Search Results (1 - 25 of 42 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Byrum, Sabrina FreemanA Technical Communication Internship with WIL Research Laboratories, Inc
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2006, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report describes my technical writing/editing internship at WIL Research Laboratories, Inc. (WIL) in Ashland, Ohio. To complete the Master of Technical and Scientific Communication (MTSC) degree from Miami University of Ohio, I interned as a Study Analyst and Report Writer for 14 weeks for WIL, a contract research organization that conducts toxicology research for pharmaceutical and agricultural chemical corporations. Topics covered in this report include a general overview of WIL; a description of the training portion of the internship, including accounts of several projects that I completed in preparation to become a report writer; a detailed account of the major report writing project completed during the internship; and a reflection on the internship, including a description of how I used the seven steps of problem solving (as defined by Kristin R. Woolever in Writing for the Technical Professions) to outline the objectives and to develop the argument of my first report.

Committee:

W. Simmons (Advisor)

Subjects:

Information Science

Keywords:

technical communication; science research; report writing; report editing; technical communication internship

Krugh, Lisa S.Report on a MTSC Internship at Golder Associates Inc
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2009, English
This internship report discusses my 14-week internship as a technical writer intern with the Houston, Texas office of Golder Associates Inc. (Golder), completed from January 2009 through April 2009. My primary role at Golder was to provide technical review of the communications generated from the environmental, oil and gas, and waste management sectors served by the Houston office. The report is broken down into four chapters that reflect on my overall internship experience, my coursework in the MTSC program, and my perception of technical communication. The first chapter provides an overview of Golder, the organizational culture, and my role in the organization. The second chapter describes the various projects I worked on during my internship. The third chapter examines one large project in close detail. Finally, the fourth chapter examines the impact of the economic crisis on Golder’s culture and its impact on technical communicators in similar organizations.

Committee:

Katherine Durack, PhD (Advisor); Michele Simmons, PhD (Committee Member); Sandra Woy-Hazleton, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Engineering; Environmental Engineering; Environmental Science; Rhetoric

Keywords:

technical communication; technical editing; Golder Associates Inc.; environmental communication; MTSC program; internship report; Front End Engineering Design Report; communication of technical information; economic impact on technical communication

Sun, KangTranslation in China as a Form of Technical Communication: Rethinking Social Roles of Technical Communication in the Current Political and Economic Contexts in China
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2005, English/Technical Writing
This thesis identifies Chinese university situations specific to the transfer of technical communication to China, especially the relationship between general socio-economic settings in China and the influences these general settings have on the university disciplinary structure changes. The objective of this research is to reveal openings in translation discipline as a shell for technical communciation to merge with. The necessities for the merger and the reasons for choosing translation as the right discipline are analyzed through the conception of institutionalization by Berger and Luckman and the theory of power relations by Michel de Certeau. Earlier attempts of U.S. technical communication to reach China are reanalyzed to expose both accomplishments and problems in these efforts. In order to show the openings of translation discipline for technical communication, a survey has been conducted among Chinese translation professionals to reveal tensions in the development of translation theories and practices. It is concluded that the merger of technical communication with translation can both gain technical communication a pivotal status of being a discipline in Chinese universities and solve some problems of the translation field. More importantly, such a merger offers a future-oriented perspective of development for the merged discipline to ride more successfully the stablly growing Chinese economic growth.

Committee:

Gary Heba (Advisor)

Keywords:

International Technical Communication; Translation; Discipline; Strategy; Chinese University; Technical Communication Education

McKinney, Elizabeth GRhetorical Technical Communication: Exploring the Gaps, Connections, and New Boundaries Between the Fields Through an Analysis of Instruction Manuals
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Findlay, 2016, Rhetoric and Writing
This thesis researches the lack of collaboration between rhetoricians and technical communicators. The aims of the study were to 1) identify areas in which collaboration could be strengthened and 2) present a means to use these areas to improve technical communication documents. The researcher designed an instruction manual evaluation rubric which incorporated theories and principles from rhetoric, technical communication, humanism, and audience theory. In a qualitative study, six instruction manuals were evaluated using this rubric. The results of the study revealed audience analysis is the most lacking category in the manuals. Technical communicators must increase their study of audience and use rhetorical principles to engage the reader and write more effective instruction manuals.

