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Dicken, Evan R.Creating Ezo: The Role of Politics and Trade in the Mapping of Japan’s Northern Frontier
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, History

This thesis explores the various factors leading to the adaptation of western style scientific cartography by Japanese mapmakers in the employ of the Tokugawa government in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It situates Japan not as a passive recipient of European cartographic techniques, but rather an active producer of geographic information in an exchange that began in the late 16th century. It focuses on the conflict over Ezo (modern day Hokkaido, Sakhalin, and the Kuril islands) between Russia and Japan as a catalyst for the Tokugawa Shogunate’s early 19th century mapping programs.

Beginning with an analysis of the development of mapmaking in Europe, I examine the political, military, and economic character of the broader exchange as well as its effect on the mapping of Ezo itself. I conclude that the Tokugawa government actively employed both native and foreign cartographic techniques to solidify its hold over both Ezo and represent Japan as a unified whole. Through continuing cartographic exchange western-style Japanese maps were transmitted to Europe, helping to formalize European representations of Japan.

Committee:

Philip Brown, PhD (Committee Chair); James Bartholomew, PhD (Committee Member); Alan Beyerchen, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Cartography; History

Keywords:

Tokugawa Period; Edo Period; Japanese Cartography; Seventeenth Century; Eighteenth Century; Ino Tadataka; Mamiya Rinzo; Phillip Franz Von Siebold; Takahashi Kageyasu; Kudo Heisuke; Hayashi Shihei; Russian Cartography; European Cartography; Matsudaira Sada

Nyerges, Timothy LeeModeling the structure of cartographic information for query processing /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1980, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Computer Science

Keywords:

Information storage and retrieval systems--Cartography;Cartography--Data processing

Bentley, ElbieA Narrative Atlas of the Gunnison-Beckwith Survey for the Pacific Railroad, 1853-1854
Master of Arts (MA), Ohio University, 2009, Geography (Arts and Sciences)
The scientific exploration and documentation of the Pacific Railroad Surveys of the nineteenth century is a subject that has received little attention in historical cartography. Of the surveys, the Gunnison-Beckwith expedition produced a particularly intriguing report containing adventure, illustration, and topographic presentation. This research explores the representation of this significant historical event in an atlas. Drawing on the concept of the atlas as a narrative form, an atlas of maps was created which can be read like a novel. In doing so, the narrative was further structured to reflect the cartographic language of the nineteenth century topographic explorers, and recreated their world of incorporated illustrations, observation, and text within each map. This research clearly reveals the potential of the atlas in a narrative form and demonstrates the technique as both viable and useful for the representation of historical subjects.

Committee:

Margaret W. Pearce (Committee Chair); Dorothy Sack (Committee Member); Timothy Anderson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Cartography; Geography

Keywords:

Cartography; Cartographic Techniques; Atlas Design; Historical Cartography; Narrative; Pacific Railroad Surveys

Thapa, KhagendraDetection of critical points : the first step to automatic line generalization /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1987, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Cartography;Critical point

Knipling, Louis HenryThe metric cartographic potential of geostationary/geosynchronous satellites /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1973, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Artificial satellites in geographical research;Cartography

Conway, April RayanaPractitioners of Earth: The Literacy Practices and Civic Rhetorics of Grassroots Cartographers and Writing Instructors
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2016, English (Rhetoric and Writing) PhD
This dissertation, "Practitioners of Earth: The Literacy Practices and Civic Rhetorics of Grassroots Cartographers and Writing Instructors," addresses the question of how diverse literacies can advance the civic rhetorical work of communities underrepresented in public discourses. Specifically, I explore how grassroots cartographers make geographic maps to change dominant narratives and material realities of marginalized communities. I also explore how writing instructors teach geographic maps and diverse literacy practices in relation to civic learning objectives. I align my scholarship with feminist cultural geographers and rhetoric and composition scholars such Amy Propen; Nedra Reynolds; and Amy Diehl, Jeffrey T. Grabill, William Hart-Davidson, and Vashil Iyer who explore geographic maps in material, spatial, and rhetorical contexts. My dissertation continues this discussion, yet it goes further by examining the relationship between civic rhetorics and literacy practices as related to geographic mapping. To do this, I conducted semi-structured interviews to gather data from my participants shared with me. Additionally, I used textual analysis, narrative inquiry, and critical citation practices. To code and analyze the data, I used feminist-oriented teacher research and grounded theory methodologies. What I learned is that grassroots cartographers engage with diverse literacy practices, specifically rhetorical (audience and ethos), composing (multimodal and situated processes), intercommunal (cultural self-awareness and cultural humility), and technological (tools and communication). My findings also show that civic rhetorical work, including grassroots mapping, is accomplished through infrastructures that rely on people who practice a range of literate activities.

