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Greve, Curt MichaelRaw
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2011, English

Raw is a collection of poetry that has been in the making for quite some time and addresses issues the “common” man and woman are faced with on a daily basis. The poetry within this manuscript speaks to primordial urges and desires that are buried deep deep down, in places that only the imagination can explore. These visceral poems are “raw” in the sense that they will create an immediate reaction within its readers. Raw is a collection of poetry that cannot be ignored based on its subject matter and content.1. legs, lips, and hips The section, legs, lips, and hips, explores the female body and the emotions it engenders in the male. In this section of Raw, the female body has given life to a set of poems that explore love, lust, sex, and desire.

2. neighbors The section, neighbors, is a series of poems written from the hard-edged working class perspective. These are poems that are easy to relate to, especially for readers who have had jobs or bosses that they have hated. neighbors looks closely at the lives of those connected to us, as well as those we bump into on the street. neighbors is filled with poetry that leaves its readers looking next door, wondering what is going on.

3. raw The section entitled raw is an ancillary chapter that juts out ripe with materials that do not fit in anywhere else, because they do not have to. What is raw? However you read raw it is intended to prompt your acknowledgment that it is a collection of poetry that may not change the word, but will definitely change the way you read it.

Committee:

Albino Carrillo (Advisor); Andrew Slade, PhD (Committee Member); Bryan Bardine, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Gender; Gender Studies; Literature; Modern Literature

Keywords:

raw; poetry; working class poetry; poetic verse; visceral poetry; hard-edged poetry; poem; rawness; visceral, masculine poetry; poetry about women

Gillilan, Emily EllenPoetry Matters
Master of Arts in English, Cleveland State University, 2010, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Dana Gioia's controversial book Can Poetry Matter? challenges poets to write in traditional forms to expand poetry's readership beyond the “subculture” of the university. In response to Gioia's position, my thesis considers the mind-numbing trends in today's entertainment and places importance on innovation to suggest that there is potential danger in Gioia's call to conform. If the artists of a society mold their work like a commodity to be consumed by the masses, this lack of originality could stint creative progress and hinder, rather than encourage, readers' interests. Gioia's position is currently a reference point for contemporary debates about poetry and society. My position offers a new suggestion to general readers: put forth individual effort and pursue professional instruction to learn how to read poetry in order to acquire a broader appreciation for the ways poetic form enriches communication. Furthermore, what is classified as difficult poetry depends upon the canon of a culture. Writers should not be required to reach a set audience or limit their innovation.

Committee:

Michael Dumanis, PhD (Committee Chair); Adam Sonstegard, PhD (Committee Member); John Gerlach, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Art Education; English literature; Fine Arts; Higher Education; Language Arts; Literacy; Literature; Secondary Education

Keywords:

poetry; Dana Gioia; Can Poetry Matter; difficulty in poetry; innovation; creative writing; poetry's readership; Gertrude Stein; language poetry; Charles Bernstein; university subculture; Patriarchal Poetry; Further Color Notes; Helen Vendler; canon

Nichols, Casey MStellar Autopsy
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Creative Writing/Poetry
Stellar Autopsy is a collection of original poetry that considers the relationship between loss and memory. The poems in this manuscript use landscape to compose elegies for childhood and family, lost time, and the self. In blending narrative voices and lyric moments, the speaker in section one embodies the chaos of grief, the wandering and dislocated sense of being lost after a loss. Bodies and relationships break. Landscapes are varied, strange, and quietly threatening. Often, poems are resigned to the knowledge that time is fleeting, and relationships, whether damaged or brilliantly meaningful, all have an inevitable end. Gradually, the speaker uses violence and fractured syntax to soothe suffering and to ground the body in a place. In section two, the speaker begins to see omens of fertility, to look to the sky for direction, and exercise reason and judgment. Though a resolution is only initiated, landscape remains the instrument by which the speaker approaches examining her relationships. It is this examination that resembles the stellar autopsy—the raw data scientists use to compose the music, or the elegy, of a star’s final moments. In their dying, stars fertilize the universe. Planets could not sustain without carbon from dying stars. It is the hope in this kind of departure, the life beyond valediction, that readers consider throughout this collection.

