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SANTHANAM, LAKSHMIIntegrated Security Architecture for Wireless Mesh Networks
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Engineering : Computer Science and Engineering
Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) have revolutionized provisioning of economical and broadband wireless internet service to the whole community of users. The self-configurable and self-healing ability of WMNs has encouraged their rapid proliferation, as adding a mesh router (MR) is as simple as plugging and turning on. The plug-and-play architecture of WMN, however paves way to malicious intruders. An attacker can raise several security concerns, like rogue routers, selfishness, and denial-of-service attacks. Unfortunately, current thrust of research in WMNs, is primarily focused on developing multi-path routing protocols; and security is very much in its infancy. Owing to the hierarchical architecture of WMNs, security issues are multi-dimensional. As mesh routers form the backbone of the network, it is critical to secure them from various attacks. In this dissertation we develop integrated security architecture to protect the mesh backbone. It is important to provide an end-to-end security for mesh clients and hence we design a novel authentication protocol for mutually authenticating mesh clients and mesh routers. The aim of this dissertation is to explore various issues that affect the performance and security of WMNs. We first examine the threat of an active attack like Denial of service attack on MRs and design a cache based throttle mechanism to control it. Next, we develop a MAC identifier based trace table to determine the precise source of a DoS attacker. We then evaluate the vulnerability of WMNs to passive attacks, like selfishness and propose an adaptive mechanism to penalize selfish MRs that discretely drop other’s packets. In order to handle route disruption attacks like malicious route discovery, we design an intelligent Intrusion Detection System. Through extensive simulations, we evaluate effectiveness of our proposed solutions in mitigating these attacks. Finally, we design a light weight authentication protocol for mesh clients using inexpensive hash operations that enables authentication of important control messages and also performs auto-refresh of authentication tokens.

Committee:

Dr. Dharma Agrawal (Advisor)

Keywords:

Wireless mesh networks,; Networks attack in mesh networks,; Selfishness in mesh networks,; Security in mesh networks,; mutual authentication protocol for mesh clients,

Zhang, QianComparing Duplexing, Multiplexing, and Multiple Access Techniques in Ad Hoc Networks
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2013, Electrical Engineering (Engineering and Technology)
Wireless ad-hoc networks have seen much attention in recent years, and are still a topic of much interest, especially as a result of an increasing need for ubiquitous connectivity. Ad-hoc networks have applications in tactical military systems as well as in commercial systems because of the numerous benefits they offer. There are still a number of open research questions regarding these networks, and this dissertation work addresses the question of which duplexing, multiplexing, and multiple access (D/M/MA) techniques are preferable in ad hoc networks. These techniques have substantial impact on network performance, yet surprisingly this particular topic has seen little attention. Moreover, most of the existing literature is focused on higher layers such as medium access control (MAC) and network layers, while our work concentrates on the physical (PHY) layer, which plays an important and fundamental role in network design. In this dissertation, we investigate D/M/MA techniques in ad-hoc networks and more generally, how to allocate time/frequency resources to achieve better network performance. We provide a comparison of time, frequency, and time-frequency schemes in terms of a number of features, including duty cycles, required data rate per transmission, required transmit power per link, throughput, relative range and capacity. To keep the analyses tractable, topologies we study are full mesh networks, relay networks, and several special cases of ad-hoc networks. The main results show that for a peak power constraint, in terms of data rate, range, or capacity, continuous single-carrier waveforms are superior to bursted multi-carrier waveforms, and these schemes are attained with appropriate application of “hybrid” time-frequency division. Latency and throughput simulation results are provided for mesh networks, and analytical signal-to-noise-plus-interference ratio, multi-hop gain and simulation results for relay networks are also presented, to support our theoretically-based claims and aid in the network design.

