Search Results (1 - 25 of 57 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Grandhee, Ashok A.Design of a computer graphics laboratory
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 1985, Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (Engineering)

Design of a computer graphics laboratory

Committee:

Robert Williams (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Industrial

Keywords:

Computer Graphics Laboratory; CAD/CAm Interactive Graphics; FORTRAN 77

Tan, Adrian HadiprionoWhile Stands the Colosseum: A Ground-Up Exploration of Ancient Roman Construction Techniques using Virtual Reality
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Civil Engineering
The construction of ancient monuments, such as the Colosseum (Coliseum) of Rome, was an enigmatic and complex process that has never been explored. Most sources about the largest ancient amphitheater focus on the historical and archaeological aspects. This dissertation seeks to elaborate on the construction methods of the Colosseum using engineering principles, based on which a digital reconstruction of the most likely of these methods in the form of a virtual-reality simulation – a process that has never been attempted before in the construction study of this ancient monument – was created. This dissertation presents a state-of-the-art and comprehensive exploration of the construction of the Colosseum, deriving and compiling information from both personal observations and a number of different historical and archaeological sources as well as findings from the monument itself. The construction processes of the Colosseum can be divided into five distinct stages: the pre-plan and plan, which details how the site of the construction was selected and drafted; the substructure, involving an analysis the best and safest alternative for constructing the foundation of the building; the hypogea or underground chambers, which provide chambers beneath the arena to house the gladiators and other contestants; the superstructure, the majority of the building which could have been built in several different ways, each of which consists of a number of organized stages; and the velarium, or roof awning, which can be installed in several different ways, resulting in different ranges of protection from the weather. After the different construction methods that may be employed for all of these stages are compared, a number of possible pathways of construction are established, and one of them is selected as the most plausible given the construction practices of the ancient Romans. The findings of the construction methods of such a majestic structure are not complete without simulations using state-of-the-art technology; virtual reality in particular is a prime candidate for this prospect. Thus, the means of creating a virtual model for presenting the construction process, which is known as the graphics pipeline, are researched and displayed in detail. The different stages for the creation process of the simulation are the possible schemes of presenting the digital assets created; the software and hardware selection, which details the possible programs that will be used in the graphics pipeline; and the implementation of the graphics pipeline itself to create the completed model, stages, and user interface. Overall, this combination of history and technology forms a pioneering and comprehensive model which details the construction processes of the Colosseum for a modern audience, and demonstrates that the hitherto unexplored engineering aspects deserve as much admiration as the monument itself.

Committee:

Frank Croft, Jr. (Advisor); Tarunjit Butalia (Committee Member); Rachel Kajfez (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Archaeology; Architecture; Civil Engineering; Classical Studies; Computer Science; Engineering; History

Keywords:

archaeology; architecture; civil engineering; engineering; Colosseum; Coliseum; computer graphics; computer-aided design; construction; digital graphics; digital simulation; history of engineering; Rome; Roman Empire; virtual reality

Chen, ZhiliTowards real-time simulation of interactions among solids and fluids
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Computer Science and Engineering
The interactions among fluids and solids create many interesting phenomena that are excessively complex for manual creation in animation. It is popular to model these interactions in physically based simulation but it is challenging especially in real-time applications. Collisions handling is a major bottleneck for solid-solid interaction problems because of high computational cost of neighbor searching in space. Solid-fluid interactions are also difficult to simulate mostly because of the difference in representations of fluids and solids. Typically simulation systems use Eulerian methods for fluids and Lagrangian methods for solids. The most adopted coupling strategy uses solid velocity as boundary condition in fluid solver and integrate fluid pressure along solid boundary to apply force on solid. However, the quality of fluid animation is limited by resolution of Eulerian grid thus it cannot handle interaction with thin features on solids. In this dissertation we focus on specific types of interactions among fluids and solids and develop simulation methods with improved quality and performance toward real-time applications. First we address the problem of cloth, air, and deformable body interactions modeling in a layered structure as commonly seen in real world. We develop an accelerated collision detection method taking advantage of the layer structure to improve efficiency and an accurate anisotropic friction model to achieve fine contact details. The interaction of air and other layers is modeled using a fast air mass field model. Next, we turn to fracture simulation in solid-solid interaction, which is known to be computationally expensive in high resolution. We develop a surface refinement approach that adds fine details to existing low-resolution fracture animation with negligible extra computation cost. Finally, we explore coupling of fluid and solid with thin features. We take a stable and fast approach that couples hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian fluid and position based solids. The approach shows its effectiveness in modeling the paint-brush interactions in a real-time oil-painting simulation system.

