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Heffner, Melissa E.The Development and Implementation of a Music Therapy and Speech-Language Therapy Collaborative Model
Master of Music (MM), Ohio University, 2017, Music Therapy (Fine Arts)
Collaboration in healthcare fields is beneficial for the patients and clients served as well as the professionals who make up the treatment team. Patients and clients receive higher quality of care and professionals improve their communication skills, increase their knowledge about the different disciplines of their colleagues, and improve their quality of work in addition to many other benefits. Music therapy and speech-language pathology are two healthcare fields in which collaboration with other healthcare professionals currently occurs for the treatment of clients. Music therapists and speech-language pathologists (SLPs) also collaborate with each other. More evidence supporting collaborative models used between these two healthcare professions, particularly in a clinic setting, is needed so that collaboration can become more prevalent in work settings. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate how a music therapist and an SLP graduate student work together to develop and implement a collaborative model in the treatment of a child currently receiving speech-language therapy services in a clinic setting. The study was a pilot and feasibility study that used qualitative and quantitative measures. The collaborative model that was developed and implemented was consultative with some occurrences of interdisciplinary collaboration. The qualitative data showed that the SLP graduate student, music therapist, and child client had positive experiences during the collaboration. The quantitative data showed that the music therapist’s performance in preparing the student to use music-based interventions increased over time, and the SLP graduate student increased the use of music in speech-language therapy sessions over time.

Committee:

Kamile Geist, PhD (Advisor); Richard Wetzel, PhD (Committee Member); Laura Brown, PhD (Committee Member); Joann Benigno, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health Care; Music; Speech Therapy

Keywords:

music therapy; speech-language pathology; collaboration; interprofessional collaboration; collaborative model; university clinic; level of collaboration; consultation; interdisciplinary

Kim, ChankookPerceptions of collaboration: a comparison of educators and scientists for cosee great lakes
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, Natural Resources
The Great Lakes region of North America can provide its 13 million K-12 learners with a relevant context for science learning, unique opportunities for exploring local environmental issues, and connections to global issues. By linking Great Lakes research scientists with educators, students, and the public, the COSEE (Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence) Great Lakes pursues its goal of enhancing science and environmental literacy of both adults and students. This dissertation consists of three research reports on professional development and interprofessional collaboration of K-12 teachers and scientists. The first report investigates primary and secondary teachers’ views of collaboration with scientists and incorporates findings of teacher surveys into discussions about professional development programs for educators. From 180 schools randomly selected in the eight Great Lakes States, 194 teachers responded to a mailed survey. Through the survey responses, the educators reported that while they have positive attitudes toward their collaboration with scientists, their professional preparation has not equipped them with enough understanding of the process of science and the professions of scientists. The second report is an attempt to reveal interactions in education by scientists whose research is focused on the Great Lakes, and incorporates findings into discussions about scientists’ potential for the role of education partner. In this parallel study, marine and aquatic scientists were recruited to complete a survey at a conference on Great Lakes research in 2006. Through 94 scientist responses, scientists reported that they were involved in educational outreach more frequently as a “resource” than a “partner” in Morrow’s framework (2000). Professional training of scientists and their lack of knowledge in education may explain the ways in which scientists are involved in educational outreach. The third report elaborates on the results and discussions by comparing the two groups and by identifying implications of the findings for teacher-scientist collaboration. Comparing responses from educators (n=194) and scientists (n=94), this study answers how educators differ in the perceptions of education collaboration from scientists, in addition to two other research questions: how do educators in the Great Lakes region collaborate with scientists, and what barriers may deter their participation in collaboration.

Committee:

Rosanne Fortner (Advisor)

Keywords:

Teacher-scientist collaboration; professional development; interprofessional collaboration; COSEE Great Lakes

Boland, Brodie JamesGenerative Disruption: The Subversive Effects of Collaboration
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2014, Organizational Behavior
This dissertation is comprised of three studies, each of which investigates the relationship between collaborative processes and subversive outcomes. The motivating idea of these studies is that significant, transformative change does not only result from conflict and contention. Indeed, collaboration between different social actors – while perhaps superficially conciliatory or moderate – may even be more subversive and disruptive than its contentious counterpart. Study 1 explores this idea in the context of an economic development and sustainability effort in an American `rust belt’ city, generating propositions of the collaborative processes that social actors use to advance disruptive change. Study 2, a review of the modern environmental movement, catalogs the collaborative tactics used by environmental movement organizations, conceptualizing a `repertoire of collaboration’ by which movements provide instead of disrupt resources, normative sanction, and cognitive frames. Study 3 then quantitatively tests the relationship between collaboration and breakthrough environmental technology innovation using a large set of patent and firm data, showing that collaboration between inventors produces more breakthrough innovations. These studies illuminate collaboratively subversive tactics for social actors, and challenge the contentious assumptions prevalent in social theory.

Committee:

David Cooperrider, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Ron Fry, Ph.D. (Committee Member); John Paul Stephens, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jorge Rivera, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Management; Organization Theory; Organizational Behavior; Social Structure; Sociology

Keywords:

social movements, institutional theory, institutional entrepreneurship, sustainability, environmental technology, collaboration, structuration theory, change, liminality, hybridity, repertoires of collaboration

