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Cameron, Kathleen AnneThe Evolving Mission and Purpose of the Pittsburgh Flute Club in the Twentieth Century
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, Music

The purpose of this study was to identify the changing mission and purpose of the Pittsburgh Flute Club since it began in 1920. The club was placed in its historical context through the inclusion of brief information on music in the United States and in Pittsburgh during each of the four major periods of activity for the club. Research revealed that the club began in 1920 and continued for only a few years. The club began again in 1950 and continued until a waning around 1980. Under the title of the Allegheny Flute Association, the club was rejuvenated in 1986 and returned in 1999 to the original name of the Pittsburgh Flute Club, which it still bears today. This document serves the purpose of preserving the institutional memory of the club, revealing what was important to the club during each of its periods of activity, and providing a framework by which other flute clubs can study their histories.

Information for the document was gathered through journal articles, Pittsburgh Flute Club archives, archival material located at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, and through interviews of four club members. Investigation of the historical information showed a marked difference in the makeup of the club’s membership and the reason for gathering over the course of the club’s history. The earlier years of the club were focused on skilled amateur flutists and professional flutists gathering monthly to play informally and to hear recitals that were mostly performed by local flutists, while the recent years, particularly since 1986, were focused more on middle school through college students and their teachers gathering for master classes, recitals, and special events, often featuring internationally known artists. The research revealed the importance of competent club leadership as a primary factor for the club to flourish and busy schedules as the biggest hindrance. The Pittsburgh Flute Club has impacted flutists since 1920 and has been a valuable resource for flutists as regards networking, socializing, learning, and performing.

Committee:

Katherine Borst Jones (Advisor); Russel Mikkelson (Committee Member); Patricia Flowers (Committee Member); Alan Green (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Pittsburgh Flute Club; Flute; Goldberg; Allegheny Flute Association; Flute Club; Kumer; Coltman; Barton; National Flute Association; Pittsburgh

Torres, Erin HelgesonFlute Articulation Pedagogy: The Effect of Language-Specific Consonant Pronunciation on a Flutist’s Articulation within the French and English Languages
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Music
The major linguistic differences between the various stop-burst consonants found within the vast multitude of languages of the world have an extensive impact on the articulation employed by the modern flutist. French and English alone have contradictory linguistic features that may largely impact articulation on the instrument. It has been shown that these syllables are produced by fast changes in the vocal tract muscles and movements of the tongue, lips and jaws and thus may have an impact on the way flutists of both the French and English languages have learned and applied their articulative practices. Additionally, the amassing of treatises and tutor literature in both languages over the past four centuries has documented the changes in teaching of mnemonics to aid the articulation of students. Since there is a difference in the way that a student pronounces the syllables that are found within the innumerable trove of pedagogical flute literature, it is speculated that the execution of those syllables may also be impacted. Therefore, the concept of teaching multiple styles of stop-burst consonants in various languages may have a profound impact on the ability and flexibility of the modern flute player’s articulation. This document investigates the validity of this question by exploring the limited research that has been conducted in this specific field of flute playing, specifically Linda Lamkin’s work. Additionally, specific mnemonic references used to aid a flutist’s articulation within the oeuvre of pedagogical flute materials dating back to Hotteterre’s treatise are annotated and catalogued. Finally, parallel vowel anticipation in tandem with common stop-burst consonants in the French and English languages that are commonly found in the flute literature (such as /p/, /b/, /t/, /d/, /k/ and /g/) are compared and contrasted with spoken syllable production through basic spectral analysis with Audacity 1.3.12 (Unicode) software. This experiment was conducted in Dijon, France, in March 2012 and simply serves as a basic foundation for the application of language-based articulation pedagogy for flutists. Previous research in this subject was confirmed in that there was a correlation between spoken syllable and articulation on the flute. Furthermore, the application of foreign language in articulation pedagogy for non-native speakers was found to impact the participants’ articulative production. Appropriate federal government permission protocol for use of human subjects was applied for and granted by the Ohio State University Institutional Review Board.

Committee:

Katherine Jones (Advisor); Dr. Charles Atkinson, PhD (Committee Member); Dr. Russel Mikkelson, DMA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Language; Music; Music Education; Pedagogy; Performing Arts

Keywords:

flute; linguistics; language; pronunciation; articulation; pedagogy; flute pedagogy; flute articulation; treatises; tutors; catalogue; articulation catalogue; french flute; boehm; tromlitz; hotteterre; lamkin; french; english; french articulation; tu

Lin, Horng-JiunAn Illustrated Basic Flute Repair Manual for Professionals
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2008, Music

This document is a comprehensive flute repair manual for the modern Boehm and Brögger flute mechanisms. Written for college professors and students, as opposed to professional repair technicians, this illustrated document offers step-by-step procedures to guide readers through standard repairs and maintenance. All chapters use four-color illustrations and offer practical repair techniques in a tight sequential order.

