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Xu, XiaojiaoPractice of Curiosity: An Intellectual Curiosity-based Industrial Design Pedagogy
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2016, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
Design education is frequently criticized by leaders in the creative industry for failing short of what is promised and expected. As the impact of designers enormously gained by the advancement of technology and connectivity to the world, the education of industrial design seems hemmed in the silo that aims exclusively at the job market. Moreover, changes were rarely made in response to socio-economical and technical changes since it was established. This thesis seeks to delineate the circumstances of Industrial Design education from both historical and disciplinary aspects and suggests a theory in the learning of Industrial Design in response to above mentioned challenges.

Committee:

Gerald Michaud, M.A. (Committee Chair); Peter Chamberlain, M.F.A. M.Phil. (Committee Member); Tony Kawanari, M.A. I.D. (Committee Member); Craig Vogel, M.I.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Design Education;Industrial Design

Garfield, M RobertControlling the Inputs of Hand Tool Development through Design Research
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
Designers of medical and non medical hand tools need human factors and usability inputs to develop successful and safe products. There are a multitude of documented processes and methodologies within the design profession to gather inputs with usability implications for hand tool design. In addition to the variety of methodologies available, designers can make use of formally published human factors guidelines, reference books, literature and standards. In practice, the challenge with formal methods and reference material is that they may not always be in scope, within budget, readily on hand, or actionable. To overcome these limitations and identify the reality of the design process, it is important to examine how human factors and usability decisions are made within the industrial design profession. The aim of this thesis is to assess how designers make form influencing decisions. Semi structured interviews were conducted with 18 professional industrial designers regarding their design methodology on real world products. The fully transcribed interviews were coded in QSR Nvivo10 using a thematic and descriptive coding process. The objective of the study was to identify the inputs designers used to define handle: shape, size, and form language, as well as control: type(s), size(s) and placement location(s). The study findings report the inputs designers referenced and the connection of those inputs to the outputs of the development process. The results indicate that observation is not explicitly expressed as a primary input to the form and control development process. Notwithstanding, many of the primary inputs documented can be traced back to the ethnography/observational phase of the design process. This research has implications for the development of human factors materials for industrial designers, the education and curriculum of industrial design, and for the further advancement of the industrial design profession.

Committee:

Dale Murray, M.A. (Committee Chair); Mary Beth Privitera, M.Des. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Industrial Design;Hand Tools;Ergonomics;Input Controls;Human Factors;Qualitative Interviews

Dadgar, MajidPattern Language: Identification of design opportunities for the child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to develop his/her social skills
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2011, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design
Children with ASDs (Autism Spectrum Disorders) have different cognitive disorders. Social interaction is the most discussed area that they fail to establish and develop. Social skills help the child to establish his/her social interaction. This research proposes a set of patterns. In these patterns situation (problems and context) and design opportunities (solutions) of social skills for the children with ASD at the early ages will be discussed. These social skills and related issues are discussed in the proposed patterns: communication of needs and ideas, joint attention, entry/approach skills, eye contact, maintenance skills, play, social interaction, and emotional expression. Pattern language – uniform structure and format – was developed based on the literature review, informal observations and industrial design perspective on the issue; these patterns helped to present the problems and solutions of the social skills. First drafts of the patterns were discussed in sessions with parents and instructors of children with ASDs. Eight revised patterns are the final outcome of this research project to be used by the parents of children with ASDs, as well as by designers and experts or therapists who are involved in area of working with the children ASDs.

Committee:

Peter Chan, PhD (Advisor); Elizabeth Sanders, PhD (Committee Member); Jane Case-Smith, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs); Industrial Design; Pattern Language; Social Skills; Social Interaction; Design Opportunities

