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Adingra, EugeneLa pertinence de Ia foi de Marie dans les textes de l'Eglise les plus anciens (Ecritures) et les plus recents (Lumen Gentium et le Magistere depuis le Concile Vatican II).
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 2009, International Marian Research Institute
No abstract.

Committee:

Francois Rossier, S.M. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Vatican Council II; Lumen Gentium; Immaculate Heart of Mary

Tulanowski, Elaine G.The iconography of the assumption of the Virgin in Italian paintings : 1480-1580 /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1986, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Keywords:

Mary;Mary;Painting

Tibbetts, James J.The historical development of biblical Mariology pre- and post-Vatican II (1943-1986 American Mariology)
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 1995, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, Biblical teaching; Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, History of Doctrines, 20th century; Vatican Council 2nd 1962-1965; Vatican II

O'Cinnsealaigh , Benedict D.The Marian theology of Adam of Dryburgh
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 2002, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, Theology; Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, Sermons; Adam, Scotus, 1130-1212

Campbell, DwightThe Historical Development and Theological Foundations of Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Relation to the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2010, IMRI Theology
This dissertation of 694 pages (including appendices and bibliography) draws its inspiration from a Sept. 22, 1986 address of Pope John Paul II to theologians gathered at Fatima, Portugal for a conference on the Alliance of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary, in which he urged them to “reflect upon devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary in the perspective of Sacred Scripture and Tradition, while at the same time concentrating on the intimate link that unites the hearts of Jesus and his Mother.” With these words Pope John Paul sets forth two important principles: 1) that the truth about Mary’s Heart, as well as the union or alliance of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary, is revealed in Scripture and Tradition; and 2) that devotion to Mary and her Heart must always be viewed in relation to Jesus and His Heart.This dissertation consists of two major parts. Part One, which makes up the bulk of the work, traces the historical development of both doctrine and devotion concerning the Immaculate Heart of Mary in relation to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, in light of Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition. The purpose of this historical survey is to demonstrate how over the centuries both doctrine and devotion pertaining to Mary’s Heart has made progress alongside the developing doctrine and devotion concerning the Heart of Jesus. After a brief discussion of the anthropological, biblical and Patristic foundations of the development, the survey continues tracing this same development throughout the medieval, modern and contemporary periods with various chapters dividing each of the major periods. The historical survey makes evident that the development of the doctrine concerning the two Hearts in Tradition over the centuries – as seen in the writings of the Fathers, saints and spiritual authors, in papal teachings and in the liturgy – provides a solid foundation for the devotion which developed towards the Hearts of Jesus and Mary, largely independent of private revelation. However, the survey also demonstrates the impact of private revelations – especially those granted to medieval mystics like St. Gertrude, Mechtilde of Magdeburg and St. Bridget of Sweden, and later apparitions granted to St. Margaret Mary and to the Fatima seers – on the development of doctrine and popular devotion, as well as the influence of these revelations on the development of the liturgical cultus of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary. Part Two sets forth the theological foundations for devotion to Mary’s Immaculate Heart, again in relation to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. It contains four chapters: (1) devotion to Our Lady’s Heart in the context of Marian devotion in general, wherein are treated the material and formal objects of Marian Heart devotion along with its purpose or end in relation to devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus; (2) an analysis of the findings in the historical survey and an evaluation of the impact of key factors (heavenly communications, the papal Magisterium, schools of spirituality, etc.) that contributed to the development of doctrine and devotion concerning Our Lady’s Heart and the union between the Hearts of Jesus and Mary; (3) the theological foundations for Marian Heart devotion; specifically, the doctrinal principles which should be reflected in authentic devotion to Our Lady’s Heart: anthropological, biblical, Trinitarian, Christological, pneumatological, ecclesiological, Mariological and liturgical; and (4) theological foundations for Marian Heart devotional practices of consecration and reparation in relation to consecration and reparation to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. This final chapter offers suggestions to renew devotion to Our Lady’s Immaculate Heart and to the united Hearts of Jesus and Mary in the lives of the faithful.

