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MOHANTY, SAMEERDECISION MATRIX FOR FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT AUTOMATION
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2006, Engineering : Civil Engineering
The construction industry is one of the largest and fastest growing industries in the USA as well as in most parts of the world. The US department of commerce reported that construction industry spending peaked all-time in the month of November 2005 with an annual spending of over $1160 billion. It presently employs over 10 million people. However, increasing demand for better services at lower costs resulting in greater market share, profits and client satisfaction compel the construction industry to focus on intangible parameters that affect its competitiveness. As a tool to aid construction management (CM) and other project activities it encompasses, scores of PM software applications have been written over the years. However, with increasing availability of a broad range of such applications, organizations are generally disoriented and uncertain with respect to which applications and tools are best suited to their business goals. Furthermore, with project management systems becoming more and more complex with time and encompassing sophisticated practices for better management and control, selection of such tools has become increasingly difficult. Amidst all of this technology development, investments and implementation towards CM efficiency, it is imperative that the project executives and senior management, who are also the primary users of such applications, be facilitated a simple decision support system that acts as a framework towards justifying investments, setup and installation, utilization and upgrade of project management applications. This study, through a broad preview of the past, current and futuristic CM application functioning, its developmental history and an industry-wide survey aims to demarcate current IT and software solutions trends in the US construction industry. Some of the pertinent issues addressed include critical business areas, investments, deployment, expenditures and work environment. Categories include computing, networking and telecommunications hardware and software, purchase, technology transfer and maintenance modalities, personnel, training and HR as well as preferences and globalization issues. Assimilated survey data has been analyzed to create a decision model that shall guide project personnel and owners step-by-step in understanding and evaluating their priorities and constraints, tasks and budgets, communications, networking and other stipulations in order to formulate a strategy that allows them to center upon software applications that functionally and financially best suit their enterprise and operations. Conclusions and recommendations that are elicited from such data analysis and the formulated decision matrix are based on statistical relevance of observed trends and logical inferences thereof.

Committee:

Dr. Sam Salem (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Civil

Keywords:

Construction project management; PM IT; Web-based project management applications; Decison matrix; Decision support systems in PM IT

Stoycheff, Peter AndonConflict in the management of education, business, and military projects : a comparative study /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1980, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

School management and organization;Project management

Jaber, Khaled M.Supporting Project Tasks, Resources, Documents, and Defects Analysis in Software Project Management
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2016, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science (Engineering and Technology)
Software development consists of different phases: initiation, planning, execution, monitoring and control, and closing. At the initiation phase a project is approved and a project manager, PM, is assigned. At the planning phase PM defines the project schedule, cost, tasks (work items), resources (team), and assigns project tasks to resources. At the execution phase, project tasks are implemented. At the closing phase, the project is delivered to customer. Across all phases, PM continue to monitor, analyze, manage, and control the execution of the project. The objective here is to keep the project under control and deliver the project on time and within planned budget. This dissertation addresses the issues of managing project tasks, resources, documents, and software defects. PMs utilize project management software to manage project schedule, tasks, and resources. These systems provide visualizations to display project information (e.g., task name, resource name, task duration, task start date, defect ID, defect description, defect severity, etc.). To help PMs analyze and manage project schedule, tasks, and resources, they currently utilize common two-dimensional (2D) visualization methods such as Gantt charts and tables/spreadsheets. They also utilize defect tracking systems and common 2D visualization to analyze and manage the software defects found during the development of software systems. The common 2D visualizations currently supported by project management and defect tracking systems have these limitations: it is difficult to see the entire schedule in a single view especially in the case of large data, they do not display analysis information, and they do not support interacting, e.g., rotating the view, with the displayed data to ease the comprehension of the data. This dissertation develops an approach that presents project tasks, resources, and defect information in three-dimensional (3D) visualizations to overcome the above limitations. To assess our approach, we conducted empirical studies using participants from both academia and industry on real-world projects. We developed a prototype tool named 3DProjView for the study. The studies showed that subjects using 3D visualizations achieved higher accuracy and spent less time analyzing project tasks, resources, and software defects. Across all phases of software development, project stakeholders develop and share documents /artifacts such as project charter, project plan, requirements document, design document, code peer reviews, testing documents, etc. The project team uses these documents to implement/solve project tasks. Currently, project documents/artifacts reside at different repositories and they are not linked together which makes it difficult to implement project tasks. This dissertation develops a traceability system that links the system artifacts together and provides different views of traceability links based on stakeholder role. To help us develop the traceability system, we conducted a survey at an industrial firm evaluating the linking between system artifacts. We developed a tool called TraceLink to prototype and evaluate the traceability system. We conducted an empirical study using participants from the industry and students to evaluate the use of the traceability system to support software maintenance. The results showed that the traceability system helped achieve high accuracy in finding and linking information together.