Markland, Geoffrey ScottA Qualitative Interpretive Study of Collaboration among Staff and Faculty at a Catholic, Marianist Institution
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2009, Higher Education (Education)
Collaboration among faculty and staff employees has been suggested as a means to attain a number of important outcomes to higher education such as student learning and institutional excellence. Studies conducted at large public institutions have pointed to a number of macro and institutional level features that promote collaboration among staff and faculty members. This study examined macro-level features that served as challenges to collaboration as well as features that facilitated collaboration among employees at a mid-sized, Catholic, and Marianist institution. Qualitative methodology was utilized to explore the experiences of staff and faculty members who had participated in a leadership development program and had experience working collaboratively. The results indicated that barriers to collaboration included: time/ workload issues, senior leader influence, fewer numbers of vowed religious leaders as role models, and competing expectations of faculty work. Features that served to promote collaboration included: the mission and philosophy of the institution, relationships with vowed leaders, Leadership UD program, departmental subculture, and formative experiences. Among staff and faculty members, the Marianist mission and philosophy, as well as the leadership development program were central features that supported collaborative work. Common barriers included and time constraints and senior leader influence. While all of the factors played a role in shaping the environment, the institutional mission and philosophy, as well as the leadership development program, were most important in helping participants to navigate barriers and successfully develop collaborative partnerships across campus. This study served to reinforce other studies that discovered the importance of a mission and institutional philosophy that support collaboration as well as mechanisms (such as leadership development programs or other networking programs) to help staff and faculty members to learn about collaboration. Further, the outcomes of this investigation would indicate that at smaller, private, religiously based institutions, mission and employee praxis surrounding institutional values are critically important features in promoting collaboration among staff and faculty members. Institutions seeking to create environments that support collaboration are encouraged to carefully examine these issues through the experiences of their staff and faculty members in order to develop a better understanding of collaboration within the context of their unique settings.

Committee:

Peter C. Mather, PhD (Committee Chair); David Descutner, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Young, PhD (Committee Member); Molly Schaller, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Higher Education

Keywords:

collaboration; collaboration among faculty and staff; Catholic; Marianist

Madden, Jennifer RThe Collaboration Blueprint: Designing and Building Effective Strategies for Innovation and Rejuvenative Collaboration
Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, 2015, Management
Although difficult, complicated, and sometimes discouraging, collaboration is recognized as a viable approach for addressing uncertain, complex and wicked problems. Collaborations can attract resources and increase efficiency, facilitate visions of mutual benefit that can ignite common desires of partners to work across and within sectors, and create shared feelings of responsibility. Collaboration can also promote conceptualized synergy, the sense that something will “be achieved that could not have been attained by any of the organizations acting alone” (Huxham, 2003). However, previous inquiries into the problems encountered in collaborations have not solved an important question: How to enable successful collaboration? Through exploratory sequential mixed-methods research conducted in three empirical studies, I discover how interorganizational collaborations can overcome barriers to innovate and rejuvenate communities and understand the factors and antecedents that influence successful collaboration. In the first study (Chapter 2), I use a grounded theory approach to identify the factors involved in successful collaboration. My interviews with leaders in affordable housing cross-sector collaborations revealed most collaborations for affordable housing encounter a common set of obstacles: funding, partnering, community, and/or government. Key findings suggest leaders of successful collaborations exhibit heightened emotional and social competencies, take actions intended to create a better future, remain mission-focused, and continuously redesign to meet ongoing challenges. Further, successful collaborations were innovative—creating solutions that rejuvenated their communities. To confirm and validate the findings in the first study, I propose a theoretical model emerging from the qualitative research, designed and empirically tested through a survey of 452 leaders and managers participating in ongoing or recently completed interorganizational collaborations. In this second study (Chapter 3), I found design attitude (ß = 0.45, p < 0.001), shared vision (ß = 0.32, p < 0.001), and autonomy (ß = 0.16, p < 0.01) all positively affect successful collaboration performance. The study proposes a theoretical perspective for collaborators to adopt design science (i.e., a solution finding approach utilizing end-user-centered research, prototyping, and collective creativity to strengthen individuals, teams, and organizations), the language of designers, and a design attitude as an empirically informed pathway for better managing the complexities inherent in collaboration. This study is also the first to quantitatively validate a design attitude scale for building better collaborations. In my third study (Chapter 4), I examine mutuality as a critical antecedent of successful collaboration performance and the importance of active listening in team interaction. This study uncovers the link between mutually beneficial exploration with validated constructs from my second quantitative study: boundary spanning (ß = 0.73, p < 0.001), design attitude (ß = 0.65, p < 0.001), shared vision (ß = 0.35, p < 0.001), and autonomy (ß = 0.34, p < 0.001). Finally, I propose how successful collaboration performance research can contribute to the development of evidence-based strategies for creating practitioner tools (Chapter 5), and I provide examples to guide practitioners (Chapter 6). This dissertation makes theoretical and empirical contributions to the literature on interorganizational collaboration extending the traditional theoretical framework to include nontraditional literature streams and theories, and connecting theory to practice. Through an integrated framework, evidence-based tools and strategies for building successful collaboration is articulated where successful collaboration performance and innovation facilitates rejuvenative collaboration. The findings will be useful for leaders and managers in nonprofit, private, and government sectors interested in building better collaborations.

Committee:

Tony Lingham (Committee Chair); Bonnie Richley (Committee Member); Mary Dolansky (Committee Member); James Gaskin (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Management

Keywords:

Rejuvenative collaboration, design attitude, mutually beneficial exploration, shared vision, autonomy, boundary spanning, team interaction, active listening, collaboration, community development, hashtagbuildbettercollaborations

