Search Results (1 - 25 of 30 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Carr, Nicolas“THE GAME DON’T CHANGE” Designing Beats and Rhymes, A metaphor and guide to ideate design concepts
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
This research aimed to investigate how to integrate the design process with creative techniques found in rap music production in order to help architects, product and fashion designers ideate concepts. To understand this integration, interviews and surveys were performed to develop connections between the creative processes of designers and rap musicians. Later on, the research findings were synthesized into sets of design hip hop methodologies that were combined and developed into a guideline intended for designers. After exploring different frameworks to communicate this guideline, a website was created as a prototype. Both designers and non-designers evaluated the website. Their positive feedback proved that integrating the design process with hip hop methodologies improves the creativity and innovation of design concepts. It also makes a powerful connection for youth who are engaged in rap music to be inspired and educated about design.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, M.I.D. (Committee Chair); Stephen Slaughter, M.Arch. (Committee Member); Noel Anderson, M.F.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Creativity;Innovation;Design Process;Rap Music;Concepts;Hip Hop

Yen, Wei-TingProduct Physical Interface Design Characteristics for Older Adults with Hand Use Limitations
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2011, Industrial and Systems Engineering
Older people often experience difficulties in performing the activities of daily living. There are two knowledge gaps associated with the problem. First, there is a research void in understanding the relationship between product interface design characteristics and hand dysfunction levels in older populations. Taking jar lids as an example of the product interface as the focus of this study, associations between jar lid design characteristics and the user experiences of older people with hand disability were explored. When investigating jar lid design characteristics, to the best of our knowledge, no prior published research specifically studied older people who were known to have difficulties opening or closing jar lids or who reported experiencing hand pain around the time of their study participation. Second, methods and tools for making it easier for industrial designers to produce inclusive designs during product design processes are still insufficient. Although there are many Human Factors design assist tools available for designers to use, it has been found that designers seldom consult these established resources. It was recognized that a gap still exists between Human Factors information explorers (e.g. engineering researchers) and information users (e.g. designers). Therefore, the aim of the study was to address knowledge limitations in two important areas by applying Ergonomics and product design research methodologies, in concert, to (1) discover what lid design features can improve the user experience of older people with hand impairment, and (2) discover what concepts of Human Factors design assist tools can satisfy the practical needs of industrial designers when solving design problems, such as jar lids that facilitate opening and closing by a wide range of potential users. Accordingly, there were three phases of research activities included: Phase 1 (“Exploration”) – Exploring different levels of user experiences when interacting with product interfaces; Phase 2 (“Evaluation”) – Evaluating product interface design characteristics through controlled experimental tests; and Phase 3 (“Communication”) – Investigating industrial designers’ needs when using an electronic Human Factors design assist tool during the product design process. For Phase 1 and 2, older females (65 years of age or older) with declined hand function, and for Phase 3, industrial designers who had at least one year of work experience in industry were recruited into the study. According to the lid design evaluation results, lid height was the strongest factor associated with the levels of perceived effort when turning a lid. For both medium lids (e.g. 42 mm in diameter) and small lids (e.g. 28 mm in diameter), the design that was rated the lowest in perceived effort to turn was the one with a tall height and a hexagonal top shape. As to the investigation of designer’s usage of Human Factors information during the design process, the result showed that most of designers used Human Factors information in the beginning (e.g. “Information Gathering”) and the end (e.g. “Evaluating and Refining Prototype”) of the design process. If compared with designers with less years of work experience, a higher percentage of designers with more than 20 years of experience would use Human Factors information to support their ideation. In addition, they tended to start their concept evaluations earlier in the design process. The study identified barriers to use of Human Factors information by designers. In addition, it demonstrated how participatory design can be applied to learn about needs of designers and features for a design assist tool that designers would find useful, usable and desirable.

Committee:

Carolyn Sommerich, PhD (Advisor); Steven Lavender, PhD (Committee Member); Sharon Flinn, PhD (Committee Member); Elizabeth Sanders, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Industrial Engineering

Keywords:

Jar lid design; Hand dysfunction; Hand function assessment; Focus group; Participatory design process; Human Factors/Ergonomics; Industrial Design; Design assist tools

Benzenberg, Elizabeth Marie AcoxExploring Design Process Evolution in Architecture and Interior Design Firms
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2011, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design

Architects and interior designers must work together and with others on the design team in a series of processes in order for the building projects they undertake to be successful. The two major processes that they go through are the creative decision-making process as well as the project timeline and process. These two processes must be able to work within one another in order to produce a successful outcome.

Along with changes in the creative decision-making and the project processes, two shifts are taking place in how architects and interior designers bureaucratically manage a project. The first is a shift in the type of technology used to share concepts and document design. The second is a shift in project management that begins to include the client (and other stakeholders) earlier in the process, thus increasing the size of the design team. These two shifts have a great affect on one another and are continuously co-evolving.