Easy, sequential instructions in this manual minimize the complexity of basic flute mechanism repairs. Brief textual explanations accompany hundreds of close-up photos that take readers from the gathering of simple tools and supplies to the sophisticated techniques needed for repairs generally performed by the professional technician. This manual offers literacy on two levels: the brevity of the written word and the unparalleled quality of images. This manual takes professors, students and flute aficionados to a whole new level of flute understanding and appreciation. Evolutionary aspects of the modern flute mechanism are included. Building a historical perspective helps readers understand the painstaking and prolonged efforts of flute makers of the past and their unique contributions to the making of the modern flute mechanism, as we know it today. Such a profound appreciation of flute development helps flutists see the extraordinary relationship between the mechanics and the fine art of making music.

Committee:

Katherine B. Jones (Advisor); R. J. David Frego, PhD (Committee Member); James Pyne (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

flute; music; flute repair; modern flute mechanism; flute repair manual; illustrated repair manual

Kaehne, Jake RobertThe Path of the Wind: An Instrumental Bridge across Cultures through the Native American Flute
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Music Ethnomusicology
There are cultural differences between Native American and non-Native people in regards to education methods, history, folklore and ceremonies. The Native American flute, with its modern adaptations, has helped bridge some of these differences. In this thesis, I describe the modern musical aspects of the Native American flute, and why these characteristics were a key reason Bemidji State University chose this flute as a gift to the Leech Lake Tribal College as a symbol of their strong, continuing, and mutually beneficial relationship. I research the history of Ojibwe education, the gifting discourse, and Ojibwe cultural gifting to set the foundation of my thesis. I then proceed to express the thoughts of key individuals involved in the particular gifting event. Last, I discuss music books/packets to further demonstrate how the Native American flute fits into both Native American and Western culture. The research obtained expresses how Ojibwe traditions are still alive and important to the culture, but also shows that teachings of music are linked to Western methods including pitches, Western notation, and repertoire. The flute is also tied to Western culture through its ability to be played alongside Western instruments. These examples validate how the flute was the perfect gift to express healing, acceptance, and a bonding of Native and non-Native people in education. My findings indicate that the gifting ceremony that took place between BSU and the LLTC was a rectifying moment between Native American and Western cultures. Gifting is a way to build social bonds, and therefore the gift of the flute was an expression of support for both cultures working together rather than one culture oppressing the other. This thesis illustrates that in the gifting discourse, interdisciplinary research is needed in the disciplines of ethnomusicology, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and education.

Committee:

Katherine Meizel, Dr. (Advisor); Megan Rancier, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Cultural Anthropology; Education; Education History; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Folklore; Music; Music Education; Native Americans; Social Psychology

Keywords:

Ethnomusicology; Gifting; Native American Flute; Indian Flute; Native Flute; Social Psychology

Searls, Jesse PatrickRhapsody for Flute and Wind Ensemble
Master of Music, The Ohio State University, 2009, Music
Rhapsody for Flute and Wind Ensemble was written from January until April of 2009. The piece took life as my Masters Thesis, a piece I was required to compose by law of The Ohio State School of Music. Over the beginning few weeks into the compositional process, I wrote various sketches and themes, hoping to find in the air enough material to compose a 10-15 minute work. In addition to being a student at OSU, I am also a Graduate Assistant in the auditorium recording studios where I work with Omar Fadul. While at work, we frequently, constantly discuss music. I mentioned during one of our conversations that I was beginning my masters thesis and Mr. Fadul said, “write a piece for me?” Knowing the talent Omar possesses, I simply said, “definitely!” Rhapsody is an 11-minute work inspired by the late-romantics of Western Europe and the beautiful, simple tone of the flute. I cannot listen to a flute without it conjuring up feelings of romanticism, and I hope while you listen to Rhapsody, you too feel its romanticism.

Committee:

Thomas Wells, Dr. (Advisor); Jan Radzynski, Dr. (Committee Member); Richard Blatti (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Literature; Music; Music Education; Psychotherapy; Religion; Wood

Keywords:

Rhapsody; flute; wind ensemble; Rhapsody Flute Wind Ensemble; Omar Fadul; Concert for Flute; Ohio State; Music; Band Music;

Brimson Cooper, JenniferThe Weinzweig School: The flute works of Harry Freedman, Harry Somers, R. Murray Schafer, Srul Irving Glick and Robert Aitken
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2012, College-Conservatory of Music: Flute
This document studies a generation of students of Canadian pedagogue John Jacob Weinzweig (1913-2006) who have written for the flute. R. Harry Freedman (1922-2005), Harry Somers (1925-1999), R Murray Schafer (b.1933), Srul Irving Glick (1934-2002) and Robert Aitken (b.1939) have all contributed substantial works to the canon of Canadian flute repertory. The purpose of this document is to show the artistic aims and scope of these composer’s works, exploring their respective approaches to writing for the flute. By synthesizing analytic and aesthetic approaches to composition and through the study of available literary history and criticism this document will broaden the perspective on Canadian flute literature. Pieces to be examined in detail include: Harry Freedman, Soliloquy (1971); Harry Somers, Etching from the Vollard Suite (1964); R. Murray Schafer, Sonatina (1958); Srul Irving Glick, Sonata for Flute and Piano (1983) and Robert Aitken, Icicle (1977).