Committee:

Chang Liu (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

3D visualization; project management; software defects; project schedule

Whitson, Donna MarieReport on a MTSC Internship at the Warren County Engineer's Office
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2013, English
This four-chapter report describes the work I performed as a technical writing intern for the Warren County Engineer's Office (WCEO) in Lebanon, Ohio, during the summer of 2010. The report provides an overview of the county organization; a description of my role in the Engineer's Office, and the documents I created for Warren County, including an instructional pamphlet on stormwater drainage maintenance for Home Owner Associations (HOA) and a booklet on stream setbacks for the Warren County Soil and Water Conservation District (WCSWCD). (I also include an analysis and comparison of project management to my internship experience and how that affected the development of my documents and the exploration of the internship and how my experience compared to my classroom training as a technical writer.)

Committee:

Jean Lutz, Ph.D (Advisor); Katherine Durack, Ph.D (Committee Member); Jerry Green, Ph.D (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Technical Communication

Keywords:

stormwater; stream setbacks; technical writing; project management

BELL, RUBEN LIONELA STUDY OF WORKLOAD SCHEDULING AND RESOURCE PLANNING AT AN OVERHAUL FACILITY
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2000, Engineering : Industrial Engineering
This study analyzes the C-141 overhaul operations at Warner Robins Air Logistic Center (WR-ALC). The literature review covers overhaul operations,techniques for scheduling in a constrained resource environment, and techniques for simulation optimization. The body of the study compares traditional formula based methods for computing facility requirements and aircraft induction scheduling to integer linear programming and simulation heuristic approaches. The study objectives are twofold. First, a schedule that maximizes the release of excess hangar, ramp, and functional test facilities to WR-ALC for the pursuit other workload (the release schedule) is needed. These facilities must be available as quickly as possible. However, the release schedule must leave sufficient capacity to allow C-141 Production Division to meet its overhaul commitments. The second study must recommend an aircraft induction schedule that will enable the first objective (the induction schedule) to be achieved. At each step, the study analyzes the traditional formula approaches used to solve the problem, a mathematical programming approach, and a simulation approach to the problem. The schedules these three techniques generate are run through a simulation models and the key parameters of resource utilization and makespan are evaluated. Each technique is then evaluated against the trade-off criteria of speed, accuracy, and level of detail. The study finds that direct manipulation of the simulation model, i.e., the simulation approach, yields the most desirable results.

Committee:

Dr. Bruce Shultes (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Industrial

Keywords:

overhaul; maintenance; project management; constrained resources; military depot

Cagley, Laura MarieReport on a MTSC Internship at a Medical Device Company
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2009, English
This four-chapter report describes the work I completed as a technical writer intern at a medical device company during the spring of 2007. It provides an overview of the company organization; an overview of my role and the projects I worked on at the company; a detailed description of an instruction manual I created for a contracted on-site replacement and diagnostic service for a medical testing system as my major writing project; and an analysis of the internship experience that compares the expectations I had from my classroom training in technical communication and the reality of the job functions of a technical writer at a medical device company.

