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Krochta, Carrie AnnLayers of Branding: City and Arts Organization Branding in Columbus, Ohio
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2012, Arts Policy and Administration

In a postmodern society, consumers make choices based on the products, organizations, and places and suit their emotional needs. Such an environment has brought the practice of branding, typically associated with private corporations, into the public sector. Cities like Columbus, Ohio are an example of one of these nontraditional practitioners of branding.

A brand is defined as “a mixture of attributes, tangible and intangible... which, if if managed properly, creates value and influence.” (“BrandChannel Glossary,” n.d). Cities are unique in that they are the sum of so many smaller brands This requires a unique brand assessment approach to get at these tangible and intangible attributes. The approach used in this thesis compares organizational brands within a city and the city brand itself in the context of arts and culture, using Columbus Ohio as a case study. It seeks to answer the following question: How do the brands of Columbus Arts Organizations interact with the arts and cultural brand of the city?

This study builds a conceptual framework that takes the shape of a layers model to compare brands of individual arts organizations in Columbus with the city brand’s treatment of arts and culture. A set of “Emotional Drivers” (Gobé, 2008) are used as indicators for cross comparison. It is found that the brands ofarts organizations and the brand of the city do have a reciprocal relationship. However it is also found that the model applied does not fully address all of the nuances of these brands. However, the conceptual framework serves as a platform for potential practical application in the future. Additionally, this thesis contributes to a growing collection of case studies on city branding.

Committee:

Wayne Lawson (Advisor); Margaret Wyszomirski (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management

Keywords:

branding; city branding; arts organization branding; creative cities; cultural brand; place branding

Boonkasemsanti, IsariyaDesign Guideline for Cross-Cultural Branding : A case for Thai Dessert Brand in Cincinnati
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2015, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
There are many brand identity guidelines currently being used in the field of graphic design, yet none of them has been specifically created for cross-cultural brands. The aim of the study was to create the methodologies for designing cross-cultural brand identity. The case of Thai Dessert Brand Identity in Cincinnati was conducted and the observations, problems, questions and findings throughout the design process were documented. The methodologies for identifying the appropriate cultural element for the design phase included the primary research, which involved qualitative research method through an in-depth interview as well as quantitative research method through online surveys, and the secondary research in fundamental design principles and existing branding strategy models are studied to help create the framework. To facilitate the data analysis of the qualitative research, the main steps of thematic analysis were applied. The primary result from the design project yields the Brand identity design for the brand `Kati-Kala’ with the essential brand assets that are well accepted by the target audience in Cincinnati. The Cross-cultural Branding Design Framework was built using analysis of the documented observations and problems during the design project. Overall the research study provides useful insights for designers and business owners who seek to create visual identity for their brand in foreign countries, as well as emphasizing the importance of understanding the cultural aspects of the brand to create an identity blend that facilitate business success.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, M.I.D. (Committee Chair); Todd Timney, M.F.A. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

cross-cultural branding;brand identity;branding design;thailand;cross-culture;graphic communication design

Kim, PielahA New Approach to Co-branding: Visual Artist and Fashion Retailer Ingredient Branding and Hedonic Brand Extension
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2015, Human Ecology: Fashion and Retail Studies
This dissertation contributed to a better understanding of the emerging phenomenon of art commercialization by examining the significant role of the visual artist as a brand. By identifying the limitations in the body of prior research that has focused on consumers’ responses to images of art on products, this research framed the visual artist as a human brand and the subject to be used as an ingredient brand in the exploitation of art commercialization. The examination of a visual artist as an effective ingredient brand consisted of three independent streams of research on the properties and functions of visual artists. To first validate the salient benefits associated with using a visual artist, Paper 1 examined and identified the mechanism of artist contagion with relationship to a product’s ability to capture the valuable essence of a visual artist by his/her presence in a retail domain. Next, upon confirmation of the positive artist contagion effect, Paper 2 investigated how the ingredient brand strategy of using a visual artist with a distinct personality affects the conceptualization of the fashion retailer. Specifically, Paper 2 demonstrated the expansion in personality dimensions of a fashion retailer that uses a visual artist with unique personality traits as its ingredient brand. Finally, Paper 3 found specific effects of visual artist ingredient branding on dimensions constituting retail branding: one, the store atmosphere impacting affect-driven shopping experience, and two, the product and its symbolic meaning of brand with which consumers identify. All studies in the three papers adapted the experimental method. The overarching theme of the three papers is that the personality of the visual artist as the ingredient brand affects the meaning and evaluation of a fashion retailer; the combination creates a dynamic brand personality for the fashion retailer.