Committee:

Johann Roten, PhD STD (Committee Chair); Bertrand Buby, STD (Committee Member); Robert Hughes, PhD (Committee Member); Francois Rossier, STD (Committee Member); Thomas Thompson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Bible; History; Theology

Keywords:

Alliance of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary; Anthropology; Christology; Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary; Doctrine; Ecclesiology; Tradition

Beemer, Cristy Ann“Usurping Authority in the Midst of Men”: Mirrors of Female Ruling Rhetoric in the Sixteenth Century
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2008, Composition and rhetoric

In this project, I seek to reclaim the British Isles' sixteenth-century queens Lady Jane Grey, Mary I, Elizabeth I, and Mary, Queen of Scots as public rhetors and as teachers of rhetorical strategy through an analysis firmly based in Aristotelian and Ciceronian rhetoric. Prepared for rule by the same texts that guided male monarchs, yet lacking a history of female rule, reigning women adapted classical rhetorical strategies to establish authority. The rhetorical artifacts of these women leaders comprise a unique collection of powerful, political, and public performances by women who reigned over a male-dominated governance in which most women were silenced.

With the sudden succession of several female queens, a new mirror of female rule was created in their rhetorical acts. Specifically, this dissertation analyzes the way these women reflected and resisted male strategies of rhetorical authority. The metaphorical and material mirror, which arrived as a commonplace and inexpensive item in the early 1500s, and brought with it the mirror-of-princes genre that provided an image of male rule, frames a community of women who mirrored one another's rhetorical strategies. Finally, I argue that this community provides a legacy of women's rhetoric for political women leaders today.

Committee:

Katharine Ronald, PhD (Committee Chair); Katharine Gillespie, PhD (Committee Member); Cynthia Lewiecki-Wilson, PhD (Committee Member); Renee Baernstein, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Rhetoric

Keywords:

women's rhetoric; sixteenth-century; rhetoric; rhetorical analysis; revisionist historiography; Tudor; Queen Elizabeth; Mary, Queen of Scots; Lady Jane Grey; Mary Tudor; kairos; apophasis

Ogden, Jenna NoelleThe Leprous Christ and the Christ-like Leper: The Leprous Body as an Intermediary to the Body of Christ in Late Medieval Art and Society
Master of Arts in History, Cleveland State University, 2011, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
I will argue that the leprous body was an intermediary to the body of Christ in the minds of late medieval viewers. They could utilize this accessible body as a tool to cultivate a closer relationship with Christ. I will explore imagery of Christ and lepers created in England, Flanders, France, Germany, and Italy from 1300 through 1500 to demonstrate my argument. I will compare representations of the Flagellation of Christ and Christ as the Man of Sorrows to images of Christ healing lepers in order to show that the leprous body could be understood as a substitute for the body of the Crucified. The visual similarities of spots on the skin and bent fragmented bodies establish the conflation of these two body types. I argue that the leprous body was like the stigmaticized body because both used physical pain to facilitate a closer relationship with Christ. An analysis of images of the Stigmatization of Saint Francis and those of lepers will show that late medieval viewers could imagine reenacting the Crucifixion themselves to gain access to the body of Christ. In addition, I will analyze imagery of the Raising of Lazarus, the Deposition of Christ, and the Pieta in order to argue that late medieval viewers could reenact the Pieta with the leprous body as well to cultivate an intimate relationship with Christ based on compassion. As a result, I will demonstrate that lepers were essential members of the late medieval community as opposed to outcasts because they offered a body onto which late medieval people could project their empathy for the Crucified on a daily basis.