Committee:

Huamin Wang (Advisor); Roger Crawfis (Committee Member); Shen Han-wei (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

computer graphics;computer animation;simulation;physics based simulation;fracture simulation;fluid simulation;CUDA;GPU;real-time graphics

Ting, Samuel TAn Efficient Framework for Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of Highly Accelerated Dynamic Cardiac MRI
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2016, Biomedical Engineering
The research presented in this work seeks to develop, validate, and deploy practical techniques for improving diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. In the philosophy of biomedical engineering, we seek to identify an existing medical problem having significant societal and economic effects and address this problem using engineering approaches. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States, accounting for more deaths than any other major cause of death in every year since 1900 with the exception of the year 1918. Cardiovascular disease is estimated to account for almost one-third of all deaths in the United States, with more than 2150 deaths each day, or roughly 1 death every 40 seconds. In the past several decades, a growing array of imaging modalities have proven useful in aiding the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular disease, including computed tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, and echocardiography. In particular, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent diagnostic tool that can provide within a single exam a high quality evaluation of cardiac function, blood flow, perfusion, viability, and edema without the use of ionizing radiation. The scope of this work focuses on the application of engineering techniques for improving imaging using cardiac magnetic resonance with the goal of improving the utility of this powerful imaging modality. Dynamic cine imaging, or the capturing of movies of a single slice or volume within the heart or great vessel region, is used in nearly every cardiac magnetic resonance imaging exam, and adequate evaluation of cardiac function and morphology for diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular disease depends heavily on both the spatial and temporal resolution as well as the image quality of the reconstruction cine images. This work focuses primarily on image reconstruction techniques utilized in cine imaging; however, the techniques discussed are also relevant to other dynamic and static imaging techniques based on cardiac magnetic resonance. Conventional segmented techniques for cardiac cine imaging require breath-holding as well as regular cardiac rhythm, and can be time-consuming to acquire. Inadequate breath-holding or irregular cardiac rhythm can result in completely non-diagnostic images, limiting the utility of these techniques in a significant patient population. Real-time single-shot cardiac cine imaging enables free-breathing acquisition with significantly shortened imaging time and promises to significantly improve the utility of cine imaging for diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular disease. However, utility of real-time cine images depends heavily on the successful reconstruction of final cine images from undersampled data. Successful reconstruction of images from more highly undersampled data results directly in images exhibiting finer spatial and temporal resolution provided that image quality is sufficient. This work focuses primarily on the development, validation, and deployment of practical techniques for enabling the reconstruction of real-time cardiac cine images at the spatial and temporal resolutions and image quality needed for diagnostic utility. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of reconstruction approaches resulting in with short computation times that can be used in the clinical environment. Specifically, the use of compressed sensing signal recovery techniques is considered; such techniques show great promise in allowing successful reconstruction of highly undersampled data. The scope of this work concerns two primary topics related to signal recovery using compressed sensing: (1) long reconstruction times of these techniques, and (2) improved sparsity models for signal recovery from more highly undersampled data. Both of these aspects are relevant to the practical application of compressed sensing techniques in the context of improving image reconstruction of real-time cardiac cine images. First, algorithmic and implementational approaches are proposed for reducing the computational time for a compressed sensing reconstruction framework. Specific optimization algorithms based on the fast iterative/shrinkage algorithm (FISTA) are applied in the context of real-time cine image reconstruction to achieve efficient per-iteration computation time. Implementation within a code framework utilizing commercially available graphics processing units (GPUs) allows for practical and efficient implementation directly within the clinical environment. Second, patch-based sparsity models are proposed to enable compressed sensing signal recovery from highly undersampled data. Numerical studies demonstrate that this approach can help improve image quality at higher undersampling ratios, enabling real-time cine imaging at higher acceleration rates. In this work, it is shown that these techniques yield a holistic framework for achieving efficient reconstruction of real-time cine images with spatial and temporal resolution sufficient for use in the clinical environment. A thorough description of these techniques from both a theoretical and practical view is provided -- both of which may be of interest to the reader in terms of future work.

