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Duncan, Robin AStudents' Perceived Value of the Community College Experience: A Mixed Methods Study
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2018, Leadership and Change
The purpose of this study was to explore students’ perceived value of their community college experience and its relationship to other factors often related to student persistence in college, namely satisfaction, academic quality, service quality, and engagement. The research was guided by three focused questions: How do students describe and define perceived value of community college; what components emerge from exploratory factor analysis of items designed to measure perceived value; and how, if at all, is a student’s perception of the value of a community college experience different from related measures such as satisfaction, engagement, or quality? Data were collected from students enrolled at, primarily, three Massachusetts community colleges, employing a three-phased, mixed methods exploratory sequential approach. Phase 1 consisted of focus group interviews with students from one of the participating colleges to identify the themes and language for developing the perceived value construct. Phase 2 consisted of an online survey targeting currently enrolled community college students. Factor analysis identified key components of the perceived value scale and multiple regression analysis determined the relationship between perceived value and other control variables. Phase 3 consisted of a virtual post survey focus group with voluntary survey participants from Massachusetts community colleges to discuss and clarify the quantitative results and narrative survey responses. The dominant theme emerging from the findings was that students described perceived value as “I am valued” by the college. Results also indicated that the perceived value construct was different from other measures and suggested promising ways for further exploring and measuring student persistence. As a result of the study’s findings, a conceptual framework in the form of a Perceived Value Wheel was proposed with recommendations to community college leaders and practical contribution to higher education leadership and change. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and Ohiolink ETD Center, https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Committee:

Jon Wergin, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Carol Baron, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Ruth Slotnick, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Adult Education; Behavioral Psychology; Behavioral Sciences; Behaviorial Sciences; Business Administration; Business Education; Community College Education; Community Colleges; Continuing Education; Education; Education Philosophy; Education Policy; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Educational Sociology; Educational Tests and Measurements; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Management; Marketing; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

Perceived Value; Service Quality; Academic Quality; Satisfaction; Student Engagement; Involvement; Student Experience; Higher Education; Two Year Colleges; Community College; Students; Mixed Methods; Regression; Factor Analysis; Persistence; Retention

Liu, YanValue Creation through Bonding Strategies: An Online Retailing Context
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Human Ecology: Fashion and Retail Studies
Previous studies have extensively illustrated that in order to obtain consumers’ e-loyalty, online retailers need to provide their consumers with superior values (e.g., Levenburg, 2005; Rafiq, Fulford, & Lu, 2013). In an effort to understand how value can be enhanced in online retailing and to gain customers’ e-loyalty, researchers have placed considerable importance on the concept of perceived value investigation and on the influence of perceived value on consumers’ e-loyalty (Cronin, Brady, & Hult, 2000). Research findings have suggested that once perceived value is created, consumers will develop a favorable attitude towards online retailers leading to e-loyalty (Rafiq et al., 2013). However, the question of how consumers’ perceived value is created has not been comprehended yet. Previous studies have investigated various psychological factors, such as perceived quality and perceived risk that serve antecedents of perceived value (e.g., Gounaris, Dimitriadis, & Stathakopoulos, 2010; Liong, Arif, Tat, Rasli, & Jusoh, 2011; Mishra & Mathew, 2013). However, business strategies that could directly drive consumers’ perceived value have not been sufficiently demonstrated either in the traditional settings or within e-commerce context (Dong, Zhang, & Yang, 2009). Furthermore, perceived value as a single construct has been well defined and examined, but applying it as a multi-dimensional construct and investigating the strategy effectiveness for creating each dimension of the perceived value is an interesting question that remains unanswered (Chiu, Hsieh, & Li, 2005). This study aims to investigate the process of online retailers’ bonding strategies and how these strategies have enhanced consumers’ perceived values as well as the subsequent e-loyalty by introducing the social capital perspective. Three types of bonding strategies are investigated in this study: financial bonding, social bonding and structural bonding. Four dimensions of perceived value are examined; they are price value, social value, emotional value and quality value. This study aims to identify effective bonding strategies for each of the value creation processes. Based on Mehrabian and Russell’s (1974) Stimulus-Organism-Response (S-O-R) framework, a research model with nine hypotheses was proposed. The effectiveness of three types of bonding strategies on the four value creation processes was examined in an online scenario-based experimental study. There were eight scenarios with a total main survey sample size of 480. Data were collected through Amazon Mechanical Turk (M-Turk). Three-Way MANOVA and Structural Equation Modeling were performed to analyze the data. SPSS and LISREL were used to conduct the data analysis. The findings reveal that: (1) financial bonding strategies enhance price value and e-loyalty; (2) social bonding strategies enhance social value and e-loyalty; and (3) both social and structural bonding strategies enhance emotional value and e-loyalty. Findings in this study extend the present body of knowledge on the perceived value construct in the Business-to-Consumer (B-to-C) relationship literature. Results of this study will help researchers better understand the effectiveness of different bonding strategies to create different dimensions of perceived value and the subsequent e-loyalty. They also provide valuable practical guidelines to online retailers in choosing the “right” strategies to enhance customers’ perceived value and e-loyalty in their online retailing practices.

Committee:

Jay Kandampully (Advisor); Brian Turner (Committee Member); Robert Burnkrant (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Communication; Management; Marketing

Keywords:

Bonding Strategies; Value Creation; Online Retailing; Social Capital; Consumer Perceived Value; E-Loyalty

McCullough, IanSmall Businesses and Their Perceived Value of Design
MFA, Kent State University, 2014, College of Communication and Information / School of Visual Communication Design
This study is a study of small business owners and their perceptions on graphic design. The basis for this study was to gain an understanding of whether or not small businesses view professional graphic design as a beneficial service worth pursuing, and why or why not they are employing the services of professional designers. The design process itself is regarded as an important tool; in a study, firms that saw design as a process or used it to innovate increased their sales by 50% more than the norm. Design can also directly affect other areas of a business, such as the firm’s image. A recent study suggested that firm image will benefit more from designer involvement in website development and corporate visual identity development if the firm adopts an innovative strategy to experiential design. While these large businesses see major benefits through the deliberate attention to funding for professional design, small businesses, unfortunately, may not have the opportunity to experience these benefits due to budgetary constraints. Small businesses also may fail to recognize the difference in the lesser value of inexpensive options versus the high value generated by professional designers (Holston, 2011). This thesis will be a comprehensive study on the perception of the value of design by small businesses. It will explore their understanding of design, the value it generates, what their metrics are for success within the business, and how design can directly affect those areas. The implications of this thesis will be the ability to start an informed conversation between professional designers and small business on the value of design. Designers will have a better idea of how to sell themselves and their services to small businesses, and those businesses will see the benefits professional design can bring to a company—such as an increased ROI and enhanced firm image. By gaining a deep understanding behind the motivations of a small business, designers can attach themselves and their services to the success metrics of the company. This study will look at case studies exploring the positive impact graphic design has on businesses in multiple areas. Primary research was conducted as well. Interviews with small business owners in Kent, Ohio were performed, and these conversations help to provide an understanding of how small business owners perceive design. Finally, suggestions will be provided to aid graphic designers and design related firms to have a reasonable conversation with small business owners, alleviating their concerns and speaking directly to their perceptions.

Committee:

Visocky O'Grady Ken (Advisor)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Small Businesses; Graphic Design; Perceived Value