This thesis first defines processes historically used in the architecture and interior design professions through secondary research and a literature review. These discipline specific processes are compared and contrasted with processes gathered from general design and related disciplines such as engineering design, product design, and software design. Second, this thesis documents primary research (in the form of interviews), which seeks to identify processes that currently utilize new technologies and expanded project team within the architecture and interior design profession. In summary, the results are analyzed, compared to secondary research, and a new process is suggested as the next step in the evolution of the design process.

Committee:

Jeffrey Haase (Advisor); Heike Goeller (Committee Member); Blaine Lilly (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture; Design; Interior Design

Keywords:

interior design; architecture; process; process evolution; design process; design

Lindsey, Gwendolyn SweezeyUSING THE DESIGN PROCESS AS A MODEL FOR WRITING A GUIDE TO MAKING MAILLE ARMOUR
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2005, Family and Consumer Sciences-Clothing, Textiles and Interiors
Maille Armour, also known as chain mail, is an intricate fabric of inter-linked metal rings which are passed through each other in a specific pattern to create a strong, flexible material. It has been used by many cultures throughout the ages and is still being used today. For an individual interested in making maille, it can be difficult to find instructional materials. This applied thesis utilized the design process as elucidated in Don Koberg and Jim Bagnall’s The Universal Traveler to design, write, and evaluate the process of creating a manuscript for an instructional book on making maille armour and other maille items. The process Koberg and Bagnall describe involves seven stages: acceptance of the situation or problem, analysis, definition, ideation, selection, implementation, and evaluation.

Committee:

Virginia Gunn (Advisor)

Keywords:

Design process; armour; armor; chain mail; maille

Mierke, David S.project: spARCH: Igniting Design Thinking Through Architecture How the Architectural Design Process can Inspire Social Entrepreneurship
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture

The Issue

As the world continues to expand and business partnerships become ever more global, CEO’s and project managers are consistently looking for news ways to innovate and stay ahead of their competition. Likewise, the most pressing issues such as homelessness, poverty, and global warming still plague our world necessitating a change of approach in order to reverse these dilemmas.

While the world waits for the next invention, advocates of design are calling for a revolution and a new way of thinking. Consistently thought of as “cosmetics” and “final touches,” design has been regulated to the confines of grade school arts-and-crafts. However, those who understand the true potential of design and design thinking realize the creative and innovative potential the profession offers. As corporations and the real-world ring the bell for original, innovative, and out-of-the-box employees, schools across the country are eliminating student’s creative outlet, art class, and instead are delivering soldier-like droids whose capabilities are pre-determined by standardized tests.

The Response

In order to combat the test-driven principles of the education system and display the true potential design has, a new method must be developed. A method rooted in social entrepreneurship in order to pass along the process, tools, and techniques that will help any individual look beyond their scope of the world and not only see the potential, but begin to attain it.

Project: spARCH (pronounced ‘spark’) is a high school design studio that teaches 25 inner-city high school students in Cincinnati, Ohio about the power of design thinking through architecture. Hughes STEM High School is a non-selective inner city public school that serves an at-risk population, primarily African-American, and focuses on helping students apply their education to the real world through business and community partnerships in the Greater Cincinnati Area.

By following a process that focuses on breaking down the creative barrier and opening student’s minds to new ways of thinking, students will be taught how creative problem solving, critical thinking, and out-of-the-box approaches can extend beyond the classroom and apply to situations in their own lives.

With a series of guest mentors from professional firms around the Greater CIncinnati Area as well as local organizations heads and faculty members from the University of Cincinnati, students will be able to obtain guidance, inspiration, and first hand knowledge about how the skills taught in this course can be applied beyond the typical “walls” of design and the classroom.

Committee:

John Eliot Hancock, MARCH (Committee Chair); Jeffrey Tilman, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Social Entrepreneurship; Design Thinking; Design Process; project: spARCH; Hughes High School; Cincinnati;

Lu, Tai-HungA Guideline for Designing Habitual and Persuasive Systems
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2017, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
For years, designers focused on styling, technology, and usability, but neglected to consider the users’ motivation. This study not only introduces a new perspective for designers but also serves as a design tool to create or evaluate persuasive and habit- forming systems. This study provides a general guideline for developing persuasive and habit-forming systems by helping designers to discover consumers’ motivations, pain points, and possible drivers that could persuade consumers. For designers, knowledge of persuasive and habit-forming design is important since they want consumers to use or purchase their products or services. However, in many situations, the design team fails to persuade their users because they lack the knowledge of persuasive and habit- forming design. Creating persuasive and habit-forming systems is complex, and it is full of restrictions. However, design based on a good understanding of persuasive and habit-forming systems can be very successful. Therefore, by understanding the relationship between users’ motivations and behaviors, designers can produce a more fruitful and positive outcome for their users.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, M.I.D. (Committee Chair); Gerald Michaud, M.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Persuasive design;Habit-forming design;Motivation;Behavior;Design Thinking;Design Process

