Search Results (1 - 18 of 18 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Engerer, Pamela J.Teacher Actions Secondary Science Students Reckon as Teacher-to-Student Classroom Respect
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, 2017, Secondary Education
Conducted over 5 weeks, this multiple case study involved seven secondary science students in an urban, STEM-focused high school. Observations, documents, and interviews were used to obtain feedback on teacher-to-student respect from the student point-of-view in answer to the question: What actions by teachers do students reckon as representations of teacher-to-student respect in the classroom? The purposes were: to understand a complex phenomenon, to add to the educational knowledge base, and to inform constituencies (Newman, Ridenour, Newman & DeMarco, 2003). Two themes, person-to-person respect and learner-to-learner respect, emerged along with seven categories of teacher actions of respect: Gives, Lets, Treats, Listens, Understands, Helps, and Answers. Students reckon as respect any teacher action that affectively or cognitively meets or exceeds students’ respect desires or respect expectations by encouraging or supporting students as persons or as learners. Two respect-reckoning questions and two meaning-making questions were representative of the types of questions students ask themselves; despite use of similar mechanisms, students reckon respect and make meaning variably. Interpreted via Goodman’s (2009) framework, person-to-person (interpersonal) respect serves as a gateway to learner-to-learner respect. Of the three categories of interpersonal respect (Gives, Lets, and Treats), Gives serves as a precursor to Lets and Treats. By respecting a student, a teacher earns that student’s respect. Though investigated via science, results are presented via art in a play: Between the Bells.

Committee:

Francis Broadway, Ph.D. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Science Education; Secondary Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Aesthetic; Art; Chemistry; Conflict resolution; Critical incident; Democratic; Expectation; Experience; Interaction; Multiple case study; Public STEM high school; Respect; Science; Secondary education; Teacher-to-student respect; Transactional analysis

Tsai, Shiao-ChenAcademic Listening and Note-Taking: A Multiple-Case Study of First-Year International Undergraduate Students’ Experiences in Different Instructional Contexts at an American University
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, EDU Teaching and Learning
Lecture note-taking skills have been studied in the context of academic listening for a long time; however, these studies have not clarified the relationship between the learners’ listening comprehension and their note-taking skills in different lecture contexts. Nowadays, many lectures are filled with various multimedia that support teaching and engage students in large class settings. What is not known is whether and how the nature of the input from these varying multimodal instructional sources may impact, positively or negatively, on second language (L2) students’ listening and note-taking experiences and efficacy. Students now have to distribute their attentional resources skillfully to account for the new combinations of visual and aural input from lecturers, and this situation could pose listening and note-taking challenges for first-year international students, who are learning how to learn in a new educational context while still developing their L2 proficiency in the language of instruction. Given these circumstances, the objectives of this dissertation were: (1) to present multiple portraits of international students’ development of lecture listening and note-taking skills, (2) to examine how different course settings affected their listening and note-taking approaches, (3) to identify the similarities and differences in their listening and note-taking methods, and (4) to provide insights into the realm of academic listening by scrutinizing the interplay between various factors that can shape students’ listening and note-taking experiences. In this multiple-case study, I observed six Chinese-speaking international students in their first semester studying at a Midwestern university in the United States. To record their development of listening and note-taking skills as well as the difficulties they encountered, I collected various types of data, including classroom observations, recall protocols, students’ notes, individual interviews, and online checklists. I inductively analyzed the data by focusing on: (1) experiences in multimedia lecture contexts, (2) primary considerations for taking notes, (3) the reasons for using L1 words in note-taking, and (4) the relationship between one’s listening strategies and note-taking performances. Baddeley’s (2000) Working Memory model was applied as a conceptual framework to interpret the findings, as the students took in both verbal and visual input from lectures and then recalled their prior knowledge stored in long-term memory to make connections between the new information and the old information before they decided what information should be noted for later review. The findings revealed that attention control was the key to one’s listening comprehension and note-taking in lecture contexts, and to retrieve relevant information from long-term memory to connect the new information with previous learning. The most salient contextual factors for the students’ attention control were visual aids, exam formats, lecture pace and classroom activities, while the most direct learner factors were their content previewing habits, prior knowledge, and their learning motivation. Those findings have enriched Baddeley’s (2000) model by explaining the mechanism of attention control and its influences on learner’s note-taking strategies in different lecture scenarios.

