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Walden, Joseph P.Comparing Formal Analyses of Dmitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5, Op. 47 Through the Theories of James Hepokoski, Warren Darcy, and William Caplin
Master of Music (MM), Ohio University, 2014, Music Theory (Fine Arts)
This thesis compares formal analyses by various authors of each movement of Shostakovich's Symphony No. 5 and relates these scholars' analyses to James Hepokoski and Warren Darcy's Elements of Sonata Theory and William Caplin's Classical Form. The thesis focuses on how aspects of inherited formal structures such as sonata form and scherzo/trio form have been used and/or adapted within Symphony No. 5.

Committee:

Elizabeth Sayrs (Advisor)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Music

Keywords:

Dmitri Shostakovich Symphony No 5; Dmitri Shostakovich; Symphony No 5; Symphony No 5, Opus 47; James Hepokoski; Warren Darcy; William Caplin; Sonata Theory; Sonata Form; Scherzo and Trio; Minuet and Trio; Comparing formal analyses

Saunders, Matthew CharlesThe Symphony for Band of Donald E. McGinnis: A guide for conductors
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2007, Music
Dr. Donald E. McGinnis (born 1917) composed his Symphony for Band as his doctoral dissertation at the University of Iowa in 1953. A consideration of the harmonic language and structure of the piece reveals that it utilizes compositional techniques appropriate to the time and scope of the work. Its historical context in the development of the symphony for wind band/ensemble places it in a cohort of pieces by Morton Gould, Paul Hindemith and Vincent Persichetti. The 1977 published edition did not include a movement that appeared in McGinnis’ original conception of the piece, the "Solemn Tune." That movement and an errata list for the 1977 score and parts represent an important step toward assuring this piece the place it deserves in the repertoire.

Committee:

Donald Harris (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

McGinnis, Donald; Symphony for Band; symphony; band music; twelve-tone music; Hindemith, Paul; Schoenberg, Arnold; errata list

Frantz, Elizabeth LorraineIs Technology the Way Forward for Classical Music? Exploring Audience Engagement in the Digital Era
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2015, Arts Policy and Administration
In the face of declining attendance rates and aging subscriber bases, American symphony orchestras have begun to seek out new ways to market classical music to a younger demographic. This target group includes the Millennial generation, which has displayed a widespread disinterest in classical music alongside a higher level of comfort with (and reliance on) technology than any previous generation. In response, many performing ensembles are experimenting with augmenting their concerts with technology such as social media interaction, projections and smartphone applications. It is important to note that although many new and interesting digital genres are made possible by the advancements of technology, this thesis focuses on classical music as performed by acoustically traditional symphonic instruments. This study explores the current phenomenon of implementing technology in the concert hall as an audience development tool using case studies of the Philadelphia Orchestra, ProMusica Chamber Orchestra, and Elevate Ensemble. The data suggests that these performing ensembles are including technology in three main areas of their audience development strategy: targeting specific niche demographics, programming new and community-based repertoire, and increasing social engagement. These themes point to the conclusion that the injection of technology alone into the concert experience is not enough to make classical music concerts appealing to the next generation. Orchestra administrators must be willing to mindfully consider each part of the traditional concert structure as an opportunity to modernize, while still keeping the celebration of quality classical music central to their mission.

Committee:

Wayne Lawson, PhD (Advisor); Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Education; Arts Management; Music

Keywords:

symphony; symphony orchestra; classical music; technology; audience development; audience engagement; innovation; customer comfort

Namazi, Behzad K.Persepolis Symphony
Master of Music (MM), Ohio University, 2015, Music Composition (Fine Arts)
From the time of its conception in Spring 2013, until its final manifestation in Spring 2015, Persepolis Symphony has developed from a short melodic motive into a large-scale composition for full orchestra. The piece embodies a majestic sensibility that may be perceived as apt for an ancient royal court. The title pays tribute to one of the grandest palaces of Ancient Persia, Persepolis. Accordingly, the work derives its musical inspiration from Persian folk and traditional music, featuring melodic and rhythmic elements from the musical tradition of Iran. The piece is written in the Persian melodic mode of Shoor, which uses an aggregate set of pitches similar to that of the Western natural minor scale, but utilizes a 2nd scale degree lowered by a quarter-tone. The work also features a pervasive rhythmic cycle salient in Persian folk music. Persepolis Symphony commences with the main theme presented in a light orchestration and gradually develops into a fuller texture as the thematic material progresses.

