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Bell, Amy M.TRANSCENDENCE TOWARD PARADISE
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2007, Music Composition

Transcendence toward Paradiseis a thirteen-minute, five-movement piece for mezzo-soprano, flute, harp, and viola. The selected text was excerpted from an Italian sonnet written by Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564), which was set in its original language. William Wordsworth provided a beautiful poetic translation, which I chose to guide my text setting.

Dolce è ben quella in un pudico core, che per cangiar di scorza o d’ora estrema non manca, e qui caparra il paradiso.

In chaste hearts uninfluenced by the power of outward change, there blooms a deathless flower, that breathes on earth the air of paradise.

The text appears in its entirety only in the last movement, with earlier movements exploring a gradual reconstruction of the text from its component parts. To accomplish this, the text was deconstructed into various syllables represented in the score with the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The first movement’s text contains only the shortest durations of syllables, denoting the highest level of text abstraction. As each subsequent movement progresses, the abstract syllables gradually merge together and expand to form words and phrases of the text.

The thematic material for Transcendence toward Paradiseoriginates from the fifth movement of the piece. Salient characteristics from the last movement were shaped into variations based upon these features, which also reflect the evolving characteristics of the text setting. This was accomplished through variation techniques including motivic and rhythmic deconstruction, augmentation, diminution, and registral displacement, among others.

Committee:

Elainie Lillios (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564); International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA); mezzo-soprano, flute, harp, and viola; Transcendence toward Paradise

Deibel, Danielle MarieThe Piazza della Signoria: The Visualization of Political Discourse through Sculpture
MA, Kent State University, 2017, College of the Arts / School of Art
In the Italian Renaissance, Florence was a known epicenter of artistic talent and influential patronage. This body of research focuses on the Piazza della Signoria, a public space located in the heart of Florence, and the first four sculptures placed within it by the Republic during the fourteenth to early sixteenth century. The formulation of the Piazza della Signoria, as well as the factionalism of the city-state, had a significant impact upon the Florentine government. Through displaying sculptures such as the Marzocco, Donatello’s David and Judith and Holofernes, and Michelangelo’s David, publicly for the first time, the Republican government could convey political messages openly to its citizens, each sculpture increasing the complexity of the overall program. Each of these works is discussed in depth and their political context emphasized, specifically in relation to the Medici exile of 1494. When the Medici returned, and were reinstalled into power in 1512, new sculptures were commissioned to temper the symbolism of the previously installed works, suggesting the success of these sculptures as images of Florentine liberty. Therefore, rather than engage with these sculptures individually, I deem it necessary to study them collectively, as they once were interpreted in the public realm.

Committee:

Gustav Medicus (Advisor); Diane Scillia (Committee Member); John-Michael Warner (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Piazza della Signoria; Palazzo Vecchio; Judith and Holofernes; Marzocco; David; Michelangelo; Donatello; Political; Sculpture; Florence; Florentine; Medici; Republic; Art; Art History; Loggia dei Lanzi; Judith; Jewish; Heroine; Hero; Symbolism

Bender, J. DennisEternal problems, eternal themes: Suite on Words of Michelangelo Buonarotti, Op. 145 of Dmitri Shostakovich
DMA, University of Cincinnati, 2009, College-Conservatory of Music : Voice
Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) used the poetry of Michelangelo as a summation of his creative life as a composer, not only identifying with Michelangelo’s personal, political and creative struggles, but with much of his world-view and philosophy as well. This document discusses those elements of the Michelangelo Suite that epitomize the techniques and concerns of Shostakovich’s late works. Specifically, these elements are the increasing importance of text-based composition, the use of twelve-note themes, the use of the DSCH motive, and self-quotation. These characteristics are then examined in context with his relationship with Benjamin Britten.Shostakovich’s 12-note writing developed as an expansion of his already chromatic language, and in context of an overall tonal framework. As such, 12-note themes are used symbolically rather than serially. Chapter Two of the document details the use of 12-note themes prior to the composition of the Michelangelo Suite and those found in the Suite. Another important trait in the late works is Shostakovich’s use of his musical signature, the DSCH motive. The third chapter will consider differences in Shostakovich’s use of the motive prior to the Michelangelo Suite, and in the Suite itself. Musical self-quotation is not strictly limited to Shostakovich’s late works, however they abound in these last works and serve to link them together. Chapter Four examines the use of self-quotation in the Michelangelo Suite and other works. The fifth chapter discusses aspects of Shostakovich’s musical style that seemed to be meaningful to Britten, and the importance and influence of Britten on Shostakovich’s late works.