Committee:

Katherine Durack, PhD (Committee Chair); Jean Lutz, PhD (Committee Member); Ronald Fetzer, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

MTSC; internship report; project management; technical communication; career progression

Sigal, Jacob R.Creating a Market Paradigm Shift with Quality Function Deployment
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2004, Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (Engineering)

The objective of this research is to develop and document the methodology of creating a process for quality function deployment into the product management process in the disc jockey market. The disc jockey product market has been selected due to its smaller relative size to traditional firms developing QFD processes. This market also is unique such that the functions deployed integrate new technology developments with existing standardized features concurrently. The development methodology as well as the methodology for determining the value of QFD is documented. This research applies Kano’s Theory as well as the use of the House of Quality. The relationships between quality functions and customer requirements are scientifically expressed with the interrelationships between the quality functions. A case study is performed at Numark Industries to develop a new product which will cause a paradigm shift in the marketplace. The procedure methodology for this process is documented.

Committee:

Charles Parks (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Industrial

Keywords:

Quality Function Deployment (QFD) Case Study; Product Development; Project Management; Marketing Paradigm Shift; Genetic Algorithm Optimization; House of Quality

Hou, ChengjunDynamic Programming under Parametric Uncertainty with Applications in Cyber Security and Project Management
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Industrial and Systems Engineering
The trustworthiness of models and optimization is limited because the associated systems might be changing and data about them can be limited, i.e., there is "parametric" uncertainty. This dissertation provides applications and theory related to mitigating the effects of changing systems and data limitations in optimal decision-making. The primary application considered relates to reducing the maintenance costs associated with cyber security. By selecting optimal policies addressing data limitations, losses from stolen information and maintenance costs can be balanced. The approximated expected savings from implementing the suggested policies at a large Midwestern organization is over $14M with a discount factor of 0.95 monthly. The dissertation also integrates data and dynamic programming models for project management decision-making that accounts for coordination and planning costs. This facilitates more accurate schedules with significant cost savings. Insights are provided into the choice between traditional planning methods and agile project management methods that reduce planning complexity. In many situations, we find that the so-called optimal approaches are suboptimal because they fail to address sizable coordination and planning costs. Two types of parametric uncertainty are explored here, each of which results in fundamentally different formulations and solution schemes. The first type of uncertainty considered relates to system parameters fluctuating over time randomly. The related models differ from ordinary inhomogeneous approaches because the specific parameters are not known and are assumed to fluctuate with known distributions. Associated decision problems are referred to as "Markov decision processes with random inhomogeneity" and proposed optimal solutions methods. Proof is given that the solution produced by backward induction is optimal for the finite horizon problems, and that the value-iteration-based algorithm gives solutions converging to the infinite horizon solutions, together with results regarding monotonicity property and rate of the convergence. The second type of parametric uncertainty is caused by insufficient data for parameter estimation, i.e., "data-driven" uncertainty. Previous researchers studying data-driven Markov decision processes declare the problem is intractable. Therefore, they propose approximation methods. We prove that their methods can approximate suboptimal solutions by a numerical example. We also provide a dynamic programming algorithm to generate data-driven optimal policies with learning. We do this by demonstrating that the problem is equivalent to partially observable Markov decision processes. Further, by exploiting the structure of the problem and bounds assuming perfect information, we develop a bounding heuristic method for the infinite horizon problems.

Committee:

Theodore Allen (Advisor); Nicholas Hall (Committee Member); Gagan Agrawal (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Industrial Engineering; Operations Research

Keywords:

Cyber security; Dynamic programming; Markov decision processes; Parametric uncertainty; Project management

Corzine Moore, Natalie L.REPORT ON A MTSC INTERNSHIP AT A MEDICAL DEVICE COMPANY
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2013, English
This four-chapter report details the projects and work completed as an intern at a medical device company (MDC) in 2010. This report outlines the corporate structure of the company and gives an overview of my role as a technical writing intern in the packaging and labeling department. This report also outlines various projects, including the development and writing of instructions for use for a device tool, the redevelopment and writing of an internal process for the customer quality department and the writing of software documentation and development of an accompanying web site. This report concludes with a summary and reflection chapter on my writing, editing, web site development, project management, process development, and marketing communications projects at the MDC.

