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Kanetzke, Erin ElizabethPerceived Utility of Parent-Generated Family Health History as a Health Promotion Tool in Pediatric Practice
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Allied Health Sciences : Genetic Counseling

Introduction: FHH is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Pediatric practice is an optimal setting to incorporate FHH because risk factors may be identified and preventive measures implemented earlier in life, resulting in sustained and improved health outcomes. My Family Health Portrait (MFHP) is a web-based tool to help families collect and share their FHH with their health care provider. To our knowledge, providers’ views about the clinical utility of MFHP, or other parent-generated FHH tools, have not been assessed in a pediatric setting.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe how pediatric providers collect and use FHH in practice and to collect data about the perceived clinical utility of MFHP as a pediatric health promotion and disease prevention tool.

Methods: A random sample of 148 pediatric providers was invited to participate in a semi-structured qualitative interview. All transcripts were reviewed and coded inductively by two coders, and inter-rater reliability was determined.

Results: 21 providers completed study interviews. Participants unanimously collected FHH at new patient visits and when patients present with a symptom or complaint. Most providers believed that collecting FHH of chronic disease benefits the pediatric population. The most commonly cited barrier to FHH collection was the short visit time, and the most frequently suggested idea for improving FHH was collecting it prior to the office visit. Providers believed that the use of MFHP would improve FHH collection and allow for targeted education and preventive recommendations. Respondents also identified logistical and patient characteristic issues that must be resolved to integrate MFHP into clinical practice.

Conclusions: Our research suggests that pediatric primary care presents many opportunities to collect and discuss FHH with patients, and that providers are optimistic about the clinical use of a parent-generated FHH collection tool. Future research should assess parent perspectives about the use of MFHP.

Committee:

Melanie Myers, PhD (Committee Chair); John Lynch, PhD (Committee Member); Cynthia Prows (Committee Member); Robert Siegel (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Health

Keywords:

family history;pediatrics;family history collection tool;public health;patient-generated family history;my family health portrait

Fuller, Melissa SuzannePrimary Care Providers Believe Patient-Generated Family History Will Increase Ability to Assess Patient Risk
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Allied Health Sciences : Genetic Counseling
Family history is the best predictor of an individuals risk for common disease, yet it is inaccurately used in routine care. We hypothesized that patient-generated family history can improve a primary care provider's ability to asses risk without decreasing the number of patients seen. We mailed surveys to 301 providers and had a response rate of 24% (n=68). Seventy-three percent felt a computer-generated pedigree would improve their ability to assess risk as compared to their current methods. Seventy percent felt a computer-generated pedigree would either have no effect on or increase the number of patients seen in a day. Results suggest that providers feel optimistic about the potential benefits of patient-generated family history and are open to the implementation of patient-generated family history into routine care.

Committee:

Melanie Myers, PhD, MS, CGC (Committee Chair); Cynthia Prows, MSN, CNS (Advisor); Thomas Webb, MD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Genetics

Keywords:

Family history; primary care providers; common disease; genetic disease; family history tool

Knapp, Kathryn Anderson"True to me": Case studies of five middle school students' experiences with official and unofficial versions of history in a social studies classroom
PHD, Kent State University, 2013, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
This qualitative study addressed the problem of students’ lack of trust of and interest in U.S. history and focused on students’ experiences with official and unofficial versions of history in the middle school social studies classroom. A collective case study of five African American students was conducted in an eighth grade classroom at Carroll Academy, a public, urban charter school in Ohio. Interviews, questionnaires, observations, artifacts, and logs were collected and analyzed with a critical, interpretivist lens. The findings included: (a) the students were suspicious of the official historical story in the form of their textbook and teacher; (b) they shared similar rationales for the perceived motivations behind the dishonest accounts in their textbooks, and the rationales changed in similar ways throughout the course of the project; (c) although they had limited experience with unofficial history before the project, they preferred to use unofficial historical sources with the condition that one eventually corroborates accounts with official sources; (d) the experience of studying family histories created race-related instances of contradiction between unofficial and official accounts in the classroom, and (e) students developed productive forms of resistance to the grand narrative in U.S. history by the end of the study. The findings of the study offer implications for teachers of social studies. By using family history projects, teachers can engage students while helping them learn critical and historical thinking skills. They can provide a more inclusive social studies curriculum and can better understand their students’ backgrounds and historical knowledge.