Committee:

Kenneth Griffiths, Prof. (Committee Chair); David Adams, Prof. (Committee Member); Kenneth Shaw, Prof. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

Shostakovich ;Suite on Words of Michelangelo Buonarotti, Op. 145

Finkel, Jennifer HMichelangelo at San Lorenzo: The “Tragedy” of the Façade
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2005, Art History
This dissertation considers Michelangelo’s intended sculptural program for the never-realized façade of the Medici parish church of San Lorenzo in Florence, and how its iconography related to the Medici, the Papacy, and the city of Florence. In 1516, Pope Leo X de’ Medici commissioned Michelangelo to complete both the sculpture and the architecture of the façade. This project, which Michelangelo claimed would be the “mirror of architecture and sculpture of all Italy,” was to be the most prestigious commission of the sixteenth century and Michelangelo’s most ambitious creation. But, for the Medici patrons, the sculptural program for the façade would have been the ultimate expression of Medici propaganda. Chapter one is a study of the history of San Lorenzo and generations of Medici patronage at their parish church. The sculptural program for the façade would have visually communicated the Medici dynasty and their destiny, and thus, the account of the San Lorenzo façade project starts here. Chapter two provides an overview of the façade commission and Michelangelo’s involvement on the project from 1516 to 1520. Chapter three is dedicated to Michelangelo’s architectural façade drawings for San Lorenzo, and his figural drawings for statuary that have been previously unassigned to a known project or connected to his other sculptural projects. These drawings are considered afresh in conjunction with the vast extant correspondence from this period, with the primary focus on Michelangelo’s concern for the sculptural decoration of the façade. Chapters four and five use the methodologies of iconography and iconology to reconstruct the intended plan for the sculptures on the façade. Michelangelo greatly enlarged the original sculptural program from ten over-life-sized marble statues, to eighteen freestanding over-life-sized marble and bronze statues, and nineteen relief panels. This expanded sculptural program relied on a calculated arrangement of the saints and their placement on the façade, which had specific meanings and connotations for the Medici, for Florence, and for the Medici in the papal court in Rome. Appendix A of the dissertation is a detailed chronological account of the façade project as extrapolated and compiled from more than three-hundred extant letters.

Committee:

Edward Olszewski (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Michelangelo; Medici; San Lorenzo; facade; Pope Leo X de'Medici

BURZLAFF, MARY CAROLINECHASTE SEXUAL WARRIOR, CIVIC HEROINE, AND FEMME FATALE: THREE VIEWS OF JUDITH IN ITALIAN RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ART
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2006, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Art History
The apocryphal story of Judith and Holofernes has fascinated artists for centuries and is thus one of the most commonly depicted religious scenes. This story was particularly popular during the Italian Renaissance and Baroque periods. Although depictions of Judith vary greatly, I believe the interpretations of Judith's role can be divided into three broad categories: chaste sexual warrior, civic heroine, and femme fatale. These classifications are not exclusive, and many images could be classified in multiple ways. In this thesis I thoroughly discuss each of these themes, using quintessential examples of each type of depiction to illustrate my ideas, and I situate these images within their political and socio-historical contexts. Studying the artists, their patrons, and their society allows a better understanding of why these images were produced.

Committee:

Diane Mankin (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Judith; Holofernes; Italian; Renaissance; Baroque; Michelangelo; Donatello; Botticelli; Giovanni della Robbia; Giorgione; Palma Vecchio; Artemisia Gentileschi; Allori; Apocrypha