Committee:

Kristine Blair (Advisor); Ronald C. Scherer (Other); Lee Nickoson (Committee Member); Sue Carter Wood (Committee Member); Clayton Rosati (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Rhetoric

Keywords:

community literacy; composition pedagogy; civic rhetorics; cultural rhetorics; multimodal composing; composing processes; technoloigical literacies; feminist methodology; grounded theory methodology; teacher-research methodology; grassroots; cartography

Patias, Petros GeorgiosApplication of random field theory in mapping problems /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1987, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Education

Keywords:

Cartography;Random fields

Loon, Joseph ColmanCartographic generalization of digital terrain models /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1978, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Physical Geography

Keywords:

Cartography

Ewing, Clair EugeneThe parallel radius method of solving the inverse shoran problem
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1955, Geodetic Science and Surveying
N/A

Committee:

Frederick Doyle (Advisor)

Subjects:

Cartography; Geology

Keywords:

Cartography; Geology

Bidoshi, KostaVirtual Reality Visualization for Maps of the Future
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2003, Geodetic Science and Surveying
In today's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Computer-Assisted Maps, users' perceptual interface with a paper map is replaced, in many cases, by the analytical and logical queries of a spatial database that represents the map in a computer form. The analytical results do not give a full account of the information that can be represented since these results do not include the implicit information contained in the map. The visual display representation of the entire map is very important for the user to determine what kind of information is to be extracted and to understand the interrelations among elements of the map. Current visualization techniques (paper maps and their computer replicas) do not take full advantage of the many modalities of human perception in representing the complete possible range of spatial information. This research investigates the use of virtual reality (VR) in map visualization and reconsiders some of the fundamental concepts of cartography in the context of the VR advances. Our investigation of spatial cognition shows that VR techniques enhance the perception of spatial phenomena in maps. Three-dimensional object visualization and terrain representation are means to increase the level of perception of the real world in maps. Spatial sound techniques used to enhance the perception of real world phenomena and describe cartographic features are considered important additions to the visual representation in a VR map. Dynamic visualization is used to display real world phenomena (like clouds, rain and movement of the cars and rivers) and to attract the map users attention. Important cartographic elements such as georeferencing, scale and symbolization are reformulated in the context of VR map visualization. User interaction with the VR map environment enhances the feeling of the realistic presence within the surroundings. Intelligent VR map visualization improves the perception of spatial phenomena through visual representation of GIS queries and analysis. In all, then, this project aims at setting the framework for building an "virtual perceptual reality" for mapping environments. This will allow us to immerse users into the mapped entities in realistic ways using somewhat conventional desktop computers.

Committee:

Alan Saalfeld (Advisor)

Subjects:

Geodesy

Keywords:

Cartography; GIS; Virtual Reality; Mapping; Spatial Data

Wagner, ChristinaJames and Shakespeare: Unification through Mapping
Master of Arts in English, Cleveland State University, 2015, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
The art of exploration became an important aspect of theater in early modern England. Exploration is typically done through the utilization of a map. The map scene in Lear provides a focal point to peer into the political ventures of King James I. As a proponent for peace, James both unified and divided his kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland through the use of cartography as a way to show the aspirations of a king. Lear, in dividing his kingdom between his three daughters, shows Shakespeare’s careful strategic planning of the division of a kingdom and what that means in early modern England. While the map scene in Lear forces us to look more closely at the land that is represented on the map, the scene also forces us to look at how the land is represented on the map. Prior criticism has focused on the division of Lear’s lands, but this paper forces us to look at how Lear divides and also how he unifies. This strategy of unification and division mirrors the political strategy of James through his own division and unification tactics. This thesis will focus both on how Shakespeare represents the map in the confines of a play and how the political struggles of a king are represented in that play.