Yen, Wei-TingProduct Physical Interface Design Characteristics for Older Adults with Hand Use Limitations
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, Industrial and Systems Engineering
Older people often experience difficulties in performing the activities of daily living. There are two knowledge gaps associated with the problem. First, there is a research void in understanding the relationship between product interface design characteristics and hand dysfunction levels in older populations. Taking jar lids as an example of the product interface as the focus of this study, associations between jar lid design characteristics and the user experiences of older people with hand disability were explored. When investigating jar lid design characteristics, to the best of our knowledge, no prior published research specifically studied older people who were known to have difficulties opening or closing jar lids or who reported experiencing hand pain around the time of their study participation. Second, methods and tools for making it easier for industrial designers to produce inclusive designs during product design processes are still insufficient. Although there are many Human Factors design assist tools available for designers to use, it has been found that designers seldom consult these established resources. It was recognized that a gap still exists between Human Factors information explorers (e.g. engineering researchers) and information users (e.g. designers). Therefore, the aim of the study was to address knowledge limitations in two important areas by applying Ergonomics and product design research methodologies, in concert, to (1) discover what lid design features can improve the user experience of older people with hand impairment, and (2) discover what concepts of Human Factors design assist tools can satisfy the practical needs of industrial designers when solving design problems, such as jar lids that facilitate opening and closing by a wide range of potential users. Accordingly, there were three phases of research activities included: Phase 1 (“Exploration”) – Exploring different levels of user experiences when interacting with product interfaces; Phase 2 (“Evaluation”) – Evaluating product interface design characteristics through controlled experimental tests; and Phase 3 (“Communication”) – Investigating industrial designers’ needs when using an electronic Human Factors design assist tool during the product design process. For Phase 1 and 2, older females (65 years of age or older) with declined hand function, and for Phase 3, industrial designers who had at least one year of work experience in industry were recruited into the study. According to the lid design evaluation results, lid height was the strongest factor associated with the levels of perceived effort when turning a lid. For both medium lids (e.g. 42 mm in diameter) and small lids (e.g. 28 mm in diameter), the design that was rated the lowest in perceived effort to turn was the one with a tall height and a hexagonal top shape. As to the investigation of designer’s usage of Human Factors information during the design process, the result showed that most of designers used Human Factors information in the beginning (e.g. “Information Gathering”) and the end (e.g. “Evaluating and Refining Prototype”) of the design process. If compared with designers with less years of work experience, a higher percentage of designers with more than 20 years of experience would use Human Factors information to support their ideation. In addition, they tended to start their concept evaluations earlier in the design process. The study identified barriers to use of Human Factors information by designers. In addition, it demonstrated how participatory design can be applied to learn about needs of designers and features for a design assist tool that designers would find useful, usable and desirable.

Committee:

Carolyn Sommerich, PhD (Advisor); Steven Lavender, PhD (Committee Member); Sharon Flinn, PhD (Committee Member); Elizabeth Sanders, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Industrial Engineering

Keywords:

Jar lid design; Hand dysfunction; Hand function assessment; Focus group; Participatory design process; Human Factors/Ergonomics; Industrial Design; Design assist tools

Ebeling, Charles EvansOn the construction of optimal regression designs /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1973, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Statistics

Keywords:

Industrial design;Systems engineering

Prather, Evin GamalThe Research and Design of an Inclusive Dishwashing Appliance
MDes, University of Cincinnati, 2007, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Design

The goal of this project is to follow user-based qualitative research to design a dishwashing appliance that is superior in functionality and more desirable to use.

The Introduction contains the background, problem statement, hypothesis, goals, objectives, parameters and pre-research opportunities.

The Design Strategies chapter investigates the components of inclusive design and emotional design as well as how the stakeholders, users and companies, benefit when inclusion is considered in the design process.

The Dishwashing Research chapter will document findings from the preliminary literature- and internet-based research phases, which includes analyses of the history, function, paradigm, technologies, and ergonomics related to dishwashing.

The User Research chapter will include conclusions from six in-home interviews with individuals and families of various types, one focus group of retirement-aged women, and internet-based opinions websites.

The Design chapter describes the concept generation, development and optimization phases of the design process all of which were informed directly by the previous three chapters. This section is composed of sketches, images of mockups and CAID-based visualizations of final concepts supplemented with explanations of the concepts.

Committee:

Dale Murray (Advisor)

Subjects:

Design and Decorative Arts

Keywords:

Design; Industrial Design; Inclusive Design; Emotional Design; Dishwahser; Dishwashing; Qualitative Design Research; User Research

Kuwik, Paul DavidA quasi-experimental study of two selected units of the industrial arts curriculum project materials to determine the measurable additive effects of a unit on design in manufacturing technology upon a similar unit on design in construction technology /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1970, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Industrial design

