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Springston, Jeffery K.The role of interaction involvement, machiavellianism, and locus of control of reinforcement on individual behavior in small task oriented groups /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1986, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Small groups;Social interaction;Machiavellianism;Human behavior;Control

Nunn, Grace GaetaPeer interaction during collaborative writing at the 4th/5th grade level /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1984, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Age groups;Social interaction;Language arts ;Fourth grade ;Fifth grade

Matthews, Lillian BeatriceCollege students' attitudes toward clothing and their relation to certain personality traits /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1963, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Home Economics

Keywords:

Clothing and dress;Social interaction

Ma, TaoA Framework for Modeling and Capturing Social Interactions
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Engineering and Applied Science: Electrical Engineering
The understanding of human behaviors in the scope of computer vision is beneficial to many different areas. Although great achievement has been made, human behavior research investigations are still targeted on isolated, low-level, and individual activities without considering other important factors, such as human-human interactions, human-object interactions, social roles, and surrounding environments. Numerous publications focus on recognizing a small number of individual activities from body motion features with pattern recognition models, and are satisfied with small improvements of recognition rate. Furthermore, methods employed in these investigations are far from being suitable to be used in real cases considering the complexity of human society. In order to address the issue, more attention should be paid on cognition level rather than feature level. In fact, for a deeper understanding of social behavior, there is a need to study its semantic meanings against the social contexts, known as social interaction understanding. A framework for detecting social interaction needs to be established to initiate the study. In addition to individual body motions, more factors, including body motions, social roles, voice, related objects, environment, and other individuals' behaviors were added to the framework. To meet the needs, this dissertation study proposed a 4-layered hierarchical framework to mathematically model social interactions, and then explored several challenging applications based on the framework to demonstrate the great value of the study. There are no existing multimodality social interaction datasets available for this research. Thus, in Research Topic I, two typical scenes were created with a total of 24 takes (a take means a shot for a scene) as social interaction dataset. Topic II introduced a 4-layered hierarchical framework of social interactions, which contained 1) feature layer, 2) simple behavior layer, 3) behavior sequence layer, and 4) pairwise social interaction layer, from down to top. The top layer eventually generated two persons' joint behaviors in the form of descriptions with semantic meanings. To deal with the recognition within each layer, different statistical models were adopted. In Topic III, three applications based on the social interaction framework were presented, including social engagement, interesting moment, and visualization. The first application measured how strong the interaction was between an interaction pair. The second one detected unusual (interesting) individual behaviors and interactions. The third application aimed to better visually represent data so that users can get access to useful information quickly. All experiments in Research Topic II and III were based on the social interaction dataset created for the study. Performance of different layers was evaluated by comparing the experiment results with those of existing literature. The framework was demonstrated to be able to successfully capture and model certain social interactions, which can be applied to other situations. The pairwise social interaction layer generated joint behaviors with high accuracy because of the coupling nature of the model. Exploration on social engagement, interesting moments, and visualization shows great practical value of the current research may stimulate discussions and intrigue more research studies in the area.

Committee:

William Wee, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Raj Bhatnagar, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Chia Han, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Anca Ralescu, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Xuefu Zhou, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Engineering

Keywords:

Human behavior understanding;Social interaction;Machine learning;Computer vision;Interesting moment;Social engagement

Dadgar, MajidPattern Language: Identification of design opportunities for the child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to develop his/her social skills
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2011, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design
Children with ASDs (Autism Spectrum Disorders) have different cognitive disorders. Social interaction is the most discussed area that they fail to establish and develop. Social skills help the child to establish his/her social interaction. This research proposes a set of patterns. In these patterns situation (problems and context) and design opportunities (solutions) of social skills for the children with ASD at the early ages will be discussed. These social skills and related issues are discussed in the proposed patterns: communication of needs and ideas, joint attention, entry/approach skills, eye contact, maintenance skills, play, social interaction, and emotional expression. Pattern language – uniform structure and format – was developed based on the literature review, informal observations and industrial design perspective on the issue; these patterns helped to present the problems and solutions of the social skills. First drafts of the patterns were discussed in sessions with parents and instructors of children with ASDs. Eight revised patterns are the final outcome of this research project to be used by the parents of children with ASDs, as well as by designers and experts or therapists who are involved in area of working with the children ASDs.