Green, JuliaDesign Thinking for Conceptualization
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2017, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
Through observation in undergraduate design studios, it was found that the ability of translating ideas into concept proved to be taxing for students. This study identifies the ambiguity between idea and concept generation in the design process and proposes a solution through a design thinking methodology known as `Idea Propagation’. Research began with a comprehensive examination of design thinking, pedagogy and methods through a literature review. Qualitative testing followed with three participatory rounds involving undergraduate design students and one involving the researcher through applied research methods.The proposed design methodology known as `Idea Propagation’ is the result of testing, framed through investigatory phases involving reflective, semantic, contextual and aesthetic analysis. Implementing these principles in a successful comprehensive order is the result of testing analysis, thus leading to a proposed solution known as the `Idea Propagation’ method.

Committee:

Steven Doehler (Committee Chair); Phyllis| Borcherding (Committee Member); Cynthia Lockhart (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Conceptualization;Design Process;Pre-Concept Design;Design Methods;Design Pedagogy;Design Research

Brallier, Lauren AA Point of Tension: Using Personas to Improve the Apparel Design Process
MA, Kent State University, 2016, College of the Arts / School of Art
The objective of this study was to improve the apparel design process through the integration of personas within the research phase. A persona is an imaginary character, developed through consumer research and analysis, which is then refined for the purpose of design. A mixed methods approach was used in order to collect statistical data and participant narratives from individuals within the BMX community in order to develop accurate personas and validate what item of clothing needed improvement. As hypothesized, the majority of respondents (48.21%), stated that the design of pants could be improved to better meet the needs and requirements of the BMX sport. From the data analysis, only one persona was evident within the BMX community, but several purchase profiles emerged with the persona. Regarding the design of pants, respondents proclaimed that fit, ventilation, and flexibility were the most frustrating aspects about the current selection available, specifically identifying the crotch, knees, and legs as problem areas. When analyzing prospective pants, participants revealed that comfort, functionality, quality, and flexibility were the most the desired features. Research considered and after extensive sampling, a new and improved pants design was developed based on the persona and three separate pairs were constructed as versatile styles. Based on participants’ feedback, the improved design was approved and deemed a success. Therefore, it was concluded that the development of better functional and aesthetic clothing for BMX riders was improved by applying personas into the research phase of the apparel design process.

Committee:

Linda Ohrn-McDaniel (Advisor)

Subjects:

Design; Fine Arts; Home Economics; Marketing; Mass Media; Materials Science; Social Research; Sports Management

Keywords:

BMX; apparel design process; persona

Duncan, ErinDesign and Critical Thinking: A Process Model to Support Critical, Creative and Empathic Learning in Studio-based Design Education
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design
The work that will be done by designers in the future will not be what it is today. In order to respond to new opportunities for creation and innovation, our user-centered methods for learning, creating, and working must be adapted and revitalized. The changes that are taking place in design and in society will have an impact not only on the practice of design but on design education as well. In light of the ever-changing global economy, it is important for students, as future designers and global citizens, to increase and activate their capacity for critical thinking, creativity and empathy. Interior designers use several skills and ways of thinking in order to develop successful projects for a wide variety of social, physical and functional contexts. In order to understand and to respond to the diverse needs of project stakeholders—clients, end users, consultants, and others—a designer must be able to analyze, synthesize and evaluate a vast amount of complex information. This practice depends on one’s ability to think critically, creatively and empathically. To guide and organize the focus of their work, designers use a multi-phase process. This design process acts iterative cycle, which often requires a designer to toggle between phases in order to fully understand and respond to a problem. At its core, the design process is one that is fueled by creative problems solving, and is universal to a broad range of design disciplines. In design education, studio-based courses use the design process to support student learning through the creation of concepts and problem solutions for projects in response to specific objectives, criteria and constraints. As such, it provides the organizational structure for teaching and learning. This thesis explores the structures and functions of three categories of thought and communication: critical thinking, creativity and empathy. The interrelation and interdependence of these modes form the central focus of this investigation. Building upon the knowledge gained through a review of current literature on critical thinking, creativity and empathy, primary research in the form of classroom observations, a survey and in-depth interviews with design educators. In response to insights and understanding that emerged through this research, a process model for the integration of the cognitive and affective practices into a studio-based curriculum was developed. The process model has implications for the current and future development of the interior design education. The framework links the essential components of critical thinking to the phases of the interior design process. As a result, a new dimension of the discipline begins to emerge. In the context of the proposed process model, several methods that can be used to support critical, creative and empathic learning by activating cognitive skills and affective mindsets are identified. These learning methods and proposed exercises are supported by examples that show outcomes of student work and professional practice.