Liu, Lanna RProduct and color: Designing a tool to aid methodical color application for Industrial Design students
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
Color plays an important role in a product’s success but is oftentimes underutilized and overshadowed by other design decisions. Preliminary industrial design education may create a foundation of color knowledge, but the translation of color knowledge and the ability to strategically select and apply color to a product occurs through experience. Color by nature is perceptual and subjective; leaving even experienced industrial designers feeling apprehensive. This thesis focuses on how to deliver a systematic color selection process to Industrial Design students. Research was conducted in order to understand the current color resources, research, considerations, and practices in industrial design and outside of industrial design. From this, key insights were revealed that served as requirements for the development of a tool. The tool aimed at providing Industrial Design students the ability to approach color confidently in their design process and help them to rationalize their decisions. The tool was prototyped and tests were conducted to gauge its value. A survey of student designers was conducted both pre-prototype and post-prototype to measure the outcome as well as to identify areas of improvement and further exploration.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, M.I.D. (Committee Chair); Peter Chamberlain, M.F.A. M.Phil. (Committee Member); Dennis Puhalla, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Color;Product Design;Industrial Design;Color Selection;Color Application;Design Education

Wang, XuekeDoes visual access when lifting unstable objects affect the biomechanical loads experienced by the spine and shoulders
Master of Science, The Ohio State University, 2017, Industrial and Systems Engineering
Objective: To explore the change of muscular and biomechanical responses in different load stability and visual access conditions during asymmetric lifting tasks. Background: Most of the lifting biomechanics literature has focused on the lifting of stable loads. However, the handling of unstable loads was hypothesized to result in lifting behaviors that would increase the biomechanical loading of the spine and the upper extremities. It was further hypothesized that being able to view the contents of the container being lifted would mitigate the increased biomechanical response when unstable loads were lifted. Methods: Fourteen volunteers, 8 male and 6 female lifted a wooden box containing either a stable load, bags of water, or a bowling ball that could shift during the lifting task. The box, which in half the conditions was covered and in half the conditions uncovered, was lifted from the floor from a location directly in front of the subject and then placed at approximately waist height on a surface that was on the participant’s left side (90 degrees of asymmetry). Spine kinematic and kinetic measures and bilateral surface electromyographic (EMG) signals from the erector spinae, the external oblique, anterior deltoid, and biceps muscles were obtained. Results: In some paired comparisons, it was found that when lifting stable loads the activities in the left external oblique, right biceps and anterior deltoid increased. However, the duration of the lifting tasks was found to be longer when lifting the unstable loads. The uncovered box decreased the activation levels of the left biceps, both anterior deltoid, and both erector spinae muscles. The frequency of load shifting was reduced when the box containing the bowling ball was uncovered. Conclusion: Contrary to the initial hypothesis, lifting unstable loads did not increase the activities in target muscles and biomechanical loads but did result in lifts of longer duration. When lifting a very unstable load (the bowling ball in this study), having an uncovered container reduced activity in relevant muscles and reduced the likelihood of the bowling ball shifting when compared to the same task with container covered. Relevance: In industry, there are many work situations where workers need to lift or carry unstable loads that can shift during transport. These shifting loads result in higher demands on muscles and risks to workers’ health. Being able to see the unstable loads might mitigate these effects which suggest the value of transparent or translucent packaging.

Committee:

Steven Lavender (Advisor); Carolyn Sommerich (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Biomechanics; Engineering

Keywords:

industrial design, unstable load, visual information, muscle response, spinal moments

Han, BingCurrent analysis of Industrial design firms in China - An Industry Report
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
This paper reviews and analyzes the state of industrial design firms and businesses in China. The research includes mixed methods of primary and secondary research. Over 40 one on one interviews and site visits were conducted with Chinese Industrial Design firms. Additional interviews were conducted with professors from U.S. and Chinese universities, senior managers and founders from United States based design firms. Concurrently, significant amounts of secondary research data were collected. Based on the research, now is a great time for industrial design in China. Business is rapidly growing due to economic, political and other factors. However, the data also uncovers that most Chinese industrial design firms are not without challenges. First, it is difficult to make Chinese clients believe that there is any value in creativity. Design is perceived as a commodity and purely execution. Second, win their clients' trust on their capability of generating innovative solution and becoming a partner in their clients' strategy. Some Chinese industrial design firms have overcome the first challenge. As these Chinese firms overcome the second one, they will begin to compete directly with international industrial design firms. Currently Chinese industrial design firms and international ones have different strengths; the author suggests that collaboration between them would be a good solution for both.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, MD (Committee Chair); Paul Zender, MFA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

industrial design;Chinese design firms;innovation;China;