BANKSTON, KAREN DENISECOLLECTIVE SELF-ESTEEM AND ATTITUDES TOWARD COLLABORATION AS PREDICTORS TO COLLABORATIVE PRACTICE BEHAVIORS USED BY REGISTERED NURSES AND PHYSICIANS IN ACUATE CARE HOSPITALS
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Nursing : Nursing, Doctoral Program
Beginning in 2000 the Institute of Medicine clearly established the importance of fostering interdisciplinary collaboration and teamwork with regard to improving patient care quality and safety in acute care hospitals. IOM documents also presented evidence of the positive impact that interdisciplinary collaboration and teamwork can have on other key dimensions of organizational performance. Interdisciplianry collaboration represents a significant issue confronting hospital and nursing executives, deans of colleges of nursing and medicine and practicing nurses and physicians. The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which collective self-esteem and attitudes toward collaboration were predictors to nurse-to-nurse, nurse-to-physician and physician-to-nurse collaborative practice behaviors in acute care hospitals. The conceptual framework used to guide the study was derived from social identity theory, symbolic interaction theory, and relevant published research on nurse-physician collaboration in contemporary acute care hospitals. Three instruments were mailed to randomly selected registered nurses and physicians in southwest Ohio. Bivariate and multi-variable regression relationships were determined. In the prediction of nurse-to-nurse collaboration, a model comprised of attitudes toward collaboration (JSA) and collective self-esteem (CSE) revealed a significant contribution from JSA (t(88)= 5.58, p < .0001) and CSE (t(88) = 2.55, p< .0126). In the prediction of nurse-to-physician collaboration a model comprised of JSA and CSE revealed a significant contribution from JSA (t(88) = 5.5, p < .0001) and a non-significant contribution from CSE (t(88) = 1.77, p =.08). A similar finding resulted when examining physcian-to-nurse collaborative practice, where a significant contribution from JSA (t(63)= 5.23, p < .0001) and a nonsignificant conrribution from CSE (t(63) = 0.08, p < 0.9366) was found.

Committee:

Dr. Linda Workman (Advisor)

Keywords:

collaboration between nurses and physicians; collective self-esteem; attitudes toward collaboration; symbolic interaction; social identity theory

Starrick, Carol A.Mentors', Teachers', and Principals' Perceptions Of a Voluntary Elementary Literacy Mentoring Program: A Case Study
Doctor of Education, University of Akron, 2005, Educational Administration
The purpose of this study was to examine a district literacy mentoring program through the lens of those participating as literacy mentors, teachers, and principals. A secondary purpose was to understand the perceived impact the program had on classroom practice and literacy achievement in the district. The site was one suburban school district in northeast Ohio which is comprised of five elementary schools. The mentor program was developed in response to a district need to increase professional development in literacy and to raise awareness of literacy issues. The study was guided by two research questions: 1) In what ways do mentors, teachers and principals characterize their experiences of participation in a literacy mentor program? and 2) What is the perceived impact of the literacy mentor program? Overall, participants characterized their experiences in the program as highly positive. A number of particular findings emerged as central to the program’s success. First, the development of collaborative relationships at all levels was critical. Inherent in the development of those relationships was frequent communication over time that nurtured the emergence of a common vocabulary within buildings and among buildings and a sense of trust among the adults. Second, the importance of sustained opportunities for rigorous academic learning that occurred throughout the program, mostly through research-based “book studies,” was extremely important. A third finding of significance was that each group, teachers, principals and mentors, perceived the mentors' primary role differently. In fact, perception of the mentors’ role appeared to be closely related to each group’s role in the building. Teachers saw the literacy mentor's role from the perspective of what the mentor could do for them. Teachers noted the instructional role as prime. Principals also talked about the instructional role mentors played in the buildings. They saw it as prime, but coupled it with many comments regarding the leadership role. Principals saw mentors helping to set goals for the building, helping to plan meetings and professional development opportunities. They talked about mentors helping to set a vision for the building. Mentors also noted instructional and leadership roles most frequently. However, they seemed to place an even heavier emphasis upon the leadership role than principals or teachers. In conclusion, all three groups mentioned instructional and leadership roles at the top of their lists. There were, however, differences in the frequency with which they mentioned them and the importance they placed upon each role. Finally, the study found that there were definite changes in increased student academic achievement, attitudes and motivation due to the program. Moreover, there was a stronger school/home connection as a result of an increase in school/home communication about reading and writing stemming from the program.

Committee:

Evangeline Newton (Advisor)

Keywords:

Literacy Mentors; Literacy Mentoring Program; Literacy Coaching; Literacy Issues; Educational Administration; Professional Development; Collaboration; Teacher Leaders; Common Vocabulary

Shellabarger, Scott S.Collaboration in Environmental Education: A Technical Communication Internship with The Ohio Wyami Appalachian Teacher CoHorts (OWATCH)
Master of Technical and Scientific Communication, Miami University, 2007, Technical and Scientific Communication
This paper reports on my internship as the Environmental Technical Communicator of OWATCH, an education consortium providing professional development in environmental science to Ohio teachers. Chapter 1 describes the organization of OWATCH including the collaborative atmosphere and the “culture of enthusiasm” fostered there. In Chapter 2, I describe my role as an SME facilitator and outline my mission in relation to the “creation of knowledge.” Chapter 3 showcases the deliverables that I produced. Chapter 4 explains the lessons I learned by delving into the processes involved in completing two information dissemination projects. A detailed analysis of the effect of tone on a document is included. Both Project Management and Anderson’s Problem-Solving Model are used to analyze the accomplishments of the internship, and a proper melding of the two methods is completed with the introduction of my own “Project Solving.”

Committee:

Jennie Dautermann (Advisor)

Keywords:

Environmental Technical Communication; collaboration; Document Tone; OWATCH Internship; information dissemination projects; website critique report; journal article process analysis; project solving; Anderson Problem Solving Model (APSM)

Graell-Colas, MercèExploring Visual Means For Communication And Collaboration In Multidisciplinary Teams, An Interpretation And Implementation For Design Education
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, Industrial, Interior, and Visual Communications Design
The complexity of today's design problems, the global economy, rate of change in new technologies, the challenges of sustainability development requires diverse design teams, comprised of multiple disciplines as well as multiple cultures, to look at broader and different perspectives and larger scopes of investigation. Due to the multilayered and multifaceted interactions between team members, effective communication and collaboration among people in multidisciplinary design teams becomes critical to ensure a project's success. Research shows that one of the most important aspects of collaboration is effective information sharing,shared knowledge and shared understanding among all team members. Design teams traditionally share information verbally as well as visually through representations such as drawings and sketches, three-dimensional models, project walls, or conceptual maps. Consequently, an important aspect of communication is the role that visual thinking and visual communication practices play in the success of the design team. The exploration and finding of a current frame of reference for creating and utilizing visual tools for communication, capable of serving as a common means of expression for multidisciplinary teams, is the purpose of this thesis research.