Committee:

Leslie Stoel (Advisor); Xioayan Deng (Committee Member); Robert Scharff (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Arts Management; Marketing

Keywords:

Art marketing; Ingredient branding; Artist collaboration; Artist contagion; Fashion branding

Kim, SeJeongUnderstanding of Museum Branding and Its Consequences on Museum Finance
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2008, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
Brands play multiple and critical roles for nonprofit museums. A strong brand is essential for fundraising and further implementing museum missions. Building trust with customers and donors helps museums succeed in an insecure and rapidly changing environment. Many museums have accepted the concept of brands into their management and actually carry out branding campaigns. However, misconceptions of brands and branding still exist, even among nonprofit leaders and managers. Also, there is no consistent understanding of brands and branding. These misconceptions can be barriers to museums efficiently undertaking branding strategies. Especially daunting is the perception of branding as an expensive practice-a very sensitive matter for nonprofit organizations. It is essential that museum managers correctly understand the financial concepts of brands and branding. Knowing the value of the brand asset can ensure that it is measured, protected, and leveraged to meet the missions of the organization successfully. Museum managers and leaders are uniquely responsible for strengthening their brand assets and for successfully positioning their organizations for the future. Case studies demonstrate the possibilities of museum branding at low cost; a fact that should motivate many small museums that can not expend millions upon branding campaigns to consider a branding project more positively. It is desirable for museums to exchange information regarding branding campaigns and to study vigorously various cases of museum branding. Since brands are related to each institution's core value each case is unique, but the process is similar in every case. It is not money, but the serious and sensible consideration for each institution's values that leads to a successful brand. It would be in the best interest of each institution to engage in a branding campaign.

Committee:

Durand Pope (Advisor); Neil Sapienza (Committee Member); Rod Bengston (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Marketing; Museums

Keywords:

Museum Branding; Nonprofit Marketing; Branding

Cable, Courtney T.The Akron Civic Theatre: A Digital Presence
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2011, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
This practical thesis discusses the considerations, planning efforts, and implementation process needed to create an online branding marketing video for a nonprofit arts organization. The goals are to sell the organization, its values and culture, build online brand awareness, drive customers to the website, and inform purchase intent. The final product is a short two minute and thirty second digital marketing video to be used to benefit the organization in its current marketing position. The commercial-like video captures the essence and values of The Akron Civic Theatre’s brand and aligns with the current and future goals of the organization. The message of the video tells the evolving story of the organization and offers a fun, inviting, and personal connection with the venue by showcasing the versatile space and highlighting organizational leaders. The content broadens and advances the organization’s digital online presence and communicates that the community can use the versatile space for purposes other than programmatic entertainment.

Committee:

Durand L. Pope, Mr.. (Advisor); Neil Sapienza, Mr. (Committee Member); Phillip Hoffman, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management; Marketing; Theater Studies

Keywords:

The Akron Civic Theatre; Akron; Arts Administration; atmospheric theatre; online branding; online marketing video; City of Akron; Lowe's Theatre; nonprofit arts organization; rust belt; urban development; venue; online branding; institutional marketing

Rutherford, SarahBusiness Environmental Design, Consumer Visual Literacy and Self-Concept
MFA, Kent State University, 2012, College of Communication and Information / School of Visual Communication Design
This research explores the hypothesis that the identity and environmental design of a business, whether created intentionally or not, attracts customers because it affirms some aspect of the customer’s self-concept. Two online surveys featuring photo-simulated shopping experiences in eight shopping scenarios—grocery stores, book stores, shoe stores, bakeries, wine stores, coffee shops, sit-down restaurants, and clothing stores—were distributed to online survey participants to evaluate self-concept, purchasing behavior, the application of retail patron images, store choice, and consumer perception of brand personality. Although connections to self-conflict were not conclusive, the findings of this research imply that consumers make judgments about the quality and availability of merchandise and service based on the exterior of a business. Consumers are also able to convey whom they think shops at a given store, an additional motivator for patronage. The research displays that it is important for retailers to have an understanding of their target audience in order to connect with them, and that predictive value may lie in consumer preference for similar store types.

Committee:

Ken Visocky O'Grady (Committee Chair); Sanda Katila (Committee Member); Jerry Kalback (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Aesthetics; Architectural; Business Community; Design; Interior Design; Urban Planning

Keywords:

retail design; visual communication; branding; retal branding; environmental graphic design; EGD; graphic design; business exteriors; business; self-concept; self-consistency; self concept; self consistency; visual literacy; visual design; consumers

Sledzik, Christopher SteelePR and Online Branding Corporate Perceptions in a Digital Space: Branding Goodyear Engineered Products in the Automotive Aftermarket Online
MA, Kent State University, 2012, College of Communication and Information / School of Journalism and Mass Communication
This thesis paper investigates how the main principles of online public relations are applied to create a brand for organizations in the digital world. Research of scholarly journals, acclaimed texts and recent articles discusses how public relations and information architecture theories and strategies have been applied to the World Wide Web to shape perceptions of key stakeholders. Based on the research findings, a content analysis was conducted reviewing brand web pages and social media activity to produce recommendations for a current business case.

Committee:

Bob Batchelor, PhD (Committee Co-Chair); Michele Ewing, MA (Committee Co-Chair); Stefanie Moore, MA (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Marketing; Mass Communications; Technical Communication; Web Studies

Keywords:

online branding; public relations; PR; social media; SM; Internet; web sites; information architecture; world wide web; web design; homepage

Westendorf, Elizabeth J.Banksy as Trickster: The Rhetoric of Street Art, Public Identity, and Celebrity Brands
Bachelor of Science of Communication Studies (BSC), Ohio University, 2010, Communication Studies
This thesis explores the spectacle of the anonymous and internationally famous artist Banksy by addressing the rhetorical situation surrounding his street art performances. The mysterious, satirical individual frustrates and enchants audiences from a marginalized aesthetic form of communication while challenging cultural institutions and social doctrines. The author demonstrates how, denied information about Banksy’s identity, the press and the public thrust one upon him. Additionally, Westendorf argues that these readings of the artist and of his communication artifacts have produced a brand identity for Banksy that aligns with the mythic trickster figure.