Gauthier, NoelDesigning for Disruption: Preparing Product Designers for the Next Billion
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
The Industrial Designer's role in Social Construction has always been evidenced by the outputs of the Design function. Now the question is being raised in the Design Community whether the inputs of the Design Function can have a primary leading role in effecting Social Construction. The exhibition “Design for the Other 90%” and the organization Project H, for example, have moved these designers from artificers to instigators. Should Design be involved in these challenges? There are examples showing that in some situations long term growth can occur by jump-starting stalled markets. There is growing thought that social business concepts that develop humanitarian products can be the spark necessary to restore momentum and opportunity to these markets. If we are going to do that, however, we must fundamentally understand not only what people in these situations most need, but what they find valuable in order to create meaningful products that are motivating enough to create transactions. This thesis looks at programs that have been successful in deploying enabling products that are both profitable and address a social need in an economic demographic making under $5 a day, often referred to as the “Bottom of the Pyramid.” It analyzes them using traditional Industrial Design techniques for determining value, and then suggests the possibility of a new model focusing on Risk and Flow. It proposes that Industrial Design can play a primary role in these areas of Social Construction by aligning products with the values of the world’s poorest customers, and doing so in a way that creates stronger markets that empower their people.

Committee:

Steven Doehler, , (Committee Chair); Michael Zaretsky, MArch (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Social Design;Product Design;Bottom of Pyramid;Design;BOP;Industrial Design

Maleki, ParvanehHow can Industrial Designers Work more Effectively with Engineers to Have a Successful Collaboration?
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2017, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
Abstract Certain companies are successfully integrating industrial design into their engineering teams, and other companies are following suit. The collaboration between designers and engineers can be challenging because they receive different training and have different perspectives. While engineers are detail oriented and mainly concerned with technical features, designers are empathetic and concerned with aesthetics and user experiences. This thesis focuses on the complications in interdisciplinary teamwork between engineers and industrial designers in a product development project, to provide guidelines for industrial designers to collaborate efficiently in future multidisciplinary settings. In this thesis, I conducted a literature review on new product development and successful collaboration criteria, and addressed the challenges surfaced from two research methods: a case study and interviews. The case study examines my experience as the sole industrial designer in a group of engineers, together designing a new type of aerial transportation mode for daily commuting purposes in the Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Cincinnati in collaboration with Workhorse Group. By interviewing industrial designers and engineers, I sought to discover their experiences in collaboration with the other profession. Based on my findings, I have developed five guidelines for industrial designers to overcome challenges in collaborating with engineers. These guidelines are: 1.Based on my findings, I have developed five guidelines for industrial designers to overcome challenges in collaborating with engineers. These guidelines are: 1. Get clear about your role in the group and in which areas you are going to contribute to the project 2. Learn the required knowledge related to the project and seek advice from experienced colleagues if needed 3. Be aware that engineers also do design, but it is different from industrial design, and industrial designers should appreciate its value 4. Use your knowledge and skills to present your ideas, and learn how to communicate and defend your concepts in discussion with engineers 5. Prepare questions to ask engineers about technical limitations, and learn how to work within those limitations ? I believe that by applying these guidelines during collaborations with engineering teams, industrial designers can overcome challenges effectively and enhance their experience and contributions to the team.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, M.I.D. (Committee Chair); Gerald Michaud, M.A. (Committee Member); Mark Turner, Sc.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Industrial Design;Engineering;Collaboration

Lin, Shang-YenDesign for Unfamiliar Cultures
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
Since we live in a global marketplace, designers do not only design for domestic consumers, but also design for international users. In this paper, I am proposing The Product Value System, an integrated design approach that is able to provide an appropriate design direction for industrial designers when dealing with an unfamiliar culture. This paper will introduce different viewpoints of culture, and how The Product Value System can be used for an industrial design project. In the end, the testing results and limitations of the tested project will be shown.

