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Bowden, Dustin DEvaluation of the Performance of a Downward Flow Inclined Gravity Settler for Algae Dewatering
Master of Science in Chemical Engineering, Cleveland State University, 2015, Washkewicz College of Engineering
With recent concerns over the environmental implications of burning fossil fuels coupled with the depletion of fossil fuel reserves an alternative source of energy is needed. Algae derived biofuels may be an effective replacement for transportation fuels as they are carbon neutral and have a high area productivity. Algae is superior to terrestrial plants as a biofuel source due to its high oil productivity and efficiency along with the fact that it will not displace food production. Currently the largest obstacle to the implementation of commercial algae to biofuel processes is algae dewatering. The separation of algae from water is difficult due to the dilute concentration of the algae suspension and the extremely low settling velocity of the algae biomass. This work investigates recent improvements to the downward flow inclined gravity settler which has the potential to unlock this much needed process. Additionally, an investigation into algae settling velocity, a field which has received little attention, is also discussed.

Committee:

Joanne Belovich, PhD (Advisor); Jorge Gatica, PhD (Committee Member); Moo-Yeal Lee, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Chemical Engineering

Keywords:

Algae; Biofuel; Biofuels; Scenedesmus Dimorphous; S Dimorphous; Bowden; Dustin; Gravity Settler; Downward Flow Inclined Gravity Settler; Inclined Gravity Settler; Cleveland State University; Settling Velocity;

Wang, LeiCoseismic Deformation Detection and Quantification for Great Earthquakes Using Spaceborne Gravimetry
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2012, Geodetic Science and Surveying
Because of Earth’s elasticity and its viscoelasticity, earthquakes induce mass redistributions in the crust and upper mantle, and consequently change Earth’s external gravitational field. Data from Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) spaceborne gravimetry mission is able to detect the permanent gravitational and its gradient changes caused by great earthquakes, and provides an independent and thus valuable data type for earthquake studies. This study uses a spatiospectral localization analysis employing the Slepian basis functions and shows that the method is novel and efficient to represent and analyze regional signals, and particularly suitable for extracting coseismic deformation signals from GRACE. For the first time, this study uses the Monte Carlo optimization method (Simulated Annealing) for geophysical inversion to quantify earthquake faulting parameters using GRACE detected gravitational changes. GRACE monthly gravity field solutions have been analyzed for recent great earthquakes. For the 2004 Mw 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman and 2005 Nias earthquakes (Mw 8.6), it is shown for the first time that refined deformation signals are detectable by processing the GRACE data in terms of the full gravitational gradient tensor. The GRACE-inferred gravitational gradients agree well with coseismic model predictions. Due to the characteristics of gradient measurements, which have enhanced high-frequency contents, the GRACE observations provide a more clear delineation of the fault lines, locate significant slips, and better define the extent of the coseismic deformation; For the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule (Chile) earthquake and the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, by inverting the GRACE detected gravity change signals, it is demonstrated that, complimentary to classic teleseismic records and geodetic measurements, the coseismic gravitational change observed by spaceborne gravimetry can be used to quantify large scale deformations induced by great earthquakes.

Committee:

Che-Kwan Shum (Advisor); Christopher Jekeli (Committee Member); Frederik Simons (Committee Member); Michael Bevis (Committee Member); Michael Barton (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Earth; Geophysics

Keywords:

spaceborne gravimetry; coseismic gravity change; time-variable gravity field; geodynamics

Obenson, Gabriel Francis TambeDirect evaluation of the earth's gravity anomaly field from orbital analysis of artificial earth satellites /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1970, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Geophysics

Keywords:

Gravity anomalies;Gravity;Artificial satellites;Satellite geodesy

Kumar, Neela ShivaCellular Mechanisms of Gravitropism in ARG1 (Altered Response to Gravity) Mutants of Arabidopsis Thaliana
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2008, Botany
Many studies have been conducted in an effort to understand the mechanisms involved in gravitropism. Gravity perception in plants occurs by the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids termed statoliths. These statoliths are located in the endodermal cells of stem-like organs and columella cells of the root cap. Plastids play an important role during the graviperception mechanism in plants in that they act as gravity sensors in the roots, hypocotyls and inflorescence stems of flowering plants. Gravity perception leads to signal transduction that eventually results in tropic curvature in plants. ARG1 (altered response to gravity) is a gene involved in gravitropism and encodes a DnaJ-like protein, suggesting its possible interaction with the cytoskeleton. We investigated whether the arg1 mutation affects gravitropism by modulating plastid sedimentation in gravity perceiving cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. By using cryofixation procedures and light microscopic studies, we have determined that ARG1 affects gravitropism in hypocotyls by reducing the plastid sedimentation process. The arg1-2 mutant exhibited reduced and delayed gravitropism in roots, shoots, and inflorescence stems in both light- and dark-grown conditions. We performed light microscopic studies of plastid movement in the gravity-perceiving statocytes (endodermal cells) of hypocotyls of arg1-2 and WT seedlings to better characterize the role of ARG1 in gravitropism. Cryofixation and freeze substitution procedures were used since these methods provide a reliable indication of rapid cellular events within the statocytes. We found that sedimentation of plastids in response to gravity in statocytes of the arg1-2 mutant was reduced and ARG1 affects gravitropism by reducing plastid movement/sedimentation, a process known to be essential for early phases of signaling cascades in the statocytes. The precise location of ARG1 protein within the columella cells has been further investigated by high resolution electron microscopy and indirect immunogold labeling suitable for Arabidopsis roots. These studies confirm that ARG1 is found specifically localized to the components of the endomembrane system such as Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum, secretory vesicles, and that this protein plays a key role in gravitropism. The significance of our study is that we have elucidated multiple roles of ARG1 both in gravity perception and signal transduction phase in statocytes.

Committee:

Dr. John Z. Kiss (Advisor); Dr. Q. Quinn Li (Committee Member); Dr. Elisabeth E. Schussler (Committee Member); Dr. M. Henry H. Stevens (Committee Member); Dr. Lori G. Isaacson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Botany

Keywords:

ARG (altered response to gravity) protein; actin cytoskeleton; Arabidopsis; columella cells; electron microscopy; endodermis; endomembrane system; gravitropism; gravity perception; immunocytochemical; plastid movement; signal transduction; statocytes

Needham, Paul EugeneThe Formation and evaluation of detailed geopotential models based on point masses /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1970, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Spherical harmonics;Gravity;Gravity anomalies

Elston, Levi J.The Effect of Variable Gravity on the Cooling Performance of a 16-Nozzle Spray Array
Master of Science in Engineering (MSEgr), Wright State University, 2008, Mechanical Engineering

The objective of this thesis was to investigate the cooling performance of a 16-nozzle spray array, using FC-72 as the working fluid, in variable gravity conditions with additional emphasis on fluid management and flow stability. A flight test experiment was modified to accommodate a 16-nozzle spray array, which was then tested in the parabolic flight trajectory environment of NASA's C-9 reduced gravity aircraft. The 16-nozzle array was designed to cool a 25.4 x 25.4 [mm] area on a thick film resistive heater used to simulate electronic components. Data was taken and reduced as a result of flight tests conducted over the course of two flight weeks (each week consisting of four flights, each flight consisting of 40 to 60 parabolas). The flight tests were conducted in order to examine gravity effects on spray cooling performance and to evaluate a novel liquid-vapor separator design. The mass flow rate through the 16-nozzle spray array ranged from 13.1 < m < 21.3 [g/s] for the spray cooling analysis and 14 < m < 35 [g/s] for the separator evaluation. The heat flux at the thick film resistor ranged from 2.9 < q" < 25 [W/cm2], the subcooling of the working fluid ranged from 1.6 < Tsc < 18.4 [C], the saturation temperature ranged from 37.4 < Tsat < 47.2 [C] and the absorbed air content in the working fluid was C = 10.1%, 14.3%, and 16.8% by volume. The spray chamber pressure ranged from 42 < P < 78 [kPa] while the acceleration ranged from -0.02 < a < -2.02 [g]. Two-phase cooling was emphasized, but some single-phase data was also collected. A one-dimensional model was used to predict the heater surface temperature from the heat input and mean heater base temperature.

It was found that the cooling performance was enhanced in micro-gravity over terrestrial and elevated gravity. In addition, a sudden degradation in performance was found at high mass flow rates in micro-gravity, possibly due to liquid buildup on the surface between the nozzle impact zones. A high degree of subcooling was found to be beneficial, but the dissolved air content had little effect on the heat transfer performance either in micro-gravity or elevated gravity. Also, an improved liquid-vapor separator concept was implemented to enable flow stability during the micro-gravity portions of the flight. Multiple liquid-vapor separator concepts were tested during micro-gravity flights until a final design was settled on. The final separator design went through more rigorous evaluation to compare performance at multiple fill levels, each with a higher percentage of vapor space within the reservoir. It was found that, using the final reservoir design, stable flow operation was achieved in micro-gravity for mass flow rates m = 14, 17.5, and 21 [g/s].