Committee:

L. Scott, DMA (Committee Chair); Randolph Bowman, BM (Committee Member); Matthew Peattie, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Canadian Flute Music;Flute;Weinzweig, John Jacob;Flute Repertoire;Freedman, Harry;Schafer, R. Murray;

Kim, Yoon HeeTHE COMMISSIONED FLUTE CHOIR PIECES PRESENTED BY UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE FLUTE CHOIRS AND NFA SPONSORED FLUTE CHOIRS AT NATIONAL FLUTE ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONVENTIONS WITH A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE FLUTE CHOIR AND ITS REPERTOIRE
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, Music
The National Flute Association (NFA) sponsors a range of non-performance and performance competitions for performers of all ages. Non-performance competitions are: a Flute Choir Composition Competition, Graduate Research, and Newly Published Music. Performance competitions are: Young Artist Competition, High School Soloist Competition, Convention Performers Competition, Flute Choirs Competitions, Professional, Collegiate, High School, and Jazz Flute Big Band, and a Masterclass Competition. These competitions provide opportunities for flutists ranging from amateurs to professionals. University/college flute choirs perform original manuscripts, arrangements and transcriptions, as well as the commissioned pieces, frequently at conventions, thus expanding substantially the repertoire for flute choir. The purpose of my work is to document commissioned repertoire for flute choir, music for five or more flutes, presented by university/college flute choirs and NFA sponsored flute choirs at NFA annual conventions. Composer, title, premiere and publication information, conductor, performer and instrumentation will be included in an annotated bibliography format. A brief history of the flute choir and its repertoire, as well as a history of NFA sponsored flute choir (1973–2012) will be included in this document.

Committee:

Katherine Borst Jones (Advisor); Charles M. Atkinson (Committee Member); Russel C. Mikkelson (Committee Member); Karen Pierson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Commissioned Flute Choir Pieces; History of the Flute Choir; Flute Choir; NFA

Goodman, Kimberlee RutheThe commissioned works of the National Flute Association for the Young Artist and High School Soloist Competitions
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2007, Music
The National Flute Association, an organization of professionals, amateurs, teachers, performers, and students has been active in the commissioning of new music for some of its competitions since 1986. The organization is responsible for more than forty new works for the Young Artist and High School Soloist competitions alone. The commissioning process has changed vastly over the years that the organization has been in existence. The National Flute Association commissions composers from all over the world to write pieces for two of its competitions; the Young Artist Competition has been commissioning works since 1986, and the High School Soloist Competition began commissioning new works in 1989. Additionally, the importance of the National Flute Association has led to many world premiere performances and individuals commissioning works to be premiered at the annual conventions. The purpose of this document is to highlight the competition commissioned works of this organization and its continuing commitment to presenting and championing new music. The National Flute Association has established itself as a leading organization in creating new works, and these commissioned pieces now represent a major body of work and a substantial portion of the newly composed repertoire for flute.

Committee:

Katherine Jones (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

National Flute Association; Young Artist Competition; High School Soloist Competition; Flute Compositions

Broffitt, VirginiaThe Music of Jennifer Higdon: Perspectives on the Styles and Compositional Approaches in Selected Chamber Compositions
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2010, College-Conservatory of Music : Flute

World-renowned contemporary composer and flutist Jennifer Higdon has made her mark on the music world with her innovative and highly individual compositions and has made significant contributions to the mixed chamber ensemble repertoire. This research examines Higdon's individual approach to composition by focusing on stylistic trends in selected chamber compositions.

This DMA document examines the background of Jennifer Higdon with emphasis on her musical influences and the orchestral compositions that have heightened her fame. The focal point of the research includes detailed stylistic analyses and discussions of the chamber compositions Summer Shimmers, DASH-, and running the edgE. Included in the stylistic analyses and subsequent discussions are the structural, intervallic, harmonic, motivic, lyrical, and rhythmic elements and trends that permeate her compositions. These elements reveal many of her trademark characteristics and define her unique compositional style in the context of her chamber works.

Committee:

Bradley Garner, DMA (Committee Chair); Rodney Winther, MMus (Committee Member); Terence Milligan, DMA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Higdon; Flute; Jennifer Higdon; motives; Piano; tritones; line in the flute

Parker-Harley, Jennifer CarolMagic and Evocation in the Cinq Incantations pour Flûte Seule by André Jolivet
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2005, College-Conservatory of Music : Flute

The Cinq incantations pour flucircte seule by Andreacute Jolivet are the manifestation of many of the philosophical, spiritual, and musical ideas that occupied the composer early in his career. Somewhat of an auto-didact in philosophical matters, through his studies Jolivet became convinced of the power of music to affect the listener in such a way as to be a means of communication between people, a pathway to self-knowledge and a bridge to spiritual transcendence. He sought to capture the ‘magic’ that would allow a composition to work on the psyche, and even the physiology, of the listener.