Committee:

Jeffrey Dill (Committee Chair); David Matolak (Advisor); Chris Bartone (Committee Member); Bryan Riley (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

Wireless ad hoc networks; multi-hop relay; mesh networks; resource allocation; multiple access

NANDIRAJU, NAGESH SA CROSS-LAYERED APPROACH FOR ACHIEVING FAIRNESS IN MULTIHOP WIRELESS MESH NETWORKS
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2007, Engineering : Computer Science and Engineering
Ubiquitous broadband internet coverage using WLANs has not been considered a viable option until recently. As WLANs have been originally designed to provide the last mile extension for wired networks, they typically require extensive wired infrastructure to access the backhaul network. Provisioning such extensive infrastructure is expensive and often time consuming. Moreover it may not be feasible to lay infrastructure at all locations. Thus, an ideal ubiquitous broadband coverage is a dream yet to become reality. With the increasing popularity and rising demand for more public Wi-Fi hotspots, network service providers are facing a daunting task due to limited availability of bandwidth and error-prone wireless medium. Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) offer an easy and economically viable alternative for providing broadband wireless internet connectivity. They are based on the multihop communication paradigms that dynamically form a connected network. However, its progress is hindered by many limitations of the multihop wireless communication such as restricted throughput, unfairness in forwarding and limited capacity. These limitations are primarily due to lack of efficient media access and routing protocols. Although, the widely deployed IEEE 802.11 standard for medium access supports multihop communication, it leads to myriad problems and its suitability for large scale networks is debatable. Even in a typical WLAN scenario, the 802.11’s DCF fails to provide fair services to uplink and downlink flows. We have conducted many experiments to demonstrate that using DCF in multihop networks leads to very unfair throughput distribution among the nodes. In this dissertation, we present novel algorithms to solve some of these problems and find that the proposed solutions are effective in mitigating the unfairness. In particular, we proposed implicit ACK based Bidirectional DCF to solve the unfairness in single hop networks and then designed two buffer management algorithms which effectively maintain fairness in a multihop WMN.

Committee:

Dr. Dharma Agrawal (Advisor)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

wireless mesh networks; multihop networks; queue management; DCF

Prakash, AbhinavRendering Secured Connectivity in a Wireless IoT Mesh Network with WPAN's and VANET's
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2017, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Science and Engineering
A ubiquitous pervasive network incorporates today’s Internet of Things/Internet of Everything Paradigm: Everything becomes smart with at least one microprocessor and a network interface. All these are under an umbrella of IoT/IoE paradigm where everything is network capable and connected. In most of the cases, these devices have multiple microprocessors and network interfaces at their disposal. In such a scenario, bringing every application to specific network on the same platform is critical, specifically for Sensor Networks, Cloud, WPANs and VANETs. While, enforcing and satisfying the requirements of CIA triad with non-repudiation universally is critical as this can solve multiple existing problems of ISM band exhaustion, leading to excessive collisions and contentions. Cooperative Interoperability also enables universal availability of data across all platforms which can be reliable and fully synchronized. Plug and play universal usability can be delivered. Such a network necessitates robust security and privacy protocols, spanning uniformly across all platforms. Once, reliable data access is made available, it leads to an accurate situation aware decision modeling. Simultaneous multiple channel usage can be exploited to maximize bandwidth otherwise unused. Optimizing Content delivery in hybrid mode which will be the major chunk of network traffic as predicted for near future of IoE. Now, such a proposed hybrid network does sound very complicated and hard to establish and maintain. However, this is the future of networks with huge leaps of technological advancement and ever dropping prices of hardware coupled with immensely improved capabilities, such a hybrid ubiquitous network can be designed and deployed in a realistic scenario. In this work, we go through not only looking into the issues of the large scale hybrid WMN, but also minutely discovering every possible scenario of direct mesh clients or sub-nets (VANET, Cloud or BAN) associated to it. Further, we propose to design and implement a robust all around security and privacy for each and every possible unit of such a large network. Special focus is provided to the application of a BAN in medical usage with intricate details is provided in form of our recent endeavor, along with an ongoing work for a wearable device patent, Smart Shoe (Patent Pending). The concepts explained with this example are equally applicable to any such Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPAN’s).

