Search Results (1 - 3 of 3 Results)

Sort By  
Sort Dir
 
Results per page  

Martin, Daniel E.Institutional Innovator: Sargent Shriver's Life as an Engaged Catholic and as an Active Liberal
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2016, Theology
This dissertation argues that Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr.’s Roman Catholicism is undervalued when understanding his role crafting late 1950s and 1960s public policies. Shriver played a role in desegregating Chicago’s Catholic and public school systems as well as Catholic hospitals. He helped to shape and lead the Peace Corps. He also designed many of the programs launched in President Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty. Shriver’s ability to produce new policies and agencies within a broader structure of governance is well known. However, Shriver’s Catholicism is often neglected when examining his influence on key public policy initiatives and innovations. This dissertation argues that Shriver’s Roman Catholic upbringing formed him in such a way as to understand the nature of large bureaucracies and to see possibilities for innovation within an overarching structure. Shriver encountered both Catholic religious orders and lay sodalities at a young age and developed a posture of institutional imagination. This aspect of his Roman Catholic faith helped him to pursue social innovation within the framework of government power rather than from the edges of US society. Therefore, Shriver’s Catholicism left him uniquely suited for generating new institutions within a broader context of the US government. Shriver’s penchant for innovation echoes the formation of various religious orders and lay sodalities within Roman Catholicism that found room within a much broader Roman Catholic Church for addressing emergent problems.

Committee:

Anthony Smith, Ph.D. (Committee Chair); Sandra Yocum, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Cecilia Moore, Ph.D. (Committee Member); David O'Brien, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Portier, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; International Relations; Political Science; Religion; Religious History; Theology

Keywords:

Sargent Shriver; War on Poverty; Peace Corps; Race; Eunice Kennedy Shriver; John F Kennedy; Lyndon B Johnson; Martin Luther King; Great Society; Institutional Imagination; Teilhard de Chardin; Catholic Social Teaching; Robert F Kennedy; Harris Wofford

Donahue, Maura StephanieMoving Beyond the Corporation: Recovering an Ontology of Participation to Envision New Forms of Business
Master of Arts (M.A.), University of Dayton, 2011, Theological Studies

This thesis offers a critique of the publicly traded, for-profit corporate form of business organization in light of the Catholic social tradition. It highlights the ways in which this organizational form is inconsistent with the view of the human person, work, and participation in the economy articulated in Pope John Paul II’s encyclical Laborem Exercens and Pope Benedict XVI’s encyclical Caritas in Veritate. The thesis argues that the corporate form creates moral problems for both shareholders and employees, and it maintains that responses to Benedict XVI’s encyclical that seek positive social change through business must address legal and organizational issues of business structure.

This thesis shows how a participatory ontology and deeper understanding of freedom as kenosis (in contrast to the unchecked freedom of the individual that undergirds the modern corporation) can help point the way toward new forms of business organization that seek to ameliorate the moral problems inherent to the corporate form. By engaging the work of John Milbank, D. Stephen Long, and others who, following Aquinas, articulate a participatory ontology, the thesis argues that such an ontology is critical to understanding human work and participation in the economy, as it allows the opportunity to question the prevalent understanding of individual freedom and its resulting lack of a unified economic telos.

The last chapter responds to Pope Benedict XVI’s call to find new ways to understand business. Drawing on lessons learned about human work, the role of the person in economy, the critique of the corporation, and by engaging an ontology of participation, the thesis explores existing alternative business structures (including microfinance through Catholic Relief Services, the Economy of Communion business model, and the TOMS’ Shoes company) and suggests ways to mobilize the resources of the church as a means by which Christians might respond to Benedict’s call.

Committee:

Kelly S Johnson, Ph.D. (Advisor); Vincent J. Miller, Ph.D. (Other); D. Stephen Long, Ph.D. (Other)

Subjects:

Theology

Keywords:

Catholic social teaching on work; moral critique of the corporation; participatory ontology; economic participation; business and economy; human development

Heron, Jason AndrewThe Analogia Communitatis: Leo XIII and the Modern Quest for Fraternity
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), University of Dayton, 2016, Theology
This dissertation examines the social magisterium of Pope Leo XIII as it is developed in the aftermath of the French Revolution and during the nationalizing process of the liberal Italian state. The thesis of the dissertation is that Leo XIII provides Catholic social teaching with a proper vision of human relationship as a mode of analogical participation in the Lord’s goodness. In his own historical context, Leo’s analogical vision of social relations is developed in tension with the nation-state’s proposal of political citizenship as the social relation that relativizes every other relation – most especially one’s ecclesial relation. In our own context, Leo’s analogical vision of social relations stands in tension with the late-modern proposal of consumerism as the social reality that relativizes every other relation – including one’s matrimonial, familial, social, and ecclesial relations.

Committee:

Kelly Johnson, Ph.D. (Advisor); Russell Hittinger, Ph.D. (Committee Member); William Portier, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Jana Bennett, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Michael Carter, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History; Philosophy; Religious History; Social Structure; Theology

Keywords:

Catholic Social Teaching; social theory; political theory; citizenship; nationalism; consumerism; 19th century Catholicism; social Catholicism; Leo XIII; modern papal teaching; Catholic social magisterium; theological anthropology; social anthropology