Committee:

Heike Goeller (Advisor); Susan Melsop (Committee Member); Candace J. Stout, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Design Education; Interior Design; Critical Thinking; Creativity; Empathy; Design Process

Scudieri, Paul AnthonyA Constraint Based Model of the Design Process: Complexity, Uncertainty, and Change
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2013, Industrial and Systems Engineering
Products, users, cultures, and designers all interact in complex, non-linear ways, as designers, users, and organizations each attempt to meet their own unique goals. The design and performance of today’s products are influenced by technological change, mechanical design, design for manufacture, human factors, psychology, anthropology, legal concerns, regulations, and market pressures. As a result, product design is inherently multidisciplinary, and there is a need to balance a complex set of factors that characterizes the product’s performance. Additionally, in a truly complex environment, designs are not static. Trade-offs, uncertainty, and change typify most physical products, as designs shift and grow alongside users, patterns of use, and contexts. In ways strongly reminiscent of coevolution, artifacts shape stakeholders’ understandings, tasks, and goals, just as those things shape future designs. This is central to what makes design challenging to do, and to study. This work serves as an introduction to complex systems, and explains in detail the principles, patterns, and phenomenon that underlie the design and performance of physical artifacts. It attempts to help designers of all types to navigate complexity within the design process, and to manage its effects on artifacts themselves. This was accomplished in three primary ways: an overview of existing complexity literature, the introduction of a constraint framework, and the development of a constraint management tool. This work present a solid theoretical background grounded in engineering design theory, as well as elements of complex adaptive systems, design constraints, product architecture, and design evolution. It situates products and contemporary product design in the larger field of complex adaptive systems, and shows how CAS theory can be usefully applied to better understand the behavior of products in rapidly changing markets. Based upon this understanding, a method for rigorously structuring product design problems based on a well–defined set of constraints common to all design–related disciplines is proposed. This constraint framework contributes to design education and practice by providing a scaffold for transdisciplinary instruction and communication with regard to the complexity of product design processes. Finally, this work presents an Excel-based software tool to assist design teams in applying constraints and complexity concepts to design problems. Based on existing matrix modeling methodologies (Design Structure Matrix, House of Quality, etc.), this tool tracks constraint interactions and trade-offs in order to help designers anticipate potential failures, and identify innovative opportunities. This tool was developed and tested in a senior/graduate level course in product design engineering at the Ohio State University. The two conducted studies attempt to assess the impact of the tool on many aspects of the design process including teamwork, design outcomes, creativity, utility, and communication. When utilized in tandem, the constraint framework and the constraint tool can increase the conceptual and practical accessibility of the complexity that underlies every product design process. If used appropriately, these methods provide a platform for understanding, exploration, and design that can help designers of all types to develop solutions that are better aligned to the constraint environment that characterizes their unique design contexts.

Committee:

Blaine Lilly (Advisor); Carolyn Sommerich (Committee Member); Elizabeth Sanders (Committee Member); Carolina Gill (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Industrial Engineering

Keywords:

product design; design; complexity; constraints; design theory; design process

Jaspart, Marie C.Emergence in Vehicle Design: Using the Concept of Emergence to Provide a New Perspective on the Creative Phases of the Automobile Design Process
MDes, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Design
Beauty, usefulness, desirability, low-cost, power, and sustainability are some of the numerous ideals that make the design of a vehicle complex and challenging. The understanding of emergence, a fundamental creative process originally found in natural systems, might provide insight for the stakeholders in the vehicle design process who wish to create innovative solutions. In this study, an exploration of this notion in design is presented, with specific examples for car design. The principles set forth by Johnson for building a system with adaptability and macro-intelligence, are analyzed. Then, several methods for implementing these principles in the car design team are suggested, along with a strategy for facilitating the emergence of innovative vehicle designs in the context of the car industry.

Committee:

Dale Murray, MA (Committee Chair); Dennis Puhalla, PhD (Committee Member); Brigid O'Kane (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

emergence;vehicle design;automobile design process;innovative design;creative process;systems thinking

Bean, Trenton WilliamScenic Design for a Production of John Dempsey's and Dana P. Rowe’s Zombie Prom
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2014, Theatre
Zombie Prom by John Dempsey and Dana P. Rowe was a musical theatre production presented during the fall semester of 2013 produced by The Ohio State University Department of Theatre. This thesis is a documentation of the process of scenic design for this show. The first chapters are a discussion of the pre-production elements of the project and the collaboration with the production team. Later chapters will discuss the design aspects in terms of the director’s concepts, my analysis of the script, the technical aspects that brought the production to the Thurber Theater, and my evaluation of the final product. Briefly, the director’s concept for the scenery was to uphold the tenants of the love of artifice, the sentimentality toward the past, and the serious intentions of “pure” Camp.