This document will first describe the influences that impacted the development of Jolivet’s early style: a fascination with other cultures (especially their music and ritual practices), an interest in ethnology, and studies in spirituality. These three interests resulted in the development of the musical philosophy that became the impetus for the compositions from his early period, 1934-1939, when the Cinq incantations were written.

An in-depth analysis of each incantation follows, concentrating on motivic development and how these motives work to express his extra-musical ideas.

Next, the document examines two specific compositional techniques which most obviously serve to further Jolivet’s aims of creating a ‘magic spell’: repetition and juxtaposition of contrasting elements. Repetition has long been used as a means of reaching altered or ecstatic states; it works in these pieces in a similar way, serving to focus the mind like a chanted prayer or mantra. The juxtaposition of contrasting elements is so effective because it heightens the awareness of the listener while mimicking the constant motion and flux of our own inner lives. The document concludes that Jolivet is successful in his aim of capturing both the programmatic theme of each incantation (evocations of singular moments in the life of a person and community, such as inter-personal communication, childbirth, daily labor, spirituality and death) and, on a deeper level, accessing the resonance of universal experiences.

Committee:

Mark Ostoich (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Andreacute Jolivet; Cinq incantations; solo flute; French flute music

Meador, Rebecca RaeA History of Extended Flute Techniques and an Examination of Their Potential as a Teaching Tool
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2001, College-Conservatory of Music : Flute
The purpose of this document is to present the history of extended techniques for the flute and examine their potential as a teaching tool. This study will trace the development of the flute’s technique and range of musical expression with special emphasis placed on early innovations, significant composers and flutists, and research that ultimately resulted in new effects and sonorities. It is also necessary to catalog the established extended techniques by discussing, defining, and illustrating these effects through musical examples. Furthermore ,these devices will be discussed in reference to studio teaching and will be illustrated by exploring the benefits of, and the implementation of these techniques in the young flute player’s musical education. The paper will conclude with four orchestral excerpts for flute, each approached from an extended technique standpoint.

Committee:

Bradley Garner (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music; Music

Keywords:

HISTORY OF EXTENDED TECHNIQUES FOR THE FLUTE; TWENTIETH- CENTURY DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF EXTENDED TECHNIQUES; PIONEER EXTENDED TECHNIQUE PUBLICATIONS; SURVEY OF TWENTIETH-CENTURY FLUTE TECHNIQUES

Kim, YejiHybridity in Flute Music of Four Contemporary Composers
Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA), Bowling Green State University, 2012, Deleted category per request
Hybridity is a concept that is widely discussed in the field of cultural studies. The term can be applied to anything that exhibits a fusion or mixture of elements and fades the demarcation between the elements. In music it is evident in the fusion of such disparate elements as old and new styles; electronic and acoustic media; Western and non-Western music; audio and visual components; classical and popular music; and the use of quotation. These elements are often combined in works that contribute to a hybrid musical vocabulary with a distinctive style, so that the points of departure are often blurred. Many recently composed works for flute demonstrate hybridity. The purpose of this document is to explore the concept of hybridity as evidenced in the flute works of four contemporary American composers and flutists: Cynthia Folio (b. 1954), Anne La Berge (b. 1955), Janice Misurell-Mitchell (b. 1946), and Maggi Payne (b. 1945). The study examines what brought about their hybrid approach to composition, as well as the relationship between their roles as both creator and presenter of works that demonstrate hybridity. Extensive email interviews, consultation of available sources, and analyses of compositions are the essential research tools. The first chapter includes pertinent biographical and educational information of the four subjects. Chapter two explores their roles as both composer and performer. The third chapter presents a general overview of hybridity as it relates to the music of each composer. The final chapter provides a discussion of the use of extended techniques in a specific work by each composer.

Committee:

Marilyn Shrude, PhD (Advisor); John Sampen, DMA (Committee Member); Mary Natvig, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Midden, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

contemporary flute music; contemporary composers; extended flute techniques

Molumby, Nicole LenaThe application of different teaching strategies reflective of individiual students' learning modalities in the university flute studio class
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2004, Music
The purpose of this Doctor of Musical Arts document is to identify and explore different learning modality combinations expressed by university flute students in the studio class. In five lessons, this document investigated how activities based on the technical and musical aspects of selected standard flute repertoire could be used in the studio class with students expressing their personal learning modalities. In this qualitative study of metacognition, the students’ awareness of their learning modality was observed as they became more conscious of their own learning style. The goal of this document was to encourage university flute students to incorporate a personal understanding of their individual learning process within the flute studio class. The majority of literature on student learning styles focuses primarily on elementary-aged students. However, this study examined how teaching strategies can be applied to students on the university level with music as the academic subject. This research identified and used different teaching strategies that encouraged students to reach their potential of understanding of their learning modality within a group environment. The study participants ranged from freshman to senior level flute majors at The Ohio State University and included both performance and music education majors. Students took the VARK learning modality questionnaire, which determined if they were visual, aural, reading, or kinesthetic learners. A combination of classroom observations and questionnaire results produced student learning profiles for each of the seven participants. The student reflection responses from each of the five lessons, as well as the final exit questionnaire, revealed that students found the studio class environment and the teaching strategies effective in meeting their personal learning styles. This brief study produced positive responses from all of the participants, particularly regarding group instruction and the students’ self-awareness of their personal learning styles.

