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Srinivasan, ChitraInteroperability Between AWSOME and Other Tools Using Model Driven Architecture
Master of Science (MS), Wright State University, 2011, Computer Science

AFIT Wide Spectrum Object Modeling Environment (AWSOME) is built on an Abstract Syntax Tree (AST) which is the meta-model of AWSOME. Transformations happen internally in AWSOME to transform anything in abstract to concrete. Earlier efforts in AWSOME were focused on developing tools to work on the AST. The goal of this thesis is to make AWSOME interoperable with other available tools. To achieve this goal, the Model Driven Architecture (MDA) concept is used. MDA is a framework aimed at portability, interoperability and reusability among different tools. Among many tools that use MDA context, EclipseUML 2008 and Dresden OCL Toolkit were considered to make interoperable with AWSOME.

This thesis focuses on making a model generated by AWSOME to be loaded in to EclipseUML 2008 and a model generated by EclipseUML 2008 to be parsed in to AWSOME. Also the Object Constraints Language (OCL) file generated by AWSOME should be able to be loaded in Dresden OCL Toolkit. The model to model mapping between these tools and the level of interoperability achieved between these tools is discussed in detail. Understanding the different functionalities of these tools and deciding the level of interoperability between the tools played a vital role in the design decisions made. All together three translation or transformation tools were developed to interface EclipseUML 2008 and Dresden OCL Toolkit with AWSOME.

Committee:

Thomas Hartrum, PhD (Advisor); Mateen Rizki, PhD (Advisor); Yong Pei, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

XMI; UML; AWSOME; OCL; packagedElement; AST; uml file

Sharif, BonitaEmpirical Assessment of UML Class Diagram Layouts Based on Architectural Importance
PHD, Kent State University, 2010, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Computer Science
The dissertation presents a suite of empirical studies that investigate the effectiveness of different layout techniques for Unified Modeling Language (UML) class diagrams. Three different layout schemes are examined. The architectural importance of classes is used to guide each layout technique. Architectural importance in a UML class diagram is defined by stereotype information, in this case the control, boundary and entity class stereotypes. Stereotypes are an extension mechanism provided by the UML that allow users to define semantics for the notation. The premise is that layout techniques for UML class diagrams significantly impact comprehension.The experiments use traditional questionnaire-based methods as well as eye-tracking equipment to quantitatively measure the performance of subjects solving specific software maintenance tasks. Both high-level and low-level software engineering tasks are examined. The layout techniques are also applied to design pattern comprehension in class diagrams. Two of the experiments are replicated using an alternate method of data collection to support and verify the findings. In addition, the effect of identifier styles (camel case and underscore) on the readability of UML class diagrams are also examined and is viewed as complementary to layout schemes used. The main contribution is a detailed empirical validation of a set of layout techniques with respect to a variety of software maintenance tasks. Results indicate that layout plays a significant role in the comprehension of UML class diagrams. In particular, there is a significant improvement in accuracy, time, and visual effort for one particular layout scheme, namely multi-cluster. In addition, a set of quantifiable eye-tracking measures are presented that provide an objective metric to measure the visual effort for class diagram layouts. The ultimate purpose of the research is to determine effective ways to adjust the layout of existing UML class diagrams to support program comprehension. Based on the empirical evidence, a set of guidelines for layout adjustment is presented.

Committee:

Jonathan Maletic, PhD (Advisor); L. Gwenn Volkert, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Walker, PhD (Committee Member); Michael Collard, PhD (Committee Member); Jocelyn Folk, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science; Education; Experiments

Keywords:

UML class diagram layout; controlled experiments; eye-tracking studies; empirical studies; layout guidelines; eye-tracking metrics; quality of UML class diagram layouts