Committee:

Orlando P. Simonetti, PhD (Advisor); Lee C. Potter, PhD (Committee Member); Rizwan Ahmad, PhD (Committee Member); Jun Liu, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Applied Mathematics; Electrical Engineering; Health; Health Care; Medical Imaging; Medicine; Radiology; Scientific Imaging

Keywords:

cardiac magnetic resonance; real time cardiac cine; image reconstruction; signal recovery; sparsity models; compressed sensing; parallel imaging; FISTA; Gadgetron; optimization; nonlinear; fast imaging; accelerated; GPU; graphics processing unit

Huang, Chien-ChiaFrameworks for Visualizing Real-Time Construction Operation Simulations
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, Civil Engineering
Visualized construction information may provide more impressive and interactive effects to information users. For construction operation designers and operators, enhanced visualization information may promote their skill and knowledge level and in turn elevate the performance of each individual operation they designed or operated in a construction project. Construction operations can be real-timely simulated with fully visualized computer graphics to convey users even more direct and effective construction information. However, the path for constructing fully visualized, dynamic and three-dimensional simulations for construction operations is not straightforward. Construction operation simulation is a program of an abstracted system to represent the key characteristics and properties of the real construction operation system. Therefore, a construction operation simulation system should be capable of at least generating virtual simulation environment, performing operational calculations and handling uncertainties of the represented system. This research proposes a system structure of simulation frameworks that provide approaches for constructing construction operation simulations that are real-timely visualized and three dimensional. This framework concept enhances the ideas of software modularity and reusability for facilitating creating complex applications. The proposed structure of simulation frameworks is consisted of three parts: the visualization framework, the modeling framework and the control modules framework. These three simulations frameworks, as their names suggest, in the simulation system will perform visualizing, model calculating and controlling tasks respectively. Outputs of these tasks combined enable the simulation to appear like real, operate like real and react like real. In the visualization framework, general models and methodologies in computer graphics for real-timely rendering simulation scene and graphical user interface are included. This framework is indeed the rendering power house that will promptly perform calculations in objects transformations, viewing transformation, generating lighting and textures, displaying simulation data, and providing interactive operation functions. The second simulation framework, the modeling framework, contains libraries and functions needed for simulation operation calculations. In this research, a rigid body physics engine is implemented and included as the main component of this framework. This physics engine can dynamically compute three dimensional motions and movements of rigid bodies simulated in the scene; and in turn calculate the corresponding reactions between rigid bodies if collisions occur. The third simulation framework, the control module framework, holds libraries and functions that enable the simulation system to better handle uncertainties and vagueness in the real situations. Due to the framework modularity and reusability, purpose-specific simulation applications can be created easily. Simulation applications can be created based on the need of specific study objective by just generating objects or retrieving needed functions from the three established simulation frameworks. Demonstrations of application examples are included in this research. The convenience and power of utilizing simulation frameworks in creating simulation application is also satisfactorily proved.

Committee:

F. Hadipriono Tan, PhD (Advisor); William Wolfe, PhD (Committee Member); Chen Qian, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Civil Engineering; Computer Science

Keywords:

Simulation; Construction Operation; Visualization; Framework; Computer Graphics

Strobel, JohnAll the better to see you with: A comparison of approaches to delivering instructions for Lego construction tasks
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Computer Science

This study was a combination and continuation of previous studies done by BGSU graduate students and faculty. It explored the use of interactive 3D stereo graphics as a component in the delivery of instructions for a construction task and compared this to a non-stereo version as well as a paper-based approach. The principal goal was to determine the relative effectiveness of the three approaches as measured by time to completion and accuracy. A secondary goal was to determine the role of inherent object complexity on performance as measured by time to completion.

In terms of accuracy, the results show no signicant differences between any of the presentations. However, they also show that subjects in the stereo condition were the slowest, with paper being slightly faster and non-stereo being the best overall. Further, an analysis of time (in seconds) per rotation reveals that the subjects in the stereo condition rotated the models less frequently than subjects in the non-stereo condition. In terms of inherent object complexity, larger amounts of space between parts of an object increases construction time.