Committee:

Dharma Agrawal, D.Sc. (Committee Chair); Richard Beck, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Yizong Cheng, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Rashmi Jha, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Wen-Ben Jone, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Marepalli Rao, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

IoT;Mesh Networks;Security;Ubiquitous Networks;Vehicular Networks;Cryptography

Gaur, AmitSecured Communication in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) and Authentic Associations in Wireless Mesh Networks
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Science
Wireless sensors are low power devices with small transmission range, restricted computation power, limited amount of memory and with portable power supply. Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is a collection of such sensors where the number of sensors can vary from few hundreds to thousands. Performing secure pair-wise communication between sensors is a really difficult task due to inherent characteristics such as lack of any fixed infrastructure. As memory and power consumption are most stringent requirements for these devices, use of conventional techniques for secured communication are totally out of question. This thesis introduces scheme that enables a complete pair-wise secure connectivity between any two adjacent sensor nodes in spite of using small key ring (KR) for sensors. The Proposed Scheme (ELKPD) doesn't require any additional hardware while providing keys to the sensors irrespective of their location. Also, proposed scheme is easily scalable which allows enables addition of sensor nodes without any computational or hardware overheads. Due to the varying degree of mobility of Mesh Clients has provided much more flexibility in Wireless Mesh Networks. And establishing an Authentic Association among entities is a non -trivial problem. In this thesis, we introduce a Polynomial Based scheme which not only provides high pair-wise connectivity, low communication and storage overhead and high scalability but also makes on the fly Authentic Association feasible. The proposed scheme is also observed to be resilient against both the traffic analysis and the node capture attacks.

Committee:

Dharma Agrawal, DSc (Committee Chair); Raj Bhatnagar, PhD (Committee Member); Carla Purdy, C, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

security;wireless sensor networks;key-predistribution;wireless mesh networks;bi-variate polynomials

He, BingArchitecture Design and Performance Optimization of Wireless Mesh Networks
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Engineering : Computer Science and Engineering

Wireless Mesh Network (WMN) is a promising wireless technology in providing high-bandwidth Internet access over a specific coverage area, with relative lower investment cost as compared to traditional access network. In a WMN, a mobile client (MC) can access the Internet through a wireless backbone formed by wireless Mesh Routers (MRs) which are interconnected in a multi-hop fashion while some MRs known as Internet Gateways (IGWs) act as the communication bridges between the wireless backbone and the Internet. The design of the network architecture is a fundamental issue for a WMN and is critical in determining the network performance and providing Quality of Service (QoS) for end users, and thus should be addressed carefully.

A unique characteristic of a WMN is the IGW oriented Internet traffic. Thus, the deployment of IGW is the key problem in the network design, and is investigated in this dissertation. Two IGW oriented network architecture are analyzed, and corresponding QoS requirements and constraints are evaluated. The IGW deployment problem is then formulated as a multiple objectives optimization problem. Besides the linear program approach, some heuristic algorithms are proposed and evaluated. Extensive simulations show the effectiveness of proposed solutions.

To improve the performance of a given WMN, load balancing between different IGW domains is also investigated. A fairness between IGWs domains improves the network performance and provides a better QoS for end users. The fairness index is defined for both homogenous and heterogeneous WMNs. A distributed load balancing scheme is proposed, and three load balancing algorithms based on diffusion methodology are introduced in the proposed scheme.

Authenticated key establishment (AKE) schemes enable two entities (e.g., a client and a server) to share common communication keys in an authentic way. Due to mobility of mesh clients (MCs), a WMN needs have a fast and efficient authentication and key establishment scheme to provide adequate security in client's handoff while meeting the Quality of Service (QoS) requirements. In this dissertation, we discuss the authentication performance requirements imposed by the unique WMN characteristics. Distributed authenticated key establishment schemes are proposed based on hierarchical multi-variable symmetric functions (HMSF) and identity-based cryptography (IBC) respectively, which enable fast key agreement and mutual authentication between network entities in a WMN. In the distributed authenticated key establishment scheme, network entities in a WMN such as MCs and mesh access points (e.g. mesh routers) can authenticate each other and establish pairwise communication keys without any interaction from a centralized authentication center, while substantially reducing the communication overhead and the authentication delay.