Committee:

Larissa Szporluk (Committee Chair); Sharona Muir (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Language; Literature

Keywords:

poetry; lyric poetry; persona poetry; landscape poetry; pastoral; prose poetry

North, NaomiFall Like a Man
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Bowling Green State University, 2016, Creative Writing/Poetry
This thesis explores Polish emigration through poetry from the present of the third generation in terms of loss of familial patriarchs, loss of the Polish language as an American monolingual English speaker, and loss of ethnic group identity. That is, this thesis explores what it means for a Polish American to be foreign to oneself. The speaker of these poems, in order to connect with an identity larger than herself, tries to regain a sense of Polish national identity by speaking to the dead patriarchs of her family and meditating on their deaths. By doing so, she attempts to make some kind of sense of her grief and of her life. This thesis utilizes formal restlessness and the themes of language, prayer, memory, dream, nature, drink, and work to connect the speaker with the unseen world that is now absent to her in the physical, visible world in which she dwells.

Committee:

Sharona Muir (Advisor); Larissa Szporluk Celli (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Bible; Bilingual Education; Dance; Earth; East European Studies; Ecology; Energy; English As A Second Language; Environmental Philosophy; Ethics; Ethnic Studies; European History; Families and Family Life; Fine Arts; Folklore; Foreign Language; Forestry; Gender; History; Holocaust Studies; Human Remains; Language; Language Arts; Literacy; Literature; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Modern History; Modern Language; Modern Literature; Multicultural Education; Multilingual Education; Peace Studies; Performing Arts; Personal Relationships; Personality; Regional Studies; Religion; Religious History; Slavic Literature; Slavic Studies; Spirituality; Theology; Therapy; Womens Studies; World History

Keywords:

poetry; poems; Polish; Poland; death; grief; ethnic identity; nature; bilingual poetry; elegy; patriarch; loss; contemporary poetry; solidarity movement; emigration; immigration; third-generation immigrant; Wigrance; Pittsburgh; working-class poetry

Patterson, ArneciaConcrete Evidence: A Collection of Poems Versifying the City
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2009, English

CONCRETE EVIDENCE: A COLLECTION OF POEMS VERSIFYING THE CITY is a poetry manuscript that contemporizes “thinking into the heart,” as the Romantic Period poet, John Keats, put it, and the forms used for such thought. As modernity started to unfold, in the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Romantics were inspired by their immediate and natural environment of scenic, pastoral expanses that served as the basis for versified meditations. However, CONCRETE EVIDENCE: A COLLECTION OF POEMS VERSIFYING THE CITY is composed on the objects of the urban environment, its inhabitants and their relationships, and it speculates, aesthetically, on how 21st century subject matter changes formal poetics.

The manuscript is intentionally funnel-shaped in that it begins wide then hones in on the specific effect of the city on people. It is organized in three parts:

1. CONCRETE EVIDENCE

The section, CONCRETE EVIDENCE, is a wide-lens poetic rendering of urban objects: transportation, garbage, buildings, work, people, sky, and pavement. It is intended to be a meditative treatment of the sights of the metropolis through observations that can be gleaned by any eye. The poems frame identifiable images in poetic forms and language to discover how each influences the other. How will the urban environment change rhyme, versification, diction and shifts in thought that are characteristic of the form, and what aesthetic choices can be made to satisfy form and function successfully—if this is at all possible?

2. VISAGE AND PERSONA

The focus of this section of poems is pointed to urban and suburban people and how their relationships have been shaped by their environment. How do environmental elements prompt the interpersonal relationships and resulting events that mark the profile of suburban dwellers? VISAGE AND PERSONA examines the urban environment’s effect on us.