Committee:

Alan Hirvela (Advisor); Leslie Moore (Committee Member); Keiko Samimy (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

academic listening, note-taking, case study, multiple-case study, multimedia, lecture listening, working memory, international students, Chinese students, higher education, study strategies, qualitative data, checklist data

Borrup, TomCreativity in Urban Placemaking: Horizontal Networks and Social Equity in Three Cultural Districts
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2015, Leadership and Change
Many authors point to expanding disparities related to wealth and social benefits brought by globalization and the creative city movement while culture and creativity emerge as growing forces in urban placemaking and economic development. The phenomenon of cultural district formation in cities around the globe presents challenges and opportunities for leaders, planners, and managers. Emerging theory related to cultural districts suggests culture can serve to build horizontal relationships that bridge people and networks from different sectors and professions as well as across ethnicities, class, and interests. Research for this dissertation examined the formation of three urban cultural districts social and their respective organizational networks in different contexts. I employed a multiple case study approach to ask: How do horizontal networks form in the process of planning, organizing and/or ongoing management of cultural districts, and what kinds of benefits do those networks generate within their communities? Field research focused on districts in Los Angeles, Minneapolis, and Miami. This dissertation is positioned within ongoing discourse around the tension between form and function in the production of space (Lefebvre, 1974/1991) and within the dialectic of centralization and decentralization in urban planning and governance (Friedmann, 1971) characterized by the push for broad social equity and the pull of local control. Research found that strong horizontal networks characterized by dense and active grassroots leadership were present at the same time as relative community stability and higher levels of social and economic equity. Where horizontal networks were weak, social and economic tensions were higher. The research did not examine other potential factors and thus cannot ascertain whether strong networks resulted in greater stability and equity or whether stability and more equitable conditions brought on by other factors fostered the formation of stronger networks. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA, http://aura.antioch.edu/etds/ and OhioLink ETD Center, http://www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mark J. Stern, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Emily Talen, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Area Planning and Development; Arts Management; Cultural Resources Management; Urban Planning

Keywords:

urban cultural districts; creative cities; economic development; multiple case study; placemaking; Los Angeles; Minneapolis; Miami; leadership; horizontal networks; arts districts; city planning; community revitalization; redevelopment; regeneration

Bond, Vanessa LeBlancSounds to Share: The State of Music Education in Three Reggio Emilia-Inspired North American Preschools
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2012, Music Education
Renowned around the world (Kantrowitz & Wingert, 1991), schools within the Municipality of Reggio Emilia, Italy have inspired North American early childhood educators for over twenty-five years. American educators began adopting the Reggio Emilia approach (REA) in the 1990s and have since expanded into a wide network of Reggio-inspired American educators. Despite the REA’s popularity and usage in the United States, music educators may be unfamiliar with this approach. There is a distinct lack of research that has discussed the use of music or application of music education in Reggio-inspired schools. The purpose of this multiple case study was to examine the state of music education in three North American preschools inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood education. The research was guided by three questions: (a) How is music socially constructed and integrated into a Reggio Emilia-inspired preschool classroom’s daily life curriculum?, (b) How does music education in Reggio-inspired classrooms compare to the National Pre-K Music Standards?, and (c) What aspects of Reggio Emilia-inspired preschools may be transferable to early childhood music classroom contexts? The researcher spent two weeks at each of three Reggio-inspired preschools in the United States, collecting data through observation, participant-observation, interviews, and document collection. Transcribed data were analyzed through reading and reflection, developing and assigning codes, and identifying prominent themes. Each case was analyzed and written separately before completing a cross-case analysis. Themes included social-construction of musical knowledge, children’s engagement in musical activities, catalysts for making music, music as one of the hundred languages, site-specific differences, comparison to National Pre-K Music Standards, transferable aspects of Reggio-inspired schools to early childhood music classrooms, and considerations of context. The researcher asserted that music was prevalent in these schools and that several models of the music teacher role existed. Furthermore, the researcher demonstrated that there was a definitive goodness of fit between the Reggio Emilia approach and early childhood music education. More work needs to be done to realize the full potential of this organic, synergistic relationship.