Committee:

Scott K. Thomas, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); James A. Menart, Ph.D. (Committee Member); J. Mitch Wolff, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kirk L. Yerkes, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Engineering; Experiments; Mechanical Engineering

Keywords:

spray cooling; variable gravity; microgravity; reduced gravity; heat transfer; two-phase; liquid-vapor separator; array

Uotila, Urho A.Investigations on the gravity field and shape of the earth /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1960, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Geology

Keywords:

Gravity;Geodesy;Earth ;Gravity anomalies

McCallister, JenniferMolecular Characterization of the Gravity Persistence Signal (gps) 2 Mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 2005, Environmental Studies (Arts and Sciences)

A gravity persistence signal (gps) mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis was identified that shows an abnormal gravity response phenotype - wrong way. The gps2 mutant was selected from a mutant population generated by a T-DNA insertion. Cloning of the GPS2-1 gene using thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction (TAIL PCR) revealed the identity as At5g11150 located on chromosome 5 of Arabidopsis. At5g11150 is a hypothetical protein proposed to be a synaptobrevin-like/vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP 713). A series of reporter gene constructs were designed and built to rescue the phenotype of gps2 and to assess subcellular localization of GPS2. Preliminary subcellular localization of the GPS2 protein using the reporter gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP) in BY-2 suspension culture cells appears to be localized in the vesicles of the endomembrane system. By cloning, identifying, and localizing GPS2, components of early signal transduction in the gravitropic pathway may be identified.

Committee:

Sarah Wyatt (Advisor)

Subjects:

Biology, Molecular

Keywords:

Gravitropism; Molecular biology; Gravity; Gravity persistence signal mutant; SNARE; VAMP

Matas, AndrewFoundations of Massive Gravity
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2016, Physics
General Relativity (GR) is a relativistic theory of gravity which has a large number of theoretical and observational successes. From the perspective of quantum field theory, GR can be thought of as a theory of a massless spin-2 particle called the graviton. It is a fundamental question to ask how the graviton behaves if it has a small but non-zero mass. In this dissertation I shall study the recently constructed theory of ghost-free massive gravity, which avoids the pernicious Boulware-Deser ghost that had thwarted previous attempts to study massive gravity. In Chapter 1 I will give a broad overview of the context, motivation, and model-building issues underlying massive gravity. Then in Chapter 2 I will give a detailed pedagogical introduction to ghost-free massive gravity focusing on concepts that will be used throughout the remainder of the work. In Chapter 3 I will derive the ghost-free structure of massive gravity from an extra dimensional perspective through a process known as Dimensional Deconstruction. Before my work it had been an open question whether Deconstruction could be consistently applied to gravity. The key insight relies on using the elegant formulation of General Relativity in terms of the vielbein. Inspired by Deconstruction, in Chapter 4 I will discuss the possibility of non-standard kinetic interactions in massive gravity. I will show that the only consistent derivative interactions for a massive spin-2 particle must be the same as in GR. This is remarkable because there is no known symmetry reason for this to be the case, since massive gravity breaks diffeomorphism invariance. Finally, in Chapter 5, in order to connect with observations I shall consider the radiation emitted from binary systems in Galileon theories, which are scalar theories that can mimic the behavior of a massive graviton. This work extends the understanding of the Vainshtein screening mechanism into a time-dependent situation.

Committee:

Claudia de Rham, Ph.D. (Advisor); Andrew Tolley, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Glenn Starkman, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Stacy McGaugh, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Physics

Keywords:

Massive gravity; modified gravity; particle cosmology

Hug, Scott A.Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Gravity Settler for Algae Dewatering
Master of Science in Chemical Engineering, Cleveland State University, 2013, Fenn College of Engineering
Algae are the future of lipid sources for biodiesel production. Algae can produce more biodiesel than soybean and canola oil and can be grown in more diverse locations. Algae concentrations are naturally around 0.1% by weight. Enough water must be removed for the algae level to reach 5%, the minimum concentration in which lipids can be used in the transesterification process for biofuel production is 5%. Current dewatering methods involve the use of settling tanks and centrifugation. The costs of centrifugation limit the commercial viability of algae based biodiesel. A novel inclined gravity settler design at Cleveland State University is analyzed in this project. A major difference between this and a traditional gravity settler is that the inlet of this gravity settler is at the top, whereas traditional gravity settlers have inlets at the bottom. A computational fluid dynamics model for the system has been developed to allow the simulations of fluid flow and particle trajectories over time. These simulations determine the optimal conditions for algae dewatering. Results show that the concentration increase of algae is largely dependent on the settler's angle of inclination, inlet flow rate, and the split ratio of water between the overflow (predominantly water) and underflow (concentrated algae) outlets. A 50-fold concentration increase requires multiple settlers set up in series. A two- or three-settler design is sufficient to increase algae concentration the desired level.

Committee:

Jorge Gatica, PhD (Committee Chair); Joanne Belovich, PhD (Committee Member); Chandra Kothapalli, PhD (Committee Member); Dhananjai Shah, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Alternative Energy; Chemical Engineering

Keywords:

Algae; Dewatering; Gravity settler; Inclined gravity settler; Fluid dynamics; Fluid flow; Particle trajectories;

Estifanos, Biniam HGeophysical Mapping of Concealed Karst and Conduits north of Bellevue, OH
Master of Science, University of Toledo, 2014, Geology
An Abstract of Geophysical Mapping of Concealed Karst and Conduits North of Bellevue, OH by Biniam H. Estifanos Submitted to the Graduate Faculty as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Geology The University of Toledo May 2014 The Bellevue region consists of thin glacio-lacustrine sediments underlain by a succession of Devonian and Silurian evaporites, carbonates and shales. These formations developed intrastratal karst due to dissolution of gypsum which was followed by subsequent collapse of the voids. This is manifested in surface expressions such as sinkholes, dolines, depressions and springs. However, there are also concealed karsts that lack surface expression. The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that gravity can delineate subsurface mass deficit and to detect water table variations. The study also tests whether electrical resistivity can detect water table variations and delineate underground rivers that flow toward Sandusky bay. Two topographic depressions about 4 km2 and 2 km2 in area were the target of this study. A microgravity survey was carried out at State Route 269, Strecker and Southwest roads while, dipole-dipole electrical resistivity surveys were done at Strecker road, a field north of Strecker road west and Hale road. A total of 346 gravity measurements and 2 km of dipole-dipole electrical resistivity profiles were conducted. A total of nine gravity lows: four on State Route 269, another four at Strecker road and one at Southwest road were delineated. Their maximum amplitude ranges between -0.075 and -0.26 mGal. The gravity lows are associated with topographic lows. The volume of the void space was calculated from the negative residual gravity and it ranges between 0.12 and 0.69 km3 depending on the density of the infill material. At Strecker road, the dipole-dipole electrical resistivity delineated three 10-20 m wide throats of sediment filled-sinkholes and a low resistivity zone underlies the Columbus limestone. The microgravity survey also suggests these sinkholes are filled with a lower density material. Repeat measurements using both methods detected changes in water table elevation. The study showed that it is possible to map areas of mass deficit within the concealed karst and both methods can detect changes in water table elevation. However, outlining underground rivers from the dipole-dipole data was not successful.

Committee:

Donald Stierman (Committee Chair); Richard Becker (Committee Member); James Martin-Hayden (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Geology

Keywords:

Karst;Gravity;Electrical Resistivity;Bellevue;Sinkhole

Sridhar, SiddharthSpacesuit and Portable Life Support System Center of Gravity Influence on Astronaut Kinematics, Exertion and Efficiency
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Engineering and Applied Science: Aerospace Engineering
NASA has initiated a series of tests aimed at understanding human physiological and biomechanical effects of spacesuits under a variety of conditions. Though these tests include metabolic rates, ground reaction forces, biomechanics, subjective workload and controllability feedback, the influences (kinematics, exertion and efficiency) of a combined spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) center of gravity (CG) during an astronaut’s extravehicular task performance has not been completely understood. The work described in this thesis was aimed at developing a quantitative means of evaluating the influence of space suit and PLSS CG location on astronaut EVA task performance in terms of kinematics (joint angular ranges), exertion (joint torques and muscle forces), and efficiency (comparative work performed). Four CG locations, representing approximate CG extremes for the NASA MK III and Z1 space suits, were evaluated using a combined experimental and computational approach. Three common EVA tasks were studied: object translation, climbing and walking. It was found that the Low-Aft CG was the best for object translation, the High-Forward CG for walking and the Low-Forward CG for climbing.