3. SPECULATION

Writing poetry and approaching problems poetically changes me over time. The turn inward, that it takes to offer a quiet, thoughtful treatise, has the effect of making me the object of my own observations. How am I transformed as I walk through the urban streets, a breath away from all of the things that populate the verse of CONCRETE EVIDENCE and VISAGE AND PERSONA? Change is inevitable, and SPECULATION provides deeply personal, poetic insight into how my imaginative filters manage life’s dynamic streams of emotional, visual, physical and aural stimuli.

Committee:

Albino Carrillo, MFA (Advisor); Morgan Thomas, PhD (Other); Slade Andrew, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

American Literature; English literature; Fine Arts; Language; Urban Planning

Keywords:

Concrete Evidence;poetry; poems;verse on the city;poems about the city;urban poetry;city poetry;contemporary poetry;contemporary verse; poetic study of the city; versification of the urban;contemporary sonnet;

Hudson, Jade D.Of Selves & Singings
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2010, Creative Writing
Of Selves & Singings presents poems exploring form, diction, lineation, musicality, linguistic patterning, rhyme, meter, mode of presentation, pagination, performative sound media and animation. Neither acting in accordance with nor setting the stage for a centralized artistic modality, these poems resist the idea of a normative practice in terms of both text and media. The relationship between poems is paradoxical. They are meant to be entirely alike in that they are meant to be entirely dissimilar. The purpose of this variance is to test whether the individual poem projects a unique set of internal architectures which require a methodology in separate acts of poetic creation.

Committee:

Keith Tuma, PhD (Committee Chair); Cris Cheek, PhD (Committee Member); David Schloss, MFA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Language Arts

Keywords:

Of Selves; Singings; I am an Alien; hybrid poetry; animation poetry; sound poetry; language poetry

Eder, Claire E.Limitrophe
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2018, English (Arts and Sciences)
The dissertation is divided into two sections: an essay titled “The Evolution of Contemporary American Poetry of Witness: C. K. Williams, Claudia Rankine, and Aracelis Girmay” and a poetry collection titled Limitrophe. “The Evolution of Contemporary American Poetry of Witness: C. K. Williams, Claudia Rankine, and Aracelis Girmay” discusses recent poetry that testifies to experiences of extremity, such as racist violence, the global migrant crisis, and environmental catastrophes. This essay traces the roots of poetry of witness to Carolyn Forché’s 1993 anthology Against Forgetting: Twentieth Century Poetry of Witness and describes how witnessing was defined in the context of the twentieth century. I then demonstrate the ways in which twenty-first-century American political poets have challenged the genre’s original articulation, expanding the category of who counts as a witness and which events are worthy of being witnessed. The writers I discuss here reframe the act of poetic testimony by expressing self-awareness, doubt, and complicity; by placing microaggressions into the category of atrocity; by investigating the possibilities for technologically mediated and nonhuman witnessing; and by invoking a witnessing that is collective and global in scope. Limitrophe is composed of poems that investigate how individuals can most ethically participate in communities, using the context of the neighborhood as a motif. The poems enact a self-conscious witnessing of local happenings, often revealing their speakers’ complicity within systems of oppression. This collection questions the limits of intimacy within romantic and platonic relationships and meditates on how connections are influenced by facets of identity, such as gender, class, and race.

Committee:

Jill Rosser (Committee Chair); Mark Halliday (Committee Member); Mary Kate Hurley (Committee Member); Devika Chawla (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

poetry; creative writing; poetry of witness; political poetry; C K Williams; Claudia Rankine; Aracelis Girmay; Carolyn Forche; twenty-first-century American poetry; atrocity; microaggressions; neighborhoods; community; insects; gender; local