Committee:

Mark Phillips (Advisor); Richard Wetzel (Committee Member); Garrett Field (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Cultural Anthropology; Ethnic Studies; Music

Keywords:

Persepolis Symphony; Persepolis; Symphony; Orchestra; Orchestral; Persian

Butterfield, Emily J.The professional life and pedagogy of Clement Barone
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2003, Music

Orchestral musician and teacher Clement Barone (1921-), played piccolo in the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and the Houston Symphony Orchestra for over forty years. A native of Philadelphia, Barone plays an open g-sharp system, which he learned from his first teacher, his flutist-father Clemente Barone. Subsequent teachers included Joseph La Monaca, Frank Versaci, Fernando Morrone, and the eminent William Kincaid, who recommended Barone for his first major orchestral position: piccolo and assistant first flute in the Houston Symphony Orchestra.

While playing in Houston, Barone secured and refined his piccolo technique performing for conductors Efrem Kurtz, Sir Thomas Beecham, and Leopold Stokowski. In 1959 Barone moved to Detroit to play piccolo in the Detroit Symphony Orchestra under principal conductor Paul Paray. During his thirty-two year career in Detroit, Barone collaborated with fellow flutists Albert Tipton, Irvin Gilman, and later members, Ervin Monroe, Shaul Ben-Meir, and Robert Patrick.

In addition to presenting a chronological study of Barone’s professional activities, this document also discusses selected aspects of Barone’s flute and piccolo pedagogy, formed from his premise that the flute “should imitate the human singing voice in style and quality of lyricism.”

Additional chapters include an account of lessons with William Kincaid, a discussion of Barone’s publication, Learning the Piccolo: A Treatise on the Subtleties and Problems of Playing the Piccolo in Relation to the Flute (1975), and Barone’s perception of changes in orchestral procedures as they impact the professional orchestral musician.

Committee:

Katherine Borst Jones (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Clement Barone; Flute Pedagogy; Piccolo Pedagogy; Detroit Symphony Orchestra; Houston Symphony Orchestra; Changes in Orchestral Auditions; Open G-sharp; Learning the Piccolo

Florjancic, Linda M.The Parents' Role in the Development of Youth and College-Level Musicians
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2007, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
Parents of young musicians have a major effect on their children in regard to their chosen musical path. In order for some of these musicians to succeed, they have to be forced to improve their talents. Parents even turn into “stage mothers and fathers” so their child can be successful. Research and even reality television has explored parental effect on young athletes and academics but little research has been completed with regard to young musicians. For this project, approximately 200 youth orchestra and college musicians were surveyed. For the youth orchestra sector, the members of the Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra and Baldwin-Wallace Senior Youth Orchestra were chosen. In the college sector, Baldwin-Wallace College Symphony Orchestra and the University of Akron Symphony Orchestra were selected. The surveys consisted of 24 questions for the youth orchestra members and 20 questions for the college musicians. The questions address such issues as seating and financial support.

Committee:

Durand Pope (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Parent's Role; Musicians; Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra; Baldwin-Wallace Senior Youth Orchestra; University of Akron Symphony Orchestra; Baldwin-Wallace College Symphony Orchestra

Davis, Derek M.AN OVERVIEW OF THREE AMERICAN CHORAL SYMPHONIES
Master of Humanities (MHum), Wright State University, 2008, Humanities
During the 20th century, serious composers in the United States increasingly wrote symphonies, and a few of these composers expanded the form with the use of chorus. Three key examples are Marc Blitzstein’s The Airborne Symphony, Peter Mennin’s Symphony No. 4 (“Cycle”), and Leonard Bernstein’s Symphony No. 3 (“Kaddish”). Although all three are choral symphonies each composer took a much different approach to the form. The paper will focus on analysis of these three symphonies and examination of their place in the history of the American symphony.

