification of religious groups was used in these analyses. Findings suggest that there are unique differences in the accumulation of and the effects of religious social capital on adolescent outcomes by religious groups with conservative Protestants experiencing the most beneficial effects of religious social capital. The results also indicate that the geographic location of a school and the religious composition of a given area created significant differences within and between religious groups. This dissertation advances the body of religious research on adolescents by adding a unique perspective to a crowded research area.

Committee:

Littisha Bates, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Sarah Mayorga-Gallo, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jeffrey Timberlake, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

Religious Social Capital;Religion;Education;Sociology of Religion;Sociology of Education;Contextual

Feiner, Christina AnnFifth Monarchist Constructions and Presentations of Gender in Print
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2015, History
This thesis argues that Fifth Monarchist ideas on gender were not easily categorized because of the active construction and negotiation of gender within their religious/political ideological framework and within Interregnum England. The study argues this through a series of cases studies of two male and two female Fifth Monarchists. This thesis contributes to the field with a gender analysis of the male Fifth Monarchists.

Committee:

Michael Graham (Advisor); Michael Levin (Advisor)

Subjects:

European History; Gender; History; Religious History

Keywords:

gender; print; Fifth Monarchist; Early Modern England; England; radical religion; Interregnum England; Mary Cary; Anna Trapnel; John Rogers; Christopher Feake; European History; history; religion

ROSEN-GALVIN, CHRISTINA MARIEVALUES, SPIRITUALITY, AND RELIGIOUS TOPICS DISCUSSED IN COUNSELING SUPERVISION
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2004, Education : Counselor Education
This study examined the extent that counselors receiving supervision are encouraged to discuss spiritual or religious issues. Information was gathered using quantitative and qualitative methods to determine the extent to which counselors and supervisors discuss spiritual or religious beliefs during supervision sessions. The study questioned whether counselors may not be discussing religious and spiritual concerns due to counselor competency, possible ethical concerns, and counselors’ relationship with supervisors.Counselors receiving supervision and supervisors providing clinical supervision received a quantitative questionnaire to identify topics discussed during supervision. Following the completion of the questionnaire, six counselors and six supervisors were involved in structured interviews. In the process of these interviews, emphasis was placed on the potential barriers preventing counselors or supervisors from discussing issues of values, religion, and spirituality. There were significant differences in counselors’ and supervisors’ perceptions of the extent that values were discussed in supervision: 68% of supervisors and 30% of counselors reported discussing values. Furthermore, in the interview process, all the supervisors reported discussing values and only some counselors reported likewise. There were also statistical significant differences in the perceptions of counselors and supervisors regarding the presence of religious discussions: 33% of supervisors and 5% of counselors indicating religion was addressed. Similarly, in the interviewing process, all supervisors stated religion was addressed, and only two counselors indicated the same. There were no statistical significant differences relating to supervisors’ and counselors’ perceptions of potential discussions of spirituality: 37% of supervisors and 25% of counselors reporting spirituality was addressed. Nonetheless, in the qualitative analyses, all supervisors reported the discussion of spirituality in supervision while the majority of counselors reported no such discussions. Counselors indicated several reasons for not addressing religion or spirituality in supervision including: lack of safety, feeling incompetent, worry that the supervisor wasn’t initiating such a topic, belief it may be irrelevant, and concerns that such topics might not be ethical. The study has furthered the current knowledge on the extent to which counselors are receiving supervision on how best to deal with spiritual and religious topics.