Committee:

Grant Schaffner, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Kelly Cohen, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Kristin Yvonne Rozier, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aerospace Materials

Keywords:

Spacesuit CG;Center of Gravity;Astronaut exertion;PLSS CG;Astronaut kinematics;Astronaut efficiency

Orlin, HymanGravity meter observations aboard a surface vessel and their geodetic applications /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1962, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Geology

Keywords:

Geodesy;Gravity;Gravimeters

Hajela, D. P.Direct recovery of mean gravity anomalies from satellite to satellite tracking /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1974, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Gravity;Geodetic satellites

Gopalapillai, S.Non-global recovery of gravity anomalies from a combination of terrestrial and satellite altimetry data /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1974, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Gravity

Kennedy, James ClarenceGravity gradient effects on some of the basic stability requirements for an orbiting satellite having long flexible antennae /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1967, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Artificial satellites;Antennas ;Gravity gradient booms

Katsambalos, Kostas E.Simulation studies on the computation of the gravity vector in space from surface data considering the topography of the earth /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Gravity;Geodesy;Boundary value problems

Jekeli, ChristopherThe downward continuation to the earth's surface of truncated spherical and ellipsoidal harmonic series of the gravity and height anomalies.
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1981, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Gravity anomalies;Harmonic functions

Cruz, Jaime Y.Disturbance vector in space from surface gravity anomalies using complementary models /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1985, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Gravity anomalies;Geodesy

Ragozzine, BrettModeling the Dark Matter of Galaxy Clusters Using the Tensor-Vector-Scalar Theory of Alternate Gravity
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2013, Physics and Astronomy (Arts and Sciences)
The invocation of dark matter in the universe is predicated upon gravitational observations that cannot be explained by the amount of luminous matter that we detect. There is an ongoing debate over which gravitational model is correct. The work herein tests a prescription of gravity theory known as Tensor-Vector-Scalar and is based upon the work of Angus et al. (2007). We add upon this work by extending the sample of galaxy clusters to five and testing the accepted Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) dark matter potential (Navarro et al., 1996). Our independent implementation of this method includes weak gravitational lensing analysis to determine the amount of dark matter in these galaxy clusters by calculating the gas fraction fgas = Mgas=Mtot. The ability of the Tensor-Vector-Scalar theory to predict a consistent fgas across all galaxy clusters is a measure of its liklihood of being the correct gravity model.

Committee:

Douglas Clowe (Advisor); Prakash Madappa (Committee Member); Shields Joseph (Committee Member); Meyer Hans (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Astrophysics; Physics

Keywords:

dark matter; galaxy clusters; alternate gravity; TeVeS; X-ray gas

Briju, Betsy J.Progress of Work towards Cloning Gravity Persistence Signal (gps) Mutants by PCR-Based Methods and Positional Mapping
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2011, Environmental and Plant Biology (Arts and Sciences)
Gravitropism is a growth response that enables a plant to orient its organs for efficient utilization of natural resources. A change in the gravity vector is sensed by the plant when statoliths sediment towards the new bottom of the cell. As a result, asymmetric distribution of auxin occurs, leading to differential growth. The signaling events that link statolith sedimentation and asymmetric auxin transport are still not well known. Gravity Persistence Signal mutants are a class of T-DNA tagged Arabidopsis mutants potentially defective in the signal transduction events. This research was aimed at identifying the genes altered in these mutants and thereby understanding the function of these genes in the process of gravitropism. PCR based methods such as Thermal Asymmetric Interlaced (TAIL) PCR, inverse PCR and adaptor ligation methods have been used to identify the flanking regions of the T-DNA insertion in gps2 and gps6. Although gps2 is no longer Kanamycin resistant, there is evidence that a part of the tag remains intact. The T-DNA tags in three of these mutants seem to have extended regions integrated beyond the canonical left border. PCR results also indicated a possibility of tandem tags. Southern hybridization results provide further evidence that gps5 and gps6 may have more than one T-DNA tags. The current knowledge on the T-DNA ends in both gps2 and gps6 suggests that a unique T-DNA region among the tandem tags, is present that would prove helpful in using modified PCR-based methods to identify the mutated genes. A F2 mapping population has been generated for map-based cloning of gps2 and gps6. Upon identification of homozygous plants in the F2 segregating population, screening for linked markers can be done from among the chosen 26 markers. If a pair of flanking markers are identified that are located on the same BAC or PAC, candidate genes could be found in their vicinity and therefore analyzed. Alternately, deep sequencing could be adopted to identify the candidate genes in the vicinity of these markers. Identification of GPS2 and GPS6 will help in delineating mechanisms that provide a sense of direction to the graviresponding plant.