Committee:

Charles Larkowski, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Christopher Chaffee, Ph.D (Committee Member); Dennis Loranger, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Leonard Bernstein; Marc Blitzstein; Peter Mennin; Choral Symphony

Titus, Jaime R.The professional life of Donald E. McGinnis, PhD
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2005, Music
Conductor, performer, and educator Dr. Donald E. McGinnis (b. 1917), directed The Ohio State University Concert Band from 1952 to 1979, played principal clarinet and flute in the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, and was recognized as a distinguished educator by numerous musical organizations. A native of Barberton, Ohio, McGinnis graduated from Oberlin Conservatory of Music where he studied clarinet with George Waln. He received a Masters of Arts and PhD from the University of Iowa, studying clarinet with Himie Voxman. Flute studies included lessons with Robert Cavally and Maurice Sharp. McGinnis began his career at The Ohio State University in 1941 as Assistant Director of the Concert Band under Manley Whitcomb. He was appointed conductor of the Concert Band in 1952 and developed the program into one of the most recognized bands in the country. He gained prominence as a conductor and was elected to The American Bandmasters Association in 1956. McGinnis served as President in 1978, and was granted Honorary Life Membership in 1999. An accomplished clarinetist and flutist, McGinnis developed a reputation as a woodwind authority, and was a clinician and recording artist for the Selmer Company for thirty years. Considerable research for this document was obtained through oral interviews with McGinnis. Thirty-five colleagues and students of McGinnis contributed to this document through personal interviews and questionnaires. Other research materials were available through McGinnis’ personal collection of concert programs and artifacts, The Ohio State University Archives, The Oberlin Archives, The Columbus Symphony Orchestra, and The Ohio State University School of Music. In addition to a complete chronological study of McGinnis’ professional activities, pedagogy and philosophies, this document presents an extensive repertoire list from The Ohio State University Concert Band, recording lists, instrumentation information, and pedagogical materials used in clinics and in the classroom. This document also discusses McGinnis’ role and influence in the cultural history of the concert band during the wind ensemble movement and radical changes in repertoire.

Committee:

Katherine Jones (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Donald McGinnis; Ohio State University; Concert Band; Selmer; American Bandmasters Association; Columbus Symphony Orchestra

Shin, WonheeWhat I wanna be in here
MM, University of Cincinnati, 2005, College-Conservatory of Music : Composition
The piece What I wanna be in here is for two flutes, two clarinets in Bb, two bassoons, one trumpet in C, one horn in F, one trombone, one tuba, one marimba, one violin, one viola, one violoncello, and one contrabass. I wrote the piece when I was exhausted by the pieces which are complex, dense, and extremely dissonance. The piece uses only four notes which are E, F, F sharp, and G.. In addition, all notes are in the down beat. It seems to the piece a quite simple. However, I vary the simple motive with dynamic change rapidly, and tempo change. The piece gradually speeds up to the middle of the piece, and then in the latter part, the tempo rapidly speeds down, so finally the tempo is back to the beginning tempo of the piece. Moreover, the rhythm of brass part helps the speed change of the piece. The duration of brass notes is gradually extended and shortened.

Committee:

Dr. Joel Hoffman (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

wind symphony

Poston, Paul WChamber Symphony
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2016, College-Conservatory of Music: Composition
To answer the question “who am I as a composer?” I felt a strong desire to compose a serious work. Throughout my time in academia, and especially during my master’s degree, I became convinced that the only music that could be considered serious or interesting was music that was modern in nature. Meaning that it used dissonance language, extended techniques, and dynamics as the primary structures for interest. Therefore, something that didn’t meet that criterion wasn’t bad music; rather it just wasn’t serious music. CCM challenged me to break through these notions, and since then I’ve been at a crossroads: Do I want my music to focus on timbre, rhythm, and dynamic exploration, or do I want to pursue music that is based on harmony, melody, and pulse? I suspect that the answer is somewhere in between. Chamber Symphony is an attempt of writing a serious piece that bridges both those gaps. More broadly, Chamber Symphony comments on the way people disengage or lose focus on something only after a short time. For example, film directors typically edit their movies to change a certain shot every five to ten seconds. Similarly, my work is composed using several short ideas (usually lasting around a minute or less) that piece together a narrative.