Committee:

Carolina Gill (Advisor); Elizabeth B.-N. Sanders (Committee Member); Wayne Carlson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Visual collaboration; communication; design process; multidisciplinary teams; visual means

Brennan, Denise M.Teachers’ Practices and Attitudes as Barriers to Parental Involvement
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2011, Curriculum and Teaching

Teachers are increasingly being required to collaborate with parents in the pursuit of the academic achievement of all students. Because teachers are being held accountable for, not only the academic success of their students, but also for collaborative measures in communicating about these, they must be aware of their professional obligations to this ‘partnership’ with parents. In this study, I examined and qualitatively analyzed the attitudes and practices of rural high school teachers in a particular high school to determine potential barriers that might inhibit or prevent the involvement of parents.

Data was collected in three forms: school documents to contextualize the research environment, and an online survey and interviews to capture participants' expressed attitudes and practices. Seven assertions emerged from the data and were used to answer the most significant research question: How might these expressed practices and attitudes inhibit or prevent parental involvement?

The findings revealed four barriers including: teachers’ feelings of competence or self-confidence in involving parents, lack of teacher training for involving parents, lack of understanding of parents’ attitudes and abilities for being involved, and lack of administrative support. Though the results of this study cannot be generalized to any other setting based on the small size of the participant population, the results are worthy of consideration by other researchers who may wish to explore potential barriers to involving parents of high school-aged students in rural schools.

Committee:

Nancy Patterson, PhD (Committee Chair); Tracy Huziak-Clark, PhD (Committee Member); Angela Thomas, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

parental involvement; collaboration; barriers; teachers' attitudes; partnership

Liu, PengDistributed Model Predictive Control for Cooperative Highway Driving
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2017, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Cooperative highway driving systems (CHDSs) consist of collaborating vehicles with automated control units and vehicle-to-vehicle communication capabilities. Such systems are proposed as an important component of intelligent transportation systems (ITS) aiming at improving energy efficiency and driving safety. CHDSs have a broad spectrum of applications, ranging from automated freight systems to highway automation to smart city transit. Modeling and control of cooperative vehicles on highways contributes importantly to CHDS development. This problem is of critical importance in developing safe and reliable controllers and establishing frameworks and criteria verifying CHDS performance. This work focuses on the cooperative control problems in developing CHDSs by investigating distributed model predictive control (DMPC) techniques. In particular, collaboration of connected and automated vehicles is first formulated into a constrained optimization problem. Then, different DMPC strategies are investigated considering features of the cooperative control problem in a CHDS. We focus on non-iterative DMPC schemes with partially parallel information exchange between subsystems. Feasibility and stability properties of the closed-loop system applying non-iterative DMPC are established taking into account the coupling of the control input with state predictions calculated at previous step. Furthermore, a non-iterative DMPC scheme implementing a partitioning procedure is proposed to reduce the conservatism of compatibility constraints while guaranteeing safe inter-vehicle distances. With the DMPC scheme controlling the connected and automated vehicles, we further investigate interactions of cooperative driving groups with surrounding human-operated vehicles in mixed traffic environments. A behavior classification framework is developed to detect driver behaviors of surrounding human-operated vehicles. With the behavior classification framework, a behavior-guided MPC controller is proposed to address disturbances caused by human-operated vehicles. Finally, the potential benefits of implementing cooperative highway driving systems is verified using microscopic traffic simulation.

Committee:

Umit Ozguner (Advisor)

Subjects:

Electrical Engineering; Robotics; Transportation

Keywords:

cooperative driving; connected and automated vehicles; CAV; highway collaboration; distributed model predictive control; spatially interconnected systems; DMPC

Abram, KristinExploring the Impact of Music Therapy on Children with Complex Communication Needs and Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Focus Group Study
Bachelor of Science (BS), Ohio University, 2014, Communication Sciences and Disorders
The purpose of this study was to explore the benefits and challenges of using music to help children with ASD meet their communication goals. Also, roles that augmentative and alternative communication systems have played in Music Therapy were discussed. Finally, information was gathered in order to help Speech-Language Pathologists incorporate music into therapeutic sessions as well as to help make collaboration easier between Speech-Language Pathologists and Music Therapists. Ten Music Therapists, who had been Board Certified for at least 5 years, were currently working with a non-speaking child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and had a high self-rank skill of using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) participated in an online focus group. Over six weeks, participants discussed topics including the impact of Music Therapy on children with complex communication needs and ASD as well as advice for Speech-Language Pathologists. Thematic analysis revealed seventeen different themes that fell into 5 different categories. These categories included benefits, challenges, roles AAC play, advice, and other. The results of this study focused around the benefits and challenges of using music with children with complex communication needs, the roles AAC plays in therapy sessions, and advice Music Therapists have for Speech-Language Pathologists. Under these four categories, there were seventeen themes, which include: Motivation and Reinforcement, Total Improvement, Neurological, Motor, Life and Social Skills, Capturing the Benefits, Learned Behavior vs. Communication, Generalization, Dividing Attention Between AAC and Music, Serves as an Individual&#x2019;s Voice, Provides Control, Provides Choices, Keep It Simple, Collaborate Effectively with a Music Therapist, Be Confident, Not Self-Conscious, Maintain Appropriate Expectations and Considerations, Use Resources, and Other. Motivation and reinforcement, along with neurology seem to have a big part in the benefits of Music Therapy on communication skills and non-communication skills of children with complex communication needs and ASD. This study lays foundation for future studies that need to be done in order to validate these ideas. Also, Speech-Language Pathologists can use information provided by this study to help them incorporate music into their therapeutic sessions as well as to justify collaboration between themselves and Music Therapists in order to give clients the best care possible.