Committee:

Katherine Jones (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Music; Music

Keywords:

Flute Performance; Learning Modalities; Teaching Strategies; University Flute Studio

CHANDLER, BETH E.The “Arcadian” Flute: Late Style in Carl Nielsen’s Works for Flute
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2004, College-Conservatory of Music : Flute
Revered as Denmark’s most celebrated musical figure and regarded as one of the finest, albeit under recognized composers, Carl Nielsen (1865–1931) holds a place as one of the most individual and creative artists of his time. Straddling the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and with consideration to the dramatically changing musical climate of that time, Nielsen’s vast output is stylistically complex. His music spans an array of styles, with elements of Romanticism in his early works, to an outright rejection of these same principles and an adoption of extensive progressivism in later works, all the while maintaining features of neoclassicism. There are six known works by Carl Nielsen that include flute in a solo or chamber role. These works date from his late, mature compositional period and include a short piece for solo flute from the incidental music to Aladdin, Op. 34 (1918–19); three pieces from the incidental music to Moderen (The mother), Op. 41 (1920): “Taagen letter” (The fog is lifting) for flute and piano or harp, “Børnene spiller” (The children are playing) for solo flute, and “Tro og håb spiller” (Faith and hope are playing) for flute and viola; the Wind Quintet, Op. 43 (1922); and the Flute Concerto (1926). The latter two works enjoy particular significance and popularity in the flute repertoire. This thesis demonstrates how the stylistic development in Nielsen’s late works evolves from simple, traditional roots and merges into a progressive, multifaceted style, as exemplified in the flute works. Through examination of these works, as well as other contemporaneous works by Nielsen, this study explores the nature and development of Nielsen’s style, identifying important compositional and aesthetic hallmarks. The analysis addresses Nielsen’s treatment of specific neoclassical or retrospective elements that are common to these late works, as well as the juxtaposition of many of these conventional elements with contemporary, innovative features. Through consideration of both the similarities of and differences between these various works, this study traces how the progression and amalgamation of many influences and stylistic traits are evident in the works that feature the flute.

Committee:

Dr. bruce mcclung (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Nielsen, Carl; Flute; Denmark; Wind Quintet; Flute Concerto; 20th-Century Music; Chamber Music; Musical Style

Jones, Mary JaneRevival and Community: The History and Practices of a Native American Flute Circle
MA, Kent State University, 2010, College of the Arts / School of Music

Much knowledge about the Native American flute was lost following the suppression of Native American musical traditions by the United States government around the turn of the twentieth century. A renewal of interest in the instrument occurred in the latter part of the twentieth century, but few knew how to play the flute stylistically. As flute enthusiasts began meeting to learn and play together, flute circles emerged throughout North America and around the world. This thesis examines one such circle in Northeast Ohio and offers insight into the views and motivations of its members of Native descent. The practices of the flute circle and the relationships that formed among its members are investigated, as well as the reasons why these people have chosen to connect with their roots by means of playing the flute. In order to identify factors contributing to the resurgence of the flute’s popularity, this study attempts to determine whether flutists believe that they are continuing the flute’s traditions or creating a new musical style derived from past Native American flute practices.

This paper also discusses broader trends in Native American music such as the flute circle phenomenon, Pan-Indianism, and integration with New Age music, World music, and other genres.

Committee:

Terry E. Miller, PhD (Advisor); Ralph Lorenz, PhD (Committee Member); Richard O. Devore, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Native Americans

Keywords:

Native American flute; Native American flute circle; Native American music

Porter, Amanda H.Remnants
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2007, Music Composition
Remnants is a setting for soprano and chamber ensemble comprised of flute/alto flute, bassoon/contrabassoon, viola, piano, harp, and percussion. The text, written by a dear friend of the composer, deals with the effects of acquaintance rape. The emotional, psychological, and physical changes that occur after a victim’s assault are emphasized in each of the three poems, with the exception of the poem Shooting Stars, which encapsulates a loss of innocence and a general feeling of distrust. The physical memories of rape are alluded to in musical meditations that separate text sections of the work. Remnants is a musical embodiment of the shifting emotional states and fragmented memories of the victim speaking in the three poems. The poems were not written chronologically, but rather in an order relating to emotional responses. There is no cause and effect within the poems, thus the overall musical form may be perceived as a suspension of time, and not a progression of musical events one would expect in a traditional dramatic music form. It is for this reason that the movements may be interchangeable, and suggest a loose interpretation of moment form technique, as described in the work, Kontakte by Karlheinz Stockhausen. The instrumental selection is based upon each instrument’s unique timbral capabilities, which include both fragile and powerful sounds. These instruments express particular elements within the text that demonstrate musicality through rhythmic schemes intrinsic to the structure of the poem, or contain onomatopoeic phrases. The instrumental arrangement was also inspired by the works of Sofia Gubaidulina, a composer known for her emphasis on non-traditional instrumental combinations and their resultant timbres. Remnants is written as a musical meditation on the complex emotions experienced in the aftermath of rape and gives a voice to the many who are survivors of this type of assault.