Committee:

Mike Fiday, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Mara Helmuth, D.M.A. (Committee Member); Douglas Knehans, D.M.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Chamber Symphony;New Music;Orchestra;Contemporary Music

Thomas, PaulTransit: Flux
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2005, Music Composition

Transit: Flux is a nine-minute composition for symphony orchestra, whose title refers to motion and the idea of passing sound from right to left and front to back. The perception of sonic motion is created through and around the orchestra by using numerous instruments to play large gestures, dovetailing the instruments to create a single coherent event. To achieve this effect, some of the orchestra members were relocated. The brass section was evenly split and paired with a set of timpani on the left and right sides of the stage behind the string section. The contrabasses were placed upstage of the percussion.

Transit: Flux is cast in a single movement and consists of four interior sections. It begins with a declamatory brass introduction that establishes the main idea of movement and panning. A melodic section devoted to the woodwinds with light string accompaniment follows the introduction. The third and largest section is sparked by the low brass playing doppler effect gestures from right to left and vice versa, creating the perception of a spinning wheel. The gestures gradually quicken until the “spinning” is nothing but a high-pitched hum or whirling sound in the strings, singing tube, and vibraphone. The final section of the piece begins when the high-pitched hum eventually snaps, sending down a cascade of chaotic rhythmic pandemonium. This gives rise to passages of controlled aleatory with an individual cell’s pitch content derived from the melodic material of the second section. The piece ends as the texture slowly dissipates away to nothing.

The harmonic and melodic material was derived from intuitively designed twelve-tone sets, each containing different groups of intervals and levels of dissonance. These sets were inspired by Witold Lutoslawski’s use of pitch in pieces such as Jeux Venitiens and Livre. Karlheinz Stockhausen’s Gruppen, Jacob Druckman’s Windows, and Gyorgy Ligeti’s Lontano were also influential in the composition of this piece.

Committee:

Marilyn Shrude (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Symphony Orchestra

Cortes, MichaelSymphony No. 1 “The Galilean Satellites”
MM, University of Cincinnati, 2010, College-Conservatory of Music : Composition
Symphony No. 1 "The Galilean Satellites" was written from 2008 to 2009. These four moons, discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilee are very unique objects in our solar system. Europa is one of the smoothest objects in the solar system and has the best chance of containing possible life. Ganymede is the largest moon in the solar system and to this point is the only moon that has its own magnetic field. Io is one of the most geologically active objects in the solar system and contains many volcanoes. Callisto is one of the most heavily cratered objects in the entire solar system. As you can tell, each of these moons is very different so I wanted to try to make each movement unique on its own, but at the same time I felt it was important to do something to unify all of the movements together somehow because these moons, although very different from each other, are all part of the great discovery of Galileo Galilee. In addition, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are all believed to contain a liquid ocean beneath their surface. When listening to the music, a very familiar slow motive will play, which is my portrayal of the possibility of life. At the very end of the entire work, you will hear ideas/motives from all of the previous movements. The electronics in this piece use not only software synthesizers and edited sounds created in MAX/MSP, but there are real sounds taken from NASA that was actually recorded through data received from space equipment that were visiting these moons from outer space.

Committee:

Mara Helmuth, DMA (Committee Chair); Mike Fiday, PhD (Committee Member); Joel Hoffman, DMA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Symphony; Galilean Satellites; pipe organ; band; moons

Bansal, TarunNetwork-Centric Mechanisms for Performance Improvement in Dense Wireless Networks
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2014, Computer Science and Engineering
In recent years, the number of wireless devices and the amount of data generated by these devices has seen an exponential growth. However, the number of channels available for data transmission has not increased significantly leading to the problem of spectrum crunch. Our measurements show that the existing wireless deployments employ high density of wireless devices (access points, smartphones etc.). However, to prevent interference, the current wireless algorithms prohibit these neighboring wireless devices to operate simultaneously. The main focus of this thesis is on improving the network experience on the mobile devices by leveraging the high density of wireless devices. This thesis proposes four different solutions that are suited for different wireless topologies: Symphony, RobinHood, Mozart and R2D2. Symphony and RobinHood are best suited for Enterprise wireless networks where multiple access points are connected to each other and are willing to cooperate. Both Symphony and RobinHood use novel cooperative decoding techniques to enable multiple neighboring access points to simultaneously receive different packets on the same channel. Symphony is suitable for wireless networks that span large geographical areas while RobinHood is suitable for smaller deployments. Symphony and RobinHood leverage the high density of access points in WiFi networks that otherwise remain unused in traditional wireless solutions. Mozart is suitable for WiFi networks where neighboring access points belong to different entities that may not be willing to cooperate. Mozart takes an unconventional approach of letting all transmitters collide at the access point and then lets the access point decode the collided packets in the fewest number of slots. Finally, R2D2 is designed for cellular networks and it enables neighboring devices to efficiently communicate with each other while reducing the dependence on the cellular base stations. R2D2 leverages the temporal spatial asymmetry in the traffic patterns to efficiently allocate resources across cellular base stations as well as to efficiently schedule links at each of the base stations. The thesis discusses all the solutions in detail, along with the techniques to address the challenges involved in their practical implementation.