Nunes, Jennifer Marie“Afternoon, a Fall”: Relationality, Accountability, and Failure as a Queer-Feminist Approach to Translating the Poetry of Yu Xiuhua
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2017, East Asian Studies
Yu Xiuhua is a contemporary Chinese poet who became a sensation in China after her poem “Crossing Half of China to Sleep with You” (Chuanguo daban ge Zhongguo qu shui ni) went viral in 2015 via the popular Chinese messaging platform, WeChat (Wexin). As a woman with cerebral palsy who did not complete high school and lives on a small farm in rural Hubei Province, Yu’s popularity intersects with her various identities, making her not only an interesting poet but also an interesting public figure. This project aims to translate a selection of her poetry in a queer-feminist mode for a contemporary English-speaking audience of politically engaged poets and writers. Drawing on a long history of feminist translation practices that visibly “womanhandle” texts in order to attend to both the author’s and the translator’s agency, alongside Aimee Carrillo Rowe’s call for a politics of relationality and queer theory’s notion of failure as a mode of resistance, these translations challenge a discourse of fluency and the resultant invisibility of the translator in standard English translation. This project thus contributes to a feminist translation practice of accountability, collaboration, and play and promotes an “ecology” of translation that values how different translations interact with each, whether symbiotically or antagonistically. Building on that foundation, these translations enact a practice of vulnerability that acknowledges and honors the failure inherent in translation as it attempts to work across difference and the power dynamics embedded in that difference. The tension between attending to the poet’s style and poetics and making visible the translator’s own processes of engagement is not relieved but rather presented as an integral part of the final translation. Ultimately, this project makes room for more varied and nuanced consideration of ethical reading approaches for those positioned in the Global North translating work by those positioned in more vulnerable locations within transnational power structures.

Committee:

Patricia Sieber (Advisor); Kirck Denton (Committee Member); Lynn Itagaki (Committee Member); Lina Ferreira (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Asian Studies

Keywords:

Yu Xiuhua; China; Chinese; poetry; Chinese poetry; contemporary poetry; translation; feminist theory; queer theory; translation studies

Ereditario, danielM3A5UR1NG (V1D30 P03TRY & 0TH3RW15E)
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2009, Creative Writing
This thesis is a collection of poems written for the page and the screen between Fall 2005 and Spring 2009. The thesis, which roughly follows a chronological order of production, with the most recent coming last, appears in two parts: the first consists of video poems made independent of each other; and the second is a sequence of forty-five sonnets relying on the recycled language of other texts. The latest version of Adobe Reader should be installed to play the videos.

Committee:

cris cheek (Committee Chair); Keith Tuma (Committee Member); Catherine Wagner (Committee Member)

Keywords:

Video; Poetry; Video Poetry; Electronic Poetry; Population Studies

Davis-Allen, Pamela MarieGypsy Soul, Wolf Spirit
Master of Arts (MA), Wright State University, 2009, English

Gypsy Soul, Wolf Spirit is a collection of thirty-six poems; the majority of the poems are written in - or evolved from drafts written in - iambic pentameter. Writing formal poetry was a challenge I decided to embrace because I believed that it would allow me to evolve as a poet.

The themes that connect these poems are represented by the collection's title: Gypsy Soul, Wolf Spirit. There is the dominant thematic presence of both the natural world and the spiritual realm within the collection. My intention was to lift the reader to a state of mind, through language, where he or she could get lost in the peaceful beauty of nature - even when that beauty is found through powerful images of the bear or wolf - and feel the spontaneous gypsy soul of the divine universe.

Committee:

Gary Pacernick, PhD (Committee Chair); Jane Blakelock, M.A. (Committee Member); David Seitz, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

English literature; Fine Arts; Language Arts; Literacy; Teaching; Womens Studies

Keywords:

Poetry; poems; nature poems; formal poetry; sonnets; free verse poetry; wolf; gypsy; universe; soul; nature

Pate, Spencer CaweinPoetic Justice: Rediscovering the Life and Work of Madison Cawein
Bachelor of Science in Education, Miami University, 2011, School of Education and Allied Professions - Middle Childhood Education
Madison Julius Cawein (b. March 23, 1865, d. December 8, 1914) was a prolific Kentucky poet – he was known as the “Keats of Kentucky,” as the majority of his work is regional romantic poetry in traditional verse forms – and also a distant relative of the author of this thesis. While Cawein was acclaimed and popular in his day, he is now all but forgotten, save for the recent discovery that T.S. Eliot likely plagiarized from his poetry. It is my contention not only that Cawein’s work is undeservedly neglected by readers and critics, but also that his oeuvre is a mirror to the cultural upheavals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century; he provides a missing link between different literary periods. It is thus my intention to examine both Cawein’s life and the vagaries of his poetic career in the service of demonstrating why his quite fine work should be remembered in its own right. Furthermore, I provide a detailed analysis of Cawein’s poetry based upon a careful reading of his collected works, and in doing so, I also offer a concise anthology of some of Cawein’s best poems.