Committee:

John McCarthy (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music; Speech Therapy

Keywords:

Music Therapy; music; Autism Spectrum Disorders; Autism; Collaboration; Speech-Language Pathologists

Yinger, Nicholas S.A Formative Evaluation of a Collaborative Problem Solving Instructional Method for a Client-Based Globally-Focused Undergraduate Program
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2014, Instructional Technology (Education)
American undergraduates completing their degrees and entering the job market are expected to have twenty-first Century skills to be able to solve problems, work collaboratively, think globally, and to use new technology in support of these skills. Nationwide polling suggests that most graduates are entering the workforce lacking the skills that employers desire. Problem-based learning arose from medical education but has been adapted to fit in other disciplines where its outcome is the development of the twenty-first Century skills. Nelson’s (1999) Collaborative Problem Solving instructional model was implemented in a client-based internationally-focused undergraduate problem solving program at a large, Midwestern university. The model was implemented once during the Fall Semester and a second time, with a revised version, during the Spring Semester of the 2013-2014 academic year. Data were collected throughout both semesters to evaluate the model’s effectiveness, efficiency, and appeal through observations, interviewing, an evaluation questionnaire, and document analysis in the form of question prompted student journaling. Findings reveal changes for this context that include methods to help a facilitator model collaborative and problem-solving behavior and to give the students greater experience with collaboration. Specific recommendations for improvements are offered for instructional activities and participant roles. A separate focus is dedicated to the use and implementation of technology to support the CPS model and the development of twenty-first Century skills. Recommendations for the use of technology include discussions of potential uses for discussion boards, a learning management system, an online scheduling client, and a mobile group chat application. A practitioner may use the resulting recommendations for changes to the model in conjunction with the original publication when employing a collaborative problem-solving model in a higher education classroom.

Committee:

Teresa Franklin (Committee Chair); Dawn Bikowski (Committee Member); Greg Emery (Committee Member); David Moore (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Higher Education

Keywords:

Problem-based learning; PBL; Collaboration; Formative Research; Instructional Design; Global Education; Higher Education; Collaborative Learning; Teamwork

Blackstone, Jordan Y.Ready or Not: Addressing the Preparation Gap Between High School and College-Level Writers
Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, 2014, Curriculum and Teaching
The educational community has long since recognized that there is preparation gap between high school and college-level writing. Current literature revealed six primary categories of concern: quantity of writing, use of formulaic writing strategies, development of cognitive skills, audience and purpose for writing/writing as communication, student qualities, and genre/cross-discipline features of writing. In light of these gaps, deliberate attention must be directed towards examining instructional strategies that might be effective in preparing students to meet the demands of college-level writing. Therefore, the focus of this research was to examine the effectiveness of current instructional strategies and their ability to address the preparation gap between high school and college-level writing. Three high school English Language Arts teachers participated in this study, which sought to explore the following research questions: 1) What instructional strategies are high school teachers using to teach college-preparatory writing? and 2) Are the instructional strategies used by high school teachers effective in addressing the main areas of the preparation gap between high school and college-level writers? A series of three interviews were conducted with three teacher participants, and classroom observations were conducted over the course of two months; additionally, artifacts such as curricular materials and student work samples were collected. The six categories of the preparation gap were used as a framework to analyze data from teacher interviews, observations, and artifact collection. Five themes emerged which directly relate to the effectiveness of classroom teachers&#x2019; instructional strategies in addressing the preparation gap: philosophy and purpose of high school writing instruction, instructional transparency, community, students&#x2019; identities as writers, and cross-discipline collaboration. Results from this study suggested that when teachers clearly articulated a philosophy and purpose for writing instruction at the high school level, it better enabled them to implement instructional transparency with regard to writing. Particularly, the strategic use of formulaic writing structures supported by teacher modeling and the development of students&#x2019; writing-related cognitive skills were found to support college-preparatory writing instruction and address specific areas of the preparation gap. Furthermore, this study suggested that establishing a collaborative community in which students view themselves as writers may assist students is developing the techniques and student dispositions that support strong writing performance across the disciplines.

Committee:

Timothy Murnen (Advisor); Tracy Huziak-Clark (Committee Member); Cheryl Hoy (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Composition; Education; Language Arts; Literacy; Teacher Education

Keywords:

High School Education; Writing Instruction; College-Level Writing; High School-Level Writing; Formulaic Writing Strategies; Collaboration and Community in Writing; Writing Curriculum; Underprepared Writers

Drewlo, Margaret AFactors in Optimal Collaboration Between Psychologists and Primary Healthcare Physicians
Psy. D., Antioch University, 2014, Antioch Seattle: Clinical Psychology
This survey study explored factors in optimal collaboration between registered psychologists and primary healthcare physicians (PHCP). With rising costs of healthcare, healthcare funding cuts, and changes in the way healthcare delivery is perceived, interprofessional collaboration is timely to explore. In particular, the attitudes of registered psychologists about salient factors noted in the collaboration literature, such as education and training, accessibility, and communication factors are important to the practice of psychology. As part of the exploratory nature of the study, questions about gender and hierarchy were also presented. While most data were quantitative, qualitative data were gathered on 6 of the 39 questions in the survey. Participants were 349 registered psychologists from all provinces in Canada, 125 male, 222 female. Two hundred and ninety five participants completed the survey in English; 54 completed the survey in French. Predictor variables used were education and training, accessibility, and communication factors. These were related to the criterion variable preferred form of collaboration consisting of the following levels of contact: (a) classic form of referral and consultation, (b) informal collaboration/ corridor consultation, (c) formal collaboration, (d) co-provision of care, and (e) co-therapy. Exploratory areas were hierarchy and necessity. Results of descriptive analysis of central tendencies and variability of the variables in the study were presented. Further data analysis indicated significance between the predictor variable of necessity and the criterion variable preferred form of collaboration. Analysis also revealed significance between the predictor variable education and training and the criterion variable: preferred form of collaboration. Finally, multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed a significant relationship among the variables age, years of practice and field of psychology as they relate to a preference for interprofessional collaboration. While the above relationships were statistically significant, the amount of variance explained was small suggesting caution in generalizing the findings. Significance was not found with other factors deemed important in the relevant literature. Data analysis also revealed that although a majority of registered psychologists in the study did not view forms of collaboration with closer contact than classic referral to be viable in their current practice, 75% preferred forms of collaboration involving more contact with the primary healthcare physicians with whom they work. Collaboration between registered psychologists and primary healthcare physicians may benefit from research using a refined scale of collaboration measurement. The electronic version of this dissertation is at OhioLink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd

Committee:

Patricia Linn, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Mary Wieneke, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Natasha R. Harvey, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Health Care; Mental Health; Psychology

Keywords:

Collaboration; Interprofessional; Psychologist; Primary Health Care Physicians; Survey Research; Mental Health

Shah, SurbhiPerceptions of Medical Students on Pharmacists provided Counseling Services and Collaboration with Pharmacists using the Theory of Planned Behavior
Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Science (MSP), University of Toledo, 2013, College of Pharmacy
In the past, pharmacists’ roles were centered around dispensing and compounding medications. With the changing roles and responsibilities of pharmacists in managing patients’ medication therapy, an emphasis is being made on providing team based care to patients. Recent changes in legislation, improvements in regulatory standards, and developmental changes in reimbursement strategies have driven this change in the healthcare environment. Several interprofessional models of care have been implemented in various settings to effectively allocate resources and improve the access and continuity of care. The counseling services provided by pharmacists provide opportunities for patients, physicians, and pharmacists to work closely with each other. Physicians benefit from these services through improving patient safety and utilizing their time and expertise to see more patients. Pharmacists benefit by building relationships with physicians with the goal of making medication related recommendations to improve patients’ drug therapy. Therefore, for the collaboration between pharmacists and physicians to be successful, interaction between them is important and begins at the educational level. With the focus being made on patient centered care, incorporating some educational sessions on the services that other healthcare providers provide or workshops on collaboration could be an important part in the curriculum of both medical and pharmacy schools. It could allow them to better understand each other’s role and responsibilities, skills, and expertise. It could also improve their communication skills, trust, and confidence with each other. Therefore, the aim of our study was to understand the perceptions of medical students on pharmacist-provided counseling services and towards collaboration. A modified Theory of Planned Behavior was used to assess awareness, attitude, perceived behavioral control, subjective norm, and intention of the first and second year medical students at the University of Toledo. The study consisted of developing a valid and reliable survey, which was sent to a total of 370 first and second year medical students from the University of Toledo, College of Medicine. A total of 87 surveys were included in the analysis. It was found that our theory was beneficial in supporting the framework and all the constructs of the theory together predicted intention of medical students to collaborate with pharmacists. By evaluating their thoughts through various open-ended questions, we found that medical students were interested in learning about the counseling services and collaboration in their curriculum. Hence, our research demonstrates the need for some changes in their curriculum by incorporating some lectures and workshops to learn about the roles and responsibilities of pharmacists and to experience interprofessionalism in their courses and clinical experiences.

Committee:

Sharrel Pinto (Advisor); Robert Bechtol (Committee Member); Gregory Stone (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Curriculum Development; Health Care; Health Care Management

Keywords:

Counseling Services; Medication Therapy Management; Collaboration; Interprofessionalism; Team work; Theory of Planned Behavior; Perceptions; Medical students perceptions; Pharmacists

Ribeiro, Bruno B. R.Reshaping Visual Communication Design Curriculum to Support Collaboration with Computer Science and Engineering
Master of Fine Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Industrial, Interior Visual Communication Design

Interaction design is an emerging field for visual communication designers. There has been a big demand for designers especially in Silicon Valley and in the software industry in general. In instances that I investigated, visual communication design curriculum has not been updated to teach students the interaction design skills they will need in their future jobs. To support this emerging area, visual communication design education needs to evolve into more technical and behavioral knowledge and less of artistic and manual skills.

One point that needs to be explored in academic settings is the collaboration with other disciplines. Since the software industry is the emerging field for visual communication designers, the collaboration with computer science and engineering is extremely important. There are misconceptions from both design and computer science students that can be demystified while they are still in college. The benefits from such collaboration will not only lead to a better understanding of professional practices, but it will also stimulate different ways of thinking and allow for students to start building their professional network.

After the analysis of visual communication design curricula from different programs in the United States, this thesis proposes changes to the current curriculum at The Ohio State University, as a case study. Every curriculum in the country is different, but the recommendations to the Ohio State program can be adapted according to the needs at each school.

Instead of a proposal for the perfect curriculum, this thesis is a call to action for Design Departments to think about their mission, the future of the field of visual communication design, and how it is best situated in a growing collaborative environment.

Committee:

R. Brian Stone (Advisor); Jodi Forlizzi, PhD (Committee Member); Rajiv Ramnath, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Visual Communication; Design; Interaction Design; Education; Curriculum; Collaboration; Computer Science

Wakefield, Lara LynnCase Study of a Speech-Language Pathologist’s Roles, Routines, and Perceptions as a Collaborative Partner in Inclusive Service Delivery
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2007, Allied Health Sciences : Communication Science and Disorders
This case study documented the roles and routines of a speech-language pathologist (SLP) as a collaborative partner in an inclusive model. This study implemented a cultural-historical-activity theory framework. Specific aims were to describe: 1) The therapy lesson routine; 2) The instructional discourse used by the SLP, special educator, and regular educator; 3) The SLP’s role. Transcripts from participant-observation and interviews were coded using Lofland’s and Lofland’s (1984) macro-categories. The therapy lesson routine consisted of four steps: 1) planning; 2) implementation; 3) assessment; and 4) debriefing. Results from the instructional discourse coding revealed five collaboration sequences that: 1) changed the focus and flow of the therapy lesson; 2) were addressed solely to adults; and 3) transpired in front of the students. The SLP had a total of 18 roles across the areas of planning, implementation, assessment, debriefing, and collaboration. Practical implications and future research related to collaboration skills are discussed.