Committee:

Peter Chan, PhD (Advisor); Elizabeth Sanders, PhD (Committee Member); Jane Case-Smith, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs); Industrial Design; Pattern Language; Social Skills; Social Interaction; Design Opportunities

Hutton, Debra GlennSelf-esteem and memory for social interaction
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 1994, Psychology
The main aim of the present research was to investigate the effects of self-esteem level on individuals' memory for their own and their partner's behavior after a social interaction. In the study, same sex pairs of strangers were asked questions regarding seven different dimensions, while also being explicitly or implicitly induced to present themselves negatively or positively. After the presentation, individuals were asked to remember both their own and their partners' behavior. High and low self-esteem individuals remembered their own and their partners' behavior with differing levels of accuracy. High self-esteem individuals remembered their own behavior with more accuracy than did those individuals with low self-esteem. High self-esteem individuals' memory for their partners' behavior was affected by the self-presentational demands of the situation, resulting in fewer recall errors in the positive than the negative condition. Low self-esteem individuals' memory for their partners' behavior was equally affected by the positive and negative condition. Two differing theories of self-esteem seemed to be able to explain the differences in recall errors made. When individuals were remembering their own scores, the theory proposing that self-esteem is based on self-knowledge seemed to elucidate the memory differences, while when individuals were rememberi ng their partner's scores, the theory based on the presentational aspects of self-esteem seemed instrumental in explaining the memory differential.

Committee:

Roy Baumeister (Advisor)

Keywords:

Self-esteem memory social interaction

Wolf, Patricia K. W.Group dynamics : effects of leadership style on cross-cultural group behavior /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1986, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Social groups;Leadership;Social interaction

Graham, Kathy C.The nature of lessons and instruction in a middle school physical education class : a social interaction perspective /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1986, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Physical education and training;Middle schools;Social interaction

Rose, SusanThe use of the test of social inference with deaf adolescents /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1975, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Social adjustment;Social interaction;Education of Deaf

Bassett, Rodney LeRoyGroup therapy and social impact theory : an exploratory study /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1977, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

Social interaction;Group psychotherapy

King, Joyce A.The development of social interaction in institutionalized moderately and severely passive mentally retarded adults /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

People with mental disabilities;Social interaction

Stewart, Luan WagnerThe development of social competence behaviors with adults of children at age six /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1980, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

Social interaction in children

LITTLE, LINDA KATHLEENENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO SOCIAL INTERACTION AMONG OLDER ADULTS
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2002, Arts and Sciences : Psychology
When physical and social aspects of the environment facilitate social interaction, individuals aged 65 and older, are more likely to maintain independent functioning. The National Council on Aging and independent architects and designers have identified criteria and guidelines for building facilities that adequately address the complex needs of older people. This study evaluated compliance with criteria, usage, and frequency and proportion of social interaction in common-use areas in an independent-living residential facility. Each area was assigned to one of four categories: (1) High-use and High criteria- compliant (HH); (2) High-use and Low criteria-compliant, (HL); (3) Low-use and High criteria-compliant (LH); (4) Low-use and Low criteria-compliant, (LL). Analyses identified area frequency of use as the primary positive influence on frequency and proportion of social interaction. The highest frequency of social interaction was obtained in high-use, low-criteria (HL) areas, many of which were the sites of "necessary" compared to optional activities. Fifty-five percent of the observations included some form of social interaction the most common of which was a reciprocal conversation (76%). Greetings and conversations represented distinct forms of social interaction. Fifty three percent of the observations were of monads, engaging in social interaction 43% of the time. Although half as common, dyads engaged in social interaction 77% of the time.

Committee:

Dr. William Meyers (Advisor)

Subjects:

Design and Decorative Arts

Keywords:

social interaction; environmental design; evaluation of the environment; retirement community

Latham, Patricia King,Factors associated with social support in mental health workers /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1987, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

Mental health personnel;Social interaction;Helping behavior;Interpersonal relations

Schaff, Wendy TalbottThe development of a method to assess reciprocity in the social interactions of parents and their high-risk infants /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1982, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

Social interaction in children;Parent and child;Infants

Yu, Linda NishigayaGender differences and similarities in coalition behavior /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1975, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Sociology

Keywords:

Social interaction;Sex role

Warehime, Robert GeorgeThe approval motive and mode of reaction to socially desirable and socially undesirable psychological interpretations /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1965, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

Social interaction

Neikirk, JuliaThe place of the answering machine in institutional interaction
BA, Oberlin College, 1998, Anthropology

Telephone conversations are unusual in several ways: messages must travel a distance, communication is based only in sound (where face to face encounters draw on visual clues), generally conversations occur only in dyads (caller-answerer), the only means of entry to these encounters is a summons-answer sequence (an unusual way for a face to face encounter to begin), and talking is the primary and often the only activity taking place in such an encounter. Telephony splits sounds from other senses, splits the dyad from society, and splits communication from other activities (Hopper 1992:41). McLuban refers to the telephone as the irresistible intruder that ignores the visual privacy provided by cubicles and offices, and any difference in the statuses of the caller and answerer (1995 :271). Identification and recognition of the interactants' names and identities form an important part of telephone conversations; names particularly playa role in the opening of most telephone conversations. The name of the target individual is the telemarketer's key to entering into an interaction, for instance. "Professional callers identify a stranger-answerer by name and then launch inquiries that simulate acquaintance. The goal is to keep a potential consumer on the line against her will." (Hopper 1992:208) This relates to McLuban's assertion that "in a visual and highly literate culture when we meet a person for the first time his visual appearance dims the sound of his name. Whereas in an ear culture the sound of the man's name is the overwhelming fact." (1995:31) In a telephone conversation, the name's sound holds great significance. Perhaps the telephone is supporting McLuhan's proposed societal shift from hot to cool; on the other hand, in a normal telephone interaction, there is not visual information available, and so the sound must become the most important aspect oft he conversation.

As this example shows, the telephone as a medium raises some interesting questions about the nature of interaction. It also has implications for how an interaction will proceed. One technology associated with the telephone that has become increasingly inescapable in American society is the answering machine. While researchers in conversational analysis have used recordings of telephone conversations to explore rules of conversation, so far they have not paid much attention to answering machines. This may be because an answering machine message is not clearly a part of conversation. In a telephone conversation the caller and an answerer participate in an exchange. An answering machine allows the answerer to make the same statement to every individual who caUs, and provides time for any caller to deliver a single response. The telephone allows people at a distance to communicate; the answering machine allows busy people to communicate without coordinating an encounter. An answering machine is a medium for people to exchange information, to conduct business, and to plan and coordinate future interactions, face to face or otherwise. The answering machine, and related technology such as voice mail, has become a ubiquitous means of interacting with other people. It would make sense, then, for scholars to fit answering machine messages into the larger body of conversation theory. How does the answering machine fit into our idea of communication?

When I began considering that question, I had to think about how I could best study answering machine messages, and fit them into an existing body of theory about conversation. Conversation analysis was the best way to pursue answers. The process of conversation analysis, in which conversations are recorded, transcribed, and described, focuses on social interaction. It begins with the study of the "interactional accomplishment of particular social activities..., [focusing on] sequences of activities." (Drew and Heritage 1992:77) Ultimately, conversation analysis seeks to identifjr the structural features underlying the orderly construction of talk (Firth 1995a: ISS). To explore how answering machine messages might fit into conversation, I will consider commonly studied aspects of talk such as error correction, routines, speech acts, and turn taking with respect to data I collected in my own research.

Committee:

Ronald Casson (Advisor)

Subjects:

Communication; Sociolinguistics; Sociology

Keywords:

answering machine;communication;social interaction;conversation;

RYAN, MICHELE MARYA HOME-BASED PEER PROGRAM: ITS EFFECT ON THE ENGAGEMENT AND INTERACTION OF A CHILD WITH DOWN SYNDROME
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2001, Allied Health Sciences : Communication Sciences and Disorders
This case study examined the overall rate of engagement and the overall rate of interaction between a child with Down syndrome and a child who was typically developing when engaged in play with and without adult intervention. Also measured were the mean time of engagement, the engagement rate of interaction, the mean rate of interaction per interaction, the overall rates of interaction by both peers individually, as well as the mean rates of interaction per interaction by both peers individually. The two children played together on a weekly basis in the home of the child with Down syndrome for a total of eleven weeks. An adult facilitator redirected the children's play and provided language models for the intervention sessions. Baseline sessions without adult intervention were also completed before the first intervention session, after the fourth intervention session, and then again following the eighth intervention session to determine the rates of engagement and interaction occurring spontaneously by both children. All play sessions were transcribed and analyzed by the researcher. Results indicated that the overall rate of engagement increased over time for the peers during adult supported intervention sessions, yet this increase was not maintained during baseline sessions. Results also indicated that the overall rates of interaction for each child, respectively, were near equal during adult supported intervention sessions, supporting the conclusion that the peers maintained reciprocal communicative interactions. This case study was conducted as part of a larger pilot study examining the effects of a home based peer buddy program on children with language- based disorders.