Committee:

Tom Romano, PhD (Advisor); Richard Turner, PhD (Committee Member); Paul Cawein, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Literature; Comparative Literature; Literature

Keywords:

Madison Cawein; T.S. Eliot; romantic poetry; nature poetry; regional poetry; Kentucky

Katko, JustinP03M5
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2007, Creative Writing
This thesis is a collection of fifteen Video Poems made between Fall 2005 and Spring 2007. They include collaborations with Camille PB (What Spam Means to Network Situationism), Jow Lindsay (Collected Vision), and Katharine Fronk (Scores). The latest version of the Quicktime player should be installed to play the videos. The supplementary text is in two parts: the first outlines Video Poetry as a genre, tracing its historical development (along with Film Poetry) to establish a foundation for contemporary discourse and practice; the second provides a statement for each of the Video Poems, and in the case of the collaboration with Jow Lindsay, presents a completely text-based Video Poem.

Committee:

Cris Cheek (Advisor)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Keywords:

Poetry; Video; Video Poetry; Film; Electronic Poetry

Marvin, Catherine ChristabelChicanery
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2003, Arts and Sciences : English and Comparative Literature
This dissertation contains three papers that address the definition of "confessional" poetry, most especially that which has been written by American women. The primary section of the dissertation is a manuscript of original poetry: thirty poems in all. These poems attempt to negotiate the boundaries between fact and fiction, truth and deception, often employing rhetorical strategies similar to those of the confessional poets of the 1960’s.

Committee:

Dr. Don Bogen (Advisor)

Subjects:

Literature, English

Keywords:

contemporary American poetry; women's poetry; Sylvia Plath; confessional poetry

Ramstetter, Anthony F.Small Gods & Orbital Bodies: A Thesis
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2013, English
This manuscript is my Master thesis, which I have compiled to fulfill the requirements of a creative writing examination in poetry. It collects diverse thematic pathways into professional and publishable form. The first section includes rough reflections on spirituality, which create worlds within their own respective compass. The second section includes humorous, incidental poems that play with the linkage of the ampersand. The third section meditates on personal relationships and various intimacies.

Committee:

cris cheek, PhD (Committee Chair); David Schloss, MFA (Committee Member); Keith Tuma, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Language Arts; Performing Arts

Keywords:

ampersand; celebrity poems; contemporary poetry; erasure; experimental; humorous poems; irony; list poems; love poetry; modernist poetry; personal relationship poems; religious poems; spirituality; thesis; witty poems

Bretz, Katherine Hazel-LouiseReviving the Nibelungenlied: A Study and Exploration of the Relationship between Medieval Literature and Music
BM, Kent State University, 2014, College of the Arts / School of Music
During the Middle Ages, oral poets often sang the tale of the hero Siegfried, his murder, his widow Kriemhild';s revenge, and the downfall of the Burgundian kingdom. A medieval epic poem written in Middle-High German, the Nibelungenlied is widely known among German citizens and scholars alike. Its historical and mythological roots include the defeat of the Burgundians during the Volkerwanderung (Great Migration Period) and the legend of Siegfried. I applied my own knowledge of medieval Germanic literature and music by performing this work in its original language, and this paper discusses the research and planning that went into my performance. Medieval epic poetry was often sung when performed, and the Nibelungenlied is no exception. To prepare the performance, I selected sections of the text to perform and set them to the Hildebrandston, a melody that is believed to be similar to that of the Nibelungenlied, whose original melody is no longer known. I also examined certain phonological aspects of Middle High German so as to present the text as authentically as possible. I accompanied my singing of the Nibelungenlied on a lap dulcimer, a three-stringed, fretted instrument and member of the zither family. I used variations in dynamics, vocal color, and accompaniment to enhance the dramatic aspect of the performance. After my investigations, I was able to consider the cultural context and reception of the Nieblungenlied, as well as interpret its many themes such as honor, duty, betrayal, revenge, and destruction. The entire work can be viewed as a commentary on the shift in ideals from heroic victory to lawful rule and order. In completing this project, I have had the opportunity to explore the relationship between literature and music in their historical and cultural context.