Committee:

Alicia Crowe (Committee Chair); Todd Hawley (Committee Member); Tricia Niesz (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Social Studies Education

Keywords:

social studies; family history; genealogy; official history; unofficial history; grand narrative

Crane, Aimee CiaraCapturing the Present, Engaging the Future: Designing a Social History Network in a Digital Age
MFA, Kent State University, 2012, College of Communication and Information / School of Visual Communication Design

For thousands of years, stories have been the ultimate source and basic instruction for human emotion and understanding. Stories operate on many levels and communicate on multiple ways that we as humans understand and appreciate.

What makes family stories great is that they are real. These accounts capture our attention and teach us lessons in layers, while the most powerful experiences linger in our memories for years. Stories are easy to share, and become reference points for physical, emotional, mental, and sometimes spiritual connections in our lives.

Historians are systematically collecting living people's testimony and life experiences while attempting to verify and analyze their findings. People's stories are unique and valuable treasures for families and communities.

It is time to reevaluate how information such as personal narratives and memories are passed on between generations moving forward in a digital age. This thesis research will help aide families in capturing these stories the moment they happen and will create a resource for social historians, archivists, independent researchers, educators and future family members, offering more insight and guidance into everyday life in the future.

Committee:

Ken Visocky O'Grady (Advisor); Gretchen Rinnert (Committee Member); Stephen Paschen (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

family history; design research; storytelling; personal narrative

Sugiura, Shinichiro Effect of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) on Vascular Function and Insulin Sensitivity
Doctor of Philosophy, University of Toledo, 2015, Exercise Science
High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is characterized by short bursts of vigorous physical activity, interspersed by periods of rest or low-intensity exercise of varying durations. HIIT may be used as an effective alternative to traditional endurance training, resulting in similar or greater improvements in a number of physiological, performance, and health-related indices in both healthy and in individuals with chronic diseases. The present thesis examined the effects of a two-week HIIT program on measures of aerobic fitness, vascular function (Chapter 3) and insulin sensitivity (Chapter 4). The first study demonstrated no effect on flow-mediated dilation or peak oxygen uptake following two weeks of HIIT with L-arginine supplement compared to HIIT alone, although both groups improved time to exhaustion and the peak work rate during progressive ramp exercise to fatigue. The results of the second study demonstrated six session of HIIT had no effect on glucose appearance and removal (i.e. oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT) or insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals with family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or in healthy individuals without a family history of T2DM. However, results of the multiple regression analysis indicated that high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) significantly predicted insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals with a family history of T2DM. In order to prevent chronic diseases, such as T2DM, as well as other diseases that have a sedentary lifestyle as a primary risk factor, it is critical that individuals engage in regular physical activity in an effort to curb the rising trends in the prevalence of hypokinetic diseases. Although the results of the present investigation did not provide significant findings in this group of young, healthy adults, further investigations are necessary, including an examination of the physiological adaptations and compliance associated with longer term HIIT exercise programs, the inclusion of additional patient populations, and the optimal combination of exercise intensity, duration and recovery intervals in order to promote HIIT as an effective, efficient alternative training method.

Committee:

Barry Scheuermann, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Suzanne Wambold, RN, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Abraham Lee, PT, Ph.D. (Committee Member); David Weldy , MD, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health Sciences

Keywords:

High Intensity Interval Training, Flow-Mediated Dilation, Family History of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin Sensitivity