Committee:

Judith Lee (Advisor)

Subjects:

Communication; Folklore; Rhetoric

Keywords:

street art; Banksy; celebrity; branding; public identity; graffiti; trickster

Tans, Katherine L.SITE UNSCENE: Architecture as Event Interface
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2011, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture

The tangible world is increasingly alienated by the accumulation of images that exist above it. That is, commodity signs and symbols have amassed beyond decorative add-ons to become substitutes for former urban vitality. Thus, updated appearances of commodity spectacle broadcast themselves, backgrounding architecture as an outdated underpinning. Highway intrusions exacerbate the situation by eroding the city into isolated segments and introducing a mass marketplace of highway consumers. In particular, this SIGN versus building predicament is dramatized in the postindustrial city where billboards often cover discarded factory buildings. These branded buildings exemplify Venturi and Brown’s decorated shed, defined in "Learning from Las Vegas" as a conventional building that applies symbols (in this case, billboards). At these layered sites, which contain an industrial past, highway superimpositions, and billboard overlays, the projection of advertisement is the only spectacle, and the consumer is its passive spectator. As postindustrial consumption accelerates, it becomes imperative to establish an architectural response that re-casts passive consumers as actor and audience, generators of the spectacle.

The methodology for designing at these complex sites includes negotiation between people’s varying experiential narratives in and around the site, exploitation of the dynamic nature and spontaneity of their interactions, and maintained stringency to the site’s physical context. The thesis project, located in Cincinnati, Ohio, asserts the significance of interface between spectacle and spectator at the site of an uninhabited factory building, branded in billboards, and tangled in a web of elevated highways and surface city streets. The design approach sets the stage for interactive event through circulatory movement and the interplay between visible public and unseen private functions. Recognizing the inevitability of branding at this highly visible site, the program takes cues from Cincinnati’s current initiative to rebrand the city as the “Consumer Marketing Hub of Innovation and Opportunity”; therefore, it includes a community event venue and educational facilities for the burgeoning creative class. This “site unscene,” in which the highway and city blindly encircle a decorated shed, exposes the problematic disregard of, yet potential for interface along these postindustrial edges.

Committee:

Aarati Kanekar, PhD (Committee Chair); Michael McInturf, MARCH (Committee Chair)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Cincinnati;interface;event;spectacle;branding;movement

Bloemhard, Mark On Contemporary Leadership and Branded Organizations
Ph.D., Antioch University, 2016, Leadership and Change
This qualitative study examined a leader’s enigmatic decision-making process guiding innovative and complex organizations—organizations that are not able to rely on market research or the precedence of industry emulators for making strategic decisions. Leaders of highly creative organizations regularly make catalytic decisions that have fateful outcomes; their ability to recognize and appropriately adjudicate complex and unpredictable market forces determine the consequences. Such influential choices often require a deep level of intuition with very little research and time to decide. The purpose of this dissertation has been to develop a framework that presents Brand Leadership as a distinct and viable leadership paradigm. A claim that leadership may be best described as a way of being with comprehensive system-thinking capable of fully understanding the context in which he or she leads; the complexity of the organization and the trends of the marketplace. A Representative Case Research study, which included three brand leaders and nine ancillary interviews, was conducted and four unique contributions have been offered: First, while certainly related to marketing, brand is the higher order and requires strategic leadership. Second, the evolving role of the brand leader fulfills certain needs, including that brand leaders see the organization in the eyes of the customer; and that Brand Leadership represents an internal momentum in which customers are at the center of the organization. Third, Brand Leadership ,in fact, should be considered a unique leadership paradigm as it sees the leader’s intuition as a quintessential proponent to understanding context of the organization and leading within the context of a larger marketplace. And fourth, Brand Leadership is an untapped educational frontier. This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive, http://aura.antioch.edu/ and OhioLINK ETD Center, http://etd.ohiolink.edu

Committee:

Mitch Kusy, PhD (Committee Chair); Laura Morgan-Roberts, PhD (Committee Member); Roger Blackwell, PhD (Committee Member); Thomas Kaplan, PhD (Other)

Subjects:

Marketing

Keywords:

Brand Leadership; Branding; Innovation; Retail; Creative Leadership; Intuition; Leadership

Murdock, Jason E.Fluid identity: History & Practice of Dynamic Visual Identity Design
MFA, Kent State University, 2016, College of Communication and Information / School of Visual Communication Design
The main aim of this thesis is twofold. Firstly, this investigation seeks to broaden the scope of graphic design history as it pertains to visual identity design by documenting the existence of an alternative paradigm—dynamic visual identity design—which has developed alongside the prevailing visual identity design paradigm—static visual identity design—but which is not currently well documented or understood. To this end, case studies will be provided to demonstrate that these two schools of thought have existed contemporaneously since the inception of visual identity design in the first decade of the twentieth century. Secondly, this investigation seeks to assist graphic design educators and practitioners in finding practical application of dynamic visual identity design in the classroom and professional practice by examining the mechanics of visual identity design and delineating three generative techniques for creating dynamic visual identity systems. Prototypes have been developed as part of this inquiry, and are presented as a way of demonstrating how these techniques are used to design functioning dynamic visual identity systems. Promoting the hegemony of one visual identity paradigm over another is not a goal of this thesis, nor is it a goal of the author to suggest that one visual identity paradigm should supplant another. Rather, it is hoped that a pluralistic view of visual identity design has been advanced in order to allow designers the broadest possible landscape and greatest opportunity to modify and adapt their approach based on the specific needs of the stakeholders with whom they design.