Committee:

Jay White (Advisor); Geoffrey Koby (Committee Member); Jane Dressler (Committee Member); Don-John Dugas (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Germanic Literature; Medieval Literature; Music

Keywords:

Nibelungenlied; Medieval German Poetry; Oral Formulaic Theory; Medieval Music; Oral Poetry; Lecture Recital; Epic Poetry

Laffey, Seth EdwardThe Letters of Edwin Arlington Robinson: A Digital Edition (1889-1895)
PHD, Kent State University, 2017, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English
This project comprises a digital edition of a selection of letters by American poet Edwin Arlington Robinson (1869-1935), including all known letters written by the poet between 1889 and 1895, and hosted online by Colby College Libraries' Digital Collections. The edition is based on work started last century by Professor Wallace L. Anderson of Bridgewater State University, and left unfinished by him at his death in 1984. Professor Anderson collected a vast quantity of Robinson's letters from various repositories and private parties around the country. He transcribed them and provided annotations and textual notes for about three-quarters of them. For my project, I have edited, updated and corrected a substantial portion of Anderson's transcriptions, as well as completed fresh transcriptions of my own, checking them for accuracy against Robinson's holographs held at Harvard and the University of Virginia. I have formatted the new edition so as to more accurately represent the holographs, and have added my own textual notes and annotations to those of Anderson, along with an introductory critical essay detailing my methods and principles. It is of primary importance to me that these letters be accessible to both the scholarly community and the general public, with a view to maximizing their usefulness for literary and historical research. I have settled on digital publication as the best means to achieve this end because it will render the letters accessible to anyone with a computer and internet connection, free of charge. The project of publishing the remainder of Robinson's letters in this format is expected to continue beyond the dissertation.

Committee:

Paul Gaston (Advisor)

Subjects:

American History; American Literature; American Studies; Comparative Literature; Literature

Keywords:

Edwin Arlington Robinson; letters; Gardiner; Maine; 19th-century American literature; nineteenth-century American literature; American poetry; modern poetry; Wallace Ludwig Anderson; Colby College; literary history; realist fiction; poetry; American poets

Bissell, Michelle L.The Barest Rib
Master of Fine Arts, University of Akron, 2009, Creative Writing
The Barest Rib is a collection of poetry, in four sections, that explores the struggle for control between a woman's mind and her body by telling stories of motherhood, daughterhood, sisterhood, and wifehood. When the mind wins, these poems are self-conscious, aware that they are manipulating the narratives. When the body wins, these poems are emotionally raw, in anger, sorrow, bitterness, and, occasionally, joy.

Committee:

Mary Biddinger, PhD (Advisor)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Keywords:

Poetry; Narrative Poetry; Poetry of the Body; Feminine Experience

Strittmatter, Jorge EmilioTres Poetas con Heráclito: Borges, Hahn, Pacheco
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2007, Spanish
This paper closely studies most of the poems related and inspired by the doctrine of the presocratic philosopher Heraclitus written by Jorge Luis Borges, Oscar Hahn and José Emilio Pacheco. It aims to explain why and how these three Latin-American poets coincided in their election of that Greek philosopher as a way to express their metaphysical concern about the changing world. In addition, it examines in which ways they were influenced not only by Heraclitus, but also by other poets that preceded them in the admiration and interpretation of his thought, and what are the intertextual relations that exist among them all.