Committee:

Burton Beerman (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

flute; alto flute; bassoon; contrabassoon; viola; piano; harp; percussion

Ti, Yu-juDuo Sonatas and Sonatinas for Two Clarinets, or Clarinet and Another Woodwind Instrument: An Annotated Catalog
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, Music
There are few scholarly writings that exist concerning unaccompanied duet literature for the clarinet. In the late 1900s David Randall and Lowell Weiner explored the unaccompanied clarinet duets in their dissertations “A Comprehensive Performance Project in Clarinet Literature with an Essay on the Clarinet Duet From ca.1715 to ca.1825” and “The Unaccompanied Clarinet Duet Repertoire from 1825 to the Present: An Annotated Catalogue”. However, unaccompanied duets for clarinet and another woodwind instrument are seldom mentioned in the academic literature and are rarely performed. In an attempt to fill the void, this research will provide a partial survey of this category. Because of the sheer volume of the duet literature, the scope of the study will be limited to original compositions entitled Sonata or Sonatina written for a pair of woodwind instruments which include at least one clarinet. Arrangements will be cited but not discussed. All of the works will be annotated, evaluated, graded by difficulty, and comparisons will be made between those with similar style.

Committee:

James Pyne (Committee Chair); Alan Green (Committee Co-Chair); James Hill (Committee Member); Robert Sorton (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Duo; Sonatas; Clarinet; Woodwind; Duet; Flute; Oboe; Bassoon; unaccompanied

Pitman, DennisLife Above the Permafrost
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2010, Music Composition
Life Above the Permafrost is a composition for soprano vocalist, flute, B-flat clarinet, violin, cello, piano and percussion. This single-movement work is based on the poem “Life Above the Permafrost” by Alice Fulton and is approximately eleven minutes in length. “Life Above the Permafrost” is a romantic poem in which the presumably female speaker juxtaposes visions of nature and changing seasons with that of herself and her lover in bed. The poem’s vivid imagery evokes a variety of moods through a number of textual themes. These themes, including the recurring elements of seasons, birds, trees, beds and color, provided ample material for text painting and motivic development throughout the work. The poem also established the framework for the structure of Life Above the Permafrost, which is comprised of five main sections matching the stanzas of the poem as well as an introduction and short interludes between sections. Melodic and harmonic pitch material was derived from a primary pitch-class set (6-Z19 [013478]) and its complement (6-Z44 [012569]), which furnish the basic intervallic content for the majority of the work. 6-Z19 can most strongly be heard as the result of one of a variety of transpositional combinations of subsets, many of which are rather consonant in nature. In contrast, its complement, 6-Z44, contains more dense intervallic content. Five of the six pitch-classes in this set are contained within a range of interval-class 6, providing more dissonant possibilities. The vocal melody was composed first, employing pitches drawn from these primary sets. The ensemble’s music was then constructed around the vocal framework using derivative material from the vocal line and new material from manipulations of the aforementioned sets. Inspired by the vibrant imagery of the text, the wide timbral palette of the ensemble is utilized in colorful ways, drawing inspiration from works by the likes of Joseph Schwantner and Steven Stucky, among others.

Committee:

Dr. Elainie Lillios (Committee Chair); Dr. Mikel Kuehn (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Music

Keywords:

composition; Life Above the Permafrost; Alice Fulton; soprano; flute; clarinet; violin; cello; piano; percussion; pierrot ensemble

PERLOVE, NINA MARGARETETHEREAL FLUIDITY: THE LATE FLUTE WORKS OF AARON COPLAND
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2003, College-Conservatory of Music : Flute
Aaron Copland’s final compositions include two chamber works for flute, the Duo for Flute and Piano (1971) and Threnodies I and II (1971 and 1973), all written as memorial tributes. This study will examine the Duo and Threnodies as examples of the composer’s late style with special attention given to Copland’s tendency to adopt and reinterpret material from outside sources and his desire to be liberated from his own popular style of the 1940s. The Duo, written in memory of flutist William Kincaid, is a representative example of Copland’s 1940s popular style. The piece incorporates jazz, boogie-woogie, ragtime, hymnody, Hebraic chant, medieval music, Russian primitivism, war-like passages, pastoral depictions, folk elements, and Indian exoticisms. The piece also contains a direct borrowing from Copland’s film scores The North Star (1943) and Something Wild (1961). Several expressive elements in this Vietnam-era piece relate to war and peace, shedding light on Copland’s views of the artist’s role in a war-torn society. Threnody I was composed as a tribute to Igor Stravinsky. Unlike the Duo, the piece outwardly appears independent from Copland’s 1940s idiom in its canonic, neoclassical treatment. However, the work quotes a Spanish song from Kurt Schindler’s Folk Music and Poetry of Spain and Portugal. This finding suggests that even while employing modernist techniques in the Threnody I, Copland was still incorporating 1940s ideas with specific folk connections. In 1973 Copland composed Threnody II, a memorial tribute in honor of Beatrice Cunningham, a personal friend. The distinctly modernist work employs tone rows in the forms of motives and harmonic dyads. The tone row is nevertheless combined with Copland’s signature wide intervals and relaxed pastoral style. By drawing upon score analysis; published texts by Copland, his contemporaries, and outside scholars; related literary and cultural sources; and Copland’s unpublished letters, manuscripts, and related documents in the Copland Collection at the Library of Congress, this thesis provides insight into the end of the composer’s career by highlighting his interest in borrowed sources even as he sought to create music that was new.