Debnath, Jayanta KumarDevelopment of Scheduling, Path Planning and Resource Management Algorithms for Robotic Fully-automated and Multi-story Parking Structure
Master of Science, University of Toledo, 2016, Electrical Engineering
This thesis demonstrates development of a complete suite of path planning, elevator scheduling and resource allocation algorithms to manage multiple concurrent requests, in real time and in a dynamic context, for storage and retrieval of vehicles loaded onto robotic carts for a robotic, fully-automated, multi-story and driving-free parking structure. The objective is to utilize, for parking, the available spaces across the floors of a parking structure that does not have any driving lanes at a much higher percentage rate which is greater than or equal to 80% in all cases while keeping the customer waiting times at minimum. Path search and planning employs the incremental informed search algorithm D* Lite with domain-specific heuristics, and the uninformed search algorithm Uniform Cost Search in a completely-automated framework. An optimization algorithm based on nested partitions and genetic algorithm is adapted for scheduling of a group of elevators in the multi-story parking structure environment. A small percentage of parking spots are reserved as “blank cells” to facilitate movement of roller beds carrying a vehicle to its storage or retrieval destination. Resource allocation and management is accomplished using statistical models employing queueing theory for structural resources such as blank cells and elevators while minimizing customer waiting time. Lower bounds on the number of elevators needed for a specific floor count and number of parking spaces per floor are derived using statistical modeling. Multiple vehicles are considered to be potentially moving from one parking space to another by roller bed pallets moving along tracks mounted on the surface of each storage cell. A software simulator based on multi-threaded Java code and unified modeling language was developed to perform empirical testing and validation of the performance of the proposed integration framework for the set of path search, elevator scheduling and resource management algorithms. A comprehensive set of test cases where the number of floors in the parking structure, the number of cells on each floor, the number of elevators and the percentage of blank cells are parameters for exploration, are generated applying the constraints that the utilization of the parking structure has to be equal or greater than 80%, and during the “morning/evening rush hours” the capacity of parking lot needs to be fully utilized within a two clock-hour period. A typical business day scenario where morning rush hour that fills the parking lot to its maximum capacity at its conclusion and the evening rush hour that nearly empties the entire parking lot from a fully-occupied state was considered. Multiple concurrent and combination of storage and retrieval requests were generated assuming Poisson distributed customer arrivals. The performance effect of immobilized carts that form fixed obstacles on the parking floor was considered. Performance of the proposed system was assessed and evaluated using a number of performance metrics that included customer waiting time for storage request, customer waiting time for retrieval request, utilization rate for each elevator, average travel distance for storage process, average travel distance for retrieval process and maximum utilization rate for each floor. Simulation results indicate that the robotic, fully-automated and multi-story parking structure system presented in this thesis is feasible and practical for a real time context. The customer waiting time for both storage and retrieval requests is primarily distributed within reasonably acceptable ranges even in the presence of many concurrent storage and retrieval requests and accommodating a variety of customer arrival rates and numerous immobilized vehicles to make it possible for deployment in real-time environments. The simulation study results further indicated that system could handle over 100 concurrent requests in real time. The simulation study indicates that the set of algorithms developed are suitable for robotic, fully-automated and multi-story robotic parking structure to serve concurrent storage-retrieval requests representing a wide range of Poisson distributed customer arrival rates in real time with manageable computing resources under real-life scenarios.

Committee:

Gursel Serpen (Committee Chair); Kevin Xu (Committee Member); Ahmad Javaid (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Artificial Intelligence

Keywords:

fully-automated robotic parking; elevator scheduling; real-time; optimal; genetic algorithm; queuing theory; nested partition;UML; simulation software design; multithreaded; path planning; scheduling; optimization

Kedalagudde, Meghashree DattatriAdding extensions to UML dynamic models for better embedded system design
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Engineering
An important facet of embedded system design today is hardware software co-design. And another important trend is that the Unified Modeling Language (UML) is increasingly being considered for modeling embedded systems due to the number of advantages this language offers. But there are a few drawbacks with UML that act as a hindrance for efficient embedded system design. Overcoming these drawbacks is a challenging task. In this work, we attempt to develop a complete specification of the system under design at the design phase of the process using UML that could directly be used to implement the system efficiently. In this thesis, this is achieved by proposing a few new extensions to the sequence and state chart diagrams in UML that define the dynamic behavior of the system under consideration. The extensions are demonstrated and the highlights and usefulness of the extensions explained through a few example designs.

Committee:

Carla Purdy, PhD (Committee Chair); Wen Ben Jone, PhD (Committee Member); George Purdy, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering

Keywords:

UML;design;dynamic models;;;;

Yusuf Patel Dawoodi, ShehnaazAssessing the Comprehension of UML Class Diagrams via Eye Tracking
MS, Kent State University, 2007, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Computer Science
In this thesis, eye-tracking equipment is used to assess how well a subject comprehends UML class diagrams. The goal of the study is to identify specific characteristics of UML class diagram, such as layout, color, and stereotype usage that are most effective for supporting a given task. Prior investigations in the software visualization and program comprehension communities have primarily focused on effective layout schemes and key aesthetics criteria with the goal of enhancing the cognitive process. A number of usability studies have been reported that evaluate UML class diagrams, including those with additional semantic information (e.g., class stereotypes), for an effective representation in addressing various software evolution tasks. These studies typically form conjectures and/or draw conclusions from the data explicitly collected from subjects’ via a combination of questionnaires, experience reports, and feedback comments after a designated task is completed. This raises a potential threat to the validity of the study namely: How well the subjects’ responses on completion of a task match the “reality” they observed while performing that task? That is, a subject may forget to report (or misreport) an observation after a lengthy task for example. Here we take a different approach to assess UML class diagrams. Results indicate subjects have a variation in the eye movements (i.e., how the subjects navigate the diagram) depending on their UML expertise and software-design ability to solve the given task. Layouts with additional semantic information about the design were found to be most effective and the use of class stereotypes seems to play a substantial role in comprehension of these diagrams.