Committee:

Gerald Michaud, M.A. (Committee Chair); Peter Chamberlain, M.F.A. M.Phil. (Committee Member); Michael Roller, M.Des. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Industrial design;Product design;Culture values;Cross-cultural;Product Value System

Alley, Krista IDefining the Industrial Designer's Role in the ISO/IEC 62366 Standard
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2014, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
In recent years, the medical device industry has revised its development practices by incorporating the ISO/IEC 62366 (Usability Engineering Process) standard. The standard, purposed to guide industry toward achieving reasonable usability in all medical devices and reduce use errors, heavily emphasizes risk management and has created a large need for usability research and an in-depth understanding of human factors. A common misconception exists that the complexity of identifying, mitigating, and testing for such risk is beyond the usability and human factors components of tradition industrial design. As a result, medical device design teams typically rely on human factors engineers, and in many cases where both disciplines are present, have consequently grayed the understanding of team roles concerning usability engineering. By surveying and performing case studies on design processes used in medical device design, this thesis examines the role of the industrial designer and suggests the best practices for industrial design within the ISO/IEC 62366 standard.

Committee:

Steven Doehler, M.A. (Committee Chair); Edwin Bills, M.Ed. (Committee Member); Soo-Shin Choi, M.F.A. (Committee Member); Tony Kawanari, M.A. I.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Medical Devices;Medical Device Design;Industrial Design;Usability Engineering;Standardization;ISO IEC 62366

Fan, XinIndustrial Design: Contrasting the United States and Chinese Methods - From the perspective of an industrial designer who has both studied and worked in the U.S. and China
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design

My professional experience is a combination of theoretical and practical education with employment in both China and the U.S. This duality gives me the proper perspective to both compare and contrast the problems and opportunities in the industrial design profession in the U.S. and China.

Chinese industrial design is experiencing rapid development on the grounds that China is becoming the world’s manufacturing center. Each year, an increasing number of international collaborations occur between the U.S. and China, requiring accurate communication and mutual understanding. However, due to cultural differences, uneven industrial design development stages, and dissimilar education systems, Chinese industrial designers, in general, work differently compared to U.S. industrial designers. This difference very often creates difficulties in international partnerships which results in wastes of time, cost, and energy for both sides.

Based on my experience and research there appears to be significant differences in the goals that drive US and Chinese designers in the product development process. Most US industrial designer respond to emerging trends in markets, refine branding, clarify distinction, and create intellectual property, whereas most Chinese industrial designers’ goals consist of observing the success of existing products in the market place. Thus, in the U.S., designers mostly focus on consumer research and have more of an influence on product strategy, opposed to Chinese designers who focus more on manufacturing and have greater influence on design execution. This thesis is to describe this difference and explain how China’s industrial design education and practice must be changed. In addition, China must learn from the Japanese by integrating their own cultural value into industrial designing, so that China can occupy a unique position in the design world to compete with other cultures. Furthermore, design promotional organizations such as the IDSA (Industrial Designers Society of America), could be more effective if Chinese designers would create dialog with designers in the U.S.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, MD (Committee Chair); Peter Chamberlain, MFAMPhil (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

industrial design;China;United States;manufacturing;research;product design

Lothrop, ThorntonDesign Drawing - An Integrated Visualization System
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design
Over the past two decades, computers and advancements in software have revolutionized the Industrial Design process. Designers are able to accelerate the development schedules for products by utilizing the same software for design and visualization as engineers use for implementation. Two-dimensional rendering software has become so advanced and intuitive that photorealistic images of a design are generated to help the client believe the product has already been manufactured. The design industry is facing a growing problem, however, as students, required to learn more skills than ever before, are not gaining the drawing skills preferred by or needed for professional practice. Curricula once structured for sketching, rendering and technical drawing have been superseded by Computer Aided Design and graphic courses. Exacerbating the issue are challenges in standardizing Industrial Design curriculum across the spectrum of design schools; as a result students are graduating with a wide range of less-than-ideal skill sets. (Amit, 2010) This thesis will examine the phenomenon of drawing in the design process and propose a new concept for drawing pedagogy that may augment or replace existing curricula to accelerate acquisition of design drawing skills and more fully prepare the student for the design profession.

Committee:

Noel Mayo, Dr. (Committee Chair); Maria Palazzi (Committee Member); Scott Shim (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Industrial Arts Education

Keywords:

design drawing pedagogy in Industrial Design education

Lee, Do YoungMoving from Ownership to Leasing: A Design Strategy to Extend Product Life and Reduce Waste
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
Overwhelming consumption has resulted from bad user–product relationships and bad service, which allow consumers to easily get frustrated, and abandons otherwise fine products. This paper proposes a new emphasis on designing a service model, moving from ownership to leasing. A service model by leasing puts emphasis on designing products with an extension of the user–product relationship, providing users with products that will be personal treasures. This is a major change in business-as-usual for most product categories, but results in creating new and different design goals that may have significant impact on achieving economic viability and environmental stewardship. This model ultimately provides user satisfaction by advocating the design of meaningful products that facilitate long-term use, and reduces the numbers of products being made, being sold, becoming obsolete, and ending up in landfills. This concept is introduced with sustainable design principles through precedents, and is then applied in the cellular phone industry for testing, in the hope of appropriate appreciation for a sustainable service model as well as providing ideas for its application to current industry.