Committee:

Brad Steinmetz, MFA (Advisor); Janet Parrott, MA (Committee Co-Chair); Amanda Fox, MFA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Theater; Theater Studies

Keywords:

Theatre; Production Design; Technical Theatre; Design Process; Scenic Design; Scene Design; Design; Scenery Design; Zombie Prom

Romaniuk, OlhaDesigning in the Context of Urban Heterotopia: Participative Programming and Narrative Formation through Transversal Design Process
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)

While historically a building design process involved a typical top-down, client-architect relationship, this hierarchical process is no longer effective in addressing the emerging heterotopic conditions of a contemporary city. With an evolving image of a Creative City, a term borrowed from Charles Landry, as a product of accumulation of collective cultural capital replacing the more traditional image of a city as system of hierarchies of control, it is evident that a client-architect power struggle prevalent in traditional linear methodology of programming is becoming obtrusive to effective programming processes of urban spaces today.

Even though the prevalent top-down approach to programming still serves as a model for programming of most of the building projects in the United States today, it is becoming inadequate at keeping up with the emerging requirements for multiplicity of user needs and typologies in its limited contextual and physical response to dense urban environments. A potential for reformulating the current methodology of programming into a transversal and participatory decision-making process can be established by examining several major architectural competitions and the structural dynamics working within them.

The derived methodology can serve as a model for conducting successful design competitions in the future that will be more likely to result in context-informed design solutions that take into an account multiple clients and stakeholders. This methodology and the participation of multiple stakeholders, in turn, will be able to ensure that the architectural responses to the proposed design challenges address a project’s potential for longevity and adaptability through contextual implications of the dense urban fabric of a city.

Committee:

Aarati Kanekar, PhD (Committee Chair); Michael McInturf, MARCH (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

heterotopia;contextualism;architectural competitions;design process;philadelphia;stakeholder participation

Acharjee, TapasInvestigating Accumulation of Tolerances and its Impact on Reliability of Job Site Installation
MS, University of Cincinnati, 2007, Engineering : Civil Engineering

Architecture-Engineering-Construction projects may account for product and process design tolerances within drawings and specifications. However, as projects combine a series of components, these tolerances will accumulate. Failure to manage this accumulation can result in component misfits or poor quality of installed work, revealing a lack of product and process design integration.

This thesis investigates how tolerance accumulation contributed to breakdowns in bleacher installation on a tennis court project. Building upon earlier work, we create product tolerance, process sequence maps, and generate a tolerance accumulation matrix for a bleacher module to identify components that have the greatest impact on job-site assembly. We discuss how to prevent breakdowns on future projects by restructuring work to enable predictable workflow and achieve better built-in quality. In particular, we explore how to introduce poka-yoke devices as well as changes in contracting, work sequencing, modularity, and new product development to achieve efficient delivery of bleacher systems.

Committee:

Cynthia Tsao (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Civil

Keywords:

Tolerances; Variability; Work Structuring; Constructability; Reliability; Product Design; Process Capability

Sheeks, Andrew VScripted Narratives as Architectural Process
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2013, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture
Scripting has become a buzzword in architecture, partly due to the proliferation of algorithmic and parametric design techniques in the field. While the influence of digital technology within architecture is without question, it can be said that the genesis of logically driven architectural processes greatly precedes the digital revolution. A comparison can be made between digital processes and how Fordism favored the assembly line process over product. Fordism and assembly line production methods were influential to architects during the first half of the twentieth century, as these designers emulated the aesthetic and formal qualities of industrially-produced objects. The system Ford invented had impact across all disciplines, including in architectural profession, and it resulted in the architect being delinquent as the creator of form, and becoming the controller of design processes similar to the assembly line. As architecture sought a means of expressing how it had been made, the diagram as a generative device became a prevalent method of expressing inherent logical operations. This thesis takes the position that architectural objects are representations of inherent logical processes contained within them. These systems form abstract diagrams, or body-plans, which ultimately translate quite literally to architectural form. By analyzing existing (constant) spatial conditions and introducing (variable) contextual forces, a sequential process is constructed, which through a series of diagrams, narrates the logic of operations.