Committee:

Dr. Nancy Creaghead (Advisor)

Keywords:

speech-language pathologist; speech-language therapy; inclusion; collaboration; service delivery; special education; related services

Coyle, James E.Wikis in the College Classroon: A Comparative Study of Online and Face-to-Face Group Collaboration at a Private Liberal Arts University
PHD, Kent State University, 2007, College of Education, Health, and Human Services / Department of Educational Foundations and Special Services
Wikis are Web-based online software programs that allow any user to add, edit, or delete content on a Wiki web page. Because of their relative simplicity and their interactive nature, Wikis are potentially effective tools for online collaborative group work, a type of activity frequently used in online distance education. This study examined online Wiki collaboration compared to more conventional face-to-face group collaboration in higher education. The study participants were juniors and seniors taking a senior-level broadcast communications course. They were divided into two groups, and each group collaborated on writing reports using both conventional face-to-face collaboration methods and collaboration using the Wiki function in Moodle course management software. Following completion of the reports, professional subject matter experts rated the quality of the reports according to specified content and format criteria. The study’s research questions addressed (1) benefits and obstacles experienced in face-to-face collaboration; (2) benefits and obstacles experienced in Wiki-based group collaboration; (3) whether there was a difference between Wiki group collaboration and face-to-face group collaboration in terms of the quality of the final product; and (4) whether there was a difference in students’ experiences of learning and sense of community after Wiki-based collaboration and face-to-face collaboration assignments. Results indicated there was no difference in the quality of reports related to the method of collaboration, suggesting that Wikis are an effective collaboration method; face-to-face collaboration is more efficient in terms of communication among group members and is sometimes preferred because it is familiar; Wiki collaboration allowed students to work at their own pace and to easily see the work of other group members; students adapted Wiki capabilities to their previous methods of group work; and there was not a significant difference in students’ experiences of learning and community between the two methods. Even though the Wiki software provided the capability, participants did not edit one another’s Wiki work unless they had volunteered and were designated by the group to be an editor. Unless they were an editor, individual participants did not feel it was appropriate to change their peers’ work.

Committee:

Drew Tiene (Advisor)

Subjects:

Education, Technology

Keywords:

Wikis; Online Group Collaboration; Distance Education; Read/Write Web; Web 2.0; Collaborative Writing

Chirume, ErasmusA Study of Educational Leadership: The Principals' and Teachers' Perceptions of Teacher Leadership Dynamics in Southeast Ohio
Doctor of Education (EdD), Ohio University, 2008, Educational Administration (Education)
This study involves teachers' and principals' perceptions of teacher leadership with a specific focus on teacher leadership with at-risk students. The dimensions of teacher leadership for this study include teacher involvement, teacher change agency, teacher collaboration, knowledge bases for diversity, and instructional improvement regarding at-risk students. Teachers and principals in elementary, middle and high schools in 15 Southeast Ohio counties participated in the study. Data analyses were completed by descriptive and MANOVA computations. There was no significant difference in the respondents attitudes regarding teacher leadership and gender; however, there was for position. Of the four dimensions of teacher leadership, data show teacher collaboration as the most agreed, followed by teacher involvement and teacher change agency comes third while knowledge bases for diversity is the least agreed. Data also reflect that the respondents believed their professional qualifications did not prepare them for the leadership challenge of dealing with at-risk students.

Committee:

Catherine H. Glascock, PhD (Advisor); George Johanson, EdD (Committee Member); Arlie Woodrum, PhD (Committee Member); Timothy Mckeny, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Theory; Higher Education; Public Administration; Secondary Education; Teacher Education; Teaching

Keywords:

Educational leadership; Instructional leadership; Leadership as a serving relationship; Effective schools; Teacher collaboration;Teacher change agency; Knowledge bases for diversity; Teacher involvement; Student at-riskness

Madlock, PaulSupervisors’ Communicative Behaviors as Predictors of their Subordinates’ Communication Satisfaction, Job Satisfaction, and Willingness to Collaborate
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2006, Communication
The study examined the relationship between supervisor and subordinate communication with respect to supervisors’ behaviors of nonverbal immediacy and communicator competence, and how these behaviors influence subordinates’ job and communication satisfaction, and their willingness to work collaboratively. Additionally, the study examined subordinates’ trait of willingness to collaborate for effects on job and communication satisfaction. Participants (N = 275 [men, 132; women, 143]) worked for female supervisors (N = 129)or worked for male supervisors (N = 146). The findings indicated a significant and positive relationship between supervisors’ communicative behaviors and their subordinates’ perceived job and communication satisfaction, and their willingness to collaborate. Additionally, the data revealed that significant differences existed between supervisors’ levels of communicative behaviors (high vs. low) and subordinates’ reported job and communication satisfaction.

Committee:

Carolyn Anderson (Advisor)

Keywords:

Nonverbal immediacy; job satisfaction; communication satisfaction; collaboration

Tidball, Brian EsleyDesigning Computer Agents with Facial Personality to Improve Human-Machine Collaboration
Master of Science in Engineering (MSEgr), Wright State University, 2006, Human Factors Engineering
The development of computer agents to enhance human-computer interfaces is an evolving field of study. This study examined whether people perceive personality in static digital faces that portray expressions of emotion, and if the digital faces would influence human performance on a simple human-machine collaborative task. The first experiment measured user-perception of personality, based on the emotional expression in two sets of five static digital faces. The results from this first phase revealed that participants provided different ratings, of the Big-Five personality model sub-traits, based on the emotional expression of a static digital face. This indicates a perception of personality based on expression. The second experiment measured how faces with identified personality traits influence decision making in a simple collaborative task. The results revealed that the different faces did not have a significant impact on performance criteria. Results from this study indicated some isolated differences related to gender and nationality.