Committee:

Elkie Burnside, Dr. (Advisor); Ron Tulley, Dr. (Committee Member); S. Chris Ward, Dr. (Committee Member); Christine Tulley, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Communication; Rhetoric; Technical Communication; Vocational Education

Keywords:

technical communication; rhetoric; instruction manuals; audience theory; writing

Rosselot-Merritt, Jeremy W.Technical Communication as a Rhetorical Enterprise: A Technical Writing Internship at E-Technologies Group
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2011, English

In this report, I discuss a technical writing internship I completed at E-Technologies Group, an engineering firm in West Chester, Ohio, as well as the collaborative and rhetorical implications of my work during the internship.

The report consists of four chapters. In Chapter 1, I describe the organization where the internship took place. In Chapter 2, I discuss several examples of the work that I performed during the internship. In Chapter 3, I focus on a specific long-term project on which I worked: the Quality Management System (QMS). In Chapter 4, I discuss ways in which practicing and future technical communicators can enhance their effectiveness in the field of technical writing and also how technical communicators might consider their roles contextually in the workplace. Using the QMS as an example, and citing existing research, I argue that technical writing is not only an instructive or expository activity, but also a rhetorical one. I also discuss the need for technical communicators to extend beyond their "traditional" roles in the workplace and the importance of collaborating with multiple stakeholders, including other technical writers, in projects like the QMS. Finally, I discuss the importance of advocating for the value of technical communication by those who work in the field.

Committee:

Jason Palmeri, PhD (Committee Chair); Jean Lutz, PhD (Committee Member); Judith Weiner, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Composition; Engineering; Rhetoric; Technical Communication

Keywords:

technical writing; technical communication; collaboration; advocacy; engineering; rhetoric; persuasion; quality; quality management; QMS

Damschroder, Carrie MarieA Technical Communication Internship with a Technical Communication Consulting Company: Write on the Edge, Inc
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2003, Technical and Scientific Communication
In this report, I discuss my internship with Write on the Edge, Inc., (WOTE). WOTE is a small technical communication consulting company in Vista, California. WOTE currently has about five clients; however, Hewlett-Packard (HP) generates most of WOTE’s business. While I interned at WOTE, I wrote print and online documentation for HP’s Photosmart division in Rancho Bernardo, California. My project work focused on writing documentation for five HP photo printers. My deliverables included printed Basics Guides, Reference Guides, one-page instruction and reminder sheets, and online Printer Help. The dates of my internship were January 6, 2003, to April 18, 2003. Chapter One of this report describes WOTE, its connection to HP, and the products for which I wrote documentation. Chapter Two discusses my major project work and deliverables. In Chapter Three, I describe my writing process and discuss my work on developing the HP Photosmart 7200 Series Reference Guide. Chapter Four offers an analysis of my writing process, explains how I used the WOTE project workflow process, and reflects on the lessons I learned during my technical communication internship.

Committee:

Jennie Dautermann (Advisor)

Subjects:

Language, General

Keywords:

technical writing; technical communication; writing; editing; problem solving; MTSC; internship report; MTSC internship report; consulting; language; English; writing process

Crowder, Julie KAN INTERNSHIP AS A SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATE AT ELI LILLY AND COMPANY
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2004, English
This report describes my projects and major activities during my internship with Eli Lilly and Company. As a Scientific Communications Associate, I worked in a highly cross-functional group at Lilly to create documents the company sends to regulatory authorities worldwide. This report provides a basic description of the organizational structure and culture, the nature of my work and the types of documents I created, my contributions to Lilly during the internship, as well as my interactions with an internship mentor. Several projects, including work on ethical review board responses and intranet virtual space design are highlighted. The process I used to complete one of my major activities, updating a Clinical Investigator’s Brochure for a Lilly compound, is described in detail. My analysis of the communications process I used to update the Clinical Investigator’s Brochure, using Paul Anderson’s problem-solving model, is also included.