Committee:

Michele Simmons, PhD (Committee Chair); Katherine Durack, PhD (Committee Member); Jason Palmeri, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Technical Communication

Keywords:

technical and scientific communications; medical device company; instructions for use; software documentation; project management; web site development; process development

Ball, Rodney J.The feasibility of determining success criteria for educational research and development projects /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1973, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Education--Research;Project management

Nagarajan, PraveenEnterprise Architecture Ontology: A Shared Vocabulary for Efficient Decision Making for Software Development Organizations
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2010, Computer Science and Engineering

To survive in today’s highly competitive, high demand business environment, management needs intelligence information to efficiently manage corporate operations and support decision-making, while support-level staff need better knowledge to provide better customer services for gaining satisfaction and retaining loyalty. Vast amounts of valuable operational data from which key insights may be drawn are scattered in various corporate databases and needs consolidating so that it may be accessed and shared among authorized users within a corporation and/or business partners. A system for integrated knowledge management and decision support is thus in great demand.

A synergy can be created by the integration of decision support and knowledge management, since these two processes involve activities that complement each other. The knowledge retrieval, storage, and dissemination activities for knowledge management enhance the dynamic creation and maintenance of decision support models, subsequently enhancing the decision support process. From the system design point of view, the challenge is that we need a new generation of knowledge-enabled systems that will provide an enterprise with an infrastructure to capture, cleanse, store, organize, leverage and disseminate, not only source data and information but also the knowledge or enriched information of the enterprise. This thesis addresses this challenge through a real-life case study within a complex state government enterprise. In this thesis we develop and validate a conceptual framework for decision making based on the characterization of an enterprise as an ‘Adaptive Complex Enterprise’(ACE). This framework addresses existing limitations by considering all the dimensions in an enterprise, viz. Business, Infrastructure, Operations, and Strategy. This framework introduces a Requirements-Execution-Delivery (RED) model to characterize the transactions in an ACE. The contributions of this thesis are as follows:

1) A new generation of knowledge-enabled operational management systems that provide enterprise with an infrastructure to capture, cleanse, store, organize, leverage, and disseminate not only source data and information but also the knowledge or enriched information of the enterprise.

2) An ACE ontology that provides the traceability among incoming Customer Service Request (CSR), the role sets processing them and performance.

3) ACE services ontology enhanced with Information Technology Infrastructure Language (ITIL) to show the complete set of collaborating objects in the processing of a CSR.

4) Leverage this ACE ontology by a tool set to analyze performance and make decision making easier. This ontology also forms the basis for a complete set of operational level performance questions for project management offices.

5)A visualization (dashboard prototype) to monitor the performance of an operational cyber infrastructure to enhance the basic balanced scorecard.

Committee:

Rajiv Ramnath (Advisor); Srinivasan Parthasarathy (Committee Member); Jay Ramanathan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Enterprise Architecture;Decision making;Project management

Latendresse, Frank JINDIVIDUAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS THAT FACILITATE AND RESTRICT BOUNDARY SPANNING OF TEAM LEADERS
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Leadership Studies
The purpose of this study was to identify the personal and organizational characteristics that facilitate and restrict boundary spanning (BS) of external leaders. The study was a two-phase sequential exploratory mixed-method study. The first phase examined the relationship between boundary spanning and emotional intelligence (EI) of external team leaders. Through interviews, the second phase explored individual and organizational characteristics that facilitate or restrict boundary spanning in external team leaders who scored differently on boundary spanning than predicted based on emotional intelligence scores. Bivariate regression and correlation showed that boundary spanning is strongly related to emotional intelligence. Three external leaders were selected for Phase II because they had nearly the same EI alignment scores but very different BS alignment scores. I wanted to know why, if EI and BS have such a strong relationship, the BS scores of these three leaders were so different. Qualitative data from 14 interviews revealed that leader distance and need are both facilitators and restrictors of boundary spanning. Boundary spanning is not just something that the leader does for the team. Boundary spanning is important based on an individual’s need. If the need is low, the leader would offer less help and, therefore, the appraisal of the leader’s boundary spanning would be lower. Also, the leader must understand when there is a need and how to react to the need by offering the appropriate help for the appropriate duration. The ability of the leader to understand the need of the team members requires relationship building. Relationship building is made easier when the leader distance (physical proximity, social distance, and perceived occurrence interval) is low. As emotional intelligence increases, so does the ability to recognize and utilize need and distance to span the boundary for the team. Boundary spanning is important on both individual and organizational levels. Organizations must learn to set the environment to facilitate boundary spanning as a valued part of the culture. Individuals must increase their own level of boundary spanning awareness and practice so that as superiors, as external leaders, or as team members they can reduce leader distance, understand need, and negotiate the most effective individual and team relationships for high performance.