Collier, AshleyIntegration of family health history in clinical guidelines for breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Medicine: Genetic Counseling
Introduction: Family health history (FHH) is clinically useful in identifying individuals at increased risk for chronic diseases such as cancer. In this study, we assessed inclusion of FHH and genetic testing, as well as FHH integration, into counseling (patient education and psychosocial support), prevention, risk assessment, and screening guidelines for breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer. We determined the proportion of guidelines that included FHH, genetic testing, and integrated FHH. Methods: We used the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC), an online, public database of clinical practice guidelines, to identify guidelines that addressed counseling, prevention, risk assessment, and/or screening for breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer. These guidelines were coded to determine the inclusion of FHH, genetic testing, and FHH integration. FHH was coded as “well-integrated” if the guideline included all three of the following points: defined FHH in terms of familial relationship, utilized FHH to stratify risk of developing disease, and utilized FHH to recommend modified medical management. Results: 65 guidelines met inclusion/exclusion criteria (23 breast cancer, 18 colorectal cancer, four ovarian cancer, and 20 for multiple conditions). FHH was included in 46 guidelines (71%). FHH was defined with respect to familial relationship (such as first-, second-, or third-degree relative with cancer) in 26 guidelines (40%). Diagnostic genetic testing was included in 23 guidelines (35%). Colorectal cancer guidelines referenced diagnostic genetic testing in the highest proportion of guidelines (10 of the 18 colorectal cancer guidelines; 56%) and referenced a specific diagnostic genetic test in the highest proportion of guidelines (8 of the 18 colorectal cancer guidelines; 44%). FHH was well-integrated into 15 guidelines (23%). Surprisingly, 19 (29%) did not include FHH at all, and five (8%) included FHH but did not include any of the above points listed for measuring FHH integration. In the remaining 26 guidelines, only one or two of the three above points were included. FHH was well-integrated into the highest proportion of colorectal cancer guidelines (50%) and the lowest proportion of breast cancer guidelines (13%). Conclusions: This study raises awareness of the deficits of FHH integration into clinical practice guidelines for breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer. Despite being a useful tool to identify individuals at increased risk for disease who might benefit from counseling (including patient education and psychosocial guidance), risk assessment, genetic testing, and earlier or different screening/management for disease detection or prevention, FHH was not well-integrated into most guidelines. Better integration of FHH into clinical practice guidelines will help practitioners identify and manage individuals at increased risk for disease, and may result in prevention or early detection of disease.

Committee:

Melanie Myers, PhD (Committee Chair); Carlos Prada, MD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Health

Keywords:

Breast Cancer;Ovarian Cancer;Colorectal Cancer;Clinical Guidelines;Family History;;

Smith, Brandon JRisk and Control of Type II Diabetes: Perceptions of Unaffected Relatives
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2013, Medicine: Genetic Counseling
Introduction: Type II diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and is increasing in incidence across the world and especially in the United States, despite known behaviors that can reduce risk. Identifying perceptions within families regarding personal risk and control may lead to the development of effective family based interventions to reduce the incidence of type II diabetes. Methods: Phone interviews of a quantitative survey were conducted and participant responses were recorded in the online tool, CIKNOW. The variables described were perceived personal and comparative risk of developing type II diabetes and heart disease; perceived control over preventing type II diabetes and heart disease; and the risk reducing behaviors of exercise and fruit and vegetable consumption. Additionally, following data transformation, Pearsons Correlation statistics were used to identify significant associations between the collected variables. Results: A total of 13 first degree relatives of individuals with type II diabetes completed the phone interview. More participants perceived a higher comparative risk than personal lifetime risk of type II diabetes; whereas the opposite was true for heart disease. Additionally, more respondents reported a higher perceived personal risk of heart disease than type II diabetes. The majority of respondents perceived a sense of control over both type II diabetes and heart disease. Significant correlations at the .05 level included a negative correlation between exercise and perceived risk (r = -0.618, p = 0.024), and a positive correlation between perceived risk and perceived control (r = 0.637, p = 0.019). Discussion: The results indicate that participants may underestimate their personal risk of developing type II diabetes, but most agreed the diseases were controllable suggesting they understand the influence of personal behaviors on risk. The associations found in this study will require further investigation through studies with greater statistical power and larger sample sizes.