Committee:

Dale Murray, MA (Committee Chair); Gerald Michaud, MA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Sustainable design;Design Strategy;Industrial Design;Leasing;User-Product Relationship;;

Nong, YushiApplying Empathy Design: Designing New Crutches for College Students with the Strategy of Empathy Design
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2016, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
College students have frequent social interactions with the surrounding people and environment. When college students happen to get injured and have to use crutches, there will be emotional needs for dealing with such sudden changes in their lives. Considering the needs in an empathic perspective, we have the opportunity to develop new crutches that provide emotional care to patients. During this research, empathic design process was applied to collect patients’ real feelings about their injuries and their opinions on crutches. After interviews with users of crutches in University of Cincinnati, combined with my personal experience of using crutches on campus, two contradictory feelings emerged. College users wanted to express the message that they could control themselves independently with crutches. Meanwhile, a kind of helpless anger exists in their minds as well. To mediate this contradiction, a new concept of crutch design was expected to not only deliver an optimistic attitude, but also give users confidence to face their injuries and the subsequent issues. Testing the prototypes showed positive feedback from subjects. Adding emotional care on crutch design generates extra value to the users.

Committee:

Steven Doehler, M.A. (Committee Chair); Gerald Michaud, M.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

empathy design;crutch;college students;industrial design;therapy

Sanders, Emma CaitlinExpanding the Use Phase of Products
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2015, Design
Household products are purchased, used, and disposed of nearly everyday. Consumer demands and trends such as “fast fashion” have lead to accelerated product cycles that fulfill the wants, and sometimes needs, of the American marketplace. The result has been an economy based on the consumer thought process of “take, make, and dispose” where natural resources are continually being used up to make cheap, short-lived products which are often quickly turned over to the landfill once they break or consumers no longer find them useful or desirable to keep. The overall purpose of this thesis was to explore some of the small steps that could be taken today, or in the near future, to lead society as a whole to be less wasteful by keeping products in use longer. Because it will take time and effort to make drastic changes within the product design industry (which involves business, manufacturing, marketing, etc.), this study focuses on what regular people are doing, or could do, in their everyday lives to achieve this. The overall outcome sought to develop design implications related to product qualities as well as service and/or system opportunities relating to household products. To identify these design implications, the primary research was designed to answer the questions: Why are some things more likely to be kept or held onto for a longer periods of time? Why are other items more likely to be discarded after a shorter period of time, and how could those stay in use somehow? This was achieved through an exploratory and qualitative case study on kitchen products using a small number of participants, followed by an online survey to validate the preliminary findings with quantitative data. Through a three-phase research plan, which is described in Chapter 6, the participants, who are all from the Millennial Generation, were immersed in thinking about their individual kitchen items through the completion of multiple activities, including interviews, a workbook, and a final participatory sorting activity. By understanding the experiences and emotions that these consumers have, as well as the decisions they make, regarding their current kitchen products, it is possible to seek future opportunities for more sustainable consumption of such products. In the final chapter, a framework for expanding the use of products is presented, as well as four design strategies that can help lead to better designed products and systems, including: 1. Design for a single user who will give the product a second life by using it in a new way. 2. Design for a single user to use the product for an extended period of time. 3. Design for multiple users, who may or may not be personally connected. 4. Design for recyclability, not just within the product but also the systems surrounding it. Whether that “better” means products that are designed for longevity, for repair-ability, for share-ability, for reusability, or for recyclability, products and the ecosystem of services surrounding them need to be able to better fit the true needs of both current, and future, consumers.