Committee:

Guy Zimmerman, PhD (Committee Chair); Laura Leventhal, PhD (Committee Member); Poor G. Micheal, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences; Computer Science

Keywords:

3D graphics; Assembly Tasks; Spatial Ability; Object Complexity; Stereo

Ortiz-Rodriguez, Alejandro HeliosDesign of a graphical package as a teaching device for probability and statistics courses
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 1984, Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (Engineering)

Design of a graphical package as a teaching device for probability and statistics courses

Committee:

Robert Williams (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Industrial

Keywords:

Computer Assisted Instruction; Interactive Computer Graphics Packages; Probability and Statisitcs

Chien, Shu-chenThe effectiveness of animated and interactive microcomputer graphics on children's development of spatial visualization ability/mental rotation skills /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1986, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Computer graphics;Space perception in children;Perceptual-motor processes

Lemasters, Clair RogerAn experimental study to determine the effectiveness of sketching practice as a part of an audio-visual presentation on graphical calculus /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1979, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Calculus;Engineering graphics

Tan, Adrian HadiprionoA Computer-Generated Model of the Construction of the Roman Colosseum
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2012, Civil Engineering

This research focuses on the construction process of the Colosseum, the famous ancient Roman amphitheater, by digitally recreating the step-by-step processes that would have been involved in the construction process, demonstrating that the process of retracing the construction of such a large and complex monument presents a variety of challenges. Computer-generated imagery, or CGI, has long been used to recreate ancient structures based on literature and archaeological evidence. Most of the simulations that are generated, however, focus primarily on the appearance of the structures upon completion and during use. Given enough data, computer graphics can serve as an effective tool in simulating the construction of ancient monuments as well, which is demonstrated via the digital (re)construction of the Colosseum as mentioned previously. Through extensive research and on-site analysis, enough dimensions for the construction process and the architectural features and concepts that such a simulation will likely entail can be obtained to create relatively accurate representations, which will in turn serve as a breeding ground for theories concerning their design, construction, and ability to withstand the test of time.

In this case, the background of the study is presented in the form of the history of Roman architecture in general and especially of theaters such as the amphitheater, the category which the Colosseum belongs to. This clarification provides a starting point for the research, and forms the precedent for most of the ideas that will be employed. The background of the simulation includes software, in this case Autodesk Inventor, which provides an ideal balance of user-friendliness and complexity handling. Coupling this is a structural analysis of the monument that provides the key dimensions and features that are present in the actual model. With this in mind, the creation of the model, using the functionality of the user interface, is compared to the actual construction, revealing a critical dissimilarity. The model renders the superstructure as one continuous feature, with all the levels being created at once instead of in stages as per the original construction process. In addition to this setback, the modeling procedure is also affected by other complications, most notably the linear correlation between complexity and render time. Large amounts of features such as those seen in the Colosseum would cause the program to potentially stall in a bid to process the corresponding amount of data, which may be due to the dissonance between the computation capabilities of the hardware and the functionality of the software.

Technical complications aside, the simulation also shows mixed results conceptually. With technology advanced enough to handle the complexity, the construction stages could theoretically be rendered, but they must be reverse-engineered from the completed model. This precludes using the simulation as a direct influence in both historical studies and civil/green engineering, and furthermore, it fails to take into account the labor, expenses, and sustainability issues regarding the structure. Thus, this simulation is best applied not as a direct reference, but rather as a demonstration of the concepts behind it.

Committee:

Franklin Croft (Advisor); William Wolfe (Committee Member); Richard Freuler (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Civil Engineering; Computer Science

Keywords:

CGI; computer graphics; computer-generated imagery; digital modeling; digital model; simulation; Colosseum; monument; Roman; ancient Rome; construction; engineering; civil engineering

Muppala, Madhavi M.Personality and Posture
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2008, Computer Science and Engineering
This work conveys the personality of a virtual character through its posture. A standard personality model from literature is integrated with a customized behavior model to design a system that takes the high-level personality configuration of the character as input. Several works from the field of nonverbal behavior have been surveyed and a set of rules that map psychological states to physiological behavior have been formulated. These rules have been implemented in a system that outputs postures given high level psychological states or personality configurations as inputs.

Committee:

Richard Parent, Phd (Advisor); Matthew Lewis, Phd (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

computer graphics; computer animation; personality; personality model; posture; virtual character

Kim, YootaiControl of physics-based fluid animation using a velocity-matching method
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2006, Computer and Information Science
Fluid animation remains one of the most challenging problems in computer graphics. Research on methods using physics-based simulation for animation has recently increased since this method has the capability of producing realistic fluid behavior. However, the primary drawback to using a simulation method is control of the resulting flow field because it is computationally expensive and highly nonlinear. The main goal of this research is to help users produce physically realistic fluid effects along a NURBS curve that can be specified directly or derived from an image or video. A linear-feedback velocity matching method is used to control the fluid flow. A physically realistic smoke flow along a user-specified path is generated by first procedurally producing a target velocity field, and then matching the velocity field obtained from a three-dimensional flow simulation with the target velocity field. The target velocity field can include various effects such as the small scale swirling motion characteristic of turbulent flows. The swirling motion is achieved by incorporating a vortex particle method into the linear feedback loop. The method is flexible in that any procedurally-generated target velocity field may be integrated with the fluid simulation. The efficacy of this approach is demonstrated by generating several three-dimensional flow animations for complex fluid paths, two-dimensional artistic fluid effects, and realistic tornado animations.