Committee:

Dr. Jo-Anne Prendeville (Advisor)

Subjects:

Health Sciences, Speech Pathology

Keywords:

play development; Down Syndrome; engagement; social interaction; language development

Kummer, QuinnNew(er) Urbanism
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
Currently federal urban policy is focused on the deconcentration of poverty, with the implicit notion that mixed-income living may allow upward mobility for the urban poor. A crucial assumption behind this mixed-income strategy is that social ties will form across socioeconomic lines. The New Urbanist theory that guides housing design today espouses an ‘architecture of engagement’ that supports a sense of ‘community,’ but the requisite cross-cultural interaction remains to be seen. Through an analysis of theoretical and empirical works from the environmental-behavioral field, I suggest that building-scale design strategies may, in fact, encourage the formation of cross-cultural social ties. Specifically, I propose a reconfiguration of traditional circulation and threshold conditions on an existing rowhouse development in Cincinnati, the Glencoe Place Apartments. These dwellings provide an ideal backdrop for innovative architectural strategies because they represent, on multiple levels, a ‘failed’ housing strategy.

Committee:

Aarati Kanekar, PhD (Committee Chair); Michael McInturf, MARCH (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

architecture;urbanism;social interaction;public housing;mixed-income;New Urbanism

RAMENZONI, VERONICA C.Effects of Joint Task Performance on Interpersonal Postural Coordination
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Arts and Sciences : Psychology
In recent years, research in the field of social interactions has focused on the explorationof the coordinative structures that substantiate the performance of joint tasks (Shockley, Santana, and Fowler, 2003; Marsh, Richardson, Baron, and Schmidt, 2006). This project explored the degree and stability of coordinative structures at the joint (interpersonal coordination) and individual (intrapersonal coordination) scales for the performance of a supra-postural task. In detail, this project investigated whether interpersonal and intrapersonal coordination are distinctly affected by changes in supra-postural task constraints, and whether reliable findings for individual performance of supra-postural tasks can be extended to the performance of joint tasks. Participants performed a joint task in which one participant held a stick to which a circle was attached at the top (holding task), while the other held a pointer through the circle without touching its borders (pointing task). Experiment 1 investigated whether interpersonal and intrapersonal coordination, and individual segment variability varied depending on task difficulty (circle size) and the role performed during the task. Results showed that as the difficulty of the task was increased, interpersonal and intrapersonal coordination increased in degree and stability, and individual postural sway variability decreased in the medial-lateral (ML) sway direction. Experiment 2 employed the same basic paradigm, but participants were asked to perform the task alone (single task) and with another person (joint task). Participants showed increased shared interpersonal coordination patterns, increased intrapersonal coordination, and more postural sway variability for joint compared to single performance. Task difficulty effects were found for joint but not single performance replicating the results of Experiment 1. Data obtained in Experiment 2 was analyzed using Principle Component Analysis (PCA), which indicated that, in general, joint performance involved fewer coordination modes than single performance. Overall, the results of this project suggest that both joint and individual coordinative structures are affected by the nature of the task performed and the constraints it places on joint and individual performance.

Committee:

Michael Riley, a (Advisor); Kevin Shockley (Other); Guy Van Orden (Other); Thomas Polgert (Other)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

Coordination; Joint Action; Social Interaction

Hunger, J. DavidAn empirical test of the superordinate goal as a means of reducing intergroup conflict in a bargaining situation /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1973, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Business Administration

Keywords:

Organization;Organizational sociology;Small groups;Social psychology;Social interaction

Schneider, Grace RoseBooks or Bytes: Media Format and Literacy Education
Bachelor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2005, School Of Interdisciplinary Studies - Interdisciplinary Studies
With new media saturating American culture and classrooms, it is particularly important that this media be evaluated before integration into the classroom. Despite public calls for computer utilization in all levels of education, the research does not support the use of computers in teaching emergent literacy skills during early childhood. This project argues that despite the advances in modern technology, children’s picture books enhance literacy in ways that computers cannot.