Committee:

Lisa H. Koops, PhD (Advisor); Matthew L. Garrett, PhD (Committee Member); Kathleen A. Horvath, PhD (Committee Member); Eileen P. Anderson-Fye, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music Education

Keywords:

Reggio Emilia approach; music education; early childhood music education; multiple case study; constructivism

Beanblossom, Kathryn M.EXPLORING THE EXPERIENCES AND PERCEPTIONS OF PERSONS DIAGNOSED WITH EARLY ONSET DEMENTIA AND THEIR PRIMARY CAREGIVERS
Master of Gerontological Studies, Miami University, 2013, Gerontology
This study explores how early onset dementia (EOD); i.e., dementia before the age of 65, affects an individual’s life and the life of their primary caregiver, how participants’ view the current services they receive from their local Alzheimer’s Association, and what additional services would benefit those affected by EOD. Participants were recruited from two Alzheimer’s Association chapters in the Midwest, where all participants attended a support group. Interviews were conducted with 7 persons with dementia and 6 of their primary caregivers. Using a case study approach, three central elements dominated the participants’ stories. First, the initial support received from doctors when diagnosed has a large impact on families. Second, families are generally happy with the support group they attend, whether it is specific to EOD or not; however, some participants did identify limitations to their support group. Finally, a greater amount of meaningful activities for persons with EOD are desired.

Committee:

Jennifer Kinney, Dr. (Committee Chair); Kate de Medeiros , Dr. (Committee Member); Ronald Bulanda, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aging; Social Research; Social Work

Keywords:

early onset dementia; services; multiple case study

Lim, Eun-JungSignificant Influences in the Lives of Senior Citizens: Reflections on Music Experiences during School Years and Beyond
PHD, Kent State University, 2012, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
The purpose of this study was to explore the influences of school music experiences on senior citizens’ musical sensibilities, tastes, or abilities by examining their recollected stories about music experiences from their school years. The author employed a multiple-case study design to enable contextual insights into personal interactions with music. With the convenience sampling method, six research participants were recruited, all of whom were age 55 or older, lived in northeastern Ohio, attended U.S. schools for their K–12 education, and had never had any professional experience in the field of music. Data were collected through participant interviews with open-ended questions, journal writings, and researcher field notes, all of which provided evidence for coherence, reliability, and validity. The collected raw data were analyzed in two ways: summarized documentation and code analysis with the cross-case method. The research findings revealed the importance of school music experiences in the development of musical sensibilities, tastes, or abilities. In particular, human interaction between students, teachers, and family members is clearly a significant factor in defining personal music experiences and that school music education does not meet musical needs. School music educators are, therefore, recommended to create learning opportunities for students by developing a feasible curriculum to meet a variety of students’ musical interests, provide a professional development program for music teachers and preservice teachers, and establish a collaborative music program with family and local communities.

Committee:

James Henderson, Ed.D. (Advisor); Craig Resta, Ph.D. (Advisor); Kenneth Cushner, Ed.D. (Committee Member); Kwang-Sae Lee, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Music Education

Keywords:

music education;music experience;music curriculum;influence of music experience;lifelong learning;multiple case study;

Waisner, Cynthia L.Through the Eyes of the Family: A Collective Case Study of Family Business Consulting
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
Interest in family businesses has increased over the last 50 years. Little empirical research, however, has been devoted specifically to the study of family business consulting. Various practitioners have offered their insights regarding approaches and tools, and a few empirical studies have offered the practitioners’ viewpoints regarding the practice area. The purpose of this study was to add to this small body of research by providing a view of family business consulting through the lens of the family business member. The chosen method of inquiry was collective case study, to allow for both contextual understanding and cross-case comparison. A total of nine participants across three cases were involved in the study. Several primary themes emerged from the study. To be considered a family business consultant by family members, a consultant needed to have entered the family business system through the family portal. The work of family business consultants was focused on inter-generational issues. Factors important to a successful consultation included chemistry with the family business leader, trust, values, and the involvement of non-business spouses. Finally, family members identified the maintenance of intact family member relationships as an important component of success in a family business consultation. Themes suggested by this study both supported and extended findings exploring family business consulting from the practitioner's point of view. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Mitchell Kusy, PhD (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Randel Carlock, PhD (Committee Member); Keith Cross, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Behavioral Sciences; Business Administration; Business Community; Entrepreneurship; Families and Family Life; Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Personal Relationships; Psychology