Committee:

Michele Simmons (Advisor)

Keywords:

scientific communication; medical writing; Eli Lilly; technical communication; science writing

Viers, Jill Diane P.Working Toward Stability in the Unstable World of IT Consulting
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2012, English
In this four-chapter report, I describe the technical writing internship I completed with a consulting company to fulfill educational requirements for a Master of Technical and Scientific Communication degree from the Miami University of Ohio. In chapter 1, I discuss the company culture of my employer, a global IT consulting firm, along with the initial project I was hired to complete. In chapter 2, I provide an overview of my internship, including the project requirements and project approach. In chapter 3, I provide a detailed discussion of the Storage Area Network (SAN) documentation project and the onboarding process documentation project. In chapter 4, I describe the project management approach I adapted to manage the scope of my projects and deliver materials that met each client’s standards for quality. I also describe how my internship experience enabled me to develop a rewarding career as a technical communicator in consulting.

Committee:

Katherine Durack (Committee Chair); Jean Lutz (Committee Member); James Coyle (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Information Technology; Instructional Design; Technical Communication

Keywords:

IT consulting; temporary staffing model; technical communication; onboarding; contract

Connolly, David E.Problems of textual transmission in early German books on mining: “Der Ursprung Gemeynner Berckrecht” and the Norwegian “Bergkordnung”
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2005, Germanic Languages and Literatures

The subject of this study is two printed books from the 1530s on metal mining and mining law, Der Ursprung gemeynner Berckrecht (“The Origin of Common Mining Laws”) and the Bergkordnung des Löblichen newen Bergkwergs/ auff dem Golmsbergk/ im Königreich Norwegen (“Mining Regulation for the praiseworthy new mine at Gullnes in the Kingdom of Norway”). I have created scholarly editions of each German text, translations into English, and the annotations and commentary requisite for understanding the works synchronically and diachronically in their historical and linguistic contexts. The two books occupy important positions in the early German literature on mining.

Ursprung, probably dating from 1535-1538, is the earliest printed compendium of legal and scientific texts on mining, containing several texts originally dating from the 13th to early 16th centuries. The collection, by known book producer Johan Haselberg, prints key early German laws on mining previously existing only in manuscripts, and it provides a new edition of the earliest printed book on mining and metallurgy, Ulrich Rülein’s “Bergbüchlein” from ca. 1500. A glossary of mining and smelting terms, a listing of mines in Bohemia, and information on mining officials complete the collection.

The other book, Bergkordnung Norwegen, was composed and printed in Saxony in 1540 for use in Norway. Commissioned by King Christian III of Denmark and Norway, the book constitutes the first mining regulations produced in Germany for use in another country. This work clearly and systematically summarizes prevailing contemporary German practices and served as the legal basis for Norwegian mining for several centuries. The introduction to this study begins with overviews of early German mining and mining literature. The two texts Ursprung and the Bergkordnung Norwegen are then discussed in their historical context, including earlier versions/sources and later editions of the works. Issues of textual transmission and compilation in the early printing period are emphasized in this study—how do the texts in question inform and/or problematize our understanding of the growth and progress of scientific knowledge in the Renaissance? Part 1.8 of the Introduction discusses the rationale and methodology used in producing the editions and translations.

Chapter 2 presents the edition of Ursprung; Chapter 3, the edition of the Norwegian Bergkordnung. The editions present near-diplomatic renditions of each text, with critical apparatuses to provide variants from the earlier and later versions of the texts. Chapters 4 and 5 are the respective English translations, with footnotes to illuminate various linguistic or technical aspects of the texts.

On the one hand, various practices and developments in compilation of technical information are demonstrated within and between these two texts. However, study of these texts also reveals some of the problems adherent to the transmission of texts from manuscript to print and among successive print editions in the early book press period.

Committee:

Anna Grotans (Advisor)

Keywords:

Medieval and Early Modern/Renaissance metal mining; mining laws; metallurgy; Early New High German technical literature; early book printing; transition of manuscript to print; history of the book; history of technical communication

Allen, Andre RamonA Technical Communication Internship at The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2004, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report describes my internship as a technical writer/editor at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in Cincinnati, Ohio. NIOSH is the primary federal agency responsible for researching and making recommendations for workplace safety and health. As a technical writer, I wrote and designed a brochure about skin exposures to hazardous chemicals in the workplace. As a technical editor, I contributed final edits to the NIOSH Chartbook and completed several other editing projects for scientists in the Document Development Branch. In this report, I discuss how I performed my writing and editing tasks in accordance with the NIOSH document development process. I also describe the challenges I encountered as I analyzed and wrote for audiences with whom I had no direct contact. Finally, I reflect on how my internship experience at NIOSH affected my development as a technical and environmental communicator.