Committee:

Jonathan Maletic (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

UML; Class Diagrams; Eye Tracking; Program Comprehension

Bhalerao, Kaustubh D.Characterizing the reliability of a BioMEMS-based cantilever sensor
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering

The cantilever-based BioMEMS sensor represents one instance from many competing ideas of biosensor technology based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems. The advancement of BioMEMS from laboratory - scale experiments to applications in the field will require standardization of their components and manufacturing procedures as well as frameworks to evaluate their performance.

Reliability, the likelihood with which a system performs its intended task, is a compact mathematical description of its performance. The mathematical and statistical foundation of systems-reliability has been applied to the cantilever-based BioMEMS sensor. The sensor is designed to detect one aspect of human ovarian cancer, namely the over-expression of the folate receptor surface protein (FR – α). Even as the application chosen is clinically motivated, the objective of this study was to demonstrate the underlying systems-based methodology used to design, develop and evaluate the sensor. The framework development can be readily extended to other BioMEMS-based devices for disease detection and will have an impact in the rapidly growing $30 bn industry.

The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a systems-based framework for design and development of object-oriented information systems which has potential application for use in systems designed to interact with biological environments. The UML has been used to abstract and describe the application of the biosensor, to identify key components of the biosensor, and the technology needed to link them together in a coherent manner. The use of the framework is also demonstrated in computation of system reliability from first principles as a function of the structure and materials of the biosensor.

The outcomes of applying the systems-based framework to the study are the following:

Characterizing the cantilever-based MEMS device for disease (cell) detection.

Development of a novel chemical interface between the analyte and the sensor that provides a degree of selectivity towards the disease.

Demonstrating the performance and measuring the reliability of the biosensor prototype, and

Identification of opportunities in technological development in order to further refine the proposed biosensor.

Application of the methodology to design develop and evaluate the reliability of BioMEMS devices will be beneficial in the streamlining the growth of the BioMEMS industry, while providing a decision-support tool in comparing and adopting suitable technologies from available competing options.

Committee:

Alfred Soboyejo (Advisor)

Keywords:

BioMEMS; Cantilever sensor; Reliability; UML

Jayaram, IndiraAdding non-traditional constraints to the embedded systems design process
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Engineering
Embedded systems are ubiquitous and have a large number of applications. The requirements for embedded systems are not restricted to functionality but also include a lot of non-functional properties such as cost, reliability, safety, ease of use etc. This makes developing a standard design methodology for embedded systems challenging. In this thesis, we are attempting to include the non-traditional, non-functional constraints of embedded systems in the design process by weighting them in the order of their importance. We propose developing UML models for a system and annotating them with the non-functional constraints by using standard profile extensions and weighted constraint charts. We demonstrate the application of this design technique by developing a few example systems. One of the systems is implemented on Altera UP3 platform and demonstrates how the design technique leads us to choose the implementation that satisfies all the requirements, including the ones that are non-functional.

Committee:

Carla Purdy,, PhD (Committee Chair); Philip Wilsey, PhD (Committee Member); Xuefu Zhou, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering

Keywords:

Embedded systems;UML;MARTE

Obeidat, Nawar H.The Design and Development Process for Hardware/Software Embedded Systems: Example Systems and Tutorials
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2014, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Engineering
Today embedded systems are found in all areas of our lives and have many different applications. They differ in their uses and properties as well as employing both software and hardware components in their implementations. This has made the design and development process for them much more complicated. Learning to use such a process is especially difficult for electrical engineering students, who have not been introduced to the systematic design and testing methodologies familiar to students trained in computer science and computer engineering. In this thesis, we illustrate the similarities and differences in the design and development design processes in for software systems and for software/hardware embedded systems. We give details for every stage for both types of systems and we develop detailed examples for example embedded systems, using a design process which extends the standard UML-based process used for software. In addition, we include details about project management. The examples and additional exercises and questions provide a set of tutorials which will assist students unfamiliar with complex design procedures in mastering the necessary skills to become well-trained embedded system developers.

Committee:

Carla Purdy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Raj Bhatnagar, Ph.D. (Committee Member); George Purdy, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering

Keywords:

Embedded Systems;UML based process;Design process;design and development process;hardware software embedded systems;vending machine