Committee:

Jessica Barness, M.F.A. (Advisor); Kenneth Visocky O'Grady, M.F.A. (Committee Member); Brian Peters, M.Arch. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Communication; Design

Keywords:

Branding; Identity Design; Visual Identity; Dynamic Visual Identity; Design History

HAYES, RYAN C.BRANDING BUILDINGS: CREATING AN ARCHETYPE DERIVED FROM PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
Market research indicates that successful companies establish an iconic product offering and communicate it to customers. This tactic is known as branding. Branding strategies create “objects of adoration” that seduce the public into identifying and purchasing a given product or service. As branding becomes ubiquitous in the 21st century, companies strive to transcend their brands into higher economic offerings that provide renewed sources of differentiation. This has resulted in brand-based experiences. Nowhere are the opportunities for experience-based branding more evident than in architecture. Tomorrow’s architecture will be integrated seamlessly into the marketing process. As Venturi suggested with his analogy of the duck and the decorated shed, the formal design response to experience should explicitly be derived from the brand identity, not merely a representation of it. Through the immersion of architectural design with established branding strategies, companies will be able to stage meaningful experiences that create personal consumer connections by appealing to our innate sensorial, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral capacities. This project will demonstrate that symbiosis can exist between a company’s brand identity and its physical structure, producing an architecture that advances the modern business environment and the perpetuates design which is sensitive to human needs.

Committee:

Barry Stedman (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Experiential Marketing; Branding; Economic Offerings; Nike; Skyscraper

BAUSER, PAUL JHIGH ASPIRATIONS: THE SKYSCRAPER AS A CORPORATE ICON
MARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2005, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning : Architecture (Master of)
Driven to gain increasing market shares, corporations are compelled to formulate distinct public imagery. Since the advent of the high-rise typology the skyscraper has provided an architectural means to this end. The end of the 19th century saw development of the corporate headquarters building as the new power structure, conveying images of opulence and wealth through increasingly tall towers. Today, the speed and pace of our contemporary, media culture has rendered architecture a slow and antiquated mode of communication. Our lives are saturated with fast-paced, adaptable, graphic, imagery. Buildings cannot keep pace. Architecture lags behind current culture; its ideas outdated before ground is broken. The question arises, what will become the enduring symbol of the corporation? Imagery, and the creation of a pictorial language have long been driving forces of communication enterprises. Since the establishment of the Christian church, icons have conveyed a greater depth of meaning. As the manifestation and condensation of an array of ideas and principles into a single, recognizable object, icons became powerful tools of influence and control, most recently through the corporate application of branding. This corporate persona is a powerful construct, one to be vigilantly maintained, but as high-rise building can no longer keep pace with evolving corporate imagery, designing a purely iconographic image of the corporate headquarters tower is no longer a valid architectural response. Rather, imagery should be found rather than sought. This thesis seeks to establish a 21st century architectural icon for Western & Southern Financial Group by allowing the pictorial, to result from objectivity. Rather than designing an image for the corporation, a contrived process likely to prove ineffective, the project aims to promote the corporation through an architecture that is responsive to specific scales of influence: sustainability, visibility, connectivity, and employability. This set of ideals formulates specific design parameters capable of generating distinctive imagery that can be endowed with meaning over time. In allowing image to result from these objective design processes, the tower becomes a collector rather than a generator of meaning; an adaptable construct capable of reinterpretation, promising longevity over obsolescence; an icon.

Committee:

Michael McIntruf (Advisor)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Corporation;High-rise;Skyscraper;Icon;Iconography;Tower;Urban;Identity;Branding;Image;Company;Architecture;Structure

Lomax, Mark AThe Black Composer: Identity, Invisibility, Relevance And The Making Of A Brand In The Digital Age
Doctor of Musical Arts, The Ohio State University, 2013, Music
Art music composers of African descent have composed works for symphonies and chamber ensembles for more than a century. It is interesting to note that Black composers cannot be readily identified by many of the performers who would likely play their music. It seems that Black composers of art music are invisible beyond one or two well-known composers whose works are performed more often by traditional classical musical organizations. Even educated Black Americans demonstrate difficulty naming Black composers of art music. As a result, a crisis of identity has developed amongst Black composers who seem to be artists without a home for which a box has not been created to adequately explain their creations. Most Black composers of art music are as comfortable speaking in the musical language of Europe as they are speaking in the vernacular languages of blues, gospel, jazz, r&b, and hip-hop. This document uses the words of Black composers as captured in two primary texts and in an inventory of questions developed by the write to explore the notion of an identity crisis among Black composers of art music, and considers the contributing factors and reasons behind this crisis. The document will also explore how community engagement and the use of technology may provide possible solutions that will assist in raising the level of relevance and visibility of Black composers within the Black community and across the vast American cultural landscape. Finally, the document concludes by suggesting that developing `ethnic blackness’ as a brand might allow composers to more effectively interact with the listener, create support for their works and, in turn, develop a degree of relevance and financial stability that will allow Black composers to operate within an artistic infrastructure that presents, promotes, and preserves their work.