Committee:

Scott Shim (Advisor); Carolina Gill (Committee Member); Richard Jagacinski (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

product design; industrial design; sustainability; sustainable design

Fiely, Megan Elisabeth“Within a Framework of Limitations”: Marianne Strengell’s Work as an Educator, Weaver, and Designer
Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, 2006, History
Marianne Strengell overcame sexual stereotypes and established herself as a notable 20th century designer. The study considers Strengell’s role as an educator at Cranbrook, innovator in cottage industry development, and active participant in design for architects and industry. Emigrating from Finland to the Detroit area in 1937, Strengell served as weaving instructor at Cranbrook Academy of Arts in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, where she inspired numerous Cranbrook weavers who shaped textile design in America and abroad. Strengell pursued various projects outside of the Academy, including the development of a cottage industry in the Philippines. During the 1940s and 1950s Strengell worked with several architects and industrial designers and designed woven car upholstery fabrics. Research methods for this thesis included archival research at Cranbrook Archives, as well as readings in published books, articles, and reports on related topics: woman designers in the United States, Scandinavian immigrants, and Cranbrook artists.

Committee:

Douglas Forsyth (Advisor)

Keywords:

Cranbrook Academy of Arts; Finnish Immigrants; Industrial Design; Textile Design; Woman Artists; Marianne Strengell; Phillipine Cottage Industry; Art Education; Immigration; Feminist History; Art History

BALDRIDGE, DEVIN WILLIAMTHE METABOLIC DESIGN METHODOLOGY
MDes, University of Cincinnati, 2003, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning : Design
Industrial designers gather references from a multitude of sources, synthesize it, and convey those influences in the design of products. Looking only at competitors for inspiration can potentially limit the perspective of contemporary designers and subsequently the innovation of products. Just as people feel connected to nature, designers can create products that consumers feel connected to through the reference of nature. This document focuses on how nature can be used as a model in order to address many of the problems confronting designers today. There has been no clear and practical methodology for modern industrial designers to observe and reference nature. The Metabolic Design Methodology is a design strategy that represents the culmination of the four categories, I have recognized, in the design of products. The categories are: Surfaces/Finishes, Form/Structure, Materials, and Processes/Production. The four categories represent common topics industrial designers consider in the design of products. They represent a tool meant to facilitate the systematic referencing of nature in the design of products. They were developed to present designers with opportunities for invention by establishing some parameters as they wade through the design process. The report is comprised of four primary parts. Part I includes; the introductory chapter as well as a chapter entitled, Contemporary and Classical Methodologies for Understanding Nature. Part II; presents and explains the four categories I am proposing. Part III; analyzes two case studies in which I demonstrate varying degrees of application of the Metabolic Design Methodology. Finally, Part IV; is the concluding chapter. The two case studies represent varying degrees of metabolic influence into an otherwise traditional design strategy. Through the case studies I demonstrate how each category can be systematically incorporated into traditional design approaches independently, or how the categories may be used collectively to produce rich design solutions. The more conscious designers are, the more references they have to tap into, and the more their creativity will be expressed. Nature holds the answer to many riddles still plaguing design today. When industrial designers expand their perspective to include nature, countless design innovations will be made possible.

Committee:

Dr. J. Chewning (Advisor)

Subjects:

Design and Decorative Arts

Keywords:

industrial design; product; biomimicry; sustainable design; metabolism

Bullock, James N.Design Principles for Emotional Durability
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design

Overconsumption has become a way of life for the average American. Our high levels of consumption, however, have not resulted in increased happiness-we are actually less happy.

Consumer psychologists suggest that the missing element in most unsuccessful user-product relationships is meaning. Buyers are looking for an increasing amount of meaning in the objects they purchase-something most products promise but don’t deliver.

The emerging concept of Emotional Durability seeks to alleviate the problems of overconsumption and user dissatisfaction by advocating for the design of meaningful products that facilitate long-term use. It rejects the outdated and Earth-destroying practice of planned obsolescence, imbuing products with characteristics that make them appealing at purchase, but even more appealing through use.

A wide spectrum of theorists and practitioners have written on the topic of Emotional Durability, but few, if any have created actionable guidelines for product designers. This thesis will investigate the root causes of consumption and failed user-product relationships in order to produce a set of principles for designers and manufacturers to utilize when designing new products and user experiences.

The resulting principles will be shared with designers in the hopes of shaping an appreciation for emotionally durable design as well as providing ideas for its implementation.

Committee:

Dale Murray, MA (Committee Chair); Peter Chamberlain, MFA MPhil (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Emotionally Durable;Emotional Durability;Design Principles;Industrial Design;;;