Committee:

Marian Bleeke, PhD (Committee Chair); Kathy Curnow, PhD (Committee Member); Stella Singer, PhD (Committee Member); Laura Wertheimer, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art Criticism; Art History; European History; European Studies; Fine Arts; History; Medieval History; Medieval Literature; Middle Ages; Religious History; Spirituality

Keywords:

leper; leprosy; Christ; Saint Francis; Virgin Mary; compassion; Man of Sorrows; stigmata; wounds; Crucifixion; flagellation; stigmatization; deposition of Christ; Pieta; blood

Moody, Kathryn IreneLexicons in Lace: The Language of Dress in the New Woman Novel
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2011, English

Historically, dress has served as a kind of shorthand for expressing information about characters, particularly female characters, in British literature. I assert that there is a language of dress at work in the New Woman novel, and this dissertation is an endeavor to interpret four components of that language: Aesthetic dress, the tea gown, the tailor-made gown, and rational dress.

Through analysis of Vernon Lee’s Miss Brown, Sarah Grand’s The Heavenly Twins, and Mary Ward’s Marcella, I argue that to dress a woman Aesthetically was often to denote her desire for women’s liberation along with her own. As painters dressed female models Aesthetically, so Aesthetically dressed characters found themselves “painted” into particular roles. Through readings of Netta Syrett’s The Day’s Journey, John Strange Winter’s A Blameless Woman, and Violet Hunt’s The Human Interest and A Hard Woman, I show that to dress a character in a tea gown was to demonstrate her desire for intimacy. New Women heroines often wear tea gowns in situations not considered socially appropriate. Such fashion statements demonstrate a desire to expand societal notions of “respectable” intimacy; one example of this is the association of the tea gown with maternity. Through interpretations of Rita’s A Jilt’s Journal, George Moore’s Evelyn Innes and Sister Teresa, Ella Hepworth Dixon’s The Story of a Modern Woman, and Beatrice Whitby’s Mary Fenwick’s Daughter, I show how the tailor-made represents a desire for solidarity with other New Woman, and a tendency to seek maternal guidance from one’s peers rather than from one’s mother. Finally, some fictional New Woman heroines appear in trousers, or rational dress. These costumes appear only rarely in fiction as they appeared rarely in life, due to social stigma which associated women in pants with actresses and prostitutes. Such fiction represents an attempt to revise the language of dress by presenting rationally dressed New Women as particularly honest, while depicting other characters as mendacious. I support this assertion through readings of H. G. Wells’ The Wheels of Chance, Rhoda Broughton’s Scylla or Charybdis?, George Paston’s The Career of Candida, and Elizabeth Burgoyne Corbett’s New Amazonia.

Committee:

William Siebebschuh, PhD (Committee Chair); Kurt Koenigsberger, PhD (Committee Member); Kenny Fountain, PhD (Committee Member); Mary Davis, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Literature

Keywords:

new woman; dress; aesthetic; Victorian; Sarah Grand; Mary Ward; Violet Hunt; Vernon Lee; George Moore; John Strange Winter; PreRaphaelite; Iota; Rita

Colatosti, Jennifer M.Geneaology
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2008, English (Arts and Sciences)
Genealogy is a collection of stories focusing on family relationships. The critical introduction explores the ways in which the familial connection influences characters’ sense of identity in this collection and in the work of Fred Chappell and Mary Hood.

Committee:

Joan Connor (Committee Chair); Candace Stewart (Committee Member); Dinty Moore (Committee Member)

Subjects:

English literature

Keywords:

genealogy; family relationship; familial connection; identity; Fred Chappell; Mary Hood

Gunderson, Maryann S.Dismissed yet Disarming: The Portrait Miniature Revival, 1890-1930
Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Ohio University, 2003, Art History (Fine Arts)

The portrait miniature revival is examined regarding contemporary influences and artists, during the period c. 1890-1930. Modern influences, including the philosophies of Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau, are defined in context of the miniature. The fine arts of John Singer Sargent’s portraiture, as well as the abstraction and color of Mary Cassatt and Edgar Degas, are revealed as instrumental in altering the style of the revival miniature. Photography is examined for its influence versus eclipse of the miniature. The miniaturist’s environment is found to be highly significant, as the city of New York provided constant immersion in art societies, exhibitions, and studio residences where artists coexisted while creating new styles. Focus is on the works of miniaturists Eulabee Dix and Laura Coombs Hills. Patronage is found to be highly supportive of the portrait miniature and essential to an understanding of why the miniature was revived during the period.