Committee:

Jan Radzynski, DMA (Advisor); William T. McDaniel, PhD (Committee Member); Graeme Boone, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

African American Studies; African Americans; Music

Keywords:

Black Composer; Invisibility; Identity; Relevance; Art Music; Social Media; Branding; American Culture; Music

Skalski, CaliThe Effects of Ingredient Branding on Restaurant Menu Items
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA), Ohio University, 2014, Business Administration
The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of ingredient branding within the context of restaurant menus in order to understand of how the use of brand name ingredients influence consumer behavior towards menu items. Extant research has proven the positive influence ingredient brands have on consumer goods. This study intends to extend this research into the restaurant industry. The model proposes that ingredient branding will influence attitudes toward menu items, attitudes toward the menu, attitudes toward the restaurant, and behavioral intentions. In addition, the effect of complexity within menu descriptions was measured. Using a true experimental design, 224 participants responded to an online questionnaire measuring their attitudes and behavioral intentions towards ingredients brands within a hypothetical restaurant scenario. The results of the hypothesis tests indicate that ingredients brands influenced attitudes and quality perceptions but did not have a strong influence on participants’ behaviors. In addition, complex menu descriptions were found to have a significant effect on attitudes and quality perceptions and consumer’s willingness to pay.

Committee:

Katherine Hartman, Dr. (Advisor)

Subjects:

Business Administration; Marketing

Keywords:

ingredient branding, experiment, restaurant menus

Fitzgerald, PatrickUnderstanding the Emerging Trend in the Craft Beverage Market
MDES, University of Cincinnati, 2016, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Design
The purpose of this thesis is to provide an overview of branding principles and the maker movement. These two subjects are important in the analysis of Rhinegeist and Coffee Emporium, which are two local Cincinnati Brands. The analysis of these two local companies will be compared to their similar national brands of Budweiser and Starbucks. The analysis will look into the companies; history, philosophy, and design elements and how they relate back to the principles discussed in the branding overview and maker movement. The conclusion will be a guideline that any coffee or craft brewery looking to start a business should follow.

Committee:

Craig Vogel, M.I.D. (Committee Chair); Dennis Puhalla, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Design

Keywords:

Branding;Maker Movement;Rhinegeist;Craft Brewery;Coffee;Coffee Emporium

Ewing, Douglas R.When Does Brand Matter? An Empirical Examination of the Roles of Attachment, Experience, and Identity within Consumer-Brand Relationships
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2010, Business Administration : Business Administration

The marketer may consider a brand to have unassailable importance, but the consumer’s view also plays a significant role. Across three essays, this dissertation speaks to questions of when and why a brand may matter to consumers. It examines the phenomenon of consumers developing a sense of connection with a brand and compares it with material possession attachment. It also investigates the extent to which social identity plays a significant role in the appearance and durability of brand resonance, or the outcomes of feeling connected to a brand, sensing a community of brand users, and evangelizing its benefits.

Essay 1 reviews brand attachment, material possession attachment, and related literature streams. This review leads to a set of hypotheses and a proposed design for testing them in a controlled setting. Essay 2 presents a Social Identity-based Model of Brand Resonance indicating that brand resonance is a self-sustaining process with factors such as alignment between brand meaning and a social identity combined with identity cultivation stage influencing a consumer’s tendency to do more than simply purchase a branded product. Essay 3 reports results of testing the predictions of Essay 1 and the conceptual model proposed in Essay 2 with two studies.

Results of testing Essay 1 predictions clarify some similarities and differences between how consumers relate to brands versus possessions. Consumers tend to be more readily attached to brands but reserve a special significance for their most favorite possessions. Results of testing the model from Essay 2 illuminate the crucial role of social identity in determining when a brand matters. Experiences with and use of a brand influence whether a consumer will become an avid user by way of some specific internally and externally focused evaluations of it. This process from experience to appraisal to resonance is changed by how a brand is implicated in a social identity.

Taken together, the results of comparing brand attachment and material possession attachment suggest that brands matter in predicting the nature of a consumer’s attachment to a particular object. Consumers may feel attached to brands but this special relationship may be fleeting. This suggests that brand attachment should not necessarily be a gauge of success for marketers. Further research is needed to ascertain how brand attachment and material possession attachment may influence one another in a more enduring and beneficial manner. Additional research is also needed with regards to the Social Identity-based Model of Brand Resonance. Results from the present research provide initial support for the model but additional testing with some respecification is necessary. The implications of this portion of the dissertation suggest that managers should look to alignment between their brand and a relevant social identity as a guide to brand building. As consumers develop within a social identity, the importance they place on brands as well as those they chose to use will vary. In short, brands matter to the extent they are socially useful to consumers.