Committee:

Mark A. Earley Patrick D. Pauken (Advisor)

Keywords:

Leadership; Boundary Spanning; Emotional Intelligence; Need; Leader Distance; Social Network; Project Management; Team; External Leader; Teamwork; Team Leader; Collaboration; Mixed Method; Multiple Method; Correlation; Case Study; Leader

Knost, Kathryn MarieReport on a Technical Communication Internship with Towers Perrin
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2008, English

This report describes my technical communication internship at Towers Perrin in Cincinnati, Ohio, as a writer/communicator. To complete the Master of Technical and Scientific Communication (MTSC) degree from Miami University (Oxford, Ohio), I interned for 14 weeks at Towers Perrin, a global professional services firm that helps organizations optimize performance through effective people, risk, and financial management.

The first chapter of this report introduces Towers Perrin, describes my role in the organization, and outlines my goals for the internship. The second chapter is an account of my learning experience about health care, which was essential to complete my project tasks. The third chapter summarizes the major projects I completed, including summary plan descriptions, communication strategy documents, meeting presentations, project work plans, and training materials. The concluding chapter of my internship evaluates the strategies of project management, audience analysis, and document design as they related to my internship experience.

Committee:

Jean Lutz, PhD (Committee Chair); Michele Simmons, PhD (Committee Member); Marjorie Nadler, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Health Care; Management

Keywords:

technical communication; consulting; health care; communication strategy; project management

Matthew, Beversdorf ArnoldFOREST PEST MANAGEMENT AT VIRGINIA TECH AND ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THE TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY: AN INTERNSHIP
Master of Environmental Science, Miami University, 2004, Environmental Sciences
I participated in two different internships. During my first internship, I conducted forest pest management research for the Department of Entomology at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia. I researched the growth response of eastern hemlocks, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr, to populations of hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), Adelgis tsugae Annand (Homoptera: Adelgidae). HWA density was compared to radial growth and new shoot growth of infested eastern hemlocks. Linear regression analyses showed statistically significant negative relationships between HWA density measurements and the difference in basal area increment from the previous year (2001) and the sampled year (2002), and between HWA density measurements and numbers of new shoots sampled. My second internship was in the Resource Stewardship division of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, Tennessee. I participated in watershed project management and planning meetings, conducted web-based research on watershed water quality and urban growth management techniques, and helped develop a management tracking tool.

Committee:

Gene Willeke (Advisor)

Keywords:

Hemlock woolly adelgid; tree growth response; Adelgis tsugae; Tsuga canadensis; Tennessee Valley Authority; water resources; water quality; urban growth; watershed project management

Dunne, Elena S.Project Risk Management: Developing a Risk Framework for Translation Projects
PHD, Kent State University, 2013, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies
In the current global business environment many endeavors are undertaken as projects. Translation, localization and other language services are no exception and must be viewed and studied as services performed in a projectized environment. If they are not, there will continue to be gaps between the way translation is taught and researched (as an isolated activity) and how it is performed in the business world (as part of projects). The existence of these gaps not only prevents translation practitioners from recognizing and communicating the value of the service that they provide, but also diminishes the value of the training that future translators receive. Lack of understanding of the context in which translation is performed limits the opportunities for mutually beneficial cooperation between translation studies and other disciplines in the academic environment, and between organizations and divisions within a given organization in the business environment. This study proposes to contribute to the research on translation in project contexts by examining risk management, which is an important area of focus for organizations and professionals in many sectors, but which is largely ignored in the language industry. This study first provides an overview of the language industry, explores key concepts, such as risk, uncertainty, project management, risk management and maturity model, and explains the role and relevance of risk management in the language industry. It then reviews existing risk management frameworks developed by project management and risk management practitioners, including the framework developed by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Next, a model of risk sources developed specifically for application in translation and localization projects is presented and discussed. The theoretical discussion is followed by a case study in which PMI’s project risk management framework is implemented and the proposed model of risk sources is applied in a real-world translation company. The description of the case study methodology is followed by observations of how the study was carried out and by a presentation and analysis of the results of the case study. The dissertation concludes by offering recommendations based on the findings of the case study and by examining possible future avenues of research.