Committee:

Dharma Agrawal, DSc (Committee Chair); Kenneth Berman, PhD (Committee Member); Chia Han, PhD (Committee Member); Kelly Cohen, PhD (Committee Member); Ernest Hall, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Wireless Mesh Networks;Internet Gateway;Load Balancing;Authenticated Key Establishment;Symmetric Polynomial;Identity-based Cryptography

Kripakaran, RamakrishnanEffective Strategies for Mesh Router Selection in Wireless Mesh Networks
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Engineering : Computer Science
Wireless Mesh Network (WMN) is a developing technology which envisions a wireless backbone architecture (in place of the existing wired) to aid in providing internet connectivity to users at the residential and commercial level. In a WMN, the density of Mesh Clients (MCs) and the rate of traffic generated from each client are not uniformly distributed. Also, the traffic routes from a Mesh Router (MR) to the Internet GateWay (IGW) are multi-hop and multi-path in nature. Due to these factors, each MR has a different performance. For large scale WMN, maintaining such information about each MR in a centralized manner is not a practical and scalable solution. In addition, when new MCs enter the WMN they have little or no information about the performance of MRs. With scarce information, it is difficult for a MC to select a MR which can provide the best service. Therefore, MCs must directly request each MR in its vicinity to obtain information that can help make this decision. Since MCs have the freedom to select a MR of their choice, examining all nearby MR increases the chance of selecting a better MR suited for their application. However, often a MC has limited time available for selecting the MR. We propose three strategies that a MC can implement in making the selection of the MR - opportunistic, conservative and calculatingly-opportunistic. We study the performance of these strategies theoretically and statistically. We obtain the closed form solution for the conservative strategy which proves to be the best of the three strategies. We also identify the network parameter that can be used to rank the performance of an MR. We perform extensive network simulations to evaluate the performance of the strategies with various network configurations.

Committee:

Dharma Agrawal, DSc (Committee Chair); Fred Annexstein, PhD (Committee Member); Chia Han, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Wireless Mesh Networks

Prakash, AbhinavAnonymous and Secure Communication in a Wireless Mesh Network
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Science

With the rapid advancement of different types of wireless technologies the problem arose of combining them together to provide improved bandwidth and enhanced throughput. The answer came out in the form of a Wireless Mesh Network (WMN). A typical WMN is made up of mesh routers and mesh clients where mesh routers have somewhat limited mobility and they form the backbone of the network whereas mesh clients are allowed to be highly mobile or completely stationary or somewhere in between. This forms a very versatile network which allows clients with different levels of mobility, interface and bandwidth requirements to be a part of the same network. The communication can be achieved by directly communicating with the router by being in its range or in an ad hoc fashion through several hops. A WMN is mainly designed to be self-configured and self-adjusting dynamically. This ensures large network coverage with minimum infrastructure requirements, hence low cost. Although a WMN gives multifold advantages it is also vulnerable to several security and privacy threats being a dynamic open medium. Different types of clients such as laptops, cell phones, smart devices can join or leave the network anytime they wish. This opens up issues like fake registrations and packet sniffing.

This work deals with the issues of security and privacy separately in two parts in great detail by simulating countermeasures for different kinds of attacks in a WMN. The first part mainly deals with creating a perfectly secure network for safe communication by using a bi-variate polynomial scheme for low overheads instead of a public-private key mechanism. The second part deals with making any communication in the network anonymous by hiding the node initiating the session by using redundancy at the cost of some associated overheads.

Committee:

Dharma Agrawal, DSc (Committee Chair); Yizong Cheng, PhD (Committee Member); Chia Han, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Mesh Networks; Security; Onion Routing; Bivariate Polynomial Function; Backbone; Hybrid Networks

Prathapani, AnooshaIntelligent Honeypot Agents for Detection of Blackhole Attack in Wireless Mesh Networks
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Engineering and Applied Science: Electrical Engineering

A Wireless Mesh Network (WMN) is a promising means to provide low-cost broadband Internet access. The routing protocols naively assume all nodes in the network to be non-malicious. The open architecture of WMN, multi-hop nature of communication, different management styles, and wireless communication paves way for malicious attackers. The attackers can exploit hidden loopholes in the multipath mesh routing protocol to conduct a suction attack called a “blackhole attack”. The attacker can falsify routing metric such as hop count, shorten transmission time to reach any destination and thereby suck the network traffic.