Committee:

Jody Lamb (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Portrait Miniature; John Singer Sargent; Mary Cassatt; Revival; American Society of Miniature Painters; Women Artists

Rashid, Timeka L.Leading by Example: An Examination of Mary McLeod Bethune's Leadership as a College President
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2009, Higher Education (Education)

African American female college presidents represent a unique population within the leadership of higher education; however, their leadership, management styles and their contributions to higher education are understudied. A study of this population is particularly important for several reasons. First, it provides a framework for understanding the leadership potential and management style of African Americans in higher education. Second, it contributes to the limited knowledge base of African American women leaders in higher education from the early 19th and 20th centuries. Third, this research provides insight into an understudied aspect of Mary McLeod Bethune's life: her presidency of Bethune Cookman University.

This study is a historical analysis of Mary McLeod Bethune's leadership as a college president. It tests Jones' (1991) finding that African American female presidents exhibit the characteristics of transformational leadership. Jones' findings related to African American women presidents in early twentieth century society. The study explored Bethune's leadership in three major areas of her presidency: academic/curriculum, financial, and personnel management. The researcher sought to determine whether Bethune's leadership style reflected transformational or transactional leadership as defined by James MacGregor Burns, Bernard Bass, and Bruce Avolio. Avolio and Yammarino's four “I's,” and three factors of transactional leadership were used as the primary analytical framework for the interpretations of transformational or transactional leadership.

Committee:

Robert B. Young (Committee Chair); Peter Mather (Committee Member); Dafina Stewart (Committee Member); Tom Duncan (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

Mary McLeod Bethune; Black women presidents; history; higher education; leadership styles of Black women presidents

Stanbridge, Bryan ScottMAGNIFICAT, FOR MEZZO-SOPRANO AND CHAMBER ENSEMBLE
Master of Music (MM), Bowling Green State University, 2006, Music Composition
Magnificat for mezzo-soprano and chamber ensemble is a setting of the Canticle of Mary lasting approximately twelve minutes. It contains three main sections, surrounded by interludes, an introduction and coda. The work is scored for flute, B-flat clarinet, bassoon, C trumpet, trombone, two percussionists, violin, viola, violoncello, double bass and mezzo-soprano. The main sections contain text taken from Luke 1:46-55. The work's material emulates periods of music history from Gregorian chant through the contemporary time by using methods of texture, rhythm and orchestration rather than any reliance on harmonic or melodic style. The melodic lines are based on pitch-class sets. While the sets may combine to form scales, they were not used to imply functional harmony. The harmonies are mostly a byproduct of the linear aspects of the piece. The piece is rhythmically complex, with interior rhythms reflecting on the work's larger-scale formal structure.

Committee:

Elainie Lillios (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

magnificat; canticles of mary; chamber ensemble; mezzo-soprano

Stanford-Randle, Greer CharlotteThe Enigmatic "Cross-Over" Leadership Life of Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955)
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2017, Leadership and Change
The dissertation is a deep study of an iconic 20th century female, African American leader whose acclaim developed not only from her remarkable first generation post-Reconstruction Era beginnings, but also from her mid-century visibility among Negroes and some Whites as a principal spokesperson for her people. Mary Jane McLeod Bethune arose from the Nadir- the darkest period for Negroes after the Civil War and three subsequent US Constitutional Amendments. She led thousands of Negro women, despite social adversity, to organize around their own aspirations for improved social and material lives among America’s diverse citizens., i.e. “the melting pot.” The subject of no fewer than thirty-two dissertation studies, numerable biographies, innumerable awards, and namesake educational institutions, Bethune ascended to public leadership roles. Her renown of the first five decades of the 20th century is reconstructed to be less enigmatic for people of African descent, and more visible for other mainstream Americans. Remarkably, she employed a uniquely crafted philosophy of interactional destiny for the world’s “races” anchored in her brand of Christian evangelism. Bethune’s uniquely early feminist worldview and strategies for inter-racial cooperation, different than the worldviews of some of her contemporaries, achieved much social capital and opened doors of opportunity for herself and countless others through a brief federal government position, and organized women’s work before 1955. Since much of her meta-narrative was riddled with hagiography and myth, this study has fettered out some myths and eradicated some of the hagiography. The study combines primary sources, secondary sources, photo-ethnography, and hermeneutics to illuminate another pathway for future leadership students and organization developers to appropriate aspects of Bethune’s 20th century leadership performance as their own. Unintended to merely applaud Dr. Bethune’s leadership performance, this study is discourse anchored in the researcher’s belief and scholarship that leadership is both teachable and learnable. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, http://etd.ohiolink.edu