Committee:

Gregory Shreve (Advisor); Fran├žoise Massardier-Kenney (Committee Member); Sue Ellen Wright (Committee Member); Jayaram Muthuswamy (Committee Member); Frederick Schroath (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Foreign Language; Language

Keywords:

translation; localization; language industry; translation studies; language services; language project; translation project; localization project; risk management; project management; risk; uncertainty; risk sources

PINIS, GEORGIA APROJECT MANAGEMENT SKILLS AND ACTIVITIES THAT DOCTORAL CANDIDATES USE TO MANAGE THEIR DISSERTATION WORK SUCCESSFULLY
EdD, University of Cincinnati, 2007, Education : Curriculum and Instruction
This case study investigated the project management skills and activities that doctoral candidates used to complete their dissertations successfully. The research was grounded in the project management body of knowledge. Eleven doctoral graduates were interviewed over a period of three months regarding which skills and activities helped them complete their doctoral dissertations in a timely manner. A focus group of interview participants was also utilized. It met to discuss the data used in this study plus suggestions for improving the doctoral program particularly the professional seminars. Although a dissertation is a major undertaking, most doctoral candidates had little or no project management training. The participants without formal project management training learned throughout the dissertation process. Through trial and error, he or she gained the skills needed to complete this major project. Communication, problem solving, and the ability to accomplish tasks were mentioned as the most commonly used project management skills. Time estimating and activity sequencing were mentioned as the most commonly used project management activities. The participants also cited the importance of the advisor and committee in completing the dissertation process successfully. Fewer project management activities were planned than were actually used. This research indicates that project management training would help doctoral candidates complete a dissertation.

Committee:

Dr. Kenneth Martin (Advisor)

Keywords:

Project Management; Dissertation; Higher Education

Eichhorn, Bradford ReeseTHE IMPACT OF USER INVOLVEMENT ON INFORMATION SYSTEM PROJECTS
Doctor of Business Administration, Cleveland State University, 2014, Monte Ahuja College of Business
Information systems (IS) development has been studied from many perspectives. Information systems are being viewed as a service as the economy shifts from being industrial-based to service-based. This shift is motivating the business user to become more involved with the development of the system. The once clear roles of user-as-specifier and IT professional-as-developer are blurring. This research addresses three objectives. First, we survey the actual business users themselves for their perception of activities and satisfaction with the completed system. Second, we analyze the separation of business requirements into two constructs representing the functional and presentation dimensions of these requirements to advance our understanding of user involvement on information system projects. Third, we explore the combinations of user characteristics and their activities that can improve IS project performance. A new comprehensive model is proposed to represent the business user as an active participant in system development. A survey instrument is developed from a widespread literature review of IS project performance, user involvement and project management. The instrument was tested to ensure its ease of completion and its comprehensibility. The revised instrument was sent to 3,419 U.S. business users in multiple industries from which 205 valid surveys were received. Structural Equation Modeling was used to validate the measurements and analyze the hypotheses and the overall model. The results confirm some previous findings and document new discoveries regarding the users, their activities and the impact on user satisfaction.