Committee:

Prasun Sinha (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Wireless Networks; Symphony; Mozart; RobinHood; Performance

Richardson, Collin AForm in the Organ Symphonies of Edward Shippen Barnes (1887-1958)
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2015, College-Conservatory of Music: Organ
This document examines the two organ symphonies by American composer Edward Shippen Barnes (1887-1958). The popularity of the works during his lifetime paints a picture of a composer that was revered by his contemporaries. These little known works lean heavily on the aesthetics and compositional practices of French symphonic organ literature. Analysis of the symphonies reveals that Barnes uses various formal approaches, particularly sonata form, in addition to ternary and free forms based on preexisting material. This document casts greater light on a scarcely known American composer whose organ symphonies have yet to assume a place in the organ repertory.

Committee:

Michael Unger, D.M.A. (Committee Chair); John Deaver, D.M.A. (Committee Member); Stephanie Schlagel, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Edward Shippen Barnes;organ symphony, Amercian;form;Vierne;French symphonic organ;twentieth century organ music, America

Rosen, Nevin BrianPart I The Seven Days of Creation For Narrator and String Orchestra Part II Shostakovich's Symphony No. 5, Movement 4: A Parametric Analysis
Master of Music, Youngstown State University, 2009, Dana School of Music

Part One, "The Seven Days of Creation For Narrator and String Orchestra" depicts the seven days of creation as portrayed in the Bible. The narrator will first read the depiction of that particular day, followed by the referant musical movement, which will enhance the bible passage. The seven-movement piece uses a wide variety of compositional techniques including modes, whole tone scales and other artificial scales.

Part Two examines Movement 4 of Shostakovich's Symphony No. 5. The hope in analyzing this movement is to discover if Shostakovich could be a progressive 20th. century composer while being closely scrutinized by the Communist Party. A brief discussion of some historic background is followed by a parametric analysis consisting of a study of form, harmonic and tonal outline, climaxes, rhythmic structure, timbre, and textural structure. The thesis shows that Shostakovich was able to be creative despite the very adverse conditions of Communist Party control. Through the examination of this movement, we find that Shostakovich can be a source of inspiration to musicians and non-musicians alike who are faced with adversity.

Committee:

Robert Rollin, PhD (Advisor); Stephen Gage, PhD (Committee Member); Jee-Weon Cha, PhD (Committee Member); William Slocum, Prof. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

creation; narrator; string orchestra; Shostakovich; symphony number five

Gazda, Courtney M.Educational Outreach in the Arts: A Study of the Link Up Music Education Program
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2017, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
Research has long supported the benefits of the arts, specifically to students in grades K-12. Although arts programs have been decreasing over the last decade, nonprofit organizations have created strong programs that enrich students in the arts and create opportunities for collaborations with the community. The Weill Institute of Music at Carnegie Hall developed the Link Up music education outreach program to provide a beneficial means of music education in collaboration with partner host organizations and schools and has proven to be highly effective.

Committee:

Elisa Gargarella (Advisor); Ramona Ortega-Liston (Committee Member); Jonathan Willis (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management; Music; Music Education

Keywords:

Arts Administration; Music; Music Education; Education; STEAM; Link Up; Akron Symphony Orchestra; Arts; Arts education; Arts Management; Nonprofit; Education Outreach; Community Engagement; Audience Development

Attilli, MaurizioA Comparative Analysis of Harmonic Language in the First Movements of Fauré’s Requiem, Poulenc’s Gloria and Stravinsky’s Symphony of Psalms
Master of Music, University of Akron, 2005, Music-Theory
This study is a comparison of the opening movements of three works (Requiem, Gloria and Symphony of Psalms) with regard to their harmonic languages.