Committee:

Philomena Esssed, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Laura Morgan Roberts, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kevin McGruder, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; American History; Black History; Black Studies; Organizational Behavior; Social Structure; Spirituality; Womens Studies

Keywords:

African Americans; African American Studies; Black History; Leadership; Womens Studies; American History; Females; Race; Feminism; Photo-Ethnography; Hermeneutics; Mary McLeod Bethune; African American Women Leaders; Biography

Jack, John RobertSan Juan de Avila : Marian preacher
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 2015, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Thomas Thompson, S.M. (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Religious History; Theology

Keywords:

John of Avila, Sermons, Mary Blessed Virgin Saint

McGowin, Emily HunterAs for Me and My House: The Theology of the Family in the American Quiverfull Movement
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2015, Theology
Broadly speaking, this dissertation is a work of theological reflection within a specific context, bringing together history, ethnography, and theology to examine a form of evangelical lived religion in contemporary America. The particular situation I am exploring is the so-called “Quiverfull movement.” The Quiverfull movement is a growing subculture of American evangelicalism that has emerged over the past forty years within the networks of the Christian homeschooling movement. Quiverfull families have a very particular lived religion. They have an unlimited number of children (pronatalism), practice homeschooling exclusively, and advocate for “biblical patriarchy,” with very prescribed sex roles for men and women. Ultimately, they view their way of life as the most faithful embodiment of biblical teaching on the family, as well as the primary way that that Christians will win the culture war in America over the next few hundred years. This dissertation advances one primary thesis: Despite the apparent strangeness of their lived religion, the Quiverfull movement in America is both thoroughly evangelical and thoroughly American. Rather than offer a radical, counter-cultural vision for the Christian family, the Quiverfull movement presents a slightly modified version of something quite commonplace: a privatized, isolated nuclear family struggling (and often failing) to maintain their bonds to the broader community, the church, and other systems of support. As such, the Quiverfull movement serves as an illuminating case study of the weaknesses and blind spots of evangelical and American cultural conceptions of the family. Lacking a broader social vision or any sense of the church as an alternative society, Quiverfull families simply cannot be the radical agents for change that they desire. Instead, they re-inscribe the norms of American individualism and privatization but with a more thoroughly religious sheen. In the end, the problem is not that the Quiverfull movement is too radical but that it is not radical enough.

Committee:

Vincent Miller, Ph.D. (Advisor); William Trollinger, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jana Bennett, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Sandra Yocum, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Mary McClintock Fulkerson, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American History; Bible; Families and Family Life; Gender Studies; Religion; Religious History; Theology

Keywords:

Quiverfull; homeschooling; home education; evangelicalism; American evangelicals; pronatalism; anti-contraception; Voddie Baucham; Douglas Phillips; Duggar family; Mary Pride; Bill Gothard; family integrated church; lived religion; theology of the family

Buffer, ThomasThe mariological doctrine of Charles Journet (1891-1975): a survey
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 1998, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Johann Roten, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, Theology; Journet, Charles

Farley, Elizabeth MarieThe use of the wedding feast at Cana, John 2:1-11 by the Latin fathers in the development of Marian doctrine from the second to the eighth century
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 2011, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biblical Studies; Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint; Turning Water into Wine at the Wedding of Cana, miracle; history of doctrines; patristic; John 2, criticism and interpretation

Alson, JavierLa corredencion mariana: un estudio sistematico de los articulos sobre la corredencion en la revista "Estudios Marianos" desde el volumen I al volumen LXIV (1942-1998)
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.), University of Dayton, 2001, International Marian Research Institute
.