Committee:

Raghu Machiraju (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

computer graphics; computer animation; fluid animation; physics based animation; fluid simulation; smoke simulation; smoke animation; fluid animation control; path based flow control; linear feedback control; velocity matching; natural phenomena

Parent, Richard EarlA system for generating three-dimensional data for computer graphics /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1977, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Computer graphics

Gómez, Julian E.Computer display of time variant functions /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1985, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Computer animation;Computer graphics

Boggus, Matthew J.Modeling, Evaluation, Editing, and Illumination of Three Dimensional Mazes and Caves for Computer Games
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2012, Computer Science and Engineering
Caves are commonly used as environments in computer games. As the popularity of open world games rises, so does the demand for expansive virtual environments. To ease this cost, many tools have been developed to create and edit content for games including terrain, plants, roads, buildings, and cities. The same is not true for caves. We present data structures and algorithms to create, evaluate, edit, and illuminate three dimensional models of caves for use in computer games. Game levels can be classified according to their spatial configuration: linear, maze, or open. Caves formed by the same geological process have similar features. These define parameters that can be used to partially or fully automate the creation of cave models of different spatial configurations. Additional information about the model such as its volume, number of branching paths, and number of connected components can be used by the designer in evaluating and editing the model to meet gameplay requirements. To assist in editing of cave models we propose a new data structure and framework and compare its use to existing modeling approaches. Physically based illumination of a cave typically results in low level lighting which is not suitable for games. We introduce a new illumination model based on radiant flux that can be used to ensure a sufficient amount of light is present throughout the cave. The new illumination model can also be adapted to assist in player navigation. Illuminating a scene according to distance to objects within it creates highlights that captures the player’s visual attention. A user study was done to evaluate the new technique.

Committee:

Roger Crawfis, PhD (Advisor); Han-Wei Shen, PhD (Committee Member); Richard Parent, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

computer graphics; computer games; caves; mazes; game level evaluation; game level illumination

Tashfeen, Asheer I.The Presentation of Spatial Design using Autonomous Characters in Virtual Environments
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, Industrial, Interior, and Visual Communications Design

This research is an exploration of virtual environments as it relates to presenting spatial design, specifically focusing on the use of autonomous behavior in virtual characters for simulation purposes. The characters in motion gives the viewer of this environment an understanding of circulation routes, traffic density and space usage (function) among other aspects. Since the characters can ‘think’ by themselves through the programmed artificial intelligence, the resulting simulation may be unexpected. Flaws or miscalculations in the design may be highlighted due to the chaos that arises from the virtual crowd.

To conduct the research, two virtual environments were produced and examined. These were modified through an iterative process based on analysis and review by groups of peers, academics, as well as designers in the field. My documentation includes the necessary steps taken prior to production, an analysis of the environments, as well as possible future directions. The existing uses of this technology were also analyzed and compared.

Similar to the impact on the design field by the introduction of perspective drawings, the use of virtual environments has the potential of creating a new method of designing, one where design is conceived and experimented on a computer, as opposed to orthographic drawings and perspective vignettes. This is due to the ability of real-time spatial manipulation which allows one to see the direct effect of any proposed change upon the characters in the simulation. One could experience the environment through these autonomous beings, giving us a dimension of sight we could never see otherwise. The functionality of designed space could now be ‘discovered’ by the virtual characters, thus enabling the most ambiguous forms to take on roles we may not have conceived ourselves.