Committee:

Ralph Turek (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Faure, Poulenc, Stravinsky; Requiem, Gloria, Symphony of Psalms

Yun, Mi YeonA New Vision for the Genre:The Five Cello Sonatas of Ludwig van Beethoven and the Striving Towards Instrumental Equality
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2013, College-Conservatory of Music: Violoncello
Mainstream scholarship teaches that Beethoven's five cello sonatas follow his progression as a composer. The Op. 5 sonatas are considered to belong to the Classical tradition of keyboard domination and cello subordination, and the Op. 69 sonata is held as an important transitional work in which the cello and the piano are first treated as equals. The Op. 102 sonatas, appearing in Beethoven's increasingly chromatic and contrapuntal late period, further integrate the cello into the music making, but many scholars see the cello here as more of an independent voice than a matching partner. A closer look at the sonatas reveals a composer who was more consistent in his thinking. This document will study the relationship between the cello and the piano in each of the five cello sonatas of Ludwig van Beethoven and demonstrate that the equal treatment of both instruments, so widely praised in the Op. 69 sonata, is present in all five works.

Committee:

L. Scott, D.M.A. (Committee Chair); David Adams, M.M. (Committee Member); Lee Fiser, B.Mus. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

symphony

Okpebholo, Shawn EhireimeSymphony No. 1: Symphony on Spirituals
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2007, College-Conservatory of Music : Composition
The symphony has been a creative outlet for many composers throughout the history of Western music. Similarly, Negro slave songs were a creative way slaves conveyed their thoughts and emotions. In this symphonic work, I use Negro spiritual melodies, for which I have a strong penchant and personal connection, to form the foundation. At times the spirituals are quoted literally while at other times the statements of the slave songs are implicit. The spirituals used in this work all have a similar theme of going to a better place, where struggles would cease. This four movement musical journey explores several different musical styles including elements of jazz, minimalism, and neoclassicism.

Committee:

Dr. Joel Hoffman (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Negro Spirituals; Symphony; Slave Songs

Williams, Meredith FPromoting Symphony Sustainability: A Case Study of the Houston Symphony's The Planets - An HD Odyssey Film Project
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2013, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
US orchestras are faced with numerous obstacles as they strive to find sustainability, and many struggle to develop new programs that contribute to the orchestra's overall financial health and community standing. By studying the Houston Symphony's successful film project, The Planets - An HD Odyssey, as well as similar orchestra programs and the Knight Foundation's Magic of Music report, one can pinpoint specific program characteristics that promote symphony sustainability.

Committee:

Durand Pope (Advisor); Neil Sapienza (Committee Member); Brandon VanWaeyenberghe (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management; Fine Arts; Music; Performing Arts

Keywords:

symphony orchestras; sustainability;

Shold, Jonathan Matthew“Temporalities of Timelessness” in Stravinsky’s Neoclassical Apotheoses
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Music History

The various musical meanings of the polysemous term “apotheosis” have received scattered and uneven attention in musicological discourse. Although some historical instances of musical “apotheosis” have generated a fair amount of research, at least one application of the term has generated only little scholarship: the climactic “apotheosis” in the nineteenth-century ballet, and the surviving legacy of this concept in the music of twentieth-century composer Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971). This thesis investigates the concept of “apotheosis” in the finales of five of Stravinsky’s neoclassical compositions: Apollo (1928), Le baiser de la fée (1928), Symphony of Psalms (1930), Scènes de ballet (1944), and Orpheus (1948). Although only three of these finales are explicitly entitled “Apothéose” in the score, the musical restraint generally exhibited in these finales will be shown to form the basis for a modern theoretical conception of the “timeless musical apotheosis” in Stravinsky's music.

Chapter 1 investigates conceptions of “apotheosis” in the symphonic poems of Franz Liszt and the ballets of Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky as potential historical models for Stravinsky’s own conception of “apotheosis.” Chapter 2 explores the antithetical model of a “temporality of timelessness,” a paradoxical frame of reference in which the passage of varying rates of time is juxtaposed with the cessation of time to create a dense temporal web; it is then suggested how such a curious “temporality” might be signified in a passage of music. Chapter 3 applies the historical and theoretical concepts of the previous chapters to Stravinsky’s music; it is argued that the reception history of these works has led to a conception of the “timeless musical apotheosis” that ultimately has little immediately in common with Stravinsky’s own understanding of “apotheosis.”