We propose a novel strategy by employing mobile honeypot agents that utilize their topological knowledge and detect such spurious route advertisements. They are deployed as roaming software agents that tour the network and lure attackers by sending Route Request (RREQ) advertisements. We first examine the threat of an active Blackhole attack, and then, using our intelligent Honeypot mechanism, we try to control it. We collect valuable information on attacker’s strategy from the intrusion logs gathered at the honeypot. We finally evaluate the effectiveness of proposed architecture using simulation in ns-2 for random topology and grid topology. The performance of the proposed detection approach has shown the encouraging results. The performance of the proposed detection scheme is shown to be increased by 80% for grid topology and 77% for random topology.

Committee:

Dharma Agrawal, DSc (Committee Chair); Carla Purdy, PhD (Committee Member); Wen Ben Jone, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Electrical Engineering

Keywords:

AODV; BLACKHOLE; HONEYPOTS; MALICIOUS; SPOOFED; WIRELESS MESH NETWORKS

Drabu, YasirGateway Placement And Fault Tolerance In QoS Aware Wireless Mesh Networks
PHD, Kent State University, 2010, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Computer Science
Wireless Mesh Networks (WMN's), in the form of WiFi (802.11x) or WiMax (802.16x), or their integrations have been proposed as an effective communication alternative for ubiquitous last mile wireless broadband access. They can be viewed as a hybrid between traditional cellular, point-to-point wireless systems, and ad-hoc networks. They offer more flexibility, mobility, coverage and expandability compared to their traditional counterparts at the expense of complex architecture and deployment structure. Though WMNs hold great promise in abetting network ubiquity, there still remain several challenges in the design and development of WMN's to support diverse services with different quality of service (QoS) requirements and large scale deployment. The focus of this dissertation is to address some of the core issues that directly affect the QoS in terms of delay, throughput, and fault tolerance. First we look at the deployment problem of the placement of wired gateways. This aspect of WMNs has a significant impact on the network's throughput performance, cost and capacity to satisfying the quality of service requirements. In the context of gateway placement, the QoS is influenced by the number of gateways, the number of nodes served by each gateway, the location of the gateways, and the relay load on each wireless router. While finding an optimal solution to simultaneously satisfy all the above constraints is known to be an NP-hard problem, near optimal solutions can be found within the feasibility region in polynomial time using various heuristic methods. In the initial part of this dissertation, we first present a near optimal heuristics algorithm for gateway placement that facilitates QoS provisioning and fault tolerance in WMNs. We then investigate fault tolerance and recovery problems in WMNs. We present a fault recovery algorithm that can exploit the known geometry of a regular cellular mesh network. While keeping the QoS metrics intact, we consider a post-deployment fault recovery algorithm and pre-deployment fault tolerance planning.

Committee:

Hassan Peyravi, PhD (Advisor); Javed Khan, PhD (Committee Member); Feador Dragan, PhD (Committee Member); Kazim Khan, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

wireless mesh networks; deployment algorithms; fault tolerant provisioning

Joshi, SaugatFast and Efficient Mutual Authentication in Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs)
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Science

Through the evolvement of high speed internet, Wireless mesh networks (WMNs) have become one of the most exciting and promising technology for providing high bandwidth features to its users. Along with the advancement of internet, the demand for enhanced capacity and higher bandwidth requirement have strived over time to meet the requirements of the Quality of Service (QoS) in WMNs. Various factors do affect the desired Qos for WMNs. In this thesis, we focus on the key generation scheme for authentication between various entities of the network to establish a secure communication between them, while taking into consideration the QoS requirements set by the benchmark. The key generation scheme discussed here is decentralized and hierarchal in nature which enables a pair of entity (e.g., servers and clients) to share a common key for a secure communication. Moreover, the scheme addresses the issue of the high speed mobility of the clients stations (STAs) from one domain to another domain, i.e. handoff between various inter- domain and intra- domain Access Points (APs). It is necessary that the STAs do not require excessive overhead during the handoff procedure. The schemes discussed enables faster and secure key generation and agreement scheme between the entities of the network during the handoff procedure.