Committee:

James Marino, PhD (Committee Member); Rachel Carnell, PhD (Committee Member); Gary Dyer, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

British and Irish Literature; Cartography; European History; Literature

Keywords:

cartography; map; King Lear; Shakespeare; unification; England

Terzuoli, Andrew JosephAn advanced prototype system for locating and mapping of underground obstacles /
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 1982, Graduate School

Committee:

Not Provided (Other)

Subjects:

Engineering

Keywords:

Cartography;Underground utility lines;Underground construction;Radar

Hartig, Andrea SLiterary Landscaping: Re-reading the Politics of Places in Late Nineteenth-Century Regional and Utopian Literature
Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, 2005, English

My dissertation, “Literary Landscaping: Re-reading the Politics of Places in Late Nineteenth-Century Regional and Utopian Literature” explores questions about how places themselves perform in or help facilitate performances of resistance and the creation of geographic subjectivity. My chief concern at the outset of the project was to defend and demonstrate the usefulness of place as a thematic focus in the rereading of nineteenth-century American literature. I argue for the value of reading landscapes in literature as conscientiously constructed, as acts of thematic cartography. As a kind of mapping, these landscapes can be understood as political elements in the text that should be examined, explained, historicized and questioned. By moving my thematic lens through first a “regional” text, Helen Hunt Jackson’s Ramona (1884) and then a “utopian” text, Pauline Hopkins’s Of One Blood; Or, the Hidden Self (1902-03), I develop a methodology drawn from regional literary theories and cartographic criticism, a thematic lens that migrates beyond its prescribed borders illuminating the latent possibilities for reciprocal cross-genre and transdisciplinary reading practices and illuminating several profound gaps within regional and utopian literary criticism such as the exclusion of “outsider” texts in regionalism and the absence of African American and Native American texts from the utopian literary canon.

Taken as a whole, these chapters work to illustrate the following arguments. First, this project argues for the value of reading landscapes in literature as conscientiously constructed, as acts of thematic cartography. As a kind of mapping, these landscapes can be understood as political elements in the text that should be examined, explained, historicized and questioned. Second, the political power of literary landscapes is a shifting and subjective narrative element. The relative familiarity or distance of a reader to the landscape, the spatiotemporal representation, is a functional component of whether or not its constructed-ness, its political (re)presentation of location will be legible to the reader. Third, this project as a whole illustrates the problems and decisions inherent in the activity of literary criticism bent on genre creation and maintenance. By critiquing genre, this dissertation also works to challenge the unquestioned institutionalization of particular reading practices.

Committee:

Whitney Smith (Advisor)

Subjects:

Literature, American

Keywords:

Utopian literature; Regional literature; geography; cartography; literary criticism; women writers

Clemm, Robert H.Delineating Dominion: Cartography and the Conception, Conquest and Control of Eastern Africa, 1844-1914
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2012, History
This dissertation documents the ways in which cartography was used during the Scramble for Africa to conceptualize, conquer and administer newly-won European colonies. By comparing the actions of two colonial powers, Germany and Britain, this study exposes how cartography was a constant in the colonial process. Using a three-tiered model of “gazes” (Discoverer, Despot, and Developer) maps are analyzed to show both the different purposes they were used for as well as the common appropriative power of the map. In doing so this study traces how cartography facilitated the colonial process of empire building from the beginnings of exploration to the administration of the colonies of German and British East Africa. During the period of exploration maps served to make the territory of Africa, previously unknown, legible to European audiences. Under the gaze of the Despot the map was used to legitimize the conquest of territory and add a permanence to the European colonies. Lastly, maps aided the capitalist development of the colonies as they were harnessed to make the land, and people, “useful.” Of special highlight is the ways in which maps were used in a similar manner by both private and state entities, suggesting a common understanding of the power of the map. Lastly, this study exposes how the conceptual power of the map facilitated the conquest and brutality of colonial rule by adding a scientific imprimatur to European rule which justified any action in quelling dissent.