Committee:

Thomas Thompson, S.M. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint, Coredemption; Coredemptrix; Estudios Marianos; Sociedad Mariologica Espanola

LaPlant, Katie DesireeKatherine Chidley, Damaris Masham, and Mary Wollstonecraft: The Development of a Liberal Feminist Tradition
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2014, History
The main argument of this thesis is that, through an examination of the works of Katherine Chidley, Damaris Masham, and Mary Wollstonecraft, a tradition of liberal feminism emerges which advocated individuality and sociability. The foundation of this liberal feminist train of thought was spirituality. Women who helped to develop liberal feminism used their own religious beliefs to argue for spiritual equality, which thus allowed them to then use spiritual liberation to argue for the expansion of other liberties. I also maintain that each female author's arguments, which rested upon spirituality, individuality, and sociability furthered both the social and political cause of human liberty and individual freedom. Thus, the arguments made by Chidley, Masham, and Wollstonecraft contributed to the overall project of eighteenth century liberalism during the English Enlightenment.

Committee:

Beth Griech-Polelle, Associate Professor of History (Advisor); Douglas Forsyth, Associate Professor of History (Committee Member); Susan Shelangoskie, Associate Professor of English (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

Katherine Chidley, Damaris Masham, Mary Wollstonecraft, Liberalism, Feminism, British Enlightenment, Female Personhood,

Taylor, AstreaPhosphorus mass balance for hypertrophic Grand Lake St. Marys, Ohio
Master of Science (MS), Wright State University, 2012, Earth and Environmental Sciences

A phosphorus (P) budget was created for Grand Lake St Marys (GLSM), a hypertrophic lake in Ohio with a highly agricultural watershed. Inputs totaled 71,200 ± 8,400 kg P, with tributaries contributing the majority of P inputs at 60,100 ± 4,500 kg P (84%). Other inputs included benthic flux at 9% (internal loading), point-source discharges into streams at 5%, and atmospheric deposition at 1%. Rainfall in 2011 was greater than average, which may affect results when comparing this P budget to years with average rainfall. Transport of P by two rivers draining GLSM was approximately three times greater than benthic deposition.

Addition of alum to remedy internal loading in GLSM did not appear to inhibit benthic flux of P. Residence time of 113 days suggests the ability of the system to decrease P concentrations in lake water if inputs are significantly decreased by the implementation of best land management practices.

Committee:

Chad R. Hammerschmidt, PhD (Advisor); Amy J. Burgin, PhD (Committee Member); Geraldine Nogaro, PhD (Committee Member); David Dominic, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Agricultural Chemicals; Agriculture; Chemistry; Environmental Geology; Environmental Management; Environmental Science; Environmental Studies; Geochemistry; Water Resource Management

Keywords:

Phosphorus p mass balance budget eutrophic hypertrophic hypereutrophic lake Ohio Grand Lake St. Saint Marys Mary's agriculture alum residence time benthic flux

Kimball, Virginia M.LITURGICAL ILLUMINATIONS: DISCOVERING RECEIVED TRADITION IN THE EASTERN ORTHROS FOR FEASTS OF THE THEOTOKOS
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2010, IMRI Theology

Liturgical Illuminations: Discovering Received Tradition in the Eastern Orthros of Feasts of the Theotokos

This dissertation develops a method of discovering and theologically evaluating the ancient Christian tradition in the liturgical texts of the Eastern Orthodox Orthros (Morning Prayer) of Feasts of the Theotokos inspired by the recommendati0on of Pope John Paul II who urged the search for beauty and truth in the ancient liturgical texts. The study utilizes liturgical theology with a mariological perspective, built on the principle of “lex orandi, lex credendi” demonstrating that the words of prayer show the way of faith. Revelation is built on Holy Scripture and on Tradition; this thesis explores the wealth of the liturgical tradition in relationship to other sources of tradition.