Committee:

Maria Alvarez (Advisor)

Subjects:

Literature, Latin American

Keywords:

Latin American poetry; Heraclitus; Presocratic philosophers; Modern poetry; Latin American poetry

Wright, Michael J.Misremembrance
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2007, English (Arts and Sciences)
This thesis provides a suggested link between my work and that of Sylvia Plath and Robert Lowell. This introduction will not make claims regarding confessional poetry. I understand that Plath and Lowell are both critically defined as confessional poets, and my own work holds qualities that are attributed to the confessional school. This discussion will be more helpful if focused on emphasizing how individual poems of mine and these writers share common ground, rather than critical definition. Analyzing Plath’s Fever 103° and Berck-Plage revealed that her poetry and my own meditate upon how the physical body is defined through gender expectations. The standards that the feminine and masculine body are expected to meet are subjects that she and I explore. Plath also treats the subject of a particular social community, and that community’s expectation of socially normative behavior. I also discuss these issues in my narrative work, and like Plath use both landscape imagery and direct commentary to do so.

Committee:

Mark Halliday (Advisor)

Keywords:

social class; masculinity; poverty; trailer park; autobiographical poetry; poetry; racism

Oeding, Carrie A.Nobody Knows What to Say
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2007, English (Arts and Sciences)

This work includes a book-length collection of poetry and a critical introduction. The critical essay discusses the author’s inquiry of the importance of tone, voice and authenticity in poetry.

Committee:

Sharmila Voorakkara (Advisor)

Subjects:

Literature, American

Keywords:

poetry; 21st Century Poetry; creative writing

Smith, Richard S.The Possibility of Actual Happiness
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2011, English (Arts and Sciences)
This thesis entitled, The Possibility of Actual Happiness contains a collection of poetry and a critical preface entitled, “The Discursive Mode and Interpersonal Relationships: How Chatty Poems Dodge Sentimentality.” The preface describes a few strategies that discursive writers employ to avoid sentimentality in love poems. I draw heavily from Frank O’Hara’s work, as well as from other contemporary American poets, to illustrate some of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in using this chatty voice. I hope the critical work illuminates certain line-level and thematic choices in my own poems.

Committee:

Mark Halliday (Committee Chair); Dinty W. Moore (Committee Member); Jill Allyn Rosser (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

Discursive poetry; O'Hara, Frank; conversational poetry; happiness; sentimentality

Patrick, Lisa DFound Poetry: A Tool for Supporting Novice Poets and Fostering Transactional Relationships Between Prospective Teachers and Young Adult Literature
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, EDU Teaching and Learning
The purpose of this qualitative classroom-based dissertation study is to examine what happens when prospective teachers write found poetry using young adult literature. Found poetry is a poetic form created by reframing words from the linguistic environment surrounding the poet. In this study, the participants wrote found poems using words from a novel of their choice that they had read for the teacher researcher’s course on young adult literature at a major Midwest university. Found poetry was investigated as a means for supporting novice poets in their writing efforts; readers in their transactional relationships with texts; and prospective teachers in their confidence and attitudes toward their future teaching of poetry writing. The primary data collected for the dissertation consisted of an extensive in-class written reflection over the found poetry writing project. Attride-Stirling’s (2001) thematic networks tool was used to analyze and interpret the data. Found data poems were created from the words of study participants in order to represent the thematic findings, as well as to seek congruence across multiple forms of data analysis and representation. The first research question asks how writing found poetry might support novice poets. After the found poetry writing experience, all of the novice poets reported positive feelings for their poem, and many expressed a sense of pride in their poetic accomplishment. The accessible and structured approach of using words from the text for a poem supported the novice poets and lessened their anxiety and worry over writing poetry. The majority of the participants favorably compared the found poetry writing experience to past school poetry writing experiences. They reported a shift in poetic self-efficacy, becoming much more comfortable and confident in their role as poets. The second research question asks how writing found poetry might support reader/text transactional relationships. Writing found poetry positively impacted every participant’s relationship with the text chosen for the poem, as well as their reflections upon the reading experience. The search for words for the poem returned readers to the text, where they revisited the reading experience and reread portions of the book. These activities impacted readers’ awareness of the text and their understanding of literary elements. The poetic writing process strengthened and extended the reading experience and enriched the overall quality of the readers’ relationship with the book chosen for the found poem. The third research question asks how writing found poetry might support prospective teachers of poetry. Found poetry provided prospective poetry teachers with support for their future teaching responsibilities. Becoming a poet in practice shifted their confidence and attitudes toward these responsibilities. The prospective teachers pointed to found poetry’s accessibility and usability, as well as its suitability for introducing students to poetry and supporting them as readers, as advantageous attributes for using the poetic form with their future students. Taken as a whole, the found poetry experience supported the writing efforts of the novice poets; transformed the nature of the readers’ transactional relationships with texts’ and positively impacted the prospective teachers’ confidence and attitudes toward teaching poetry writing.