Committee:

Michael McInturf, M.Arch. (Committee Chair); Nnamdi Elleh, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

diagramming;architecture;Fordism;design process;Peter Eisenman;parametricism

Shahi, SepidehBusiness sensible design: Exploratory research on the importance of considering cost and profit for undergraduate industrial design students.
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2013, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
This research aimed to investigate how important it is to embed business education into undergraduate industrial design curriculum and help design students understand the financial aspects of their design ideas, particularly in the areas of cost and profit. To respond to this question, a user-centered design approach was applied to understand design students' perceptions towards business education. Later on, the research findings were synthesized into a list of design requirements for developing a financial assessment tool. After rounds of ideation and looking into other frameworks from business related disciplines, a financial assessment tool was developed. Consequently, this tool was prototyped and piloted in a senior industrial design class in order to test its effectiveness. At last, students who had participated in the experiment evaluated the tool. Their positive feedback proved such methods could be successfully integrated into undergraduate design curriculum and help industrial design students gain a better understanding of the business aspects related to their ideas.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, M.I.D. (Committee Chair); Steven Doehler, M.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

design education;design process;business design;financial assessment tool;design tools;design business model;

Burns, Mikaila MarieMapping the Gap: Using Growth Opportunity Items and Principles as well as Design Thinking to Eliminate the Creative Achievement Gap
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2014, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design
The Skills Gap is a disconnect in the skills that students have acquired throughout their education, and the skills that businesses are seeking from potential employees. The Creativity Crisis is the documented phenomenon where young children test at genius levels of creativity, but by adulthood, lose most of their creative capacity. Until now, these two ideas have been considered separate circumstances, but what if they are part of a bigger problem…of a Creative Achievement Gap? While students continue to lose creativity, businesses demand innovative, creative thinkers. Design Thinking can help to bridge the gap. Using existing research and literature, I have uncovered five separate Growth Opportunities that will help to align the goals of K–12 education, business, and learners (of any age). These Growth Opportunities are Skills, Character, Mindset, Values, and Community. Items in each individual Growth Opportunity have been communicated by authors from many different backgrounds, and writings about a variety of topics (education, business, design, thinking, creativity, etc). In the end, I will propose a list of “Shared Principles for Stakeholder Alignment” which are the Growth Opportunity items that I’ve interpreted as actionable principles that can be used to align all stakeholder groups—students, parents, teachers, workers, businesses, and learners of any age. By doing so, we can effectively address the Creative Achievement Gap.

Committee:

Paul Nini (Committee Chair); Elizabeth B.-N. Sanders Sanders, PhD (Committee Member); David Staley, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Business Community; Design; Education

Keywords:

Skills Gap, Creativity Crisis, Creativity, Education, Design Thinking, Design, Creative Process, Design Process, Growth Opportunity, Growth Opportunities

Lin, Yi-chunThe perceptions of human resource development professionals in Taiwan regarding their working relationships with subject matter experts (SMEs)during the training design process
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2006, Educational Studies: Hums, Science, Tech and Voc

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of human resource development professionals in Taiwan regarding their working relationships with subject-matter experts (SMEs) during the training design process. A descriptive correlation survey was used in this study. The target population in the study was 314 HRD professionals who worked in high-tech companies located in a science park in Taiwan. One hundred forty-six of 173 respondents completed the online survey (response rate: 84.39%).

The questionnaire was used to assess the independent variables, the current and desired ability of HRD professionals in the training design process, classified across the four stages (analysis, design and development, implementation, and evaluation) and the dependent variable, the ability of HRD professionals in working with SMEs. Paired t-tests, one-way ANOVA, Chi-square, Pearson product-moment correlation, and simple linear regression analysis were used to address the research questions.

The results showed there was no perceived difference between the HRD professionals’ current and desired ability regardless of whether they had worked with SMEs or not. Among HRD professionals who had not worked with SMEs, education level, years of work experience in HR related jobs, and experience in designing training programs were significantly related to current ability in the training design process; among HRD professionals who had worked with SMEs, education level was significantly related to ability to work with SMEs. In particular, a higher percentage of HRD professionals who had not worked with SMEs had obtained bachelor’s degrees while a higher percentage of HRD professionals who had worked with SMEs had obtained master’s degrees. A higher percentage of HRD professionals who had worked with SMEs had experience in designing training programs compared to HRD professionals who had not worked with SMEs. Finally, there was a significant positive relationship between the ability to work with SMEs and current ability in the training design process among HRD professionals who had worked with SMEs.

This study provides implications for the professional development of HRD practitioners and the practice of HRD in Taiwan companies. Cross-cultural issues are discussed to explain inconsistencies between the results and US-based perspectives on the training design process.

Committee:

Ronald L. Jacobs (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Vocational

Keywords:

Training design process; human competence; competencies; Human resource development; Taiwan; Subject Matter Experts (SMEs); Training design