Although many skills are needed to become literate, three widely accepted categories of literacy skills focused on are: print and phonological awareness, comprehension, and social interaction. To utilize literacy instruction time most effectively, this project evaluates the media of computers and picture books through analysis of: media evolution in the classroom, the physical format of the media, and an original observational study.

Committee:

Christopher Myers (Advisor)

Keywords:

Media Format; Picture Books; Computers; Early Elementary Education; Early Childhood; Print Awareness; Phonological Awareness; Reading Comprehension; Social Interaction

Jung, SunhwaUsing high-probability request sequences to increase social interactions in young children with autism
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Physical Activity and Educational Services
The importance of children’s development and learning in the early years has been strongly emphasized in practice and research. To date, a variety of empirically validated strategies in early childhood special education and applied behavior analysis have been developed. Among the variety of effective instructional strategies, the high-probability request sequence has been demonstrated as an antecedent and non-aversive procedure, which is well incorporated into classroom routines. Few studies on the use of the high-probability request sequence have addressed the social behaviors of young children with autism with peers in their natural environment. The inclusion of young children with disabilities is increasing, and building meaningful social relationships between children with and without disabilities is one of the most important goals of inclusion. Due to the substantial social skill deficits of children with autism, facilitating social interactions has been a critical issue in educational research. Among a variety of social interaction interventions, peer-mediated strategies are the most frequently used and have shown the strongest empirical support for social outcomes. However, it is noted that these strategies focus on peer training to initiate with children with autism, and often yield prompt-dependent behavior and limitations in generalization and maintenance. Few studies have been implemented to teach social behaviors children with autism as well as the typically developing peers. The purpose of this study was to investigate an effective strategy to increase social interactions of children with autism in the children’s typical classroom environment. The high-probability request sequence intervention was first delivered to the peers as a model and then delivered to the target children. The intervention was implemented using the children’s favorite play materials during a center time in an inclusive classroom. The specific dependent variables of interest were the percent correct responses to the low-probability requests, and number of intervals of social initiations and responses toward other children. The effects of the intervention on these variables were monitored using a single subject multiple baseline design across subjects. In addition, measures of procedural integrity, accuracy and social validity were collected. The results of this study indicated that all three children’s compliant responding to low-probability requests and social initiations and responses increased during the intervention condition. Furthermore, the target children’s social initiations and responses generalized with their peers and in generality settings.

Committee:

Diane Sainato (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Early Childhood

Keywords:

High-probability request sequence; Social interaction; Autism

Baker, Jonathan RamonWeb-Based vs. Classroom Instruction of Statistics
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, ED Teaching and Learning (Columbus campus)
This study compares the performance and experiences in an introductory statistics course across two modalities: web-based and classroom-based instruction. The research was conducted in classrooms from each learning environment for two teachers at a large midwestern community college. The results from the Pre-Test, Post-Test, and departmental final exam indicated that students in web-based statistics courses can have levels of average achievement comparable to that of their classroom-instructed counterparts. Yet, the facts that distance learners entered the course with stronger levels of mathematical preparedness, and had greater proportions of students at the extremes of the performance indicators, jointly challenge the notion of web-based instruction being “as good as traditional.” The faculty interviews, student questionnaires, and both virtual and physical instructional observations informed the researcher that the successful teaching strategies in the classroom can have an online comparative. Independent of modality, students desire teacher immediacy. It is also confirmed that the asynchronous nature of online learning that allows students to learn at their own pace will continue to drive student interest in spite of any potential barriers. The researcher recommends that future studies control for relevant student characteristics and any instructor effect to measure overall learning gains over longer periods of time. Hybrid courses were discussed as being the next modality on the horizon that would merit further research.

Committee:

Patricia Brosnan, PhD (Advisor); Dennis Pearl, PhD (Committee Member); Terri Bucci, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mathematics Education

Keywords:

online; web-based; face-to-face; distance learning; statistics education; mathematics education; Internet; asynchronous; social interaction

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