The key generation scheme is distributed in nature. The higher level hierarchy namely the Internet Gateways (IGWs) or the authentication, authorization and accounting (AAA) servers such as RADIUS, generate a multi variate symmetric polynomial function and exchange the information among them such that none of them have a complete knowledge of the entire generated function. As the functions are passed to the lower level hierarchical entities such as Mesh access points (MAPs), the function further reduces providing only legitimate information to them. The process continues until the lowest level of the hierarchy (STAs or clients) is reached where the entities will be able to deduce a secure key for the communication. We refer to this as a distributed mechanism or a distributed authenticated key establishment (AKE) scheme based on hierarchal multi-variable symmetric functions (HMSF). Since, the deduced key is obtained from distributed scheme and below various levels none of the entities have a complete knowledge to reverse engineer the original function used in the generation process. Using the distributed authenticated key establishment scheme the STAs and MAPs could authenticate among themselves without any assistance from the higher hierarchy entities, thus saving the communication overhead time and the delay involved in authentication by getting back to the servers hence maintaining the required QoS.

Committee:

Dharma Agrawal, DSc (Committee Chair); Raj Bhatnagar, PhD (Committee Member); Yizong Cheng, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Wireless Mesh Networks;Authentication;symmetric;polynomial;handoff;security

Fu, WeihuangAnalytical Model for Capacity and Delay Optimization in Wireless Mesh Networks
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Science and Engineering

Motivated by ubiquitous communication, both wireless network theory and technology have vigorously developed in the past decades that could support broadband wireless access (BWA), and the current trend continues to replace wired network backbone. Conventional network access is served by network infrastructure, which is deployed at fixed locations and acts as "bridge", i.e., gateway, between wired backbone and mobile clients (MCs) with equipped wired-interface and air-interface. Infrastructures have to be placed at the locations where cables available, including network and power cables, which poses strong constraints on deployment locations, and high cost in cable deployment and maintenance.

Wireless mesh networks (WMNs) are comprised of multi-radio mesh routers (MRs), which interconnect each other using wireless links to form a mesh backbone. This also forms a multi-cell architecture to provide network service for MCs, where Internet gateways (IGWs) are special MRs having wired connection to the Internet. The deployment of MRs is flexible, cost-efficient, self-organizing, etc. Mobile MRs even form a mobile mesh backbone. Due to its advantages, WMN could be one of the promising case of the next generation Internet. However, developing such a network also needs to address many fundamental issues inherited from two-tier network architecture, wireless multi-hop transmission, multi-cell structure, etc.

In this dissertation, we analytically model a two-tier WMN and derive the asymptotic bounds of network capacity and delay, which are essential and tightly related factors in developing a WMN to support delay-sensitive applications such as voice over IP (VoIP), video conference, etc. This dissertation performs the analysis on a WMN backbone formed by self-organizing ad hoc MRs and shows how the network capacity is dominated by the network delay constraints, and the numbers of MCs, MRs and IGWs. We find that the network delay scales to either the number of MRs or the number of IGWs, and dominating factors depends on the type of routing strategy. Some of our results are also applicable to ad hoc networks, which can be equivalent to special case of a self-organizing WMN.

We optimize the backbone capacity by introducing two types of channel assignment schemes in managing spectrum resource and mitigating backbone interference. One is a centralized channel assignment scheme, which is suitable to WMNs deployed by Internet service providers (ISPs), and the other is a distributed channel assignment scheme, which applies to static or mobile self-organizing WMN. In addition, we propose a clustering based fractional frequency reuse for multi-cell coverage of WMNs, which offers resource allocation higher flexibility and better fairness with additional spatial dimension. Our work is to analyze and solve the fundamental problems in developing WMNs for ubiquitous and pervasive access. The results in our dissertation can serve as the guideline in research and design of practical WMNs. We conclude with dissertation with some discussion on future area of research.

Committee:

Dharma Agrawal, DSc (Committee Chair); Chia Han, PhD (Committee Member); Prabir Bhattacharya, PhD (Committee Member); Kenneth Berman, PhD (Committee Member); Wen Ben Jone, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Channel Assignment;Interference Mitigation;Multi-channel and Multi-radio;Multi-hop;Resource Management;Wireless Mesh Networks