Sridhar, DeepakOxygen Carrier Development and Integrated Process Demonstration for Chemical Looping Gasification Systems
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2012, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
The dependence on fossil fuels to meet the ever rising energy demand cannot be avoided in the near future. Amongst the fossil fuels, only coal utilization can provide energy security to the United States of America due to its indigenous abundance. The utilization of this energy source results in the maximum carbon dioxide emission, which is the main source of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission. The increasing awareness about greenhouse gas emissions and the ever increasing demand calls for advanced technologies that can handle coal in an efficient and eco-friendly manner. Chapter 1 describes the various strategies that can be adapted to handle coal and highlights the superior performance of the unique moving bed design based chemical looping systems developed at The Ohio State University that utilize oxygen carriers to transfer oxygen from air to the fuel. The chapter then describes the syngas chemical looping (SCL) process and the coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) process in detail, with special emphasis on the operating conditions of the various reactors in the process and the utilization of the redox property of the metal oxides to achieve in-situ carbon dioxide separation. Chapter 2 elaborates on the properties that are important for the oxygen carrier. The various metal oxides that can serve as oxygen carriers are compared and the reason behind selection of Iron oxide as the active metal oxide is discussed. The role of the support/inert material in the oxygen carrier is highlighted. The first generation oxygen carrier is synthesized and various parametric testing is performed on this oxygen carrier to study its performance. Chapter 3 begins with the design of the first ever integrated syngas chemical looping sub-pilot 25kWth unit. The construction and results obtained from operating the unit is discussed in detail. The ability of the system to convert ~100% of the fuel and generate H2 is showcased. The testing of the unit serves as a proof-of-concept for the SCL process and paves way for the development of the CDCL process. The unit also reveals the areas that the oxygen carrier can be further improved. It also indicates the problems associated with mechanical valves and suggests the need to move towards non-mechanical valve systems. Chapter 4 analyzes the oxygen carrier performance from the sub-pilot unit in great detail. The influence of volume expansion on the oxygen carrier strength is elucidated. The need to improve the oxygen carrier is realized and the pathway to proceed with the oxygen carrier development is discussed. The testing pattern used to evaluate the improved oxygen carriers is provided and the second generation oxygen carrier is synthesized. The influence of clay supports on the oxygen carrier strength is studied. Chapter 5 focuses on the targeted development of the oxygen carriers for specific improvements. The influence of dopants on the oxidation rate is studied. The slower kinetics of fuels like methane and coal, compared to syngas is observed. Two different strategies to improve the oxygen carriers to convert the more difficult fuels are adopted. The influence of the pollutants on the performance of the oxygen carrier is discussed. The cost involved with the large quantity of oxygen carriers required for commercial installations drives the need to test cheaper oxygen carrier materials. Finally, Chapter 6 summarizes the achievements made in the OSU based chemical looping systems and highlights the path for future development. Other research areas where the experience gained can be utilized is also highlighted. Overall, the SCL process has been developed from a concept to a sub-pilot demonstration. Additionally two generations of oxygen carriers have been developed. Expedited progress towards commercialization is being targeted to address the pressing need for clean energy from coal.

Committee:

Liang -Shih Fan, PhD (Advisor); Kurt Koelling, PhD (Committee Member); Andre Palmer, PhD (Committee Member); Robert M. Sykes, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Chemical Engineering; Design; Energy; Environmental Engineering; Materials Science

Keywords:

Coal; Energy; Chemical Looping; Syngas; Methane; global warming; CO2 capture; process design; process demonstration

Graell-Colas, MercèExploring Visual Means For Communication And Collaboration In Multidisciplinary Teams, An Interpretation And Implementation For Design Education
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, Industrial, Interior, and Visual Communications Design
The complexity of today's design problems, the global economy, rate of change in new technologies, the challenges of sustainability development requires diverse design teams, comprised of multiple disciplines as well as multiple cultures, to look at broader and different perspectives and larger scopes of investigation. Due to the multilayered and multifaceted interactions between team members, effective communication and collaboration among people in multidisciplinary design teams becomes critical to ensure a project's success. Research shows that one of the most important aspects of collaboration is effective information sharing,shared knowledge and shared understanding among all team members. Design teams traditionally share information verbally as well as visually through representations such as drawings and sketches, three-dimensional models, project walls, or conceptual maps. Consequently, an important aspect of communication is the role that visual thinking and visual communication practices play in the success of the design team. The exploration and finding of a current frame of reference for creating and utilizing visual tools for communication, capable of serving as a common means of expression for multidisciplinary teams, is the purpose of this thesis research.

Committee:

Carolina Gill (Advisor); Elizabeth B.-N. Sanders (Committee Member); Wayne Carlson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Visual collaboration; communication; design process; multidisciplinary teams; visual means

Karim, Mohammed R.An IDEF0 representation of a garment manufacturing system design process
Master of Science (MS), Ohio University, 1994, Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (Engineering)

An IDEF0 representation of a garment manufacturing system design process.