Committee:

Chris Allen, PhD (Committee Chair); David Curry, PhD (Committee Member); Karen Machleit, PhD (Committee Member); Robert Kleine, III, PhD (Committee Member); Susan Kleine, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Marketing

Keywords:

Branding;Social Identity;Attachment;Brand Resonance

Nash, Meghan E.Branding the Buaile: Using Ireland's Vernacular Architecture to Create a Global Tourism Brand
MSARCH, University of Cincinnati, 2012, Design, Architecture, Art and Planning: Architecture

In the past decade, Ireland’s tourism industry has experienced unprecedented growth, playing host to over 7 million international visitors annually. These tourists spend over 4.9 billion Euros, or just over 7 billion dollars, on Irish soil every year, accounting for some 4% of Ireland’s Gross National Product (GNP). The way in which a country is internationally branded exists as a largely influential component in tourism, transforming the country from a physical destination into a cultural commodity. The implementation of these national brands can create associations and beliefs about a country that influence a tourist’s selection of destination.

What role does the architecture of a country play in this nation branding process? Images of nations dominate over text in tourism material, solidifying the advantage a well-chosen picture holds over a well-penned catch line. Can the structures iconicized by a country in these marketing materials reflect the desired social and political trajectory for their nation? This thesis will investigate the ability to trace the evolution of a nation’s brand through the depiction of their architecture, using the EcoBooley project in Tipperary, Ireland as a lens.

The adaptive reuse of this vernacular Irish cottage indicates a major evolution in Ireland’s brand and in the process of nation branding itself. For the past half century, Ireland’s brand has remained static, clinging to traditionally recognized images and associations. This stasis fails to acknowledge the major economic and social advances that have swept across Ireland since the Celtic Tiger years of the late 1980s, choosing instead to cement the Irish national identity in the past. The marketing of the EcoBooley cottage challenges this traditional brand, focusing on the progressive, sustainable features of the project and its reflection of Irish culture today. This offering of an alternative national brand by a third party organization signifies a transition in tourism branding, made possible by the ever- expanding presence of the Internet. The susceptibility of today’s national brands to input from those beyond the governments’ control may result in more multi-vocal, multi-dimensional marketed national identities.

Committee:

John Eliot Hancock, MARCH (Committee Chair); Elizabeth Riorden, MARCH (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Architecture

Keywords:

Buaile;Booley;Ireland;Tourism;Branding;Veracular Architecture;

Hirshon, Nicholas H."We Want Fish Sticks!": The Failed Rebranding of the New York Islanders
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Ohio University, 2016, Mass Communication (Communication)
In 1995, the National Hockey League’s New York Islanders undertook one of the most notorious rebranding efforts in the history of professional sports. In addition to unveiling a new mascot and hiring a new coach, the Islanders abandoned their original logo, which featured the bold letters “NY” and a simple map of Long Island, in favor of a grimacing, cartoon fisherman wearing a rain slicker and gripping a hockey stick. The fisherman jerseys, which also included ocean waves across the bottom and lighthouse patches on the shoulders, were the products of a period when many NHL franchises entrusted a nascent sports branding industry with updating their looks, hoping to imitate the strong sales of the fashion-forward jerseys worn by the league’s three California teams, the Los Angeles Kings, the San Jose Sharks, and the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim. In an era of escalating player salaries that endangered cash-strapped, small-market franchises, the Islanders looked to the fisherman brand as a way of raising revenues with little cost and differentiating the suburban team from the big-city New York Rangers. However, the rebranding campaign suffered from a lack of consumer research, the perceived abandonment of the team’s championship heritage, dubious trades, poor on-ice performance, and negative media coverage. The press infamously compared the fisherman logo to the mascot for Gorton’s frozen seafood, and the last-place Islanders skated onto the ice to derisive chants such as “We Want Fish Sticks!” on the road and “No More Fish Sticks!” at home. The Islanders wore the fisherman jerseys for only two seasons, in 1995-1996 and 1996-1997, before returning to the original crest. In order to fill a gap on an understudied period in hockey branding history and offer a model for sports marketers today, this historical study identifies and examines the factors that marred the Islanders rebrand. The narrative is conveyed through an analysis of period newspapers and magazines, television broadcasts, team programs, fan newsletters, and archival documents, as well as oral history interviews with fifty-one people associated with the Islanders at the time, including logo designers, players, executives, broadcasters, and fans.

Committee:

Marilyn Greenwald (Committee Chair); Michael Sweeney (Committee Member); Roger Cooper (Committee Member); Catherine Axinn (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Mass Communications

Keywords:

mass communication; history; marketing; sports branding; rebranding; hockey; National Hockey League; New York Islanders

McGeary, Bryan JamesHouses, Hot Dogs, and 'Hoods: Place Branding and the Reconstruction of Identity in Rick Sebak's Pittsburgh Documentaries
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Bowling Green State University, 2012, American Culture Studies/Communication

This project investigates the implementation of place branding theory via documentary filmmaking focused closely on the local characteristics of a place/region. Employing a close reading of WQED filmmaker Rick Sebak's Pittsburgh History Series focused upon recurrent themes about aspects of Pittsburgh's unique identity framed in relation to rhetorical approach and documentary techniques, while also noting aspects left out of Sebak's films, this dissertation demonstrates the progressive potential of publicly funded documentary filmmaking to enable the residents of a given place to rebrand their identity and foster revitalization, independent of the expectations of city planners or corporate sponsors, and without sacrificing the diversity of experiences that give that place its unique character. As a whole, Sebak's body of work constructs a particular narrative of Western Pennsylvania’s identity that revamps some of the preexisting notions about that identity. As a project of self-definition and self-understanding, the Pittsburgh History Series provides the local populace with some agency in recreating its image, rather than being branded from the outside. The success of this place branding approach to documentary filmmaking for Sebak and Western Pennsylvania suggests that other cities and regions could use it as a model to take greater control of their identities and cultivate renewal.