Committee:

Dr. bruce d. mcclung (Advisor)

Subjects:

American Studies; Music

Keywords:

Aaron Copland; flute performance and repertoire; American Indian Music; 20th Century music and analysis

Krystal, Kuhns R.Organizational Principles in Two of George Crumb's Chamber Works with Flute: Madrigals, Book II and Federico's Little Songs for Children
MA, Kent State University, 2011, College of the Arts / School of Music

George Crumb developed his mature style in 1962 and wrote eight chamber works with flute between 1965 and 1986. The first, Madrigals, Book II (composed 1965) was written for soprano, alto flute (doubling flute in C and piccolo) and percussion. The last, Federico’s Little Songs for Children (composed 1986) was written for soprano, flute (also piccolo, alto flute and bass flute) and harp. This thesis explores the organizational principles that are the essence of Crumb’s unique individual style with a detailed analysis of pitch-class content and contour, along with a general survey of rhythm and special effects in both pieces. Also included is an essay on the performance of the extended flute techniques throughout all eight of Crumb’s chamber works with flute.

Written 21 years apart, Madrigals, Book II and Federico’s Little Songs for Children employ many of the same organizational principles, including chromaticism, symmetry, dissonance, and disjunct motion. Both of these pieces are highly chromatic, often emphasizing pitch-class sets that are symmetrical and contain the tritone, such as (0167). Small sets are often expanded into larger supersets while large sets are generally fragmented and broken down into smaller subsets. The contour of the music is often disjunct, with displaced chromaticism and frequent large leaps of dissonant intervals such as tritones, sevenths and ninths. Crumb also utilizes irregular rhythmic patterns and special effects that contribute to his individual style. Irrational divisions of the beat, ties over barlines and radical time signatures often distort any sense of time and meter.

Committee:

Richard Devore, Dr. (Advisor); Ralph Lorenz, Dr. (Committee Member); Frank Wiley, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music; Pedagogy; Performing Arts

Keywords:

George Crumb; extended flute techniques; pitch-class content; intervallic contour; Madrigals, Book II; Book IV; Federico's Little Songs for Children; Night of the Four Moons; Vox Balaenae; Lux Aeterna; Idyll for the Misbegotten; Eleven Echoes

Leach, Lindsay A.Performing Hugo Kauder: An Expansion of Flute Literature
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2012, College-Conservatory of Music: Flute
Early twentieth-century composer Hugo Kauder set out to revolutionize the course of classical music composition through the fusion of modern and fifteenth- and sixteenth-century compositional devices. His natural approach to melodic writing, based on the harmonic overtone series, includes omitting bar lines in his scores, writing segmental non-modulating passages, employing frequent recitation tones, and exploiting long unobstructed phrases. The use of his double scale, pentatonicism, eastern elements, and folk melodies and rhythms add a spice to the otherwise holistic sonorities. Described as “Neo-Medieval” and “Hindemith-like,” Kauder compositions not only offer a unique addition to a recital program, but often provide a musical style of which flutists rarely have the opportunity to study or perform. This document will analyze Hugo Kauder’s compositional style, techniques, and influences evident in his chamber works for flute. The perfomer’s editions of the Trio No. 2 for Flute, Oboe, and Horn, the Trio for Flute, Cello, and Piano, and the Trio for Flute, Horn, and Piano help to illustrate the hurdles in playing these pieces and facilitate solutions that enable successful performances.

Committee:

Bradley Garner, DMA (Committee Chair); Randolph Bowman, BM (Committee Member); Vivian Montgomery, DMA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Hugo Kauder;Flute;Ockeghem;Trio;Folk;Hindemith;