Committee:

Paul Anderson (Advisor)

Keywords:

technical communication; environmental science; technical writing; technical editing; federal government

Warren, Jessica L.Report on a MTSC Internship at Seapine Software
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2012, English
This four-chapter report describes the Master of Technical and Scientific Communication internship I completed as a member of the technical publications team at Seapine Software, Inc. during the fall of 2008. It provides an overview of the company, my role as a technical writing intern, and the projects I worked on; a description of a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) set I created as my major project; and an analysis of how my internship experience compared to my expectations generated from my coursework at Miami University. In Chapter 4, I also address my development from intern to full-time technical writer.

Committee:

Jean Lutz, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Michele Simmons, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Glenn Platt, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Technical Communication

Keywords:

MTSC; technical communication; technical writing; software documentation

Marks, Pamela AnneAN INTERNSHIP WITH THE OHIO EVALUATION & ASSESSMENT CENTER
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2005, English
This report is a summary of an internship I performed with the Ohio Evaluation & Assessment Center from March 2005 through July 2005. The Center is a semi-independent organization based at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and conducts evaluations of education research studies. I begin this report by discussinng the Center's purpose and organizational structure, as well as my internship role. I also describe the major projects on which I worked and outline the tasks that each project required. In general, such tasks included writing, editing, and formatting evaluation reports; data analysis; and information design. To give readers an in-depth understanding of my work and the types of evaluation reports produced by the Center, I describe in detail one of these projects: the Ohio State University Teacher Quality study. Finally, I discuss my internship experience from the perspective of a telecommuter and outline several aspects of working within a research-oriented organization.

Committee:

Jennie Dautermann (Advisor)

Keywords:

Education Research; Data Analysis; Technical Communication; Internship

Berkowitz, MeganUnderstanding the Relevance of Cognitive Psychology to Composition: Taking a Closer Look at How Cognitive Psychology has Influenced Ideas about Reading, Writing, and the Teaching Process
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2008, Technical and Scientific Communication
This thesis reviews literature on cognitive psychology to demonstrate its relevance to the field of composition with a specific focus on technical communication. It specifically addresses how cognitive psychology became important to composition and how it has enhanced the field's understanding of reading, writing, and teaching processes. In terms of reading, cognitive psychology provides the field with guidelines writers can use to best enhance reader comprehension. In terms of writing, cognitive psychology brings to the field the view of writing as a process. Teaching writing and reading processes involves looking at how the two are intertwined. Building on connections between reading and writing, contemporary studies of cognitive psychology focus on how teaching students metacognitive strategies can help students enhance their reading comprehension and improve their writing ability. MOOs and Knowledge Forums are presented as two examples of online learning environments that incorporate the teaching of metacognitive strategies. Ultimately, this thesis argues for the overt inclusion of cognitive psychological principles in writing classes as a way to help students understand the guidelines writing teachers pass on to them.

Committee:

Jean Lutz (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Cognitive Therapy; Communication; Composition; Design; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Psychology; Higher Education; Linguistics; Literacy; Psychology; Reading Instruction; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Cognitive Psychology; composition; writing; reading; reading comprehension; metacognition; metacognitive strategies; cognitive processes in writing; cognitive apprenticeship; MOOs; Knowledge Forums; Technical Communication; Social Cognitive Theory

Lamborg, Amy DavisonTechnical Communications at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH): An Internship Report
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2004, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report is a case study of a technical communications internship in a government institute devoted to scientific research in occupational safety and health. Descriptions in this report include the structure and goals of the Institute and how my internship corresponded with these goals, the three projects I worked on during the internship, and an in-depth examination of the activities required for converting material from a Dutch database to functional Web pages. The final chapter examines my technical communication activities with respect to several communication models, and briefly describes three specific-purpose communication models (social marketing, elaboration likelihood, and diffusion of innovations) and their use at NIOSH.