Committee:

Dr. Geoffrey Yager (Advisor)

Keywords:

Values, Spirituality, Religious, Counseling Supervision; Counselor; Supervisor; Values; Religion; Spirituality; Counseling Supervision; Mental Health and Values, Religion, Spirituality

Ellis, Steven GRELIGION, CIVIL RELIGION, AND THE PRESIDENCY: EXISTENCE AND USES OF AMERICA’S COMMON THREAD
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2006, Political Science
This paper attempts to describe the religious and civil religious discourse used by presidents during their inaugural addresses and State of the Union speeches, overlooked in the literature. This deductive, plausibility probe categorizes different words into different categories. It begins by offering definitions of religion and civil religion, separating interested words into either religious or civil religious categories, and then further attempts to subcategorize relevant words into groups that may explain a possible usage for their choice in the speech. From these subcategories, possible hypotheses were developed for future research. From the study, results show that religious and civil religious discourse is used for several purposes (ties to history, links to a common heritage, creating a common belief, policy objectives). This paper also presents limitations with the study and directions for future research into political discourse regarding religious and civil religious usage.

Committee:

Ryan Barilleaux (Advisor)

Subjects:

Political Science, General

Keywords:

civil religion; religion; presidency

Farley, Jared A.The Politicalization of the American Evangelical Press, 1960-1981: A Test of the Ideological Theory of Social Movement Mobilization
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2006, Political Science
In the last decade, scholars have increasingly begun to study the role of issue entrepreneurs and subculture elites in utilizing ideologies, frames and cultural symbolism in the mobilization of social and political movements. Despite this, one of the most important social/political movements of the last century, the rise of the Evangelical Right, has largely escaped examination through these lenses. A limited number have focused their attention upon the more prominent evangelical leaders, like Rev. Jerry Falwell, but this work examines the evangelical subculture from a broader perspective. A similar criticism is that the scholarship in this field often oversimplifies this political reawakening. Researchers often suggest that the 1976 presidential campaign of fellow evangelical Jimmy Carter was the central mobilizing force which propelled white evangelicals into the electoral arena, causing secular conservative political operatives to realize the dormant electoral potential of this community. This study shows that operatives and elites within the evangelical subculture were moving to politicalize the subculture long before the 1980 election, the establishment of Jerry Falwell’s Moral Majority or even the 1976 election. Finally, this study provides an analysis of the ideology evangelicals were mobilized under during the 1960s and 1970s. Social movement scholars have recently begun talking about the functions movement ideologies must serve for a mobilization to be successful. This study tests these hypotheses with a systematic, empirical, primary source analysis, rather than the nonsystematic, hearsay or anecdotal evidence that exemplifies most of the social movements’ literature. The final chapter provides an overview of the political ideology and issue framing which emerge from the pages of the major evangelical periodicals of this time period. This politicalization of the evangelical subculture is an important topic for analysis not only because of what it can tell us about the top-down mobilization of social/political movements, but also because of the insights it lends to the formation of one of the most significant and powerful political movements in recent history.

Committee:

Ryan Barilleaux (Advisor)

Keywords:

religious right; Christian right; evangelical right; Christian conservatives; evangelical magazines; social movements; religion and politics; Christianity Today; Christian Life; Moody Monthly; Decision

Rothfuss, David AlexanderFireworks and Sex! A field study guide to America's shiniest religion
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2011, English
Fireworks and Sex! is a new religion I’m launching so I can get rich without paying taxes. The religious document that follows, which you’re probably not even allowed to read on account of copyright restrictions, is pretty standard as religious documents go, providing you, the religious consumer, with 154 pages of morally ambiguous poems, fables and doodles to base your life upon. It is by far the most American religion out there, and a sure-fire path to a shinier existence, with the average follower experiencing 74% more happiness, 93% more freedom, and 87% more American Dream than those in other religions. If you were allowed to read it, which you’re not, it would provide you with an inside track to God and eternal salvation.

Committee:

Keith Tuma (Advisor); David Schloss (Committee Chair); cris cheek (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Religion

Keywords:

American Dreamscape; religion; ponies; bling bling; satire; poet laureate; donald rumsfeld; self actualization and personal betterment through making God love you more by being a shinier person; great american novels

Rosenbohm, Clifford James MichaelPerceptions and experiences of BSW students with religion and spirituality in social work education and practice
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2011, Social Welfare

The role of religion and spirituality has not always been included in conversations about social work education and practice, but there has been an increased interest in the topics as evidenced by the attention given to religion and spirituality in the professional literature. Although there have been multiple studies focused on students at the masters’ level as well as with practitioners and a few with faculty there were even less with social work students at the undergraduate level.