Keywords:

family business consulting; family enterprise; family firms; family-owned business; multiple case study; organization development; consultant; trust; values; consulting models; leadership; succession; intergenerational change; entrepreneurs

Vurdelja, IvaHow Leaders Think: Measuring Cognitive Complexity in Leading Organizational Change
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2011, Leadership and Change
The ability to lead complex organizational change is considered the most difficult leadership responsibility. Habitual linear thinking based on sequential procedural decision making is insufficient when responding to ambiguous and unpredictable challenges and interpreting systemic variables in the context of unforeseen problems, risks, and invisible interrelationships. The purpose of this exploratory multiple case study was to expand our understanding of the structure of the thinking employed by executive leaders as initiators and enablers of complex, large-scale organizational change. The researcher integrated knowledge of adult cognitive development and organizational leadership to examine the higher forms of reasoning abilities required for dealing with the complex and nonlinear nature of change. By using Laske‘s (2009) dialectical thought form (DTF) framework, the researcher explored the existence of dialectical thinking through structural analysis of interviews with 10 senior leaders who successfully transformed their respective organizations. Specifically, the study explored: (1) To what degree do the sponsors of organizational change engage in dialectical thinking in their work? (2) Is complexity of thinking related to complexity of sponsorship roles? (3) What phase of cognitive development must sponsors of transformational change attain to become effective change agents? (4) Does a higher level of dialectical thinking lead to more effective sponsorship of transformational, complex change? The results revealed that all 10 effective leaders were fully developed dialectical thinkers and that each one had a unique pattern of dialectical thinking. Data illustrated how metasystemic thinkers, despite their surface similarities, have deep epistemological differences that indicate profoundly different areas of strength and developmental needs. The potential application of the DTF framework as a developmental tool for expanding cognitive capabilities to deal with complex change is addressed and explored. The study opens an array of opportunities for another, richer way of looking at adult development. The electronic version of this dissertation is available in the open-access OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Jon Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Laurien Alexandre, PhD (Committee Member); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Daryl Conner, MA (Committee Member); Linda Hoopes, PhD (Committee Member); Sara Nora Ross, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Business Education; Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Epistemology; Management

Keywords:

multiple case study; senior executives; complexity; CEOs; change leaders; adult cognitive development; change sponsorship; leading change; dialectical thinking; metasystemic thinking

Hansen, Sean WilliamA Socio-Technical Perspective on Requirements Engineering
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2010, Management

This dissertation explores facets of contemporary requirements engineering (RE) practice as they emerge in situ. Requirements-based processes have been a primary source of project distress and failure in information systems development (ISD) work. Despite more than 30 years of associated research, IS professionals and organizational managers continue to wrestle with the challenges inherent in all design undertakings: What is it that we want to create? To what constraints must our design conform? At their core, these considerations are questions about requirements.

The persistence of requirements-related difficulties in ISD is augmented by the fact that the research community has struggled to keep pace with changing contingencies within RE practice. This apparent disconnect may reflect the observation that RE research, while developing a multiplicity of formal and computational models for how to reason about requirements, has remained largely a-theoretical in its view of RE as a socio-technical endeavor. I seek to address the lack of theoretical inquiries around the socio-technical processes surrounding RE through the application of available theories of social cognition and the generation of novel theorizing. The research centers on three studies approaching RE as a socio-technical process: 1) a field study of contemporary approaches to RE; 2) an analysis of prevalent socio-technical RE challenges and mitigation approaches using grounded theory methodology and simulation; and 3) a multi-case study of RE processes focusing on their cognitively-distributed nature.