Committee:

W. Simmons (Advisor)

Keywords:

technical communication; safety and health; communication models; internship report; risk communication

Shellabarger, Scott S.Collaboration in Environmental Education: A Technical Communication Internship with The Ohio Wyami Appalachian Teacher CoHorts (OWATCH)
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2007, Technical and Scientific Communication
This paper reports on my internship as the Environmental Technical Communicator of OWATCH, an education consortium providing professional development in environmental science to Ohio teachers. Chapter 1 describes the organization of OWATCH including the collaborative atmosphere and the “culture of enthusiasm” fostered there. In Chapter 2, I describe my role as an SME facilitator and outline my mission in relation to the “creation of knowledge.” Chapter 3 showcases the deliverables that I produced. Chapter 4 explains the lessons I learned by delving into the processes involved in completing two information dissemination projects. A detailed analysis of the effect of tone on a document is included. Both Project Management and Anderson’s Problem-Solving Model are used to analyze the accomplishments of the internship, and a proper melding of the two methods is completed with the introduction of my own “Project Solving.”

Committee:

Jennie Dautermann (Advisor)

Keywords:

Environmental Technical Communication; collaboration; Document Tone; OWATCH Internship; information dissemination projects; website critique report; journal article process analysis; project solving; Anderson Problem Solving Model (APSM)

Green, Toby P.Learning by Doing at MedPlus
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2009, English

This report describes my internship at MedPlus, Inc., a subsidiary of Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, between August 1 and October 14, 2008. MedPlus is a leading provider of information technology solutions to hospitals and other medical sites. I interned with the documentation group for MedPlus’ flagship product, ChartMaxx, editing, authoring, and designing instructional materials for ChartMaxx users.

This report reflects the phases of my internship: my introduction to the company, training within the technical communications department, and work on ChartMaxx documentation. I have also made conclusions describing differences between academic communication and the practical workforce, strengths and limitations of a technical communications department, and the lessons I learned while moving from academic to professional communication. These conclusions are juxtaposed to relative theories of knowledge management.

Committee:

Jean Lutz, PhD (Committee Chair); Alton Sanders, PhD (Committee Member); Katherine Durack, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Information Systems; Technology

Keywords:

Software; Documentation; Technical; Communication; Internship; Lessons; Technology; Medical

Steiner, Lindsay BThe Available Means of Design: A Rhetorical Investigation of Professional Multimodal Composition
PHD, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English
This dissertation describes how four professional graphic designers use rhetoric in their design processes. While the classical understanding of rhetorical arrangement refers to the ordering of elements within oral discourse, I argue, instead, that arrangement is a creative and guiding tool for making meaning in these graphic design processes. This perspective suggests that arrangement is used horizontally and vertically instead of in a static, linear fashion. Ultimately, I describe how rhetorical arrangement in professional graphic design processes is layered and dimensional—a rational reconstruction of the classical understanding of arrangement as the organization of the parts of verbal discourse (Schiappa, 1990). An underlying theme of this dissertation is the invisibility of these composing processes and their respective technologies and techniques. Data were collected through research methods designed to capture much of the rhetorical complexities in a set of four professional graphic design processes, including: • Pre-interviews to develop a contextual picture of each participant’s design approach and background, • Think-aloud protocols (multimodal recording with video screen-capture and audio software) to create a trace of each participant’s design process, and • Stimulated recall retrospective interviews (using the video screen-capture recording to stimulate responses) for additional context. I analyzed verbal think-aloud protocol data by looking for emergent rhetorical themes with support from video screen capture data and supplementary interviews for context. I then define and describe horizontal and vertical arrangement through multi-dimensional examples supported by verbal and visual think-aloud data. This project is not intended to support broad generalizations about contemporary multimodal and graphic design processes (a kind of multimodal composing). Instead, the purpose is to contribute current descriptive insight into how such practices may occur. In addition, the findings suggest the need for further empirical research on professional graphic design activity and theorizing of rhetorical concepts situated within that activity.