Committee:

Melanie Myers, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Ge Zhang, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Health

Keywords:

Family history;first degree relatives;type II diabetes;heart disease;perceived risk;perceived control;

WISSMAN-SCHWIEBERT, MICHELLE LEEA STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP OF DISORDERED EATING AND JOB STRESS, BODY IMAGE, FAMILY HISTORY OF DISORDERED EATING, BODY MASS INDEX, AND AGE AMONG NURSES IN THE STATE OF OHIO
MEd, University of Cincinnati, 2002, Education : Health Promotion and Education
The purpose of this study was to examine among nurses in the state of Ohio the relationship between disordered eating and family history of eating disorders, job stress, body image, age and body mass index (BMI). A survey instrument was mailed to a random sample of 1000 nurses in the state of Ohio. The results of the study indicate that there was a significant relationship between disordered eating and a family history of eating disorders, a significant relationship between disordered eating and job stress, body image, and BMI. No significant relationship was found between disordered eating and age. Previous research found that nurses are a population at risk for the development of eating disorders (McNulty, 1996). This study explored the risk factors influencing disordered eating among this population. A significant relationship was found between a high BMI and disordered eating. A high BMI is an indication that an individual is overweight and/or obese. If nurses with a high BMI are at risk for the development of disordered eating then it is important that nurses are educated of the risk so as to avoid partaking in abnormal behaviors. A family history of disordered eating was found to have a significant relationship with disordered eating. The family unit may influence an individual both biologically and socially. Body image and disordered eating also showed a significant relationship. Body image can be influenced by cultural influences as well as self-esteem. Since this is a high-risk population, more research is needed to determine if there is a personality type influencing this population to have issues with self-esteem. Job stress and disordered eating also showed a significant relationship. This result was important since it may be the easiest variable to address. If nurses are experiencing a significant amount of job stress, employers of nurses may be able to address this variable in the hopes of improving the overall well being of their staff. It is important not to generalize the results. A nurse that may have any of these risk factors may not develop abnormal eating behaviors. Eating disorders are very dynamic and many factors will influence if someone will develop the disorder.

Committee:

Dr. Keith King (Advisor)

Keywords:

eating disorders; nurses; risk factors for eating disorders; family history; body mass index

Fernandes, Sara LExploring Communication about Risk and Family Health History of Type Two Diabetes in Unaffected First Degree Relatives of an Affected Individual
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2014, Medicine: Genetic Counseling

Introduction: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is expected to affect 1 in 3 adults by 2050. This study aimed to learn more about risk perception and communication about T2D between family members, particularly unaffected first degree relatives of an individual with diabetes. Identifying ways to improve communication and reduce T2D risk among those with a family history of T2D can inform family-based risk-reduction interventions.

Methods: Semi-structured qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 33 unaffected individuals, who had a first degree relative with T2D, to gain perspectives on ways to facilitate familial T2D communication and risk reduction. Participants were recruited from the community and from a T2D pharmacogenetic study. Themes were developed using deductive and inductive codes and were applied to the transcripts.

Results: Many participants expressed worry or fear about T2D. The most common topic of conversation regarding T2D was diet, including diet as management for affected individuals and diet as prevention for unaffected individuals. Many participants felt that the biggest barrier to communication was that T2D was not relevant to people who didn’t have it. Recommendations to increase communication included becoming more educated about T2D and then sharing that education with others or appointing role models within the family who will facilitate communication.

Conclusion: Educational efforts are needed to inform family members at-risk of T2D of their own risk based on family history, as well as ways to reduce risk in addition to dietary changes. Family members with and without T2D should be encouraged to communicate with their relatives about T2D and the risk to family members. Such efforts may help increase awareness about risk and motivate at-risk individuals to modify their lifestyle to reduce their risk.

Committee:

Melanie Myers, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Lora Arduser, M.F.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Public Health

Keywords:

type 2 diabetes; social influence; family history; communication; risk perception; intervention

ROUSH, LAURA E.ANXIETY AND PERCEPTIONS OF HEALTH RISKS AS RELATED TO A FAMILY HISTORY OF LIFE-THREATENING ILLNESS
MA, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Arts and Sciences : Psychology
People close to someone with a serious illness are at increased risk for psychological distress. The purpose of the present study was to address the influences of a family history of life-threatening illness on an individual’s anxiety level and perceptions of personal risk for developing an illness. 558 students completed questionnaires assessing general anxiety, health-specific anxiety, perception of risk for developing six serious illnesses, demographic variables, and family history of life-threatening illnesses. Eighty-one percent of the participants reported having at least one relative with a serious illness history. Results found higher general anxiety levels in females with a parental history of illness. Both males and females with a family history of illness perceived themselves at higher risk for developing an illness in their lifetime as compared to those without such a family history. Both males and females were more anxious if they reported a family history of breast cancer.