Committee:

Charles Parks (Advisor)

Subjects:

Engineering, Industrial

Keywords:

IDEF0 representation; Garment manufacturing; system design process

Nestok, Bennett RUninhibited Ideation: Childhood Games as Design Methods
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2016, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
This thesis investigates childlike thinking as a means toward creative practice through researching literature, constructing a set of original childlike thinking design methods, and testing these methods using burgeoning design practitioners. Scientific studies show that creativity wanes with age. This thesis indicates which phase within the design process benefits most from creative thinking, positing that childlike thinking can increase creative thinking through molding childhood games (e.g., Musical Chairs) into design ideation games. Five main creativity criteria are used to measure the outcomes of the game testing, and in the end the experimental group (who played design ideation games) is proven more creative than the control group (who did not play games). Both groups report how they would label their thinking throughout the design ideation process. The game-playing group's self-labeling proves more creative than the non-game-playing group. Ultimately, the results indicate that game-playing during the design ideation phase produces about 170% more ideas. This thesis concludes with thoughts on further studies regarding the facilitation of creative childlike thinking.

Committee:

Emily Verba, M.F.A. (Committee Chair); Dennis Puhalla, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

childlike creativity;childhood games;childlike thinking;creativity;design methods;design process

Bayram, MerveDesign is fun: Promoting play in design process
MDes, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Design
Designers, as creative individuals, are encouraged to play with various ideas to achieve innovation. Although play is acknowledged in design world in the context of ideation, the value of play is underestimated. This is why it is essential to explore ways to promote play in the whole design process. The purpose of this thesis is to introduce a fresh way of viewing play through examining it in the design process with an observational study, which evaluates play to identify potential research implications for its role in the product design process. To evaluate the impact of play, the researcher not only observed, but also worked with design students focusing on a particular project for ten weeks. Based on her observations, the researcher surveyed the students to evaluate their perceptions of play and their work habits. The results indicate that a considerable improvement would be present when play is promoted in the design process. This research is not only significant for examining play in terms of design but also for identifying necessary expertise to develop a comprehensive study in this field.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, MID (Committee Chair); Dennis Puhalla, PhD (Committee Member); Sean Sauber, MBA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

play;play and design;play in design process

Miller, Louis JamesCombining Media Processes for Ideation in 3D Character Design for Computer Animation
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, Industrial, Interior, and Visual Communications Design
This study proposes Selective Media Leveraging as an ideation strategy for designing three-dimensional form. Selective Media leveraging involves the use of creative media actions in an integrated way that utilizes the strengths of each media at precise moments for answering design questions that a particular media can best address. The strategy integrates both traditional and digital 2D and 3D actions using exploratory techniques in form reduction which then are used to assist in the re-establishment of form complexity with improved understanding of the underlying reasoning of the form. Selective Media Leveraging has the potential to fully develop ideas toward becoming unique and impactful design solutions. Applied studies will show examples of Selective Media Leveraging employed for 3D animation character development to inform decisions about the establishment of character traits, communicative shapes, and parameters for abstraction and simplification of form. In support of the strategy are descriptions and analysis of process and the purposes for using each media type for generating solutions. This is followed by a review of basic volumetric structure and the creative interpretation of form by artists and 3D animation designers for a distillation of form that delineates clearly. Possible implementation of Selective Media Leveraging within a design course that focuses on developing personal ideation processes for students is addressed in conclusion.

Committee:

Maria Palazzi (Advisor); Dr. Wayne Carlson (Committee Member); James Arnold (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design; Fine Arts; Motion Pictures; Technology

Keywords:

Character Design; Computer Animation; Ideation; Design Process; Three-Dimensional Design

Fatkins, Paul J.Digital Integration in the Design Process
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture

The realization of Architecture relies on the fundamentals of building construction, specifically methods and materials. The relationship between design and production needs to change. Architects, now severed from the skill of construction, depend on builders and fabricators to carry out their designs. It is a process mediated through technology, aka the computer, which has transformed the building industry, increasing efficiency and production, while further separating us from the process of making. Using new technology in practice requires innovative techniques, in order to establish and uphold a construction-based practice.

Recently the Architecture industry has adapted new software in design. The main component of this software is Non-uniform rational basis splines (NURBS), which allow geometries that are more curvilinear and irregular. What makes it a valuable tool is it provides an efficient and effective way for architects to explore new geometries, allowing for much greater freedom during the design process. However, new trouble arises from the use of this software when we attempt to translate the information for construction purposes. We need to find a way to convey hundreds or even thousands of unique details in order to have the builder construct the project. The details, now in an ephemeral state of morphological transformation are causing an information overload during the typical documentation process. Ironically, working in the digital realm creates problems, because any geometry is possible, the design solutions are infinite, which leads to inefficiencies in design, entangling it in a morass of digital information translation. Establishing a material interface and integrating all parts of the process, enables us to control information in this new digital designing era.

Using a new method for design, directly engaging in digital fabrication, and providing a constant cyclical evaluation of the materials from the earliest stages of design, dissolves barriers between the architect and the builder. The new methodology provides a way to efficiently construct and manage massive amounts of unique information caused by these irregular geometries.

Committee:

Aarati Kanekar, PhD (Committee Chair); Michael McInturf, MARCH (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Digital;Architecture;Design;Process;Integration;Parametric

Next Page