Committee:

Jeffrey Haase, MA (Advisor); Alan Price, MFA (Committee Member); Stephen Turk, MA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture; Artificial Intelligence; Design; Interior Design

Keywords:

virtual environment; architecture; architectural graphics; spatial representation; autonomous characters;

Hordemann, Glen JExploring High Performance SQL Databases with Graphics Processing Units
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2013, Computer Science
This thesis introduces the development of a new GPU-based database to accelerate queries of Digital Humanities data to extract document texts that are then data-mined to produce visualizations of aspects of the humanities data. The goal is to advance the state-of-the-art in massively parallel database work by investigating methods for utilizing graphical processing units in database systems. This thesis advances prior work done in the field of high-performance, massively-parallel databases. Some prior work focused on fixed length data types such as integers and doubles, often coupled with straight-forward single table queries. Other work focused on using primitives that are not a component of standard SQL databases. This thesis introduces an efficient virtual database engine that executes the majority of database operations directly on the GPU. The GPU database executes a subset of SQLite’s SELECT queries, which are typically the most computationally expensive operations in a transactional database. This database engine extends existing research by exploring methods of string operations, multiple table joins, indexing, and varying length data types and sets. This thesis discusses the design of a new GPU virtual database engine, which is developed using the CUDA extensions to C/C++, from loading data from the file on disk to processing the program on the GPU. This thesis focuses on the development of new improvements to deal with caching data for the GPU, processing and coalescing varying length data, and performing joins between multiple tables in the GPU database. The GPU database is demonstrated in a real world application. The application wraps the database in a graphical user interface which facilitates data selection. The application performs data mining of Humanities data for common text mining algorithms. The mined data is processed into visualizations to illustrate the resulting data digests.

Committee:

Jong Kwan Lee (Advisor); Joseph Chao (Committee Member); Andrew Schocket (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

GPU; Graphics Processing Unit; Database; SQL; SQLite; Visualization; Data Mining; CUDA; GPGPU; Parallel Computing; High Performance Computing; NVIDIA

Zhang, ChengThe Moon Experience: Designing Participatory Immersive Environments for Experiential Learning
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design
The Moon Experience is an interactive and immersive virtual reality system based on the historic events of the Apollo Program (1961-1972). The goal of this thesis project is to demonstrate a solution to the design challenge of framing and creating an effective learning experience in a virtual space that would otherwise be impossible to realize in the real world. I employ technologies and approaches from multiple disciplines in the design and implementation of the system. Through the technology of virtual reality I establish the virtual lunar world, which provides participants with immersive firsthand experiences. Computer game technology reinforces the effectiveness of the learning environment, lending The Moon Experience the qualities of entertainment, deep thought, and knowledge retention. Motion capture and computer animation facilitate real-time interactions between users and the system to sustain the sensation of being on the Moon. I take into account related learning principles and narrative storytelling to give a participant the proper situated learning content. Providing a framework of narrative helps heighten the audience’s perception, trigger their imagination, and transcend the virtual reality’s current limitations.

Committee:

Alan Price (Advisor); Maria Palazzi (Committee Member); Rick Parent (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering; Computer Science; Design; Information Technology

Keywords:

Virtual reality; computer graphics; computer game design; storytelling; firsthand learning experience; Apollo mission; Lunar landing

Carlson, Wayne EarlTechniques for the generation of three dimensional data for use in complex image synthesis /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1982, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Computer graphics;Image processing;Optical data processing

Zeltzer, David LouisRepresentation and control of three dimensional computer animated figures /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1984, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Computer animation;Computer graphics;Image processing

Koehler, Karen EExamining the Conceptual Understandings of Geoscience Concepts of Students with Visual Impairments: Implications of 3-D Printing
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, EDU Teaching and Learning
The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the use of 3-D printed models as an instructional tool in a middle school science classroom for students with visual impairments and compare their use to traditional tactile graphics for aiding conceptual understanding of geoscience concepts. Specifically, this study examined if the students’ conceptual understanding of plate tectonics was different when 3-D printed objects were used versus traditional tactile graphics and explored the misconceptions held by students with visual impairments related to plate tectonics and associated geoscience concepts. Interview data was collected one week prior to instruction and one week after instruction and throughout the 3-week instructional period and additional ata sources included student journals, other student documents and audio taped instructional sessions. All students in the middle school classroom received instruction on plate tectonics using the same inquiry-based curriculum but during different time periods of the day. One group of students, the 3D group, had access to 3-D printed models illustrating specific geoscience concepts and the group of students, the TG group, had access to tactile graphics illustrating the same geoscience concepts. The videotaped pre and post interviews were transcribed, analyzed and coded for conceptual understanding using constant comparative analysis and to uncover student misconceptions. All student responses to the interview questions were categorized in terms of conceptual understanding. Analysis of student journals and classroom talk served to uncover student mental models and misconceptions about plate tectonics and associated geoscience concepts to measure conceptual understanding. A slight majority of the conceptual understanding before instruction was categorized as no understanding or alternative understanding and after instruction the larger majority of conceptual understanding was categorized as scientific or scientific with fragments. Most of the participants in the study increased their scientific understandings of plate tectonics and other geoscience concepts and held more scientific understandings after instruction than before instruction. All students had misconceptions before the instructional period began, but the number of misconceptions were fewer after the instructional period. Students in the TG group not only had fewer misconceptions than the 3D group before instruction, but also after instruction. Many of the student misconceptions were similar to those held by students with typical vision; however, some were unique to students with visual impairments. One unique aspect of this study was the examination of student mental models, which had not previously been done with students with visual impairments, but is more commonplace in research on students with typical vision. Student mental models were often descriptive rather than explanatory, often incorporating scientific language, but not clearly showing that the student had a complete grasp of the concept. Consistent with prior research, the use of 3-D printed models instead of tactile graphics seemed to make little difference either positively or negatively on student conceptual understanding; however, the participants did interact with the 3-D printed models differently, sometimes gleaning additional information from them. This study also provides additional support for inquiry-based instruction as an effective means of science instruction for students with visual impairments.