On the whole, this dissertation views Sebak's films as a series of reconstructions. While place branding aims to reconstruct a place's identity, the process of documentary filmmaking involves a specific reconstruction of reality in order to communicate certain ideas about that reality. In other words, through his films Sebak constructs or reconstructs aspects of Pittsburgh identity and feeds them back to the residents of that area. Particular aspects of this unique identity frequently emerge in his films. These recurring characteristics that he stresses include neighborhoods that retain a sense of closeness and community as well as ties to their history, a uniquely dedicated workforce that can innovate without abandoning the working-class values of the past, and a rich cultural life that is competitive with that of larger cities in terms of quality yet also more modest and accessible than that found elsewhere. This redefinition of Western Pennsylvania's identity seeks a way forward without attempting to completely discard all aspects of the region’s existing identity. This celebration of the region's positive attributes—and consequent downplaying of its more divisive and unpleasant elements and episodes—encourages pride among the local population while also enhancing its appeal to outsiders who might consider relocating themselves and/or their businesses to the area.

Committee:

Ellen Berry, PhD (Committee Chair); Cynthia Baron, PhD (Committee Member); Scott Magelssen, PhD (Committee Member); Ellen Gorsevski, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

American Studies; Film Studies; Mass Communications; Mass Media; Regional Studies

Keywords:

Place branding; place identity; Rick Sebak; documentary film; public television; WQED; Pittsburgh; Western Pennsylvania

Hancock, Joseph Henry“These Aren’t the Same Pants Your Grandfather Wore!” The evolution of branding cargo pants in 21st century mass fashion
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2007, Textiles and Clothing
In this study, fashion and brand ideologies are utilized in explaining how cargo pants (the fashion) are no longer the main attraction for the consumer when purchasing the pants. It appears that the consumer may identify with the branding concept used to contextualize cargo pants and to create a selling story; these branding channels sometimes create a hyperreality that entices the consumer to buy the garment thinking s/he is “purchasing” part of the fantasy. Understanding this phenomenon is key to this investigation of cargo pants that have been manipulated and changed through brand culture. The goal of the study is to build upon these fashion studies synthesizing the theoretical foundations of branding by conducting an applied study of a cargo pants in fashion. By examining a single garment type, it was possible to comprehend how all elements of the fashion system are manipulated and systematically changed through branding, and how a garment’s meaning becomes context dependent. This is important for understanding that during a particular fashion season a garment can have multiple meanings, thereby appealing to more consumers who may or may not purchase the garment for the same reasons. By deconstructing changes in fabrications, garment labeling, design features, and contextual placement, the reader will begin to understand that cargo pants are no longer the same army uniform pants worn by their grandfathers. As the American culture continues to become more diverse and multicultural, the goal of retailers becomes not only one of showing how a garment is multi-functional, but also how these companies must market a similar garment to a number of diverse target markets. The re-invention of cargo pants in brand advertising serves as a key to understanding change in American material and popular culture. While fashion advertising is referenced in many studies to depict fashion and its evolution, few fashion scholars discuss how the branding (context) of the garment is the actual vehicle that aids in changing the perception, meaning and “language” of fashion.

Committee:

Patricia Cunningham (Advisor)

Keywords:

fashion branding; mass fashion; postmodernism; hyperreality; Abercrombie & Fitch; Ralph Lauren; retail strategy

Ding, Zi-YunBranding in Arts Organizations
Master of Arts, University of Akron, 2011, Theatre Arts-Arts Administration
As the economic climate has weakened and the technology available for accessing arts and entertainment at home has improved, the number of people attending arts events has declined. Arts organizations are facing increasing challenges both from competitors and from the current economic situation. If arts organizations are to survive, they must evolve with the times by expanding their current strategies and creating new tactics to ensure the continuation of attendance of the events that they organize. Many studies have found that brands can strengthen the power of organizations by increasing customer loyalty and developing a differentiated or clear identity. The purpose of this thesis is to examine branding, which is a useful and well-known strategy in the commercial sector, and investigate ways that it might be applied in the area of nonprofit—specifically arts—organizations. An examination of existing research can help establish how arts organizations use branding. The intention of this thesis is to suggest ways to enhance the use of branding strategies in arts organizations. As the scholar Alan Kay has stated, “the best way to predict the future is to create it” (Wheeler 2009), and it is this notion that lies at the heart of this thesis; the use of branding is clearly beneficial to arts organizations, regardless of whether they are profit or nonprofit, big or small.