Committee:

Sarah Wyatt, PhD (Advisor); Ahmed Faik, PhD (Committee Member); Allan Showalter, PhD (Committee Member); Frank Horodyski, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Cellular Biology; Molecular Biology; Plant Biology

Keywords:

Gravitropism; T-DNA insertion; Molecular mapping; Gravity persistence signal; Feldmann T-DNA; Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation

Langille, NicoleOf Measure and Material
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, Art
Measure and material are both the physical and conceptual components of my work. Using the body and other substances, the intangible elements of space, time, movement and gravity are made palpable. Through objects and performances, videos and drawings, the invisible is made visible with rigorous subtlety.

Committee:

Suzanne Silver (Advisor); Laura Lisbon (Committee Member); Alison Crocetta (Committee Member); Robert Derr (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Art History

Keywords:

visual art; performance art; conceptual art; time; movement; space; gravity

Ritzer, Jason AndreasThe Topography, Gravity, and Tectonics of the Terrestrial Planets
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2010, Geological Sciences
The topography and gravity of some of the solid earth bodies in our solar system including the Moon, Mercury, and Mars are used to investigate the density structure, lithospheric structure and resultant tectonic deformation. The difficulties in representing the gravitational field based on satellite data are explored including possible solutions including a change of representational basis function. The problem of representing the gravitational field based on non-uniform data distributions is addressed. Early results and expected returns from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury including compressional tectonics are studied.

Committee:

Steven Hauck, II (Committee Chair); James Van Orman (Committee Member); J. Iwan D. Alexander (Committee Member); Ralph Harvey (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Geophysics; Mathematics

Keywords:

Geophysics; Planetary Science; Geodesy; Lithosphere; Gravity; Topography; Mars; Mercury; Spherical Harmonics; Radial Basis

KARIYAWASAM, THARANGA MANOHARITheoretical Analysis of the Temperature Variations and the Krassovsky Ratio for Long Period Gravity Waves
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Arts and Sciences : Physics
Based on the assumption that they are caused by atmospheric gravity waves rather than atmospheric tides, this study aims at developing a theoretical analysis of the long period (~ 8 hour) fluctuations of both the Meinel OH band intensity and the rotational temperature. Eddy thermal conduction and eddy viscosity is included in the calculation. In addition, to account for the very long periods (approximately 8 hour), Coriolis force due to earths rotation will also be taken into account by employing the 'shallow atmosphere' approximation. The current theoretical analysis differ from the prior models in that it will include the Coriolis force and the model will deal with very long periods, and in addition the height varying background wind is also included in the discussion. Long period fluctuations in the airglow have been measured in many recent experimental observations (Taylor M.J., Gardner L.C., Pendleton W.R., Adv. Space Res., 2001). The Krassovsky ratio which determines the efficiency of producing an intensity fluctuation for a given temperature fluctuation, and also the phase difference between the intensity and temperature fluctuation will also be calculated based on the gravity wave assumption.

Committee:

Tai-Fu Tuan (Advisor); Paul Esposito (Committee Member); Serota Rostislav (Committee Member); Rohana Wijewardhana (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Physics

Keywords:

Gravity waves; Krassovsky ratio

Frankel, Leah HThe Gravity of the Ordinary
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2014, Art
This text is a supplement to my installation- and sculpture-based practice. My graduate thesis work deals with finding the extraordinary in the ordinary and calling attention to connections between us based on what we all hold in common— our relationship with the earth and our surroundings. My work questions how we can hold a universal system in our hand, observe the microscopic in a gallery space, and see the simple beauty in our everyday lives that is too often overlooked.

Committee:

Ann Hamilton (Committee Member); Laura Lisbon (Committee Member); Todd Slaughter (Advisor)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Keywords:

sculpture; installation; balloons; light; shadow; time; time-based installation; sun; water; printmaking; rope; intersection; relationship; gravity

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