Committee:

Tiffany Wild (Advisor); Mollie Blackburn (Committee Member); Lin Ding (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Geology; Middle School Education; Plate Tectonics; Science Education; Teaching

Keywords:

3-D Printing; visual impairments; science; inquiry-based; misconceptions; conceptual understanding; mental models; classroom talk; classroom instruction; plate tectonics; geoscience; tactile graphics; conceptual change

XUE, DaqingVolume Visualization Using Advanced Graphics Hardware Shaders
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2008, Computer Science and Engineering

Graphics hardware based volume visualization techniques have been the active research topic over the last decade. With the more powerful computation ability, the availability of large texture memory, and the high programmability, modern graphics hardware has been playing a more and more important role in volume visualization.

In the first part of the thesis, we focus on the graphics hardware acceleration techniques. Particularly, we develop a fast X-Ray volume rendering technique using point-convolution. An X-ray image is generated by convolving the voxel projection in the rendering buffer with a reconstruction kernel. Our technique allows users to interactively view large datasets at their original resolutions on standard PC hardware. Later, an acceleration technique for slice based volume rendering (SBVR) is examined. By means of the early z-culling feature from the modern graphics hardware, we can properly set up the z-buffer from isosurfaces to gain significant improvement in rendering speed for SBVR.

The high programmability of the graphics processing unit (GPU) incurs a great deal of research work on exploring this advanced graphics hardware feature. In the second part of the thesis, we first revisit the texture splat for flow visualization. We develop a texture splat vertex shader to achieve fast animated flow visualization. Furthermore, we develop a new rendering shader of the implicit flow. By careful tracking and encoding of the advection parameters into a three-dimensional texture, we achieve high appearance control and flow representation in real time rendering. Finally, we present an indirect shader synthesizer to combine different shader rendering effects to create a highly informative image to visualize the investigating data. One or more different shaders are associated with the voxels or geometries. The shader is resolved at run time to be selected for rendering. Our indirect shader synthesizer provides a novel method to control the appearance of the rendering over multi-shaders.

Committee:

Roger Crawfis, PhD (Advisor); Raghu Machiraju, PhD (Committee Member); Han-Wei Shen, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

volume visualization; graphics hardware; hardware acceleration; flow visualization; multi-shader rendering

Lauthers, Chad M.The Effects of Stereoscopic Technologies on Subjects’ Ability to Perform a LEGO Block Construction Task
Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Computer Science/Software Engineering
In recent years, one of the more popular ways of presenting information is as a three-dimensional graphical model on a computer. With 3-D graphics becoming more popular, they are starting to be used for instructional purposes. Instructions presented in 3-D should make performing a task easier than a task presented with two-dimensional instructions. BGSU researchers in computer science and psychology have conducted a number of studies that involved presenting instructions with three-dimensional graphics. The current study represents a convergence of the BGSU work involving the presentation of instructions for construction tasks and the use of stereo graphics. The task itself used a true three-dimensional artifact, a LEGO block, rather than the paper artifacts of the prior BGSU studies. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of stereoscopic technologies on participants’ ability to perform a LEGO block construction task. This was a qualitative study that consisted of six participants who were all computer science graduate students. The task for this study was to construct a 111 piece LEGO tower for a pre-built castle. The tower construction task was divided into two parts with the participants building one part with the stereo glasses on and the other part with them off. The results of the study found that two of the six participants thought that the stereo glasses were a benefit in constructing the object. Most of the participants felt that the glasses did not help in constructing the object. The stereoscopic glasses for the most part do not appear to affect the results of the study. One reason the glasses did not appear to help was because the software provided enough features that the glasses were not necessary. There was also some indication that while performing the higher complexity steps the participants were slower when wearing the glasses.