This research addresses multiple objectives, including the discernment of trends in RE, the development of novel theory around RE challenges, and the application of distributed cognition theory to integrate disparate facets of RE research. My findings suggest that socio-technical issues in RE have received limited consideration and that wider application of theoretical principles could better position RE researchers to support IS professionals in addressing the persistent challenges of the requirements undertaking.

Committee:

Kalle Lyytinen, PhD (Committee Chair); Richard J. Boland, PhD (Committee Member); Fred Collopy, PhD (Committee Member); John L. King, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Information Systems; Management; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Information systems development; requirements engineering; requirements challenges; requirements quality; mitigation strategies; distributed cognition; multiple case study; grounded theory; simulation

Johnson, BrianCan Education Improve the Environment? Applying the Pressure-State-Response Environmental Indicator Framework to Environmental Education Program Outcomes
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2013, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies
The purpose of this study was to investigate the ways in which environmental education (EE) programs are contributing to environmental quality (EQ) improvement. The research applied the Pressure-State-Response (PSR) environmental indicator framework to the reported outcomes of 103 EE programs in order to 1) determine the extent to which existing EE programs are reporting EQ improvement outcomes; and 2) examine the extent to which these programs are impacting indicators in the three areas of the PSR framework. The study consisted of three research phases: evaluation synthesis, semi-structured interviews, and multiple-case study. The study found that 42 of 103 programs (41%) in the study's sample reported one or more outcomes that could be considered an EQ improvement based on the PSR framework. Of the 91 instances of EQ-related outcomes reported by the 42 EE programs, 75 (82%) were categorized as response outcomes, 13 (14%) as pressure outcomes, and three (3%) as state outcomes. Another finding of this study was that EE practitioners said that EE can and should improve EQ. Barriers to EQ evaluation of EE programs, as cited by EE practitioners, included the scale of EQ issues versus the scale of EE programs; a lack of evaluation tools and understanding; and limited time and money for evaluation. Finally, the findings suggest that factors that may promote EQ improvement outcomes of EE programs include real-world application of learning; strong partnerships; and a commitment to environmental change. The electronic version of this dissertation is available in the open-access Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Elizabeth McCann, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); James Gruber, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Marianne Krasny, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Evaluation; Environmental Education; Environmental Studies; Natural Resource Management; Sustainability; Teaching

Keywords:

Environmental Education; Environmental Quality; Environmental Indicators; Pressure-State-Response; Evaluation; Environmental Actions; Evaluation Synthesis; Semi-structured Interviews; Multiple-case Study

Zike, Derek MichaelAthletes' Experiences of Leaving Sport Due to Spinal Cord Injury: A Multiple Case Study Examination
Master of Science, Miami University, 2016, Sport Studies
Leaving sport can be a difficult transition for an athlete. This process is one comprised of both positive and negative events, which can significantly affect individual development. Much of the previous research utilizing the Conceptual Model of Adaptation to Retirement Among Athletes (Taylor & Ogilvie, 1994) has focused on normative and non-normative career-ending injury. No prior investigations have used the entire conceptual model to focus on spinal cord injury specifically. This study was a multiple case investigation into athletes’ experiences of leaving able-bodied sport with a spinal cord injury. Semi-structured interviews and multiple inventories were conducted with three athletes who had left able-bodied sport due to a spinal cord injury. In general, findings indicated that athletes adjusted to transition in various positive and negative ways. The influence of the adaptive community, coping strategies, and social support were perceived to facilitate transition. Support for the conceptual model was found.

Committee:

Robin Vealey (Advisor); Valeria Freysinger (Committee Member); Karly Geller (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health; Kinesiology; Recreation

Keywords:

spinal cord injury; sport career transition; adaptive sport; social support; self-concept; life satisfaction; athletic retirement; athlete; multiple case study; quality of adaptation; normalcy; adaptive community