Committee:

Christine Hovanitz (Advisor)

Keywords:

family history of illness; anxiety; perceived risk

Powers, Julie RaeQueer in the Holler
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2016, Art
My photographic work centers around the self and how identity is constructed through the concept of intersectionality: race, class, gender, sexuality, etc. Particularly, the work is about my own personal identity. I grew up in the “hollers” of West Virginia to a working class family whose primary income came from the coal industry. The imagery and text explores how I have come to my own contemporary understanding of my sexuality, gender performance (masculinity, specifically,) and work ethic is contrast to the traditional ideologies of my family.

Committee:

Robert Derr (Advisor); Rebecca Harvey (Committee Member); Ann Hamilton (Committee Member); Dani Leventhal (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Fine Arts

Keywords:

appalachia, west virginia, south, queer, lesbian, photography, documentary, art, butch, labor, coal, family, history,

Richardson, Carlyn M.Psychosocial associations of mammography screening: An exploratory analysis using the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 2005
Master of Science, Miami University, 2011, Family and Child Studies
This study examined compliance in mammography screening among a sample of African American and Caucasian women aged 40 and over, using data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). The socio-ecological model helped to identify the psychosocial associations that influence breast cancer screening. Compared to Caucasian women, African American women reported significantly higher psychological distress (M=1.7, SD=.69; M=1.9, SD=.84, respectively). Logistic regression indicated that race (z = 5.556), age (z = 22.933), household income (z = 8.398), health coverage (z = 6.772), and having a family history of breast cancer (z = 5.167) have significant predictive contributions to compliance.

Committee:

Sherrill Sellers, PhD (Committee Chair); Elise Radina, PhD (Committee Member); Rose Marie Ward, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Behaviorial Sciences

Keywords:

Breast cancer screening; cancer screening; mammography; mammography screening; compliance; psychosocial associations; influences of breast cancer screening; African American and Caucasian women; psychological distress; family history of breast cancer

Qualmann, Krista JExamining the Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Population: The Prognostic Value of Central Nervous System Comorbidities in Probands and their Families
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2014, Medicine: Genetic Counseling
Objective: To determine prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) comorbidities in pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery and their families, and correlate these findings with long-term seizure outcome. Methods: Parents of children, age 0-17, with epilepsy who received resective surgery at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) between January 1, 2007 – June 30, 2012 were invited to participate in the study. A three-generation pedigree of epilepsy and its CNS comorbidities was collected via an online or telephone questionnaire from 52 participants. Surgery outcome classification by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) scale was abstracted from an existing CCHMC clinical database. Proportions of affected probands and relatives were calculated and compared to the general population rates of individual comorbidities and the probands’ seizure outcome classification at their most recent follow-up evaluation. Results: Probands had significantly higher rates of ADHD, anxiety, autism, bipolar disorder, cognitive disability, depression and motor disability than the general population. First degree relatives (FDRs) had significantly higher rates of ADHD, autism, depression, and motor disability, and total relatives had higher rates of depression, epilepsy/seizures, and motor disability. Diagnoses of cognitive disability and autism in probands and autism in FDRs were associated with poorer surgery outcomes. Conclusions: Epilepsy probands and their families have significantly higher rates of CNS comorbidities than the general population. Poorer long-term seizure outcomes following resective surgery were associated with diagnoses of autism or cognitive disability in probands and autism in FDRs. Together these data support evidence for a common pathophysiological mechanism between epilepsy and its comorbidities.

Committee:

Melanie Myers, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Hansel Matthias Greiner, M.D. (Committee Member); Paul Horn, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Christine Spaeth, M.S. C.G.C. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Genetics

Keywords:

Epilepsy;Intractable;Resective Surgery;Comorbidity;Family History

GUTH, RYAN K.HOME TRUTHS
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2002, Arts and Sciences : English and Comparative Literature
This dissertation consists of two parts: a collection of original poetry entitled Home Truths, and a critical essay entitled "Exploring Technical Difficulties: A Reader's Negotiation with the Stylistic Innovations of Ulysses, Episode 12." Home Truths, a four-part sequence of lyric and narrative poems, is based on people and events in the author's family. Part I records the author's memories of conflict between his father and members of his mother's family. Part II, based on letters and photographs, documents the decisions which led to the conflict, while Parts III and IV attempt an imaginative reconstruction of the events themselves, as well as the central characters' responses to them. The principal theme of the poems is the gap between received cultural roles and lived experience - gaps which are filled, not always successfully, by the improvising of new roles and responses. In addition, since the crucial events took place before the author was born, his effort to posit and examine a web of likely (but never verifiable) circumstances, misunderstandings, and emotions, becomes an important subsidiary theme of the sequence. The article, "Experiencing Technical Difficulties," discusses the technical innovations of Ulysses, Episode 12, specifically exploring the implications for the novel (and for its readers) of the alternation between first-person narration and the numerous parodic set-pieces.

Committee:

Dr. Don Bogen (Advisor)

Subjects:

Fine Arts; Literature, Modern

Keywords:

home truths; family history; James Joyce; Ulysses; poetry

Ash, KathleenThe relationship between family history of disease and adherence to a DASH dietary pattern by adolescents with high blood pressure
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2013, Allied Health Sciences: Nutrition
Purpose: To investigate the relationship between family history of cardiovascular disease (inclusive of heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke) and adherence to a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) type dietary pattern by adolescents with high blood pressure. Subjects: 111 adolescents ages 11- 18 diagnosed with either pre-hypertension or stage I hypertension, who voluntarily participated in a nutrition intervention program promoting a DASH type dietary plan were included in this study. Methods: All participants were recruited from Cincinnati Children's Hypertension Center (CCHC) located at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC). Subjects were randomly selected to be in one of two groups: the DASH-4-Teens intervention group or usual care group. Both groups received dietary counseling focusing on the development of a DASH type dietary pattern, rich in fruits, vegetables, and low fat dairy products and low in sodium and fat. Only those participants who completed both the baseline and 6 month follow up visit were included in these analyses. Multiple regression mixed models were used to evaluate the association between family history of diseases and change in DASH score which represented adherence. Statistical significance was defined as P<0.05. Data analysis was conducted using SAS version 9.2 (SAS Inc., Daly, NC, USA). Results: A family history of heart attack was significantly associated with a positive change in DASH score, and change in DASH fruit component score. There were no significant relationships between family history of high blood pressure and stroke and change in DASH score or independent DASH component scores. Conclusion: Based on these findings, family history of heart attack predicted a positive change in adolescent DASH score and DASH fruit score. Additional research is needed to confirm these relationships and determine why these relationships exist. If family history of heart disease proves to be a predictor of adolescent adherence to a therapeutic diet to lower blood pressure, it may be useful to emphasize the familial relationships between high blood pressure and heart disease to positively influence adherence to the DASH dietary pattern.

Committee:

Abigail Peairs, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Sarah Couch, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Nutrition

Keywords:

adolescents;hypertension;adherence;DASH diet;family history

Balka, HannahCharacterizing pediatric narcolepsy: family history and familial autoimmunity
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2016, Medicine: Genetic Counseling
Objective: We examined the prevalence of family histories of narcolepsy and other autoimmune diseases in a pediatric narcolepsy population in order to evaluate narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease and help clinicians provide better risk assessment. Methods: Study participants were 46 children diagnosed with narcolepsy between the ages of 0-21 who received care at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC). A retrospective chart review collected clinical sleep study data and HLA genotype results. A structured interview was given to patients and their guardians to assess the family histories of narcolepsy and other autoimmune diseases. Results: The median age of excessive daytime sleepiness onset was 8.2 years, the median MSL was 2.95 minutes and the median number of SOREMPs was 5. Over half of patients had narcolepsy type 1 and median age of cataplexy onset was 9.9 years. Almost all (94%) of our patients had at least one HLA DQB1*06:02 allele. Seven individuals (15.2%) had a family history of narcolepsy and 20 (43.4%) had a family history of autoimmune disease. Eight individuals (17.4%) met the definition of familial autoimmunity. Conclusions: Polysomnography and HLA genotyping confirmed that our pediatric population is representative of the larger narcolepsy population. The prevalence of a positive family history of autoimmune diseases is higher than expected. Narcolepsy appears to fit within cases of familial autoimmunity, providing additional evidence for narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease.