Using a cross-sectional survey design, a national stratified random sample of social work programs were asked to invite senior BSW students to respond to an online questionnaire about their perceptions and experiences of religion and spirituality in social work education and practice. The final sample consisted of 412 seniors enrolled in 56 accredited social work programs from across the United States.

Student perceptions about the role of religion and spirituality in social work education and practice were explored with specific attention to differences between students attending public and church-related schools. Students’ experiences with religion and spirituality in their education as well as their personal religious and/or spiritual beliefs and practices were investigated. Views about the appropriateness and use of specific spiritually-derived interventions were explored. Student attitudes toward the role of religion and spirituality in social work practice were generally positive, however there were significant differences between students on several items (e.g. levels of preparation, satisfaction, content, and personal beliefs).

Committee:

Kathleen Farkas, PhD (Committee Chair); Joy Bostic, PhD (Committee Member); M. C. Terry Hokenstad, PhD (Committee Member); Elizabeth Tracy, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education; Religion; Social Work; Spirituality

Keywords:

religion; spirituality; BSW; social work education; practice; school auspice

Smidt, Andrea J.Fiestas and fervor: religious life and Catholic enlightenment in the Diocese of Barcelona, 1766-1775
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2006, History

The Enlightenment, or the “Age of Reason,” had a profound impact on eighteenth-century Europe, especially on its religion, producing both outright atheism and powerful movements of religious reform within the Church. The former – culminating in the French Revolution – has attracted many scholars; the latter has been relatively neglected. By looking at “enlightened” attempts to reform popular religious practices in Spain, my project examines the religious fervor of people whose story usually escapes historical attention. “Fiestas and Fervor” reveals the capacity of the Enlightenment to reform the Catholicism of ordinary Spaniards, examining how enlightened or Reform Catholicism affected popular piety in the diocese of Barcelona.

This study focuses on the efforts of an exceptional figure of Reform Catholicism and Enlightenment Spain – Josep Climent i Avinent, Bishop of Barcelona from 1766-1775. The program of “Enlightenment” as sponsored by the Spanish monarchy was one that did not question the Catholic faith and that championed economic progress and the advancement of the sciences, primarily benefiting the elite of Spanish society. In this context, Climent is noteworthy not only because his idea of “Catholic Enlightenment” opposed that sponsored by the Spanish monarchy but also because his was one that implicitly condemned the present hierarchy of the Catholic Church and explicitly advocated popular enlightenment and the creation of a more independent “public sphere” in Spain by means of increased literacy and education of the masses.

Examining the types of popular – albeit exterior – religious practices that were the object of reform as well as Climent’s efforts to promote a better understanding of the Catholic faith which focused on interior rather than exterior forms of piety, I argue that by establishing gratis elementary schools, reforming seminary curricula, and mass-distributing books and pamphlets Climent was able to bring “Enlightenment” to eighteenth-century Barcelona. Illustrating the tensions created by the differing enlightened projects proposed by Climent and the Spanish monarchy, Climent was forced to abdicate. Although he had to step down, branded a “Catalan separatist” by the Council of Castile, Climent’s plan for reform and his implementation of that plan had a larger impact on the form the Enlightenment took in Spain and calls for a re-examination of what was perceived as the Enlightenment in eighteenth-century Europe.

Committee:

Dale Van Kley (Advisor)

Subjects:

History, European

Keywords:

Enlightenment; Catholic Enlightenment; Spanish Enlightenment; Jansenism; Eighteenth-Century Catholic Reform; Enlightened Despotism; Enlightened Catholicism; Local Religion; Spanish Lay Piety; Tridentine Reform

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