Hower, Mark A.Faculty Work: Moving Beyond the Paradox of Autonomy and Collaboration
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
Freedom to pursue one's intellectual interests, known as professional autonomy, is a valued and longstanding faculty tradition. Profound changes in society and the academy, however, suggest new values may be emerging. Collaboration, for example, is increasingly vital to success outside of the academy, and faculty culture, long an individualistic domain, may be shifting in response. This multiple case study explores how faculty members experience the relationship between professional autonomy and collaboration within the context of their department work. Faculty members in four departments were interviewed and both qualitative and simple quantitative data collected. The study found faculty members satisfied with the autonomy they experienced. Collaborative practices were evident, though faculty generally expressed a desire for increased collaboration with colleagues. The interviews also suggested attributes of a collaborative department, one in which collaboration is a more intentional element of the unit practice and design. The electronic version of the Dissertation is at the open-access Ohiolink ETD Center, http:www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Jon F. Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Alan E. Guskin, PhD (Committee Member); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Ann E. Austin, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

collaboration; organizational change; faculty work; higher education; multiple case study; academic departments; colleges; universities

Backes, Aaron J.A Multiple Case Study of Six Exemplary Band Directors’ Repertoire Selection Processes
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Music Education
The purpose of the study was to conduct a multiple case study of six exemplary band directors' repertoire selection processes. Two collegiate, two high school, and two middle school band directors were nominated based on their outstanding reputations as instrumental music educators and their knowledge in repertoire selection. Each band director was interviewed in person and asked ten semi-structured interview questions on the repertoire selection process they use for the ensembles that they teach. Each interview lasted approximately 45 minutes and was video-recorded and transcribed. The band directors identified a number of factors that are important in the repertoire selection process with the most important being that the music is high quality. The band directors use different criteria in determining quality of music, which include form, harmony, scoring, variety, and unpredictability. The directors select music that is appropriate for their ensemble's ability level by selecting works that will challenge the students but also allow them to be successful in making music. The band directors indicated that an effective concert program has a variety of composers and styles as well as works that appeal to the audience, students, and conductor. The band directors also offer suggestions on how young band directors can become more effective in the repertoire selection process.

Committee:

Carol Hayward, D.M.A. (Advisor); Vincent Kantorski, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Multiple Case Study; Band Repertoire; Repertoire Selection; Band Directors; Band; Repertoire Selection Processes

Willis, Jennifer LCharacter Education and Emerging Adulthood: A Multiple Case Study of the Impact of High School Character Education on Students in the College Environment
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services: Counselor Education
This study explored how four young adults experienced the lasting effects of high school character education in the college environment. Utilizing a qualitative approach, this multiple case study explored how college students identified high school character education in their own high school, how college students utilized their high school character education, and how college student’s context shaped the utilization of character education. This study serves to address the existing gap in the literature by focusing on college student experience and extends the current line of inquiry to focus specifically on student experience, with participants who have progressed beyond the high school environment into college. Data collection consisted of rich descriptions provided by four participants through individual interviews. Data analysis followed the guidelines set forth by Braun and Clarke (2006) and are presented in four case-by-case analyses as well as a cross case analysis describing the general phenomenon across all of the cases. Five themes emerged from the cross-case analysis describing how the four young adults experienced the lasting effects of high school character education in the college environment: 1) explicit curriculum, 2) faculty involvement and connection, 3) independence and autonomy, 4) creating new connections in college, and 5) diversity. The findings from this study can serve to assist school counselors and administrators who are interested in developing and implementing character education programs in the high school environment.

Committee:

Michael Brubaker, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Julie Morrison, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mei Tang, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Academic Guidance Counseling

Keywords:

Character Education;Multiple Case Study;College Students;Emerging Adulthood

Wadams, AmandaDetermining the Relationship Between Language and Attention in Elders with Nonfluent Aphasia
Master of Arts in Speech Pathology and Audiology, Cleveland State University, 2014, College of Sciences and Health Professions
Researchers have questioned whether the occurrence of aphasia creates executive function deficiencies that result in cognitive-linguistic deficits. Aphasia is a breakdown in language comprehension and production caused by a focal lesion in the left hemisphere of the brain (Papathanasiou, Coppens, & Potagas, 2013). Executive function refers to a set of “higher order component functions required to control and coordinate performance on complex problem solving tasks” (Dick & Overton, 2010). Researchers have speculated that attention, an important part of executive function, may be compromised in addition to language deficits in persons with aphasia. The purpose of this exploratory multiple case comparison is to investigate the relationship between language and attention in persons with aphasia by comparing measures of attention that rely on language comprehension and use against measures of attentions that are independent of language comprehension and use. The study investigated eight participants between the ages 57 and 79 who have experienced a lesion in the left hemisphere of the brain resulting in nonfluent aphasia. Each participant completed subtests from the following assessments in order to measure language and attention: Western Aphasia Battery Bedside Screener-Revised, Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test, The Test of Everyday Attention, and the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised. vi Attention was affected to varying degrees in some participants with nonfluent aphasia. The degree to which attention was affected was not consistently related to the severity of aphasia. This study concludes by describing each participant’s performance in detail and providing clinical implications for diagnosis and treatment.

Committee:

Monica Gordon Pershey, EdD (Committee Chair); Violet Cox, PhD (Committee Member); Mary Milidonis, PhD (Committee Member); Amir Poreh, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Speech Therapy

Keywords:

APHASIA; LANGUAGE; ATTENTION; MULTIPLE CASE STUDY

Teneycke, Tricia L.Utilizing the Standard Trauma-Focused EMDR Protocol in Treatment of Fibromyalgia
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2012, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic pain and fatigue. It notably impacts individuals and their families, creates notable opportunity costs for society, and places heavy demands on the medical system. Fibromyalgia has no cure. Its etiology is uncertain but likely biopsychosocial. In a subset of individuals experiencing Fibromyalgia, the experience of one or more traumatic experiences precipitates the onset of symptoms. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is an evidence-based treatment for traumatic stress injuries. None of the handful of published accounts of EMDR treatment of Fibromyalgia have utilized the standard evidenced-based, trauma-focused EMDR (TF-EMDR) protocol, opting instead for untested modifications of EMDR related protocols rendering generalization of effects across studies difficult at best. The current study explored whether the use of the TF-EMDR protocol was sufficient to reduce chronic physical and psychological symptoms of Fibromyalgia in three female participants. Standardized symptom measures of post-traumatic stress, depression, pain, and Fibromyalgia-specific symptoms were administered at pre, post, and 3-month follow-up. Results indicated a decrease in symptoms across all standardized symptom measures. Participants’ pain and symptoms of Fibromyalgia decreased, as did depression and trauma symptoms. Other results of treatment included: improved sleep, improved communication with loved ones, and improved sexual functioning. Treatment observations suggest TF-EMDR may help facilitate participants’ ability to: identify their emotions, observe the relationship between emotions and physical sensation, and observe (without trying to change) emotions and physical sensation. Results are promising and support the use of TF-EMDR in the treatment of Fibromyalgia patients with a history of trauma. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Mark Russell, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Melissa Kennedy, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jan Fite, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