Committee:

Thomas John Dye, M.D. (Committee Chair); Emily J. King Partack, M.S. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Genetics

Keywords:

narcolepsy;family;history;autoimmune;familial

Cunningham, Connie K.ECHOES FROM HENDERSON HALL: THE HISTORY OF ONE PIONEER FAMILY SETTLING IN THE OHIO VALLEY
Masters in Education, Marietta College, 2006, Education
Every family has a history. It may be filled with heroism, patriotism, and fame, or it may be filled with treachery, violence, and shame. Regardless of the content, it is the legacy and heritage of the family’s descendents. This researcher has attempted to convey the story of one family whose pioneer ancestry began in old Virginia and extended into the beautiful river bottoms of the Ohio Valley. Entwined in the legacy of the Henderson family is their friendship with George Washington, disclosure of the treasonous plans of Aaron Burr and Harman Blennerhassett, and a court case over a runaway slave. From the House of Burgesses to the modern renovation of the train depot of Williamstown, West Virginia in 1998, this pioneer family’s legacy covers over 250 years of written and oral history that deserves to be heard, for it is a heritage that exceeds the boundaries of family. It is the heritage of a people, a region, a country, and a nation.

Committee:

William Bauer (Advisor)

Subjects:

History, United States

Keywords:

HENDERSON FAMILY HISTORY; Anna; HENDERSON HALL; Rosalie

HARBISON, ANDREA EA CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A 5TH GRADE LITERACY BROCHURE ABOUT FAMILY HEALTH HISTORY
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Allied Health Sciences : Genetic Counseling
The US Surgeon General’s office encourages people to use their family health history as a screening tool for disease prevention and health promotion. When preparing health awareness materials, it is important to consider that 47% of the US population demonstrates limited literacy. We developed a brochure written at a 5th grade reading level about the importance of family history and then assessed peoples’ responses to this brochure as compared to a brochure with similar information written at an 11th grade reading level. Study participants (n=351), adults from 16 to 65 years old, were recruited from community settings. 179 participants (51%) had some high school education; 172 (49%) had some college education. Each participant read one brochure and completed a 10 question survey assessing participants’ attitudes about family health history and their intentions to act on the information they had read. Overall, participants who read the 5th grade literacy brochure were more likely to agree with each positively worded statement on the survey. A brochure written at a 5th grade level is an effective method of teaching adults of all education levels about the importance of family health history and is more effective than a higher literacy brochure, especially for individuals with less education.

Committee:

Dr. Nancy Warren (Advisor)

Subjects:

Health Sciences, Education

Keywords:

Family health; adult literacy; low literacy; patient education materials; patient literacy; adult education; family history

Patel, Krishna DKnowledge, perception, and risk reducing behaviors among female college students with family history of osteoporosis
MS, Kent State University, 2016, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Health Sciences
PATEL, KRISHNA D., M.S., December 2016 Nutrition KNOWLEDGE, PERCEPTION, AND RISK REDUCING BEHAVIORS OF FEMALE COLLEGE STUDENTS WITH FAMILY HISTORY OF OSTEOPOROSIS (197 pp) Director of Thesis: Eun-Jeong (Angie) Ha, Ph.D. Family history of osteoporosis (FHO) has been recognized as one of the most important risk factors for osteoporosis development (Iqbal, 2000). The amount of bony tissue present at the end of skeletal maturation, known as peak bone mass, has been identified as a crucial component for osteoporosis prevention (Rizzoli, & Bonjour, 1999; Valimaki et al., 1994). The primary objective of this study was to assess knowledge and perception about osteoporosis and risk reducing behaviors of female college students with family history of osteoporosis in comparison with those without FHO. The secondary purpose of this study was to compare modifiable risk factors between the two groups. Inclusion criteria was limited to female college students enrolled at Kent State University in spring 2016 semester ages 18 and older. Family history was determined by self-reported data from participants indicating a FHO or fragility fractures in first- or second-degree relatives. Analysis of the data revealed that 95 students had FHO, making up 16.4% of the sample. Results showed there were significant differences in general knowledge and modifiable risk factors of osteoporosis, and risk perception between female college students with FHO and female college students without FHO (P=0.05). However, no significant differences in perception in risk reducing behaviors and modifiable risk factors were noted between the two groups (P=0.05). Future studies with a more consistent method of recording calcium intake and including calcium/vitamin supplementation questions are needed to reconfirm the findings of this study.