Committee:

Jennie Gallimore (Advisor)

Keywords:

Computer Agents; Personality; Collaboration; Emotion; Facial Expression; Physiognomy; Human-Machine Interaction; Human-Computer Interaction; Augmented Cognition

Hower, Mark A.Faculty Work: Moving Beyond the Paradox of Autonomy and Collaboration
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2012, Leadership and Change
Freedom to pursue one's intellectual interests, known as professional autonomy, is a valued and longstanding faculty tradition. Profound changes in society and the academy, however, suggest new values may be emerging. Collaboration, for example, is increasingly vital to success outside of the academy, and faculty culture, long an individualistic domain, may be shifting in response. This multiple case study explores how faculty members experience the relationship between professional autonomy and collaboration within the context of their department work. Faculty members in four departments were interviewed and both qualitative and simple quantitative data collected. The study found faculty members satisfied with the autonomy they experienced. Collaborative practices were evident, though faculty generally expressed a desire for increased collaboration with colleagues. The interviews also suggested attributes of a collaborative department, one in which collaboration is a more intentional element of the unit practice and design. The electronic version of the Dissertation is at the open-access Ohiolink ETD Center, http:www.ohiolink.edu/etd.

Committee:

Jon F. Wergin, PhD (Committee Chair); Alan E. Guskin, PhD (Committee Member); Carol Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Ann E. Austin, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Organizational Behavior

Keywords:

collaboration; organizational change; faculty work; higher education; multiple case study; academic departments; colleges; universities

Fronckowiak, AnnThe oboe concerto of John Harbison: A guide to analysis, performance, and the collaboration with oboist, William Bennett
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2006, Music
Oboists are extremely fortunate to have a twentieth-century concerto written by John Harbison, a highly sought after, award-winning, and prolific American composer, in their repertory. Unfortunately, this significant work has not yet been fully integrated into the standard repertoire due to its complexities and a lack of thorough scholarly documentation. I hope to change this by being the first to complete such documentation. The project includes proper analysis of the work and a study of the collaboration between John Harbison and William Bennett, the oboist for whom the piece was written, to identify how much the performer influenced the composition. In addition, performance concerns and difficulties, along with their subsequent suggestions for interpretation and execution, are contained in the text. Harbison, former composer-in-residence with the Pittsburgh Symphony and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, is a Pulitzer Prize winner. He wrote his Oboe Concerto in 1990-1991 for William Bennett, principal oboist of the San Francisco Symphony. This study utilized many different methods. I have collected biographical information on Harbison and Bennett and documented the historical context of the concerto, including its conception, collaborative process, and premiere. A detailed structural analysis is also included, containing form charts for each movement. In addition, I interviewed both Harbison and Bennett and had an oboe lesson with Bennett on this concerto. Transcripts of these interactions are included in the document. Finally, I have practiced and performed this work. The three-movement concerto is unique in its employment of traditional baroque forms, jazz, and blues. The first movement is based on a Gregorian chant-like theme and is composed in sonata form. The second movement is a two-voice passacaglia, and the third is a fantasia designed to sound like a 1920s big band. Bennett collaborated extensively with Harbison, and Bennett’s suggestions, personality, and playing style influenced the concerto. These conclusions are extremely significant because valuable interpretive and technical insights are presented from two primary sources, John Harbison and William Bennett. From these insights, this work will become more comprehendible for scholars and more accessible for oboists and become an enduring piece in the oboe repertoire.

Committee:

Robert Sorton (Advisor)

Subjects:

Music

Keywords:

John Harbison; Oboe Concerto; William Bennett; Collaboration; Analysis; Performance

Fredlund, Katherine Helene"Among Ourselves:" The Collaborative Rhetorics of Nineteenth Century Ladies' Literary Societies
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2012, English (Rhetoric and Writing)
As traditional conceptions of authorship have been problematized (Barthe; Foucault; Moi), collaborative composition has gained the interest of scholars, particularly those within the field of rhetoric and writing. Much of the resultant research has focused on student learning and academic or job-related productions of texts. Yet a large area of the field, historical rhetoric, has not yet reevaluated the assumptions concerning authors and production. For these reasons, this dissertation seeks to further understand historical, collaborative rhetorics, specifically those of large groups such as Ladies Literary Societies. Utilizing heuristics, I approach the discovery and understanding of historical collaborations by conducting research in the archives of three carefully selected and purposefully diverse Women’s Clubs from the nineteenth century: Boston’s Gleaning Circle (1805), Oberlin’s Young Ladies’ Literary Society (1835), and Boston’s Woman’s Era Club (1894). These societies focused on the improvement of their members’ intellects with regard to rhetoric, literature, and religion. Yet while these groups have been researched in detail by other scholars (Anne Ruggles Gere, Mary Kelley, Elizabeth McHenry, Shirley Wilson Logan), the dynamism of their collaborations has not been the focus of scholarly inquiry. Consequently, this dissertation investigates the ways these societies collaborated by looking at both their products and practices. This dissertation concludes with a multimodal theory of collaboration that recognizes a number of key factors as the determinants of the characteristics (and success) of any given collaboration. While Ede and Lunsford and Lindal Buchanan outline the modes of collaboration that were utilized in my heuristics, the case studies revealed that nineteenth century women were utilizing a variety of these modes simultaneously dependent upon a variety of determining features. Recognizing context and stakeholders as the two primary determining features, this theory outlines six other factors that impact the characteristics of collaboration: need, purpose, process, time, size, and power. These factors all influence, then, the ways people collaborate with a variety of purposes (in contrast to most theories of collaboration which focus on collaborative writing). Consequently, when scholars look to study a collaboration or teachers look to develop collaborations in their classroom, they should consider all of these factors.

Committee:

Sue Carter Wood, PhD (Committee Chair); Kristine Blair, PhD (Committee Member); Lee Nickoson, PhD (Committee Member); Carolyn Tompsett, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Rhetoric

Keywords:

Women's Rhetoric; Ladies' Literary Societies; Collaboration; Rhetoric; Composition

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