Committee:

Barbara Kiefer, Dr. (Advisor); Barbara Lehman, Dr. (Committee Member); Linda Parsons, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Educational Theory; Elementary Education; Higher Education; Language Arts; Literacy; Literature; Middle School Education; Pedagogy; Reading Instruction; Secondary Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

poetry; found poetry; novice poets; Rosenblatt; Transactional Theory; prospective teachers; young adult literature; transactional reading relationships; reader text worlds; thematic networks; literacy education; teacher education

Williams, Todd OwenPoetic Renewal and Reparation in the Classroom: Poetry Therapy, Psychoanalysis, and Pedagogy with Three Victorian Poets
PHD, Kent State University, 2007, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English
By looking at the way therapists use poetry in their practices we can find new approaches to teaching and exploring poetry that will make literary study more valuable to students. Poetry therapists approach poetry by focusing on the reader’s experience of a poem rather than on the poem’s meaning per se. Using this approach to poetry in the classroom has a number of potential benefits for students. First, poetry offers students the opportunity to increase their self-awareness by helping them examine their experience in terms of emotions and images as well as language. Such a process can enable students to have new perceptions and emotional experiences that can benefit them greatly. The study of poetry can also validate students’ emotional experiences, particularly painful ones that are often repressed. And poems can also serve as loving external objects that can help students repair their negative attitudes toward the external world. If we allow students to relate to poems emotionally and imaginatively, we can help them achieve the goals of personal renewal and a more positive relationship to the external world. The study begins by examining students’ defense mechanisms that prevent them from experiencing the benefits of the study of poetry, and by considering how we can use poetry to relax these defenses. It moves on to consider how the regressive nature of poetry helps students to become more self-aware and integrated. The second part of the study presents specific classroom approaches and exercises that enable students to use poetry to achieve renewal, openness, deeper self awareness, reparation, empathy, and a positive yet realistic view of the world. Part two presents approaches based on brief poetry therapy, experiential therapy, and metaphor therapy. The final chapters deal with classroom approaches to three Pre-Raphaelite poets—Christina Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and William Morris—whose work is particularly useful for this approach to poetry.

Committee:

Mark Bracher (Advisor)

Keywords:

Poetry therapy; psychoanalysis; Victorian poetry; Pre-Raphaelite

Borowicz Betrus, MelissaSKY SLIDING
Master of Arts, Miami University, 2003, Creative Writing
The thirty poems selected for this thesis were written during my two years in the Graduate Poetry Workshop and reflect what I feel are the aesthetics of both meaningful and accessible poetry. Roughly half of the poems are written in free verse while the other half are written in traditional metered forms. Thematically, the poems reflect personal experiences, including relationships within my family, most specifically my relationship with my late grandmother, encounters with nature, and the adventures of travel. They are largely narrative in nature and invite readers in to enjoy the often overlooked details of life. These poems also invite readers into my life to experience a piece of the emotion that compels me to put pen to paper.

Committee:

James Reiss (Advisor)

Subjects:

Literature, English

Keywords:

poetry; Graduate Poetry Workshop

Harris, Gary RobertThe theology of the German seventeenth-century meditative poem /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1978, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

Religious poetry;German poetry

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