The methodology of this dissertation is to look for the Received Tradition in the conceptual illuminations that the ancient liturgical texts provide. The methodology developed rests on the idea that there is a mysterium silentio abiding in Christian liturgy and that all aspects of tradition draw on this source of the mystery of faith. Each of the feasts of the Theotokos are examined for their context and their relationship to the cycle of time, the synaxarion (anonymous commentary in Orthros), history of the feast, related shrines, and devotional activities for each feast. Also, and importantly, the inter-relationship of the feasts with other sources is examined: iconography, biblical texts, apocryphal writings, patristic writing and conciliar documents. The hymns and prayers of each feast’s texts are studied in relationship to their translation and original authorship. As a conclusion, the study provides an analysis of all the theological illuminations identified and how they demonstrate the ancient tradition of Marian doctrines. In addition, the dissertation provides a specific method of properly describing these theological illuminations in the use of lex orandi by applying 12 principles to assure authenticity for the conclusions.

The methodology of the study is introduced in the Prologue. Justification for examining Orthros and a review of existing literature on applicable liturgical theology is found in Chapter One. Chapter Two provides an indepth examination of the Feasts of the Annunciation, Nativity, Synaxis of the Nativity, and Hypapante. Chapter Three studies the Feast of the Dormition. Chapter Four investigates the Feast of the Theotokos of the Life-Giving Fountain and Chapter Five covers the Feast of the Virgin of Protection at Blachernae. Conclusions, description of the overall Marian illuminations, and guidelines for valid use of the method are given in Chapter Six. Bibliography and extensive Endnotes are provided. 715 pp. Virginia M. Kimball

Committee:

Bertrand Buby, STD (Committee Chair); Johann Roten, STD (Committee Member); Thomas Thompson, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Bible; Religion; Theology

Keywords:

Blessed Virgin Mary; Eastern Orthodox Tradition; Liturgy; iconography; apocryphal writings; patristics; conciliar documents.

Peters, Danielle M.ECCE EDUCATRIX TUA: The Role of the Blessed Virgin Mary for a Pedagogy of Holiness in the Thought of John Paul II and Father Joseph Kentenich
Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), University of Dayton, 2008, IMRI Theology

The dissertation of 761 pages takes its bearing from the Apostolic Letter Novo millennio ineunte (NMI) in which John Paul II outlined the path the Church is to adopt in the newest epoch. At stake is the “necessity to rediscover the full practical significance of Chapter 5 of the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church Lumen Gentium, dedicated to the universal call to holiness (NMI 30). To meet this challenge, John Paul II stressed that a concrete “pedagogy of holiness” is required, which above all must include a “spiritual path” without which “external structures … will serve very little purpose (NMI 43).” The Polish Pontiff invited all ecclesial movements to present their original pedagogy of holiness (cf. NMI 31). The author of this dissertation responds to this challenge by highlighting the task of the Blessed Virgin Mary as educator in a pedagogy of holiness both in the teachings of John Paul II and of Father Joseph Kentenich, founder of the Schoenstatt Movement.

The dissertation consists of two parts with a concluding chapter comparing John Paul II’s considerations with those of Father Kentenich. Part I focuses on Pope John Paul II’s concept of holiness and the task of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the process of education towards human perfection. The topic is developed in six chapters: (1) Pope John Paul II’s notion of the Human Person’s call to Human Fulfillment and Holiness; (2) Wojtyla’s Philosophical Anthropology in “The Acting Person;” (3) the Pope’s Theological Anthropology; (4) his concept of Holiness; (5) his Marian Teaching and (6) John Paul II’s Contribution to a Pedagogy of Holiness. Part II concentrates on Father Joseph Kentenich’ quest for the New Person called to holiness. Parallel to part I the topic is structured in six chapters: (1) Father J. Kentenich as a Pioneer of a Pedagogy of Sanctity; (2) his Theological Anthropology in view of his Pedagogy of Holiness; (3) his Concept of Holiness; (4) his Mariology; (5) his notion of Mary as Educator and (6) Mary as Educator of Holiness in the Schoenstatt Tradition.