Committee:

Marcus Zagorski, PhD (Advisor); Eftychia Papanikolaou, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Stravinsky; apotheosis; timelessness; temporality of timelessness; eternity; neoclassical; Apoth&233;ose; Apollo; Le baiser de la f&233;e; Symphony of Psalms; Sc&232;nes de ballet; Orpheus

Lin, Pei YiChallenges of Developing Audiences for Symphony Orchestras in Twenty-First Century
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2008, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
The proliferation of symphony orchestras has enriched American cultural life. However, as the environment has changed over the past decades, symphony orchestras have encountered new challenges and opportunities in developing audiences. To survive, symphony orchestras must identify challenges and adapt their programming and marketing to maintain audiences and to develop new audiences. This thesis discusses the special challenges in developing audiences in the twenty-first century, and proposes the development of young professional audiences as one possible solution.

Committee:

Neil Sapienza (Advisor)

Keywords:

Symphony Orchestra; Audience Development

Halen, Walter JohnAn analysis and comparison of compositional practices used by five contemporary composers in works entitled \"Symphony\" /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1970, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Music appreciation;Musical analysis;Symphony;Music

Kang, YongsikThe Symphonies of Pietro Maria Crispi (1737-1797): Style and Authenticity
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2016, College-Conservatory of Music: Music (Musicology)
Pietro Maria Crispi (1737-1797) was a Roman church maestro and keyboard player. Although almost completely forgotten nowadays, he had a modest international career during his lifetime; one of his symphonies was published in London in 1763 by Robert Bremmer, and Charles Burney referred to him as a “famous church maestro here” while visiting Rome in 1770. Friedrich Lippmann introduced Crispi to musicologists in a 1968 article investigating a symphony collection at Doria-Pamphilj archive in Rome. Among over 120 symphonies, this collection contains eighteen by Crispi, the largest among the eighteenth-century Italian composers represented. However, there has been no systematic research -- including archival research on the source materials -- on Crispi since. This study brings Crispi’s works to contemporary scholarship by locating the sources of and editing his remaining thirty-two symphonies into a modern edition. Based on the resulting scores, I examine the style of the twenty-four symphonies found in MS-829 at the University of California at Berkeley; I also discuss eight other symphonies, from other sources, in terms of their authenticity.

Committee:

Mary Sue Morrow, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Jonathan Kregor, Ph.D. (Committee Member); bruce mcclung, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Crispi;Source;Style;Authenticity;Eighteenth-century;Symphony

Hill, ChristopherArt Nouveau and the Symphony during the Fin-de-Si¿¿¿¿cle: The Intersection of the Arts in Paris and Vienna
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2012, College-Conservatory of Music: Conducting, Orchestral Emphasis

This interdisciplinary document examines the intersection of art and music during the fin-de-si¿¿¿¿cle in Paris and Vienna, with particular emphasis on the convergence of Art Nouveau with the symphonic genre. It relates the more fluid Art Nouveau of Paris with the more geometric Jugendstil and Sezessionstil styles of Art Nouveau that emerged in Vienna, and explores the reciprocal influence of each in the development of the symphony during the fin-de-si¿¿¿¿cle. Four symphonic works that span the height of the Art Nouveau era are examined in detail, including the Symphony in B-flat major (1890) by Ernest Chausson (1855-1899), the Symphony No. 3 in B-flat major (1897) by Alexander von Zemlinsky (1871-1942), the Symphony No. 2 in B-flat major (1902-3) by Vincent d'Indy (1851-1931), and the Symphony No. 7 (1904-5) by Gustav

Mahler (1860-1911). Through an analysis of the shared Art Nouveau characteristics of each, a new lens for understanding and contextualizing these works is proposed.

Committee:

Jonathan Kregor, PhD (Committee Chair); Mark Gibson, MM (Committee Member); Jeongwon Joe, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Symphony;Art Nouveau;Mahler;d'Indy;Zemlinsky;Chausson;

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