EMDR; Fibromyalgia; chronic pain; trauma; multiple case study

Senot, ClaireCombining Conformance Quality and Experiential Quality in the Delivery of Health Care
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Business Administration
This dissertation aims at understanding the organizational antecedents and performance consequences for hospitals of combining conformance quality and experiential quality when delivering care. Conformance quality reduces variance around a set of technical guidelines and has been a long standing priority in health care delivery. Experiential quality requires a shift in culture and focuses on the quality of interactions between caregivers and patients and by definition enhances variance. In the context of health care delivery, reconciling both quality dimensions has proven a challenge given the need for the same caregiver to simultaneously focus on two dimensions that trigger different learning mechanisms. Existing theories on reconciling dual learning goals are not adapted to the particularities of this setting. This dissertation develops a framework on combining conformance and experiential quality in the health care delivery context through three inter-related studies that use multiple methods. The first study, “The Impact of Combining Conformance and Experiential Quality on Health Care Clinical and Cost Performance”, investigates whether overcoming the tensions between conformance quality and experiential quality has an impact on the effectiveness of care delivery. The study builds on the quality management and organizational learning literature to investigate the impact of combining experiential and conformance quality dimensions on clinical and cost outcomes. Hypotheses are tested using secondary data from 9 distinct sources on 3474 U.S. acute care hospitals over a six-year period. Econometric analyses indicate that combining conformance and experiential quality promotes clinical outcomes but at the expense of cost efficiency. The second study, “The Effects of Coordination Mechanisms on Combining Conformance and Experiential Quality in the Delivery of Care: A Multi-Method Study”, investigates the effect of top-down control versus bottom-up decision-making mechanisms on hospitals’ ability to simultaneously improve on conformance and experiential quality. This study adopts a theory building approach, iterating between extant organizational learning and operations management literature and a multiple-case study involving 49 semi-structured interviews of heart failure units across 5 U.S. acute care hospitals. Hypotheses are then tested using secondary data for a sample of 2031 U.S. acute care hospitals. Results reveal that bottom-up decision-making increases the likelihood for hospitals to simultaneously improve on both process quality dimensions but this effect only partially mutes the direct negative effect of top-down control. This indicates the need to look for further organizational mechanisms that allow hospitals to combine conformance and experiential quality when delivering care. The third study, “Pursuing Conformance Quality and Experiential Quality during the Delivery of Health Care: Evidence from a Multiple-Case Study in U.S. Hospitals”, is a multiple-case study conducted in the heart failure units of 5 major teaching hospitals. It involves 49 semi-structured interviews with caregivers and administrators, complemented by the collection of additional material as well as participation to multiple training sessions. Through a grounded theory building approach, this study offers a deeper understanding on the organizational mechanisms that allow successful combination of conformance and experiential quality. Qualitative analyses reveal that cross-level collaboration between medical and nursing functional entities is an important antecedent for hospitals to overcome the tensions between conformance and experiential quality.

Committee:

Aravind Chandrasekaran, PhD (Advisor); Peter Ward, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Health Care Management; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

conformance quality; experiential quality; combined quality; health care delivery; hospitals; econometric analyses; system GMM, multiple-case study

Carter, Allia L.Collaborative Leadership Practices Among Ohio's Early College High School Prinicpals and Their Post-Secondary Partners
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Higher Education Administration

This constructivist multiple-case study examined the collaborative leadership practices of seven secondary and seven post-secondary leaders who participate in Ohio's Early College High School Initiative (ECHSI). The 14 educational leaders in this study partnered in an effort to respond to the access and success of traditionally underrepresented (i.e., ethnic/racial minorities, low-income, and first-generation students, and/or non-native English speaking) students in higher education. Therefore, it was proposed that relationships are essential to fulfilling the ECHSI mission, and seeks to: (a) explicate the leaders' understanding of their school-university partnership and (b) explain the relationship between Early College leaders and the Relational Leadership Theory and its components (purpose, ethics, empowerment, inclusion, and process).

Collaborative leadership is a complex and dynamic process for which strong evidentiary support is required. Therefore, this dissertation applied an exploratory multiple-case study approach to analyzing seven within-case and cross-case comparisons. The foundation of this study was based on qualitative interviews, supported by a web-based survey which yielded a 100% return rate. Additionally, document analysis was used to gain a better understanding of how relationships across secondary and post-secondary educational sectors create comprehensive, seamless systems of learning.

The participants explained the interplay between individual and organizational backgrounds, experiences, leadership styles, values, and goals that promoted the development of their inter-organizational relationship. In this study, three major findings uncovered that cross-sector educational programs make sense and strengthen the educational pipeline between K-12 and higher education. Secondly, the development of a collaborative working environment can be optimized through the Relational Leadership Model. Finally, true collaboration occurs through meaningful connections with open communication, trust, mutual respect, commitment, accountability, and professional knowledge and competence.

Implications of findings and recommendations for future research are discussed. Notably, future research should consider the exploration school-university partnerships to build effective transitional and support services in addition to developing state-wide and national educational policies that strengthen America's educational pipeline.

Committee:

Patrick Pauken (Advisor); Robert DeBard (Committee Member); William Kyle Ingle (Committee Member); Patricia Kubow (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Community Colleges; Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; School Administration

Keywords:

Early College; PSEO; pipeline education; seamless learning; P-16; P-20; Relational Leadership Model; collaborative leadership; Ohio; principal; college administration; school-university; educational partnerships; multiple-case study