The final chapter highlights in 3 steps the commonalities and distinctive accents of Paul II’s pastoral vision for the third millennium and the spiritual thrust on which Father J. Kentenich founded the Schoenstatt Work: (1) Anthropological Foundations for a Pedagogy of Holiness; (2) Holiness - Fulfillment of the Human Person; (3) Mary - Model and Mother of the Human Person called to Holiness. The thesis concludes by addressing perspectives of further development in the pastoral field.

Committee:

Johann Roten, G (Committee Chair); Bertrand Buby, A (Committee Member); Luigi Gambero (Other); Robert Hughes (Committee Member); Thomas Thompson, A (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Psychology; Philosophy; Theology

Keywords:

Blessed Virgin Mary; John Paul II; Joseph Kentenich; Pedagogy of Holiness; Third Millennium; The Acting Person; Theological Anthropology; Schoenstatt;

Eads, Heidi ChristineAspects of the mask in the work of Emil Nolde and Mary Wigman
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 1988, History of Art

Committee:

Myroslava Ciszkewycz (Advisor)

Keywords:

WIGMAN; NOLDE; Dance; MASK; MARY WIGMAN; EMIL

Leist, MarnieThe Virgin and Hell: An Anomalous Fifteenth-Century Italian Mural
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Art History
In contemporary analyses of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Italian portrayals of the Last Judgment, one mural is usually mentioned as an anomaly: Giovanni da Modena’s fresco in the Bolognini Chapel in the basilica of San Petronio in Bologna. The mural presents the unusual combination of the subjects of the Coronation of the Virgin in Paradise and Hell. While the pairing of Paradise and Hell is thematically linked to representations of the Last Judgment, the act of Judgment is not portrayed in the chapel. The idea for the atypical subject likely derived from artworks from northern Europe, which combine the Coronation of the Virgin with the Last Judgment. The exclusive rendering of the Coronation and Hell is only found in artworks that postdate Giovanni’s mural. Finally, the iconography of the mural specifically relates to the politico-religious messages of the chapel decoration.

Committee:

Jonathan Riess (Advisor)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

Italy; Painting; Hell; Last Judgment; Virgin Mary; Iconography; Bologna; Fifteenth century; Mural; Italian; Fresco; Chapel; Patron; Politics; Church; Pope; Papacy; San Petronio; Bolognini; Giovanni da Modena; Nardo di Cione; Francesco Traini

Supiano, Rebecca E.She's a Rebel: Exploring Mary Magdalene Through History
Bachelor of Arts, Miami University, 2006, College of Arts and Sciences - Religion
Mary Magdalene has left her mark. She has been represented in many disparate ways since ancient times, yet no one knows who she really was. The Magdalene is mentioned in the New Testament gospels, and in other, non-canonical ancient texts, but there is not nearly enough material in these sources to produce an historical account of what Mary was like. The Magdalene has been used by many different groups of people to advocate certain stances about women and religion. When seen as a prostitute, Mary has often been used to dismiss women’s religious participation. Yet, she has also been depicted as the “apostle to the apostles,” who announces Jesus’ resurrection to his disciples. As “apostle to the apostles,” the Magdalene is once again being used to advance women’s leadership opportunities in churches. These two main visions of Mary Magdalene, and many more, have contributed to how women are viewed in Christianity. The vacuum left by scarce historical information has been filled by all manner of content, making various points about women and religion. Thus, depictions of the Magdalene provide a good lens into the continuing question of where women stand in religion.

Committee:

Julye Bidmead (Advisor)

Keywords:

Mary Magdalene; Biblical studies; Feminism; women and religion

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