Committee:

Eun-Jeong (Angie) Ha (Advisor); Natalie Caine-Bish (Committee Member); Karen Gordon (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health Sciences; Nutrition

Keywords:

family history of osteoporosis; knowledge of osteoporosis; osteoporosis risk reducing behaviors; modifiable risk factors of osteoporosis; perceived risk reducing behaviors

Nadkarni-DeAngelis, Radha BhaskarClinical Course of Children with a Depressive Spectrum Disorder and Transient Manic Symptoms
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2009, Psychology
The present study (Multi-family Psychoeducation Group) provides 18-month longitudinal follow-up of children diagnosed with depressive spectrum disorder (DSD; major depressive disorder and/or dysthymic disorder) who present with clearly demarcated transient manic symptoms (TMS) of insufficient number or duration to be diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder (BPSD; Bipolar-I, Bipolar-II, Cyclothymia, Bipolar-Not Otherwise Specified). Assessments were conducted at four time points, baseline (Time 1), 6 months (Time 2), 12 months (Time 3) and 18 months (Time 4). At Time 1 there were 115 participants in the BPSD group, 37 in the DSD + TMS group, and 13 in the DSD group. Due to sample attrition in the DSD + TMS and DSD groups, at Time 2 these two groups had 38 participants, at Time 3, 35 participants, and at Time 4, 33 participants. Measures that assessed socio-demographic variables, IQ (Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test), mood and co-morbid diagnoses (Children’s Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes – Child and Parent form [ChIPS/P-ChIPS]), clinical presentation (Mania Rating Scale, Children’s Depression Rating Scale – Revised, Children’s Global Assessment Scale, duration of prodromes), family environment (Coddington’s Life Events Scale, Expressed Emotion Adjective Checklist) and family history (Family History Research Diagnostic Criteria, Parental Mood Severity Index [calculated using Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Mania Rating Scale]) were collected at Time 1. I hypothesized that: 1) at Time 1, children with DSD + TMS will have lower C-GAS scores than children with DSD but higher scores than children with BPSD; 2) children with DSD + TMS at Time 1 will convert to BPSD at follow-up at a higher rate than children with DSD at Time 1; 3) conversion rates differed will not differ for DSD + TMS participants regardless of treatment status; 4) children with DSD + TMS at Time 1 who convert to BPSD at follow–up (converted group) will have greater impairment in clinical presentation, family environment and/or family history compared to children with DSD + TMS at Time 1 who do not convert (non-converted group). A secondary hypothesis was: the converted group will be more impaired on components of clinical presentation, family environment and/or family history than the non-converted group. Hypothesis 1, 3 and 4 were not supported. Hypothesis 2 was supported. The conversion rate from DSD + TMS to BPSD was 48% whereas the conversion rate from DSD to BPSD was 12.5% suggesting that TMS in a DSD population is a risk factor for conversion. This is particularly important, as pharmacologic treatments for children with depression and/or ADHD can destabilize children with bipolar disorder (Geller et al., 1992; Reichart & Nolen, 2004). Contrary to the hypothesis, for DSD + TMS participants, the one year wait-list control group (WLC) conversion rate was 60% whereas the immediate treatment group (IMM) conversion rate was 16% suggesting that psychosocial treatment may be beneficial. The secondary hypothesis was supported only for C-GAS scores. The converted group had lower C-GAS scores at Time 1 than the non-converted group. Clinical descriptions of converters and non-converters, limitations, clinical implication and future research ideas are discussed.

Committee:

Mary Fristad, PhD (Advisor); Steven Beck, PhD (Committee Member); Julian Thayer, PhD (Committee Member); James McAuley, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Psychology

Keywords:

depression; mania; hypomania; irritability; children; conversion; bipolar disorder; depressive disorder; aggression; medication; dysthymia; major depressive disorder; risk factors; family history; family environment; clinical presentation; C-GAS; ADHD