Sloan, Steven ErnestThe Seasons: 30 Haiku for Flute, Clarinet, Violin, Cello, Mezzo-Soprano, and Baritone
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2017, Music Composition
The Seasons is a 30-movement work for mezzo-soprano, baritone, and Pierrot ensemble (flute, clarinet in b-flat, violin, violoncello, and piano). The text for the work consists of 30 haiku written by the composer — seven haiku for each of the four seasons, plus a pair of transitional poems between summer and autumn, then autumn and winter. There are seven songs in each season— a nod to the father of the Pierrot ensemble, Arnold Schonberg, and his love of numerology. The seasons slowly infect each other as they progress, paying tribute to their natural evolution. While each section of The Seasons is unique, bearing its own characteristics and signatures, certain elements recur and reference one another. A descending gesture, most salient in “Winter II” and “Interlude I,” evokes precipitation — one of the shared characteristics, in various forms, between seasons. The tittering of birds and other animals is heard in fragmentary figures and trills throughout the entire piece. As haiku mirror and refer to one another, the music does the same. The equinoxes, “Spring III” and “Autumn V,” begin with a prayerful duet between the voices. “Autumn III” appears as a more frantic, darker version of “Spring I.” The flurry of activity as the world awakens from Winter becomes the frenzied preparation for hibernation and dearth. The most explicit connection between movements is the link between Spring VI, Summer V, Autumn IV, and Winter III. Each is based on the same tone row as expressed in the voice, is rhythmically identical, and is harmonized according to the predominant scale of each season.

Committee:

Marilyn Shrude (Advisor); Christopher Dietz (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Composition; Haiku; Pierrot Ensemble; Chamber Music; Vocal Music; Mezzo-Soprano; Baritone; Flute; Clarinet; Violin; Cello; Piano; Music

Jang, Seon HeeInterpretation of Extended Techniques in Unaccompanied flute Works by East-Asian Composers: Isang Yun, Toru Takemitsu, and Kazuo Fukushima
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2010, College-Conservatory of Music : Flute
Extended flute techniques include many different ways of producing non-traditional sonorities and effects on the flute and have been an important compositional staple of Avant-garde composers in the twentieth century. While many of these techniques developed exclusively within the Western tradition, many others derived from influence of non-Western flute traditions. Three East-Asian composers, Isang Yun (1917–1995), Toru Takemitsu (1930–1996), and Kazuo Fukushima (b.1930), contributed to this performance practice style by drawing from the flute traditions of their cultures. By focusing on the unaccompanied solo flute works of these three composers, this document will demonstrate many of the important applications of extended flute techniques in the twentieth century present their East-Asian influences and provide performance suggestions for this repertoire.

Committee:

Bradley Garner, DMA (Committee Chair); Jeongwon Joe, PhD (Committee Member); Sandra Rivers, MS (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Extended techniques;Flute;Isang Yun;Toru Takemitsu;Kazuo Fukushima

Leung, Cleo D.M.Overtone Characterization of Garner Headjoints Using Spectrographic Analysis and Fast Fourier Transforms
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2014, College-Conservatory of Music: Flute
Recent innovations by the Garner Headjoint Company in machine standardizing the making of flute headjoints has allowed us to reopen a seemingly closed discussion into the apparent differences in the power spectrum (strengths of each harmonic in the sound) produced by flutes made of different materials. Because of their standardized geometry, we can be reasonably sure that differences in power spectrum will be due to the variation in metal. Previous studies have implied that the physical composition of the flute is irrelevant to the sonic output. However, in this study, we will approach this problem by eliminating as many variables as possible besides the metals, including replacing the human flutist with an angularly accurate flute machine that plays the headjoints using a source of high purity compressed nitrogen funneled through a copper tube formed into the shape of a flute embouchure. Data acquisition was performed in a mostly anechoic chamber normally used to test the acoustics of jet engines by an array of thirteen microphones. From this, we produced unique physical portraits for six Garner headjoints sounded alone and fitted to silver Yamaha #YFL-587HCT #548, and 14K gold Yamaha YFL-997 HCT # 977A C338. While we were unable to find definite patterns explaining the power spectra we observe, this study represents a first step towards a more complete understanding of the precise effect of the materials used on the sound produced.

Committee:

Bradley Garner, D.M.A. (Committee Chair); Steven Cahn, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Howard Everett Jackson, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Acoustics

Keywords:

Garner Headjoints;headjoints;flute;Michael Geoghagen;Bradley Garner;power spectrum

Haug, Rachel E.An Introduction to Twentieth-Century Flute Music by Norwegian Composers: With Emphasis on Øistein Sommerfeldt and Publications by Norsk Musikforlag
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2015, Music
When we think of Norwegian composers, the name Edvard Grieg readily comes to mind, yet we can seldom name others, let alone more contemporary composers. This document explores the twentieth-century flute compositions of Norway, emphasizing Øistein Sommerfeldt, publications by Norsk Musikforlag, and several other Norwegian composers, including Johan Kvandal, Egil Hovland, Carl Gustav Sparre Olsen, and Finn Mortensen. A brief history of Norway with specific emphasis on the country’s musical development is included to gain understanding of the events and characteristics that define Norway’s musical voice. In addition to a chapter entirely focused on Norway’s musical history in the twentieth century, we will examine Norwegian folk music and its resulting impact on several twentieth-century composers. Through an examination of twentieth-century flute music by Norwegian composers, we discover works outside our normal scope, yielding a more comprehensive and globally encompassing standard flute repertoire library.

Committee:

Katherine Borst Jones (Advisor); Charles Atkinson (Committee Member); Russel Mikkelson (Committee Member); Karen Pierson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Sommerfeldt; Norway; Norwegian; flute music

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