Committee:

Durand L. Pope, Dr. (Advisor); Neil Sapienza, Dr. (Committee Member); James Slowiak, Dr. (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management

Keywords:

Branding; Arts; Arts organization

Mussman, Mark P.Consumerism in the Classroom: An Investigation into the Effect of Advertising on Student Trust and Comprehension
PhD, University of Cincinnati, 2008, Education : Educational Studies

Historically, there has been a lack of educational studies measuring student trust and commercial messaging; therefore, this study presents and encourages further research into this problem. Today's American student is educated within a realm of brands, logos, and other corporate identifiers that may facilitate an educational environment that reinforces consumerism, rather than promotes critical thinking.

As we progress into the technological, information-based, 21st Century, teachers may be eager to utilize new methods involving technology. In response to this instructional need, new products are being marketed towards teachers and students, many with advertising attached. Instructors that choose to incorporate current events, or popular culture into their curriculum may also wish to use materials from other commercial sources, such as ABC, NBC, or MTV. While commercially broadcast materials may present very relevant topics, is there a cost associated with presenting corporately sponsored media in the classroom?

The literature review of this study demonstrates ways in which schools enter into partnerships with external funding sources with the desire of mutual gain. Through small donations and large contracts, corporations are able to get their messages to millions of students each day on textbook covers, satellite television, websites, and DVDs. To some, schools are seen as a powerful market to be privatized.

Trust is seen as a necessary component of education. As a necessary component of education, this study identifies the historical and contemporary understandings of trust and creates and validates a survey instrument capable of measuring trust in an educational setting. The results of this quantitative study show that student trust and comprehension are affected by the endorsement of the educational material.

Committee:

Marvin Berlowitz, PhD (Committee Chair); Vanessa Allen-Brown, PhD (Committee Member); Steven Carlton-Ford, PhD (Committee Member); Rodney Coates, PhD (Committee Member); Wei Pan, PhD (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Curricula; Education; Educational Theory; Mass Media

Keywords:

strudent trust; trust; advertising; branding; school partnerships; Channel One; popular culture

Wang, Chia-HsingThree essays on economics of quality in agricultural markets
Doctor of Philosophy, The Ohio State University, 2004, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology
I simulate growth and quality changes for pens of cattle and derive the value of pre-harvest sorting and genetic selection under grid pricing in a deterministic setting featuring animals with heterogeneous growth and quality maturation paths. The key findings are: 1) both pre-harvest sorting and increased genetic uniformity could substantially affect an individual cattle feeder’s net revenues; 2) one could expect higher marginal revenue gains from the genetic uniformity than from pre-market sorting; 3) both methods exhibit diminishing marginal returns and 4) aggregate beef supply may increase as improving uniformity typically leads to later optimal marketing dates and, hence, heavier animals at slaughter. Post-slaughter quality-based pricing of cattle is increasingly common. This quality, however, is dependent upon unobservable quality characteristics of the feeder cattle used as inputs and unverifiable effort exerted by feedlot managers. Through stochastic simulation I construct incentive compatible quality risk-sharing contracts based upon final grid-quality schedules in feeder cattle markets. Darby and Karni suggest branding as means of solving the potential fraudulence problems in the credence good market. Umbrella branding is a common marketing practice to promote new product and bond the product quality to the brand reputation. However, while umbrella branding works well in the experience good market, no evidence shows it would work in the credence good markets. I set up a framework for discussing the effect of umbrella branding on the quality provision of credence good. The results show that brand reputation, product similarity, probability of detection, punishment severity, and exogenous quality noise all play important roles in determining a firm’s decision on umbrella branding and fraud.

Committee:

Brian Roe (Advisor)

Keywords:

Cattle; genetic uniformity; growth curve; optimal marketing date; simulation; sorting; feeder cattle; incentive compatible contract; premium sharing; double-sided moral hazard; umbrella branding; credence good; auto repair; advertising

Small, Jarred DavidDiscovering Chile: Addressing International Reputation Through the Arts
Master of Arts, The Ohio State University, 2015, Arts Policy and Administration
The nation of Chile means different things to different people. As Chile progresses as one of Latin America’s most stable emerging democracies, its reputation abroad is becoming all the more important in fostering further growth. How do the arts and culture contribute to this reputation formation, and what can Chile do with this continually in-flux perception? Through analysis of current research on the ingredients and applications of a national reputation utilizing arts and culture, this research poses a framework with which the nation of Chile is examined. Empirical observation is combined with data obtained from in-person interviews to gain multiple perspectives on an increasingly popular issue within the country. Findings indicate that Chile’s international reputation not only comes from sending its artists abroad on official and unofficial visits and exchanges, but also includes a number of domestic undertakings that form the cultural base Chile may draw from in molding its name. However, these tasks are not without its own set of unique challenges pertinent to the country’s distinctive geopolitical position and history. By operating within the established framework aimed at capturing the breadth of activity occurring within and outside of Chile, conclusions are surmised that may inform effective practices for governments, organizations, and artists in contributing to a nation’s reputation through its most constant and identifiable asset -- its culture.

Committee:

Margaret Wyszomirski (Advisor); Wayne Lawson (Committee Member)

Subjects:

Arts Management; International Relations; Public Policy

Keywords:

Chile; arts and culture; international relations; public policy; reputation; soft power; nation branding; cultural diplomacy

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