Committee:

Pamela Takayoshi (Committee Chair); Raymond Craig (Committee Member); Sara Newman (Committee Member); Stanley Wearden (Committee Member); Albert Ingram (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Design; Rhetoric; Technical Communication; Technology

Keywords:

multimodality; graphic design; technology; writing studies; rhetoric; Aristotle; composing process; professional writing; technical communication; qualitative research; think-aloud protocols; video screen capture

Pegue, Misty LynnPracticing Technical and Scientific Communication in a Community Health Center
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2010, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report contains four chapters wherein I record my internship experiences as a full-time, paid Community HealthCorps VISTA (Volunteer in Service to America) at the Southeast Health Center. As a VISTA, I expanded and ensured the clinic’s capacity to provide quality care to the medically underserved population of Bayview Hunter’s Point in San Francisco, California. In Chapter 1, I describe the organizations that sponsored my employment and the nature of my role and VISTA duties. In Chapter 2, I review major projects that I worked on from April 20 to September 15, 2009, the timeframe set aside for my Master of Technical and Scientific Communication internship. In Chapter 3, I describe one major project in detail, the i2iTracks training sessions and tutorials, and I reflect on my internship experiences in Chapter 4.

Committee:

Jean Lutz, PhD (Advisor); Cynthia Lewiecki-Wilson, PhD (Committee Member); W. Michele Simmons, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Design; Health; Health Care; Health Education; Literacy; Organization Theory; Public Health; Technology

Keywords:

community health center; clinic; technical communication; diabetes; chronic care; training; information design; technology; sehc; health center; health clinic; primary care; MTSC; internship; public health; organization theory

Ambro, SharonTwo Technical Communication Projects Performed During an Internship with Analex Corporation
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2002, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report describes and analyzes my work as a technical writer for Analex Corporation during my 16-week Master of Technical and Scientific Communication internship period. Analexs Cleveland branch works in the aerospace industry and primarily contracts for NASAs Glenn Research Center. This report details my work on two projects during this time: Combustion Module-2 (CM-2) and Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). For the CM-2 project, I wrote procedures for astronauts to run combustion science experiments on board the space shuttle. For the FCF project, I edited requirements documents for experiment hardware that will be on board the International Space Station. This report discusses background information for each project and analyzes my writing and editing processes in terms of the Anderson Problem-Solving Model for technical communication. The final chapter describes my learning experiences and how these experiences contributed to my development as a technical communicator.

Committee:

Paul Anderson (Advisor)

Keywords:

Technical Communication; Technical Writing; Scientific Communication; Science Writing; Aerospace Industry; Problem-Solving Model

Denman, Christopher DavidDEFINING THE ROLE OF THE TECHNICAL COMMUNICATOR: AN INTERNSHIP WITH THE WEB-BASED LEARNING GROUP AT THE KROGER COMPANY
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2004, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report discusses my internship experiences at the Kroger Company in Cincinnati, Ohio, where I worked as a technical writer from May 2004 through August 2004. The report describes working in the expanding field of web-based learning for the largest grocery retailer in the United States. I discuss my role within the organization, the contributions I made to the Web-based Learning group, and the ways in which I demonstrated the value of technical communication when developing learning products. This report presents a sample training course project where I was responsible for helping with initial planning, editing and revising content, providing suggestions for visual presentation, and assisting in final development.

Committee:

Jennie Dautermann (Advisor)

Keywords:

technical writer; technical writing; technical communication; technical communicator; editor; editing; web-based learning; web-based training; training; content development; instructional design; simulation; course development

Rouse, Vicki HendersonAn Internship with Choice Systems, Inc., A Supply Chain Solution Software Company
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2006, Technical and Scientific Communication
During my internship with Choice Systems, Inc. from April until December 2005, I worked as a technical communicator, developing documentation for the company’s supply chain management software applications. This report is a chronicle of my internship and includes information about the company and the projects on which I worked. It provides a discussion of single-sourcing, a documentation methodology I investigated to determine whether it would improve the efficiency of developing and managing the large body of documentation that Choice maintains. This report also includes an analysis of the process I used to develop documentation based on the Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) model from supply chain management. From this analysis, I conclude that efficiencies in documentation can be realized less by automating the documentation process than by aligning the software development and documentation development supply chains. An additional benefit would be increased availability of information, which is critical to organizations like Choice with networked cultures.

