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Casaday, Brian PatrickInvestigation of Particle Deposition in Internal Cooling Cavities of a Nozzle Guide Vane
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Aero/Astro Engineering
Experimental and computational studies were conducted regarding particle deposition in the internal film cooling cavities of nozzle guide vanes. An experimental facility was fabricated to simulate particle deposition on an impingement liner and upstream surface of a nozzle guide vane wall. The facility supplied particle-laden flow at temperatures up to 1000°F (540°C) to a simplified impingement cooling test section. The heated flow passed through a perforated impingement plate and impacted on a heated flat wall. The particle-laden impingement jets resulted in the buildup of deposit cones associated with individual impingement jets. The deposit growth rate increased with increasing temperature and decreasing impinging velocities. For some low flow rates or high flow temperatures, the deposit cones heights spanned the entire gap between the impingement plate and wall, and grew through the impingement holes. For high flow rates, deposit structures were removed by shear forces from the flow. At low temperatures, deposit formed not only as individual cones, but as ridges located at the mid-planes between impinging jets. A computational model was developed to predict the deposit buildup seen in the experiments. The test section geometry and fluid flow from the experiment were replicated computationally and an Eulerian-Lagrangian particle tracking technique was employed. Several particle sticking models were employed and tested for adequacy. Sticking models that accurately predicted locations and rates in external deposition experiments failed to predict certain structures or rates seen in internal applications. A geometry adaptation technique was employed and the effect on deposition prediction was discussed. A new computational sticking model was developed that predicts deposition rates based on the local wall shear. The growth patterns were compared to experiments under different operating conditions. Of all the sticking models employed, the model based on wall shear, in conjunction with geometry adaptation, proved to be the most accurate in predicting the forms of deposit growth. It was the only model that predicted the changing deposition trends based on flow temperature or Reynolds number, and is recommended for further investigation and application in the modeling of deposition in internal cooling cavities.

Committee:

Jeffrey Bons (Advisor); Ali Ameri (Committee Member); Michael Dunn (Committee Member); Datta Gaitonde (Committee Member); Sandip Mazumder (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aerospace Engineering

Keywords:

particle deposition; turbomachinery; internal cooling, engine fouling

Yerich, Andrew JDevelopment of an Artificial Nose for the Study of Nanomaterials Deposition in Nasal Olfactory Region
Master of Science, Miami University, 2017, Chemical, Paper & Biomedical Engineering
Engineered nanoparticles show great promise as a future medium for drug delivery due to their ability to transport great distances within the human body. Recent studies have shown that some nanoparticles may have the ability to diffuse to the central nervous system by means of the olfactory region of the nasal cavity. Although animal models and human simulations are available, the information they can provide is limited. In order to better test nanoparticles on this possible pathway, this study has created a more advanced respiratory device that incorporates a microfluidic device in a nasal cavity model to mimic the olfactory region through 3D modeling and printing. The unique geometry of the nasal cavity allows for the gathering of more realistic results. This unique respiratory device, in conjunction with an artificial lung apparatus, is able to accurately simulate a breathing human nasal cavity. During this study, the artificial nasal cavity was exposed to particles of varying sizes to determine the dosage reaching the olfactory region, which in turn can be used to determine which types of particles are most likely to travel this pathway. Results show similar trends to that of past studies: smaller nanoparticles are more effective at transporting to the olfactory region. While preliminary results are promising, further modifications to the setup are discussed that might better simulate an actual nasal cavity as well as to incorporate cell culture into the design.

Committee:

Lei Kerr, PhD (Advisor); Shashi Lalvani, PhD (Committee Member); Douglas Coffin, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biomedical Engineering; Chemical Engineering

Keywords:

olfactory; nasal cavity; nose; nanoparticles; nanomaterials; drug delivery; 3D printing; model; in vitro; particle deposition; gold nanoparticles; neurological drug delivery; microfluidics; organ-on-chip; microfluidic devices