Committee:

John Guilmartin, PhD (Advisor); Alan Beyerchen, PhD (Committee Member); Ousman Kobo, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

Imperialism; Africa; Cartography

VanHorn, Jason EugeneGeovisualizing terror: the geography of terrorism threat in the United States
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, Geography
Terrorism is a world-wide multi-dimensional problem that appears at many scales. Many aspects of terrorism have been studied extensively; however, the geographic and spatial component of terrorism has received little attention by researchers. The aims of this research are to evaluate definitions of terrorism and demonstrate how geographic scale within the definition of terrorism provides a clearer distinction between terrorism from other forms of violence, conduct a vulnerability analysis through the methods presented by the hazard research paradigm, survey the general population and create a perceived risk profile, and evaluate the effectiveness of the geographic scale at which the Homeland Security Advisory System operates. The results demonstrate ways in which geovisualization of terrorism using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be achieved for both anti-terrorism and counter-terrorism activities. Realized (real) and perception-based approaches are taken to understanding vulnerability and risk issues in a regional study of Columbus, Ohio through geographic visualization.

Committee:

Mei-Po Kwan (Advisor)

Subjects:

Geography

Keywords:

GIS; Terrorism; Hazards; Geovisualization; Cartography

Wozolek, Boni-jane LThe Presence of Absence: The Negotiation of Space and Place for Students of Color at a Predominantly White Suburban High School
PHD, Kent State University, 2015, College and Graduate School of Education, Health and Human Services / School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies
This study explored how normalized structures and interactions impact marginalized high school students’ negotiations of physical places and sociocultural spaces in school. This study includes the voices of 29 students, 2 parents, 4 teachers, the school resource officer, a cafeteria worker, a boys’ basketball coach, and 4 building principals. The study of how students of color negotiated the spaces and places of normalized racist ideas and ideals in this particular Midwestern high school was done through a sonic ethnography. The purpose of this non-traditional ethnographic process was to attend to the ethics of participant voices, shared experiences, and agency that is central to this study. Conclusions from this dissertation include several resonant points to the study of high school education, race, gender, and sexual orientation. First, the performances of self that the students of color implemented in order to participate in the underlife of the institution as well as the broader school culture were, on one hand, layers of protection against the culture in which they worked to participate. On the other, such performances functioned to both constrain and enable students of color in their everyday experiences in school. In addition, this dissertation concludes that the curricula—formal, hidden, enacted, and null—functioned as a mechanism to suffocate the ways of being and knowing of students of color. Finally, this study explores the intersection of gender with race, discussing how marginalization for girls of color functioned in separate and yet imbricated ways to the experiences of their male counterparts.

Committee:

Walter Gershon, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); James Henderson, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Amoaba Gooden, PhD (Committee Member); Anneli Frelin, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Education; Secondary Education

Keywords:

Race; Gender; Ethnography; Sound; Cartography; Secondary Education

Johnson, Ryan J.The Throw: An Introduction to Diagrammatics
MA, Kent State University, 2008, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Philosophy
Diagrammatics is a rigorous four-part process for instigating dramatic social change through minor shifts in the structuration of social formations of knowledge, power, and intensity. By intensively reading only four pages in the fifth plateau of A Thousand Plateaus, and tying together a new constellation of concepts from throughout the writings and lectures of Foucault, Deleuze, and Guattari, I develop a loose methodology for reading the social strata and finding a way to shift things around, so that old social formations can be thrown to the sky, the aleatory peak of a Nietzschean dice throw, and then return to the table of the earth so that new patterns of behavior can be produced and actualized.

Committee:

Gina Zavota, PhD (Advisor); Gene Pendleton, PhD (Committee Member); Navjotika Kumar, PhD (Committee Member); David Odell-Scott, PhD (Committee Member); Frank Ryan, PhD (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Philosophy

Keywords:

diagrammatics; cartography; tracing; program; Deleuze; Foucault;

Clemm, Robert H.Delineating Dominion: The use of cartography in the creation and control of German East Africa
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2009, History
The goal of this study is to illustrate the role and power of the map and its connection to the exploration, conquest and colonization of German East Africa. Maps are generally considered a constant, a clear representation of reality, rather than a conceptual construct. Using a three tiered model of “gazes” (Dominion, Despot and Development) a series of maps were analyzed to show how the process of conceptual to actual control of the territory known as German East Africa was facilitated through the medium of cartography. After exploring and establishing a space intended for future use (Dominion) maps were used to solidify control through conquest (Despot), which then allowed for capitalist investment (Development). Of special highlight is the role of the Schutztruppe or German Protective Force in mapping the colony and creating the stability necessary for capital investment in the colony.

Committee:

John Guilmartin, PhD (Committee Chair); Jennifer Siegel, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Alan Beyerchen, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

History

Keywords:

German East Africa; Cartography; Imperialism; Africa