Committee:

Laura Leventhal (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Virtual Reality; Stereoscopy; Construction; 3-D Graphics; Human Computer Interaction

Denison, E. ScottWhen Designers Ask, "What If?"
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design

Combining the conventions of narrative storytelling with design prototyping is an emerging area of study. The practice is known as design fiction, and the resulting stories, create compelling speculations of near and distant futures made more believable, and therefore more provocative, through realistic prototypes. These scenarios can bring cultural legibility to representations of the future and thereby provoke discussion and debate, challenge conventional thinking, and encourage individual foresight and participation into the implications of today's decision-making.

With the expanding definition of design beyond the archetypal products, spaces, or communications into things such as service design and strategic thinking, design fiction presents itself as a promising form of design research, in a construct with different rules and possibilities, to experiment with the impact of technology and design on society, government, culture, and individuals.

The focus of this thesis is explored through historical applications of design and narrative, a survey of current trends in the practice of design fiction, and through a project whereby the author/designer becomes a reflective practitioner to create a story that portrays a speculative future heavily influenced by technological change and enhanced with visual prototypes.

The project portion of the thesis necessitated that the author become immersed in a narrative construct based on research into trending technological advancements and to surround this world with human interaction inside a speculative ethnography. These virtual worlds and their “diegetic prototypes” (Kirby 2010) were subsequently visualized using computer generated models and rendered imagery to impart a sense of realism to depict tangible artifacts, tactile surfaces, and atmospheric detail. The story and visualization were combined using the distinctive meta-language of sequential art as in a graphic novel to enable the reader to linger and examine the unfolding narrative and the subtlety with which design and culture interact.

Using computer graphics (CG) visualization in a graphic novel is only one form of creating a legible future scenario. That which distinguishes design fiction from a conventional science fiction graphic novel, film, or other creative effort is the designer's focus on the prototypes and the subsequent examination of the implications that these prototypes present within the realm of human interaction. Therefore, the narrative emphasis does not revolve around the prototype, but rather how society has folded them into everyday life for better or for worse. It becomes both an exercise for designers and a catalyst to provoke thinking and discussion among readers, participants, or observers. How will future technologies or social changes influence design? How will the resulting design affect human behavior? The practice of design fiction becomes a promising method for designers to become thought leaders, practitioners, and facilitators in envisioning the future. There are applications of design education that better equip designers for combining design and narrative as well as the fields of foresight and futurist studies as a means to stimulate critical thinking, generating debate and individual participation toward shaping the techno-social future.

“The ability to project ourselves into future worlds is a powerful tool for asking why this world is the way it is and how we can make it better” (Finn).

Committee:

Alan Price (Advisor); Maria Palazzi (Committee Member); Jared Gardner (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Literature; Sociology; Technology

Keywords:

design fiction; science fiction; design research; computer graphics; cg; graphic novel; foresight; future studies

Hagan, Aaron M.PARALLEL 3D IMAGE SEGMENTATION BY GPU-AMENABLE LEVEL SET SOLUTION
MS, Kent State University, 2009, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Computer Science
This thesis proposes an inherent parallel scheme for image segmentation of large data sets using the GPU. The method originates from an extended Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM), and provides a new numerical solution for solving the level set equation. As a local, explicit and parallel scheme, this method lends itself to several favorable features: (1) Very easy to implement with the core program only requiring a few lines of code; (2) Implicit computation of curvatures; (3) Flexible control of generating smooth segmentation results; (4) Strong amenability to parallel computing, especially on the low-cost, powerful graphics hardware (GPU). The parallel computational scheme is also well suited for cluster computing, leading to solution for segmenting very large data sets, which cannot be accommodated by a single machine. While large data sets are typically found in various applications, current level set segmentation algorithms cannot easily operate on such data. This method proposes a new tool adopting distributed computing for the visualization community. Several examples are shown performing segmentation on the GPU and GPU cluster with satisfying results and performance.

Committee:

Ye Zhao, PhD (Advisor); Paul A Farrell, PhD (Committee Member); Arden Ruttan, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

3D Image Segmentation; Large Data Set; Level Set; Graphics Hardware; Cluster Computing; Lattice Boltzmann Method

Next Page