Committee:

Jean Lutz (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

technical communication; single-sourcing; supply chain management

Hausen, Michelle JenniferConverting Instructor-Led Training to Web-Based Training at Atos Origin
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2008, English
This report describes the internship I completed as part of the requirements for my Master's in Technical and Scientific Communication at Miami University. During my internship period from November 2006 through February 2007 as an instructional designer for Atos Origin, Inc., I worked on several projects. My main project work involved converting instructor-led training to web-based training, but I also worked as a quality tester for a website and worked on a new project that developed from the web-based training conversion work.

Committee:

Jean Lutz, PhD (Committee Chair); Michele Simmons, PhD (Committee Member); Gary Shulman, PhD (Committee Member)

Keywords:

technical writer; technical writing; technical communication; technical communicator; editor; editing; web-based learning; web-based training; training; content development; instructional design; simulation; course development

Bugg, Samuel R.Internship with Environmental Quality Management, Inc. - Technical Communication and Environmental Compliance
Master of Environmental Science, Miami University, 2008, Environmental Sciences
This paper details my experiences and activities at Environmental Quality Management, Inc. (EQ) in Cincinnati, Ohio, from August 2007 through February 2008. During the first six months at EQ, I provided technical and field support to several types of environmental projects including National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit applications, Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SWPPP), Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plans, and others. I worked primarily in EQ's Environmental Compliance and Permitting discipline. The purpose of this report is to summarize the projects and documents I contributed to and the training I received during my internship at EQ.

Committee:

Jean Lutz, PhD (Committee Chair); David E. Russell, PhD (Committee Member); Michele Simmons, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Environmental Science

Keywords:

technical communication; environmental compliance; surface water

Miskioglu, Elif ELearning in Style: Investigation of Factors Impacting Student Success in Chemical Engineering at Individual and Team-Levels with a Focus on Student Learning Styles
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Chemical Engineering
Our three studies examine the factors of learning styles, student self-efficacy, collective (team) efficacy, attitudes, perceptions, and performance at individual and team levels. Each study addresses a different environment: (i) Individual Level—we are interested in how variability in learning styles engaged by specific exam problems may correlate with student learning styles, self-efficacy, and performance in our introductory chemical engineering course, Process Fundamentals (i.e., mass and energy or material balances); (ii) Team Level—we are interested in understanding how team composition with respect to learning styles (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous teams) may influence these factors in the upper level Unit Operations course; (iii) Combinatorial Level—we are interested in understanding how collective efficacy may influence individual self-efficacy and again if there are any correlations with learning styles and performance in the senior level Process Design and Development course. Some of the most interesting results of these studies have stemmed from the study on individual students, which has shown correlations between learning style preferences and performance in specific instances. Even more interesting, evaluating and characterizing the learning styles that exam problems engage has shown strong variations in problem types by instructor. This presents new questions regarding how these variations may affect student understanding and subsequent performance. Also included are details regarding a course developed in Technical and Professional Communication (for Chemical Engineers) that was offered Spring 2014 and Spring 2015.

Committee:

David Wood (Advisor); James Rathman (Committee Member); David Tomasko (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Chemical Engineering; Education

Keywords:

learning styles; chemical engineering education; problem-solving; teaching styles; factors for student success; technical communication; professional communication

Weflen, Mark R.Technical Writing Internship at a Medical Device Company
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2011, Communication Studies
From January to July 2010, I worked as a technical writing intern at a medical device company where I gained experience developing a wide variety of departmental and product documentation. The most comprehensive project I worked on involved developing instructional inserts for two new surgical devices. Through my participation in this project—and other projects during my internship—I learned to leverage the knowledge of subject matter experts more effectively by closely collaborating with them throughout the document development process rather than treating them as isolated technical resources. Consequently, I gained a deeper understanding of the role of subject matter experts in the document development process and, as a result, will be better at determining how and when to leverage their skills and knowledge in my future endeavors.

Committee:

Dr. Jean Lutz (Committee Chair); Dr. Michele Simmons (Committee Member); Dr. Jason Palmeri (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Technical Communication

Keywords:

technical communication; technical writing; medical writing; medical device company; internship; medical device documentation; medical device instructions

Next Page