Committee:

Oya Tukel, PhD (Committee Chair); Walter Rom, PhD (Committee Member); Ray Henry, PhD (Committee Member); Tibor Kremic, DBA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Information Systems; Information Technology; Management; Operations Research

Keywords:

User Involvement; Project Management; Business Requirements; Structural Equation Modeling; Functional Requirements; Presentation Requirements; Information Systems

Stickney, Frank AlexanderThe authority perception of the program manager in the aerospace industry /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1969, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Business Administration

Keywords:

Project management;Aerospace industries

SHAH, RONAK YOGESHCHANDRACONSTRUCTABILITY ISSUES FOR CONNECTION BETWEEN SIMPLE SPAN PRECAST CONCRETE GIRDERS MADE CONTINUOUS
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2001, Engineering : Civil Engineering
Constructability implementation right from project conception to completion results in gains to owners, designers, fabricators, and contractors in terms of time and cost without compromising on quality. Constructability implementation optimizes all the phases of a construction project including planning, design, and construction stages. Success of constructability implementation can be easily measured by taking into consideration cost and schedule performance. Higher the degree of constructability implementation, the more efficiently a constructor can build, eventually leading to an economical project for the owner. The use of constructability to reduce costs and simplify construction implies neither lower quality nor compromise in design. Constructability requires that companies, particularly owners, go beyond conventional approaches to project execution by expanding front-end planning and investing additional effort in order to anticipate potential problems. The degree to which a constructability program is needed varies greatly with the size and complexity of a project. The work undertaken herein concentrates on studying constructability application in detail, when to use and how to use constructability, and effectively and efficiently implementing it for providing positive moment connections in bridges.

Committee:

Dr. Makarand Hastak (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Civil

Keywords:

constructability; bridges; project management; precast concrete bridges; management

Byrne, Daniel ScottA Technical Communication Internship With An eCRM Software Company: Synchrony Communications, INC
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2001, English
In this report, I discuss my internship with Synchrony Communications. Synchrony is an eCRM (electronic Customer Relationship Management) software company dedicated to developing world-class, cutting-edge technology. As an intern in the Information Development department, my work focused on developing documentation and training for Synchrony’s eCRM software package. My projects deliverables included a user’s guide, training guide, and multiple project plans. The dates of my internship were July 2nd, 2000 to January 5th, 2001. Chapter One of this report describes Synchrony Communications and the software it produces. Chapter Two discusses my major project work. In Chapter Three, I discuss my work on developing a specific user guide. Chapter Four explains how I used the five-phase publications-development model in my work. Chapter Five covers my lessons learned.

Committee:

Jennie Dautermann (Advisor)

Keywords:

Technical Communication; Technical Writer; Instructional Design; Training; Trainer; Information Development; Project Management

Zadik, Jill ElizabethReport on a MTSC Internship at The Normandy Group
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2008, English
This four-chapter report describes the work I completed as a technical writer/trainer intern at The Normandy Group (TNG). It provides an overview of TNG; an overview of my role and the projects I worked on at TNG; a description of the user guide I created as my major writing project at TNG; and an analysis and application of the Problem Solving Model for Technical Communicators in regards to my major project and an exploration of the internship regarding the expectations I had before the internship began, the reality of the internship, and the hindsight gained from the internship.

Committee:

Katherine Durack, Ph. D. (Committee Chair); Jean Lutz, Ph. D (Committee Member); Rebecca Balish, Ph. D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication

Keywords:

MTSC; internship report; documentation; Problem Solving Model for Technical Communicators; project management; application

Justice Stafford, Ruth M.Report on a MTSC Internship at The Normandy Group
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2002, Technical and Scientific Communication
This report describes the work I performed during my internship with The Normandy Group (TNG) and provides an analysis of how my experience as a writer during my internship differed from my other professional experience as a project manager. The report contains four chapters. Chapter 1: Introduction – provides background information about TNG’s organization and mission. Chapter 2: Internship Overview – provides a detailed description of my role at both my client site and at TNG. Chapter 3: Creating the User Documentation – explores the writing project on which I spent the majority of my time. Chapter 4: Reflecting on Working as a Writer – discusses how working as a writer at my client site differed from working as a manager in my office and from managing a staff of writers and multiple writing projects.

Committee:

Jean Lutz (Advisor)

Keywords:

TNG; ATLAS; Quick Reference Guides; client; Project Management; project; Quick Reference